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1

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003...

2

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

3

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

4

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

5

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

6

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

7

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

8

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

9

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

10

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

11

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

12

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

13

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

14

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

15

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

16

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

17

Well performance under solutions gas drive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully implicit black-oil simulator was written to predict the drawdown and buildup responses for a single well under Solution Gas Drive. The model is capable of handling the following reservoir behaviors: Unfractured reservoir, Double-Porosity system, and Double Permeability-Double Porosity model of Bourdet. The accuracy of the model results is tested for both single-phase liquid flow and two-phase flow. The results presented here provide a basis for the empirical equations presented in the literature. New definitions of pseudopressure and dimensionless time are presented. By using these two definitions, the multiphase flow solutions correlate with the constant rate liquid flow solution for both transient and boundary-dominated flow. For pressure buildup tests, an analogue for the liquid solution is constructed from the drawdown pseudopressure, similar to the reservoir integral of J. Jones. The utility of using the producing gas-oil ration at shut in to compute pseudopressures and pseudotimes is documented. The influence of pressure level and skin factor on the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) of wells producing solution gas drive systems is examined. A new definition of flow efficiency that is based on the structure of the deliverability equations is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the presently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells. The need for using pseudopressures to analyze well test data for fractured reservoirs is shown. Expressions to compute sandface saturations for fractured systems are presented.

Camacho-Velazquez, R.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

19

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

20

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

22

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

23

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

24

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

25

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

26

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

27

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

28

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

29

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

30

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

31

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

32

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

33

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

34

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

35

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

36

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

37

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

38

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

39

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

40

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

42

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

43

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

44

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

45

Definition: Artesian Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Artesian Well An artesian well is a water well that doesn't require a pump to bring water to the surface; this occurs when there is enough pressure in the aquifer. The pressure causes hydrostatic equilibrium and if the pressure is high enough the water may even reach the ground surface in which case the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition See Great Artesian Basin for the water source in Australia. An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. This type of well is called an artesian well. Water may even reach the ground surface if the natural

46

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

47

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

48

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

49

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

50

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

51

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

52

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

53

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

54

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

55

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

56

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

57

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

58

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

59

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

60

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

62

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

63

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

64

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

65

EIAs Proposed Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids 1 Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids 1 June 14, 2013 EIA's Proposed Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids Term Current Definition Proposed Definition Note Lease condensate Condensate (lease condensate): A natural gas liquid recovered from associated and non associated gas wells from lease separators or field facilities, reported in barrels of 42 U.S. gallons at atmospheric pressure and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Lease condensate: Light liquid hydrocarbons recovered from lease separators or field facilities at associated and non-associated natural gas wells. Mostly pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons. Normally enters the crude oil stream after production. Includes lease condensate as part of the crude oil stream, not an NGL. Plant condensate Plant condensate: One of the

66

Definition: Natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Natural gas A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in

67

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 40 37 39 38 37 36 35...

69

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

70

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

71

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

72

Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

73

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

74

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

75

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

78

Definition: Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Various methods are applied to obtain samples used for determination of the composition of gases present in soils or hydrothermal discharges. The flux of volatile gases emitted from a hydrothermal system can also be determined by measuring the flow of gases at specific locations and comparing it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can provide an indication of hydrothermal activity at depth that is otherwise not apparent. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

79

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

80

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

82

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

83

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

84

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

85

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

86

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

87

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

88

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

89

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

90

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

91

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

92

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

93

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

94

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

95

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

96

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

97

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246" Category:

98

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Analyses of 8,000 offshore wells in the Gulf of Mexico show that 1112% of wells developed pressure in the outer...underground gas storage, and even geothermal energy (1620). We...to learn about how often wells fail, when and why they...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 5,426 5,547 5,508 5,613 6,064 5,964 1949-2008 Crude Oil 4,783 4,829 4,836 4,846 5,111 5,094 1949-2008 Natural Gas 5,616 5,757 5,777 5,961 6,522 6,500 1949-2008 Dry Holes 5,744 5,848 5,405 5,382 5,578 5,540 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 6,744 6,579 6,272 6,187 6,247 6,322 1949-2008 Crude Oil 6,950 8,136 8,011 7,448 7,537 7,778 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,589 5,948 5,732 5,770 5,901 5,899 1949-2008 Dry Holes 6,809 6,924 6,437 6,340 6,307 6,232 1949-2008

100

Program solves for gas well inflow performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Windows-based program, GasIPR, can solve for the gas well inflow performance relationship (IPR). The program calculates gas producing rates at various pressures and is applicable for both turbulent and non-turbulent flow. It also has the following capabilities: computes PVT properties {gamma}{sub g}, P{sub c}, T{sub c}, heating value, Z, {mu}{sub g}, B{sub g}, and {rho}{sub g} from input gas composition data; calculates the Reynolds number (N{sub Re}) and shows the gas flow rates at the sandface at which the turbulence effect must be considered; helps the user to optimize the net perforation interval (h{sub p}) so that the turbulence effect can be minimized; and helps the user to evaluate the sensitivity of formation permeability on gas flow rate for a new play. IPR is a critical component in forecasting gas well deliverability. IPRs are used for sizing optimum tubing configurations and compressors, designing gravel packs, and solving gas well loading problems. IPR is the key reference for nodal analysis.

Engineer, R. [AERA Energy LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Grillete, G. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Definitions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions Map Definitions Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Definitions The regions defined in the above map are based upon the 10 Federal Regions of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The State groupings are as follows: Northeast Region - Federal Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region 2: New Jersey, and New York. Federal Region 3:Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Southeast Region - Federal Region 4: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Midwest Region - Federal Region 5: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and

102

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Thousand Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 176,867 203,997 240,969 285,398 308,210 331,740 1949-2008 Crude Oil 38,495 42,032 51,511 63,649 66,527 88,382 1949-2008 Natural Gas 115,833 138,503 164,353 193,595 212,753 212,079 1949-2008 Dry Holes 22,539 23,462 25,104 28,154 28,931 31,280 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 17,785 22,382 25,955 29,630 36,534 35,585 1949-2008 Crude Oil 2,453 3,141 4,262 4,998 6,271 7,389 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,569 9,998 12,347 14,945 19,982 17,066 1949-2008 Dry Holes

103

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gas well operation with liquid production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prediction of liquid loading in gas wells is discussed in terms of intersecting tubing or system performance curves with IPR curves and by using a more simplified critical velocity relationship. Different methods of liquid removal are discussed including such methods as intermittent lift, plunger lift, use of foam, gas lift, and rod, jet, and electric submersible pumps. Advantages, disadvantages, and techniques for design and application of the methods of liquid removal are discussed.

Lea, J.F.; Tighe, R.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

106

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploratory and Development Wells Exploratory and Development Wells Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 View History Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Exploratory NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Development Wells Drilled NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012

107

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil and natural gas wells passing through drinking-water aquifers (14). In PNAS, Ingraffea et al. (5) examine one of...Jackson RB ( 2014 ) The environmental costs and benefits of fracking. Annu Rev Environ Resour, in press . 12 Nicot JP Scanlon...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Thousand Dollars per Well All (Real*) 1,011.9 1,127.4 1,528.5 1,522.3 1,801.3 3,481.8 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 1,054.2 1,199.5 1,673.1 1,720.7 2,101.7 4,171.7 1960-2007 Crude Oil (Nominal) 882.8 1,037.3 1,441.8 1,920.4 2,238.6 4,000.4 1960-2007 Natural Gas (Nominal) 991.9 1,106.0 1,716.4 1,497.6 1,936.2 3,906.9 1960-2007 Dry Holes (Nominal) 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9 2,664.6 6,131.2 1960-2007 Dollars per Foot All (Real*) 187.46 203.25 267.28 271.16 324.00 574.46 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 195.31 216.27 292.57 306.50 378.03 688.30 1960-2007

109

Rod Pumping, Gas Well Dewatering and Gas Lift  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new in artificial new in artificial lift? Production technology Part 1: In this first of two monthly reports, new innovations that improve operations and/or reduced expenses are described in the categories of Beam/ Rod Pumping, Gas Well Dewatering and Gas Lift ŝ ŝ JAMES F. LEA, PL Tech LLC; and HERALD W. WINKLER, Texas Tech University It has been another banner year for ar- tificial lift innovations. The offerings have been prolific enough, that we have split this year's report into two halves. This first-half report will cover eight develop- ments in Beam/Rod Pumping, Gas Lift and Gas Well Dewatering. In beam/rod pumping, a "three-in- one" solution is discussed, whereby coiled tubing is not only used as a pumping string, but as a means for the operator to preventively treat the well. Another item

110

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

111

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

312014 Next Release Date: 1302015 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

113

Definition: Stepout-Deepening Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stepout-Deepening Wells Stepout-Deepening Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stepout-Deepening Wells A well drilled at a later time over remote, undeveloped portions of a partially developed continuous reservoir rock. A deepening well is reentering a well and drilling to a deeper reservoir. Often referred to as an "infield exploration well" in the oil and gas industry.[1] Also Known As delayed development well References ↑ http://www.answers.com/topic/step-out-well Ste LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. p-out-well: a well drilled in the expected extent of a reservoir that is being developed but at a significant distance, usually two or more drilling and spacing units, from the nearest producer in that reservoir. A step-out

114

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results...

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 standard deviations). Past price surges have been of short duration. The possibility of a downward price adjustment before the end of next winter is a source of considerable risk for storage operators who acquire gas at recent elevated prices. Storage levels in the Lower 48 States were 7.5 percent below the 5-year average (1995-1999) by mid-August (August 11), although the differential is only 6.4 percent in the East, which depends most heavily on storage to meet peak demand. Low storage levels are attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices combined with only small price

116

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...storage, and even geothermal energy (1620...Expect a lot more research on this topic to...Impact of shale gas development on regional water...Alberta, Canada . Energy Procedia 1 : 3531...unconventional shale gas development and hydraulic fracturing...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 12312014 Next Release Date: 1302015 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...

118

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 12312014 Next Release Date: 1302015 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...

119

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................24 3.4 Ideal Number of Transverse Fractures..........................................26 3.5 Constant Volume Transverse Fractures ........................................32 3.6... of a longitudinal fracture..............................................10 2.5 Example of horizontal well with longitudinal fracture performance .............11 2.6 DVS representation of transverse fractures...

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

120

Oil and Gas Well Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil and Gas Well Drilling Citation Jeff Tester. 2011. Oil and Gas Well Drilling. NA. NA....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some-states-confirm-water-pollution-drilling. Accessed June 19, 2014 . 11 Jackson RB ( 2014 ) The environmental costs and benefits of fracking. Annu Rev Environ Resour, in press . 12 Nicot JP Scanlon BR ( 2012 ) Water use for Shale-gas production in Texas, U...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...collected ?$225 million in impact fees. What Pennsylvania...Pennsylvania. Most of the impact fees that Pennsylvania...Yoxtheimer D Abad JD ( 2013 ) Impact of shale gas development on regional...environmental costs and benefits of fracking. Annu Rev Environ Resour...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

124

Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fuel Distributor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation having possession or control of any natural gas well, oil well or coalbed natural gas well, whether as a contractor, owner, lessee, agent or manager, to use or permit the use of gas by direct well pressure. Any person or persons, firm, company or corporation violating any of the provisions of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be fined in any

125

Chapter 10 - Use of beam pumps to deliquify gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Beam pump installations typically carry high costs relative to other deliquifying methods. The initial cost of a beam pump unit can be high if a surplus unit is not available. In addition, electric costs can be high when electric motors are used to power the prime movers, and high maintenance costs often are associated with beam pumping operations. Due to the expense, alternative methods to deliquify gas wells should be considered before installing beam pumps. In addition, beam pumps are likely the most common method used to remove liquids from gas wells. They can be used to pump liquids up the tubing and allow gas production to flow up the casing. Their ready availability and ease of operation have promoted their use in a variety of applications. If beam pumps are to be used for gas well liquid production, the beam system often will produce smaller volumes of liquids. Because of the usually low volumes required to deliquify gas wells and the fact that beam pumps do not have a lower limit for production and efficiency, as do other pumping systems such as ESPs, they often are used for gas well liquid production. The presence of high gas volumes when deliquifying gas wells means that measures often are required to keep gas from entering the down hole pump or to allow the pump to fill and function with some gas present. Pump-off control and gas separation to keep gas out of the pump are briefly discussed in this chapter.

James F. Lea; Henry V. Nickens; Mike R. Wells

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

How perforation shot density affects gas well performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single gas well model is formulated using the systems analysis approach and is composed of three main modules. The first module is the modified inflow performance relationship (IPR). This IPR accounts for pressure drops through the reservoir, laminar skin and damaged, compacted zone around casing perforations. The second module is the tubing outflow performance computed via the Cullender and Smith method. The third module is the gas material balance equation for computing average well pressure with a given gas production level. By coupling this equation with the computed inflow and outflow results, future gas deliverability and economic return of a gas well can then be projected.

Cheng, A.M.C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Mixed Integer Model Predictive Control of Multiple Shale Gas Wells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Horizontal wells with multistage hydraulic fracturing are today the most important drilling technology for shale gas extraction. Considered unprofitable before, the production has now (more)

Nordsveen, Espen T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Release date: January 7, 2011 | Next Release Date: To be determined Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are now available for most states for the years 1995 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. To download data for all states and all years, including years prior to 1995, in an Excel spreadsheet XLS (4,000 KB). The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available.

130

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

131

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

132

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

133

Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1...

134

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

135

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Multiple-well testing in low permeability gas sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to determine the effect of various reservoir and well parameters in order to design a multiple-well pressure transient test to be conducted in low permeability, porosity, gas saturation, net pay thickness and well spacing. Long test times were found to be required for interference or pulse testing in low permeability gas reservoirs; however, the well spacing has been optimized. These calculations were made using two techniques: interference testing and pulse testing.

Bixel, H.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.; Crawley, A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

Berthelot, Jan Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

140

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optimization of well rates under gas coning conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production rates under gas caning conditions. This new method applies to an oil reservoir overlain by a large gas cap containing multiple wells. The cases consider have a limit on the maximum field production rate for both oil and gas. It was found... that the optimal p~ion rates are achieved when Eq. 1 is satisfied for any pair of wells i and j: ) I = constant i = 1, . . . , n dqo This condition minimizes the f ield gas production rate when the maximum field production rate for oil is met, and maximizes...

Urbanczyk, Christopher Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cost analysis of oil, gas, and geothermal well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper evaluates current and historical drilling and completion costs of oil and gas wells and compares them with geothermal wells costs. As a starting point, we developed a new cost index for US onshore oil and gas wells based primarily on the API Joint Association Survey 19762009 data. This index describes year-to-year variations in drilling costs and allows one to express historical drilling expenditures in current year dollars. To distinguish from other cost indices we have labeled it the Cornell Energy Institute (CEI) Index. This index has nine sub-indices for different well depth intervals and has been corrected for yearly changes in drilling activity. The CEI index shows 70% higher increase in well cost between 2003 and 2008 compared to the commonly used Producer Price Index (PPI) for drilling oil and gas wells. Cost trends for various depths were found to be significantly different and explained in terms of variations of oil and gas prices, costs, and availability of major well components and services at particular locations. Multiple methods were evaluated to infer the cost-depth correlation for geothermal wells in current year dollars. In addition to analyzing reported costs of the most recently completed geothermal wells, we investigated the results of the predictive geothermal well cost model WellCost Lite. Moreover, a cost database of 146 historical geothermal wells has been assembled. The CEI index was initially used to normalize costs of these wells to current year dollars. A comparison of normalized costs of historical wells with recently drilled ones and WellCost Lite predictions shows that cost escalation rates of geothermal wells were considerably lower compared to hydrocarbon wells and that a cost index based on hydrocarbon wells is not applicable to geothermal well drilling. Besides evaluating the average well costs, this work examined economic improvements resulting from increased drilling experience. Learning curve effects related to drilling multiple similar wells within the same field were correlated.

Maciej Z. Lukawski; Brian J. Anderson; Chad Augustine; Louis E. Capuano Jr.; Koenraad F. Beckers; Bill Livesay; Jefferson W. Tester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Methods for determining vented volumes during gas well blowouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods are presented for determining vented volumes during gas well blowouts. The methods described apply to gas production in which no liquids phase(s), hydrocarbon and/or water, are present in the gas. Each method is illustrated with a numerical example. Sensitivity analyses provide estimates of probable errors. The method of crossplotting formation and flow string resistances is the only one which does not require special measurements. It is therefore applicalbe to cratered wells and underwater blowouts. The report includes several suggestions for investigations which might lead to better methods.

Hawkins, M.F. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Tests show production logging problems in horizontal gas wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has concluded that production logging tools employed to evaluate multiphase horizontal well production behavior should be carefully screened as to their response characteristics in fully-segregated, two-phase flow. The study, performed at Marathon Oil Co.'s petroleum technology center in Littleton, Colo., indicated that gas in highly deviated well bores segregates rapidly in the presence of water, creating a downhole environment that produces sporadic responses from full bore and diverter spinners as well as density and holdup tools. Gas Research Institute (GRI), as part of its horizontal gas well completion technology program, initiated the full-scale laboratory study to determine the severity and consequences of multiphase flow on tool response from horizontal well production. The paper discusses background of the problem, the test objectives, test facility, experimental procedures, single-phase flow, two-phase flow, and recommendations.

Branagan, P. (Branagan and Associates, Las Vegas, NV (United States)); Knight, B.L. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States)); Aslakson, J. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Middlebrook, M.L. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

1994-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

General inflow performance relationship for solution-gas reservoir wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two equations are developed to describe the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of wells producing from solution-gas drive reservoirs. These are general equations (extensions of the currently available IPR's) that apply to wells with any drainage-area shape at any state of completion flow efficiency and any stage of reservoir depletion. 7 refs.

Dias-Couto, L.E.; Golan, M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS 9.0 to ArcGIS 9.2) of the polygon smoothing algorithm described below. A bug that occurred when multiple wells had the same location was also fixed. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINE POLYGONS MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS Why smooth buffered field outlines? See the issues in the figure below: [pic] The smoothing application provided as VBA code below does the following: Adds area to the concave portions; doesn't add area to convex portions to maintain buffer spacing Fills in non-field "islands" smaller than buffer size Joins separate polygon rings with a "bridge" if sufficiently close Minimizes increase in total field area Methodology: creates trapezoids between neighboring wells within an oil/gas

147

Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterwards, the site was shut down, then remediated and the emplacement well (R-E) and reentry well (R-Ex) plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

148

Apparatus for operating a gas and oil producing well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apparatus is disclosed for automatically operating a gas and oil producing well of the plunger lift type, including a comparator for comparing casing and tubing pressures, a device for opening the gas delivery valve when the difference between casing and tubing pressure is less than a selected minimum value, a device for closing the gas discharge valve when casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value, an arrival sensor switch for initially closing the fluid discharge valve when the plunger reaches the upper end of the tubing, and a device for reopening the fluid discharge valve at the end of a given downtime period in the event that the level of oil in the tubing produces a pressure difference greater than the given minimum differential value, and the casing pressure is greater than lift pressure. The gas discharge valve is closed if the pressure difference exceeds a selected maximum value, or if the casing pressure falls below a selected casing bleed value. The fluid discharge valve is closed if tubing pressure exceeds a maximum safe value. In the event that the plunger does not reach the upper end of the tubing during a selected uptime period, a lockout indication is presented on a visual display device, and the well is held shut-in until the well differential is forced down to the maximum differential setting of the device. When this occurs, the device will automatically unlock and normal cycling will resume.

Wynn, S. R.

1985-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 20,182 27,443 33,331 31,799 31,380 31,236 38,545 1990's 34,332 35,391 41,284 41,532 42,497 46,916 61,276 69,084 71,019 75,034 2000's 68,752 67,034 64,735 56,363 53,805 53,404 38,313 43,379 43,300 40,023 2010's 39,444 35,020 12,703 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

150

U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

151

U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

152

U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

153

Natural Gas Development and Grassland Songbird Abundance in Southwestern Saskatchewan: The Impact of Gas Wells and Cumulative Disturbance .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The quantity and quality of remaining grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, are threatened by expansion of natural gas development. The number of natural gas wells (more)

Bogard, Holly Jayne Kalyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discharge Water Management for Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development Final Report Start Date: October 1, 2009 End Date: March 31, 2012 Authors: Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD Jennifer Hause Raymond Lovett, PhD David Locke Harry Johnson Doug Patchen, PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award #: DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV 26506-6064 FilterSure, Inc. PO Box 1277 McLean, VA 22101 ShipShaper, LLP PO Box 2 Morgantown, WV 26507 2 | P a g e Acknowledgment "This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001466." Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

155

Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,428,342 3,725,728 3,902,074 1980's 3,839,367 3,854,440 3,522,247 2,904,722 3,288,820 2,784,091 2,542,447 2,913,949 2,992,004 2,970,536 1990's 3,140,870 2,946,749 2,867,842 2,883,761 2,995,676 2,937,666 3,166,015 3,194,743 3,115,154 3,009,296 2000's 2,919,128 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

156

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 54,124 56,893 1980's 49,396 57,951 54,298 56,371 57,052 53,042 53,460 53,234 57,878 72,430 1990's 94,642 100,733 110,067 127,834 99,801 105,867 118,996 115,934 125,231 118,902 2000's 114,881 113,870 102,972 85,606 73,457 74,928 62,156 48,876 43,079 40,954 2010's 42,034 36,202 32,875 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

157

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 86,801 246,367 550,072 1980's 677,414 758,982 850,497 811,729 875,842 799,468 1,015,811 1,197,326 1,239,657 1,303,479 1990's 1,405,634 1,351,194 1,297,602 1,234,121 1,249,914 1,199,326 1,235,419 1,192,672 1,091,583 1,049,619 2000's 1,006,022 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

158

Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

159

Economic analysis of shale gas wells in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas produced from shale formations has increased dramatically in the past decade and has altered the oil and gas industry greatly. The use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has enabled the production ...

Hammond, Christopher D. (Christopher Daniel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?, including tight gas, gas/oil shale, oil sands, and coal-bed methane. North America has a substantial growth in its unconventional oil and gas market over the last two decades. The primary reason for that growth is because North America, being a mature...

Lin, Jiajing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gas flow to a barometric pumping well in a multilayer unsaturated Kehua You,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas flow to a barometric pumping well in a multilayer unsaturated zone Kehua You,1 Hongbin Zhan,1. [1] When an open well is installed in an unsaturated zone, gas can flow between the subsurface and the well depending on the gas pressure gradient near the well. This well is called a barometric pumping

Zhan, Hongbin

162

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 5,335 4,954 5,465 5,228 5,405 5,163 4,817 5,652 5,165 5,347 4,814 5,420 2004 5,684 5,278 5,822 5,570 5,758 5,500 5,132 6,022 5,502 5,697 5,129 5,774 2005 5,889 5,469 6,033 5,771 5,967 5,699 5,318 6,240 5,702 5,903 5,315 5,983 2006 65,302 59,484 66,007 63,071 65,663 63,437 65,249 65,951 62,242 65,271 63,215 64,841 2007 72,657 65,625 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 2008 75,926 71,027 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926

163

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,515,143 3,972,095 4,452,146 1980's 4,516,781 4,613,422 4,372,744 3,720,437 4,183,582 3,614,786 3,585,537 4,134,700 4,249,592 4,286,261 1990's 4,562,144 4,314,407 4,258,686 4,215,015 4,373,962 4,288,219 4,558,997 4,586,352 4,381,022 4,225,452 2000's 4,092,681 4,146,993 3,722,249 3,565,614 3,214,488 2,474,076 2,272,669 2,204,379 1,849,891 1,878,928 2010's 1,701,665 1,355,489 1,028,474 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

165

Production decline analysis of horizontal well in gas shale reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The major factor influencing the increase of natural gas use is the rise in its global demand. Due to the relentlessly increasing demand, there have (more)

Adekoya, Folarin.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

167

U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0...

168

Optimal fracture treatment design for dry gas wells maximizes well performance in the presence of non-Darcy flow effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a methodology based on Proppant Number approach for optimal fracture treatment design of natural gas wells considering non-Darcy flow effects in the design process. Closure stress is taken into account, by default, because...

Lopez Hernandez, Henry De Jesus

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

16 TAC, part 1, chapter 3, rule 3.79 Definitions in Oil and Gas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definitions in Oil and Gas Division Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 16 TAC, part 1, chapter 3, rule 3.79...

170

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 72,328 63,451 67,732 63,118 62,276 59,557 61,217 60,722 59,142 65,119 67,627 70,643 1992 66,374 62,007 65,284 63,487 63,488 60,701 62,949 63,036 61,442 66,259 65,974 68,514 1993 66,943 61,161 64,007 60,709 61,964 63,278 60,746 62,204 59,969 64,103 63,410 70,929 1994 65,551 60,458 63,396 60,438 60,965 61,963 60,675 62,160 59,730 63,444 62,373 68,990 1995 64,205 59,095 62,006 58,918 60,063 60,885 58,713 59,803 57,421 61,243 60,372 67,498 1996 64,824 61,742 66,951 60,806 62,653 59,952 61,102 62,970 61,239 65,475 67,324 68,206

171

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

172

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

173

Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................................................... 65 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Algorithm for single generation of GA.... well location......................................................... 40 11 Maximum function fitness value vs generation number for Case 1........... 41 12 Case 2 fitness value vs. well location...

Gibbs, Trevor Howard

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analysis of gas deliverability curves for predicting future well performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Darcy flow) Forecast of Rate vs. Time for Well A (Pipeline pressure = 200 psia) Forecast of Cum. Prod. vs. Time for Well A (Pipeline pressure = ZOO psia) Forecast of Rate v s. Time for Well 8 (Pipeline pressure = 1, 000 psia) Forecast of Cum. Prod. vs.... Time for Well 8 (Pipeline pressure = 1, 000 psia) 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 63 64 65 66 Figure LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) page 39 Forecast of Rate vs. Time for Well C (Pipeline pressure = 1, 000 psia) 40 Forecast of Cum. Prod. vs. Time...

Corbett, Thomas Gary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Data Bias in Rate Transient Analysis of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ......................................................................................................... 10 6 Rate and time relationship developed by Gentry (1972) ............................ 11 7 Fetkovich type-curves ................................................................................ 13 8 Gas type-curves developed by Carter (1985... the production data analyst to the proper use of superposition diagnostic plots ? To program a VBA program that performs proper use of superposition time functions according to the proposed work flow. 5 1.4 Organization of the thesis This report...

Agnia, Ammar Khalifa Mohammed

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Numerical Simulation of the Radius of Influence for Landfill Gas Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Radius of Influence for Landfill Gas Wells Harold Vigneault a * * Corresponding...used to quantify the efficiency of landfill gas recovery wells for unlined landfills...Results will help with the design of landfill gas recovery systems. In North America...

Harold Vigneault; Ren Lefebvre; Miroslav Nastev

177

Control structure design for stabilizing unstable gas-lift oil wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control structure design for stabilizing unstable gas-lift oil wells Esmaeil Jahanshahi, Sigurd valve is the recommended solution to prevent casing-heading instability in gas-lifted oil wells. Focus to be effective to stabilize this system. Keywords: Oil production, two-phase flow, gas-lift, controllability, H

Skogestad, Sigurd

178

Reservoir-Wellbore Coupled Simulation of Liquid Loaded Gas Well Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid loading of gas wells causes production difficulty and reduces ultimate recovery from these wells. In 1969, Turner proposed that existence of annular two-phase flow at the wellhead is necessary for the well to avoid liquid loading...

Riza, Muhammad Feldy

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells already producing oil and gas and drilling operations for new wells. One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells

180

Effects of flow paths on tight gas well performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the production rate for constant pwf case. Equal emphasis is placed on short-term production (hours to a few days) as well as long-term production (1 to 15 years). A wide range of complex flow regime is investigated. A major section of this study deals...

Ganpule, Sameer Vasant

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gas-lift technology applied to dewatering of coalbed methane wells in the black warrior basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) wells are usually dewatered with sucker rod or progressive cavity pumps to reduce wellbore water levels, although not without problems. This paper describes high-volume artificial-lift technology that incorporates specifically designed gas-lift methods to dewater Black Warrior CBM wells. Gas lift provides improved well maintenance and production optimization by the use of conventional wireline service methods.

Johnson, K.J.; Coats, A. (Otis Engineering Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)); Marinello, S.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING SCALING METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELLS IN THE HAYNESVILLE SHALE USING. INTRODUCTION Before the advent of hydraulic fracturing technology and hor- izontal drilling, the Haynesville

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

183

Preliminary Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Hydrate Test Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in two primary horizons; an upper zone, (D Unit) containing 14 meters of gas hydrate-bearing sands

Thomas D. Lorenson; Timothy S. Collett; Robert B. Hunter

184

The integrity of oil and gas wells Robert B. Jacksona,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMENTARY The integrity of oil and gas wells Robert B. Jacksona,b,1 a Department of Environmental concerns about oil and natural gas extraction these days inevitably turn to hydraulic fracturing, where--nearer the surface--emphasizing risks from spills, wastewater disposal, and the integrity of oil and natural gas

Jackson, Robert B.

185

The elimination of liquid loading problems in low productivity gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated. The Beggs and Brill multiphase pressure drop correlation was programmed and used as a basis to generate tubing performance curves and to study the effects of various parameters on long term gas production. Turner's method for predicting... the known methods of analyzing liquid loading problems in gas wells. A computer program will be developed to aid in generating tubing performance curves along with calculated gas velocity profiles. The calculated gas velocity profile...

Neves, Toby Roy

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 475,614 500,196 1993...

187

U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's...

188

U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

189

US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

190

An Empirical Analysis of Gas Well Design and Pumping Tests for Retrofitting Landfill Gas Collection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Retrofitting a landfill with a gas collection system is an expensive and time consuming endeavor. Such an undertaking usually consists of longer-term extraction testing programs (more)

Stevens, Derek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Well testing model for multi-fractured horizontal well for shale gas reservoirs with consideration of dual diffusion in matrix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shale gas reservoir is typical unconventional reservoir, it's necessary to take advantage of multi-stage fractured horizontal well so as to develop those kinds of reservoirs, which can form high conductivity hydraulic fractures and activate natural fractures. Due to the existence of concentration gap between matrix and fractures, desorption gas can simultaneously diffuse into the natural fractures and hydraulic fractures. This process can be called dual diffusion. Based on the triple-porosity cubic model, this paper establishes a new well testing model of multi-stage fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoir with consideration of the unique mechanisms of desorption and dual diffusion in matrix. Laplace transformation is employed to solve this new model. The pseudo pressure transient responses are inverted into real time space with stehfest numerical inversion algorithm. Type curves are plotted, and different flow regimes in shale gas reservoirs are identified and the effects of relevant parameters are analyzed as well. Considering the mechanism of dual diffusion in matrix, the flow can be divided into five regimes: early linear flow; pseudo-steady state inter-porosity flow; the diffusion from matrix into micro-fractures; the diffusion from matrix into hydraulic fractures and boundary-dominated flow. There are large distinctions of pressure response between pseudo steady state diffusion and unsteady state diffusion under different value of pore volume ratio. It's similar to the feature of pseudo-steady state inter-porosity flow, diffusion coefficient and Langmuir parameters reflect the characters of pseudo-steady state diffusion. The numbers of stage of hydraulic fractures have certain impact on the shape factor of matrix and the inter-porosity coefficient. This new model is validated compared with some existing models. Finally, coupled with an application, this mew model can be approximately reliable and make some more precise productivity prediction.

Leng Tian; Cong Xiao; Mingjin Liu; Daihong Gu; Guangyu Song; Helong Cao; Xianglong Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364 ): 271...13 Boyer EW ( 2012 ) The Impact of Marcellus Gas Drilling on Rural Drinking Water Supplies...the Nicholas School of the Environment and Center on Global Change...derived from depositional environments that ranged from proposed...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Economic Incentives and Regulatory Framework for Shale Gas Well Site Reclamation in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic Incentives and Regulatory Framework for Shale Gas Well Site Reclamation in Pennsylvania ... They also noted that economies of scale exist when more than one well is on each well pad, which is the norm for wells in the Marcellus Shale. ... Pennsylvanias experience with bonding of coal mining sites may be indicative of what to expect. ...

Austin L. Mitchell; Elizabeth A. Casman

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

U.S. Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Dataset Summary Description Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are available from the EIA for most states for the years 1919 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available. Source EIA Date Released January 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

195

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan, and Bjarne Foss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan flow systems is an area of increasing interest for the oil and gas industry. Oil wells with highly related to oil and gas wells exist, and in this study, unstable gas lifted wells will be the area

Foss, Bjarne A.

196

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 ( 30...hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers . Ground Water 50...constitute the two primary aquifer li- thologies in northeastern...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pennsylvania, Texas, and North Dakota. In addition to predrilling...Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Middle Devonian of eastern North America . Palaeogeogr Palaeoclimatol...Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kerr RA ( 2010 ) Energy. Natural gas from...1626 . 3 US Energy Information Administration...March 2013 (US Energy Information Administration...Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk...isotopes in Icelandic geothermal systems. 1. He-3...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31 March 2011 31 March 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the seven gas wells sampled are between 0.75 and 0.90 mile from the Project Rulison detonation point. All wells sampled are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected: * 7 gas samples from 7 wells * 7 produced water samples from 6 wells and 1 drip tank; one well was dry Findings:

200

Integrated Multi-Well Reservoir and Decision Model to Determine Optimal Well Spacing in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on unconventional gas has increased with tight gas sands, gas shales and coalbed methane being the primary contributors. Elsewhere, the potential of unconventional gas formations is just beginning to be explored, with assessments under way in Europe, South...

Ortiz Prada, Rubiel Paul

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Decision matrix for liquid loading in gas wells for cost/benefit analyses of lifting options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rotation using an electric motor at the surface. Fig. 2.9 PCP system (Schlumberger, 2007). Applications PCP can be applied to the wells producing sand-laden heavy oil and bitumen, high water-cut wells, and in the gas wells that require...

Park, Han-Young

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Motor Drives of Modern Drilling and Servicing Rigs for Oil and Gas Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a synthetic view on the most recent achievements in the field of drilling and servicing rig drives for oil and gas wells. This field is featuring ... kilowatts and speeds of 150250rpm for drilling

Aurelian Iamandei; Gheorghe Miloiu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient...

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Pressure Transient Analysis for Multi-stage Fractured Horizontal Wells in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the PTA on the multi-stage fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoirs incorporating desorption and diffusive flow in ... considering the mechanisms of desorption and diffusion in shale

Jingjing Guo; Liehui Zhang; Haitao Wang; Guoqing Feng

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A study of the effects of stimulation on Devonian Shale gas well performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF STIMULATION ON DEVONIAN SHALE GAS WELL PERFORMANCE A Thesis by MICHAEL DEAN ZUBER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December l985 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineerinq A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF STIMULATION ON DEVONIAN SHALE GAS WELL PERFORMANCE A Thesis by MICHAEL DEAN ZUBER Approved as to style and content by: John Lee (Chair of Committee) Stephen A...

Zuber, Michael Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

The impact of gravity segregation on multiphase non-Darcy flow in hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE IMPACT OF GRAVITY SEGREGATION ON MULTIPHASE NON-DARCY FLOW IN HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis by MARK DICKINS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE IMPACT OF GRAVITY SEGREGATION ON MULTIPHASE NON-DARCY FLOW IN HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis by MARK DICKINS...

Dickins, Mark Ian

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

A qualitative analysis of non-Darcy flow effects in hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF NON-DARCY FLOW EFFECTS IN HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis by JOANNE CAROL HRESKO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 5 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS OF NON-DARCY FLOW EFFECTS IN HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis by JOANNE CAROL HRESKO Approved as to style and content by: W. J. Lee (Chairman...

Hresko, Joanne Carol

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells Definitions Key Terms Definition Gas Well A well completed for the production of natural gas from one or more gas zones or reservoirs. Such wells contain no completions for the production of crude oil. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources Form EIA-895A, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report" , EIA estimates based on data from the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, and predecessor agencies; state agencies; and World Oil Magazine. Background on "Natural Gas Annual" data Natural Gas Survey Forms and Instructions Explanatory Notes Beginning in 2001, the number of Federal offshore Gulf of Mexico producing gas and gas condensate wells is reported separately. For previous years the well counts for the Federal offshore Gulf of Mexico were included in the well counts

210

Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Coproduced Fluids for Oil and Gas Wells Project Description The geothermal organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system will be installed at an oil field operated by Encore Acquisition in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. The data and knowledge acquire during the O & M phase can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

212

LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This final technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two additional wells were selected for remediation and included into the study. Furthermore, the remediation results of wells that were a part of the study group of wells are also described.

Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects to Improve 'Stripper' Gas Well  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 13, 2000 June 13, 2000 DOE Selects Project to Improve 'Stripper' Gas Well Economics By Using Low-Cost Clean Coal Product to Filter Waste Water In its third and final round of competition for projects that can help sustain natural gas production from "stripper" wells, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected a proposal to test a coal-based filtering material that could sharply reduce the costs of disposing of waste water from these low-volume wells. The Western SynCoal Clean Coal Plant The Rosebud SynCoal® demonstration plant near Colstrip, Montana, was built in DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. Its upgraded coal product, originally intended as a high quality fuel for power plants, may also be a low cost filter material for oil and gas well waste water.

214

Microsoft Word - RUL_2Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells_23June2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

23 June 2011 23 June 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the DOE's directive to protect human health and the environment, sample are collected and analyzed from producing gas wells to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institution control boundary. Using the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan as guidance, samples are collected on a frequency based on their respective distance from the site. The monitoring plan also specifies the type of analysis and the reporting thresholds. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations.

215

LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This eight quarterly technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two to three additional wells will be selected for remediation for inclusion into the study. The results of the additional remediations will be included in the final report.

Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Definitions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Below are a few small business procurement definitions as stated by the Small Business Administration and the Federal Acquisition Regulation. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Get clarity on common terms (and is your business defined by one?) Small business An independently owned and operated entity Not dominant in the field of operation in which it is bidding on government contracts Meets any applicable criteria concerning number of employees or annual receipts established by the Small Business Administration (SBA). Concerns are "affiliates" when one either controls or has the power to control the other or when a third party (or parties) controls or has the power to control both. North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

217

Microsoft Word - RUL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_18Wells.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring Results Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells near the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 July 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 18 gas wells sampled are within 1.1 miles of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison is the Plowshare Program code name for the detonation of a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device on 10 September 1969. The detonation point was 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. The purpose of the test

218

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Natural Gas > Natural Gas Information Query System > Definitions, Sources, & Notes Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes The EIA-176 form contains responses submitted from an identified universe of pipelines, local distribution companies, and operators of fields, wells or gas processing plants, who distribute gas to end users or transport gas across State borders; or underground natural gas storage operators. Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities.

219

A review of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation in oil and gas well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The prospect of employing Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) for well drilling in oil and gas industry was examined. In this work, the experimental works carried out on various oil well drilling operations was discussed. The results show that, LASER or LASER-aided oil and gas well drilling has many potential advantages over conventional rotary drilling, including high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, bit costs, enhanced well control, as well as perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The investigation also reveals that modern infrared \\{LASERs\\} have a higher rate of rock cuttings removal than that of conventional rotary drilling and flame-jet spallation. It also reveals that LASER can destroy rock without damaging formation permeability but rather, it enhances or improves permeability and that permeability and porosity increases in all rock types. The paper has therefore provided more knowledge on the potential value to drilling operations and techniques using LASER.

M OLALEYE B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Inflow performance relationship for perforated wells producing from solution gas drive reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IPR curve equations, which are available today, are developed for open hole wells. In the application of Nodal System Analysis in perforated wells, an accurate calculation of pressure loss in the perforation is very important. Nowadays, the equation which is widely used is Blount, Jones and Glaze equation, to estimate pressure loss across perforation. This equation is derived for single phase flow, either oil or gas, therefore it is not suitable for two-phase production wells. In this paper, an IPR curve equation for perforated wells, producing from solution gas drive reservoir, is introduced. The equation has been developed using two phase single well simulator combine to two phase flow in perforation equation, derived by Perez and Kelkar. A wide range of reservoir rock and fluid properties and perforation geometry are used to develop the equation statistically.

Sukarno, P. [Inst. Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Tobing, E.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Case study of a horizontal well in a layered Rotliegendes gas field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A horizontal well was drilled in the Ravenspurn North field to drain a thin gas column above the aquifer. The field has a significant variation in reservoir quality, with most of the wells requiring stimulation by hydraulic fracturing. The reservoir is formed from a stacked sequence of aeolian dune and fluvial sandstones with a wide permeability range. The horizontal well was chosen as an alternative to stimulation by hydraulic fracturing to avoid water production from the aquifer. The well was successful, flowing at higher gas rates than expected with no water production. Production, core, and production logging data were used to demonstrate greater than expected lateral heterogeneity in the field. The horizontal well was found to be appropriate for the very specific conditions found in one part of the reservoir; however, the overall development strategy of using hydraulic fracture remains the preferred technique.

Catterall, S.J.A.; Yaliz, A. (Hamilton Oil Co. Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2009_Gas_Samp_Results_6wells_22Jan09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 22 January 2009 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) directive to protect human health and the environment, samples are collected from producing gas wells and analyzed to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institutional-control boundary. These samples were collected before the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan was released in July 2010. The Rulison Monitoring Plan provides guidance for sample collection frequency, based on distance from the Rulison

223

Microsoft Word - RUL_4Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_8Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the Project Rulison Horizon the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 21 October 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 8 gas wells sampled are within 0.75 and 1.0 mile of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program to try stimulation natural gas in tight sandstone formations using a nuclear device. On 10 September 1969, a 40- nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected:

224

Methods for determining vented volumes during gas-condensate and oil-well blowouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods are presented for determining vented volumes during gas-condensate and oil well blowouts. Each method is illustrated with a numerical example. The method of crossplotting formation and flow string resistances is the only one which does not require special measurements. It is, therefore, applicable to cratered wells and underwater blowouts. The report includes several suggestions for investigations which might lead to better methods.

Hawkins, M.F. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011 of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Shale Plays (2010). Tudor Pickering Holt & Co with Reservoir Research Partners, with a thoughtful discussion Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources

Manning, Sturt

226

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated June 23, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated June 23, 2011 of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Shale Plays (2010). Tudor Pickering Holt & Co with Reservoir Research Partners, with a thoughtful discussion Draft Plan to Study the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Drinking Water

227

Low cost methodologies to analyze and correct abnormal production decline in stripper gas wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This first quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to establish a study group of stripper gas wells in which Artex Oil Company or its affiliate, Arloma Corporation, own a working or royalty interest. The report describes the procedures to define wells exhibiting abnormal decline and identify the associated problem. Finally, the report discusses initial development of diagnostic procedures to evaluate the cause of abnormal production declines.

James, J.; Huck, G.; Knobloch, T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

Phillip Mills

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Gas-surface scattering with multiple collisions in the physisorption potential well Guoqing Fan and J. R. Manson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-surface scattering with multiple collisions in the physisorption potential well Guoqing Fan The problem of gas-surface collisions is developed in terms of a theoretical formalism that allows calcula gas distributions are considered, a monoenergetic incident beam and an equilibrium gas appropriate

Manson, Joseph R.

230

Stopping a water crossflow in a sour-gas producing well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lacq is a sour-gas field in southwest France. After maximum production of 774 MMcf/D in the 1970`s, production is now 290 MMcf/D, with a reservoir pressure of 712 psi. Despite the loss of pressure, production is maintained by adapting the surface equipment and well architecture to reservoir conditions. The original 5-in. production tubing is being replaced with 7-in. tubing to sustain production rates. During openhole cleaning, the casing collapsed in Well LA141. The primary objective was to plug all possible hydraulic communication paths into the lower zones. The following options were available: (1) re-entering the well from the top and pulling the fish before setting cement plugs; (2) sidetracking the well; and (3) drilling a relief well to intercept Well LA141 above the reservoirs. The decision was made to start with the first option and switch to a sidetrack if this option failed.

Hello, Y. Le [Elf Aquitaine Production (Norway); Woodruff, J. [John Wight Co. (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Oil and Gas Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization (Minnesota) Oil and Gas Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Natural Resources is given the authority to create and promulgate regulations related to spacing, pooling, and utilization of oil

232

An approach for assessing engineering risk from shale gas wells in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In response to a series of energy crises in the 1970s, the United States government began investigating the potential of unconventional, domestic sources of energy to offset imported oil. Hydraulic fracturing applied to vertical tight sand and coal bed methane wells achieved some degree of success during a period of high energy prices in the early 1980s, but shale gas remained largely untapped until the late 1990s with the application of directional drilling, a mature technology adapted from deepwater offshore platforms that allowed horizontal wells to penetrate kilometers of organic-rich shale, and staged hydraulic fracturing, which created high permeability flowpaths from the horizontal wells into a much greater volume of the target formations than previous completion methods. These new engineering techniques opened up vast unconventional natural gas and oil reserves, but also raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. These include short-term and long-term impacts to air and water quality from rig operations, potential migration of gas, fluids and chemicals through the ground, and effects on small watersheds and landscapes from roads, pads and other surface structures. Engineering risk assessment commonly uses integrated assessment models (IAMs), which define sources of risk from features, events and processes. The risk from each system element is assessed using high-fidelity models. Output from these is simplified into reduced-order models, so that a large, integrated site performance assessment can be run using the IAM. The technique has been applied to engineered systems in geologic settings for sequestering carbon dioxide, and it is also applicable to shale gas, albeit with some modifications of the various system elements. Preliminary findings indicate that shale gas well drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques are generally safe when properly applied. Incident reports recorded by state environmental agencies suggest that human error resulting from the disregard of prescribed practices is the greatest cause of environmental incidents. This can only be addressed through education, regulations and enforcement.

Daniel J. Soeder; Shikha Sharma; Natalie Pekney; Leslie Hopkinson; Robert Dilmore; Barbara Kutchko; Brian Stewart; Kimberly Carter; Alexandra Hakala; Rosemary Capo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Gas, Condensate, Brine, and Solids: Pleasant Bayou Well Test, 1988-Present  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This section covers analyses performed on gas. Chemical analyses can only be related to well performance if the quantity of the various fluids are known. The IGT on-line data computer system measures the flowrate, the pressures, and the temperatures every 10 seconds. These values are automatically recorded over operator selected intervals both on magnetic media and on paper. This allows review of samples versus operating conditions. This paper covers analyses performed on gas, including: An approximate sampling schedule during flow tests; On-site sample handling and storage of gas samples; Addresses of laboratories that perform off site analyses; Sample shipping instructions; Data archiving; and Quality Control/Quality Assurance. It is expected that the above procedures will change as the flow test progresses, but deviations from the written procedures should be approved by C. Hayden of IGT and noted on the results of the analysis.

Hayden, Chris

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microsoft Word - RBL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_3Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 September 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor natural gas wells for radionuclides from Project Rio Blanco. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the 3 gas wells sampled are within 1.4 miles of the Project Rio Blanco detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Mesaverde Group. Background: Project Rio Blanco is the Plowshare Program code name for the near-simultaneous detonation of a three 33-kiloton-yield nuclear devices in one emplacement well (RB-E-01) on 17 May 1973. The devices were detonated at 5,839-feet, 6,230-feet, and 6,689-feet below the ground surface. The shallowest device (at 5,839 feet) was detonated in the lower part of the Fort Union Formation, the

235

TI-59 helps predict IPRs for gravel-packed gas wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inflow performance relationship (IPR) is an important tool for reservoir and production engineers. It helps optimize completion, tubing, gas lift, and storm choke design. It facilitates accurate rate predictions that can be used to evaluate field development decisions. The IPR is the first step of the systems analysis that translates reservoir rock and fluid parameters into predictable flow rates. Use of gravel packing for sand control complicates the calculation that predicts a well's IPR curve, particularly in gas wells where high velocities in the formation and through gravel-filled perforation tunnels can cause turbulent flow. The program presented in this article calculates the pressure drop and the flowing bottomhole pressures at varying flow rates for gravel-packed gas wells. The program was written for a Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator with a PC-100 printer. Program features include: Calculations for in-casing gravel packs, open-hole gravel packs, or ungravel packed wells. Program prompts for the required data variables. Easy change of data values to run new cases. Calculates pressures for an unlimited number of flow rates. Results show the total pressure drop and the relative magnitude of its components.

Capdevielle, W.C.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

System definition and analysis gas-fired industrial advanced turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to define and analyze an engine system based on the gas fuel Advanced Turbine from Task 3. Using the cycle results of Task 3, a technical effort was started for Task 6 which would establish the definition of the engine flowpath and the key engine component systems. The key engine systems are: gas turbine engine overall flowpath; booster (low pressure compressor); intercooler; high pressure compressor; combustor; high pressure turbine; low pressure turbine and materials; engine system packaging; and power plant configurations. The design objective is to use the GE90 engine as the platform for the GE Industrial Advanced Turbine System. This objective sets the bounds for the engine flowpath and component systems.

Holloway, G.M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Development of reservoir simulator for hydraulically fractured gas wells in noncontinuous lenticular reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model is presented which forms the basis for a reservoir simulator that can be used to assist in the interpretation and prediction of the performance of hydraulically fractured gas wells completed in the western tight sands area. The model represents a first step in developing a reservoir simulator that can be used as an exploration tool and to analyze proposed gas well tests and future production trends in noncontinuous sand lense formations which are representative of the tight gas sands located in the Rocky Mountain gas provinces. The model developed consists of the necessary mathematical equations to simulate both reservoir and well performance under a variety of operating conditions. The equations developed are general in that they consider the following effects: (1) three-dimensional flow in the reservoir and one-dimensional flow in the fracture; (2) non-Darcy flow in the reservoir and fracture; (3) wellbore and fracture storage; (4) formation damage on the fracture face; (5) frictional pressure drop in the production string; (6) noncontinuous sand lenses; and (7) Klinkenberg effect. As a start toward the development of the final version of the desired reservoir simulator, a two-dimensional simulator was secured, placed on the computer, and debugged, and some test cases were run to ensure its validity. Using this simulator as a starting point, changes to reflect the effects of items 3 and 6 were made since it was believed these were the more important effects to consider at this stage of development. The development of an operational two-dimensional gas reservoir simulator was completed. Further work will be required to extend the simulator to three dimensions and incorporate all the changes reflected in items 1 to 6.

Evans, R.D.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Demonstration of the enrichment of medium quality gas from gob wells through interactive well operating practices. Final report, June--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane released to the atmosphere during coal mining operations is believed to contribute to global warming and represents a waste of a valuable energy resource. Commercial production of pipeline-quality gob well methane through wells drilled from the surface into the area above the gob can, if properly implemented, be the most effective means of reducing mine methane emissions. However, much of the gas produced from gob wells is vented because the quality of the gas is highly variable and is often below current natural gas pipeline specifications. Prior to the initiation of field-testing required to further understand the operational criteria for upgrading gob well gas, a preliminary evaluation and assessment was performed. An assessment of the methane gas in-place and producible methane resource at the Jim Walter Resources, Inc. No. 4 and No. 5 Mines established a potential 15-year supply of 60 billion cubic feet of mien methane from gob wells, satisfying the resource criteria for the test site. To understand the effect of operating conditions on gob gas quality, gob wells producing pipeline quality (i.e., < 96% hydrocarbons) gas at this site will be operated over a wide range of suction pressures. Parameters to be determined will include absolute methane quantity and methane concentration produced through the gob wells; working face, tailgate and bleeder entry methane levels in the mine; and the effect on the economics of production of gob wells at various levels of methane quality. Following this, a field demonstration will be initiated at a mine where commercial gob gas production has not been attempted. The guidelines established during the first phase of the project will be used to design the production program. The economic feasibility of various utilization options will also be tested based upon the information gathered during the first phase. 41 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

Blackburn, S.T.; Sanders, R.G.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.; Stevenson, J.W.; Mills, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11,226 12,829 1980's 11,634 11,759 12,222 12,117 12,525 13,378 12,935 10,962 9,728 8,243 1990's 7,743 7,610 7,242 6,484 7,204 5,904 6,309 7,171 6,883 6,738 2000's 7,808 7,262 7,068 6,866 6,966 6,685 6,654 6,977 6,764 5,470 2010's 5,483 4,904 4,411 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil

240

Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project area encompasses 6,273 acres of both private and federal lands including water and surface rights. It is reasonable to expect a capacity of about 20 MW. GeothermEx estimated a potential capacity of 40 MW. Black Warrior is a large blind geothermal prospect near the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation that was identified by reconnaissance temperature gradient drilling in the 1980s by Philips Petroleum but was never tested through deep exploration drilling. Although the 10 square miles of high heat flow in the area reveals significant energy potential it also makes selection of an optimal exploration drilling target difficult.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 30,264 26,439 1980's 22,965 22,153 23,654 26,510 30,099 29,904 33,453 28,698 23,950 22,673 1990's 20,948 19,538 21,631 23,750 21,690 14,528 19,414 16,002 22,744 17,510 2000's 17,089 13,513 11,711 9,517 11,299 8,294 8,822 9,512 4,137 4,108 2010's 6,614 6,778 5,443 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil

242

Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 410,179 375,593 360,533 1980's 360,906 348,113 357,671 408,632 461,821 502,000 529,453 470,493 426,945 403,144 1990's 408,654 455,052 436,493 467,340 518,305 522,437 523,155 566,210 643,886 722,750 2000's 752,296 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil

243

Performance evaluation of Appalachian wells using a microcomputer gas simulation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Appalachian Basin contains very low reservoir pressures (as low as 120 psi). To help solve these problems, a one-dimensional gas simulator has been developed for use on a microcomputer. The simulation program provides production engineers with tools to generate data and determine the inflow performance relationships (IPR) of Appalachian-type wells. These Appalachian well field case studies were conducted, whereby various production methods were analyzed using the Nodal analysis method. Consequently, improved design criteria were established for selecting compatible production methods and handling production problems in the Appalachian Basin.

Yu, J.P.; Mustafa, A. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown (USA)); Hefner, M.H. (CNG Transmission Co., Clarksburg, WV (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Failure of a gas well to respond to a foam hydraulic fracturing treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well No. 1 (not the real name of the well) is not producing gas at maximum capacity following a foam hydraulic fracturing treatment performed upon completion of the well in 1987. The failure of the stimulation treatment, which has affected other wells throughout the field, was due to a combination of three factors: (1) downward fracture growth and proppant settling during injection (2) embedment due to a high pressure drawdown in the wellbore during flowback procedures, and (3) poor cleanup of the fracture fluid due to high capillary pressures. The following are recommendations to help improve future fracturing treatments throughout the field: (1) Fracture at lower treating pressures; (2) Improve perforating techniques; (3) Change flowback procedures; and (4) Evaluate using N{sub 2} as a fracture fluid.

Rauscher, B.D.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Pixelized Gas Micro-well Detectors for Advanced Gamma-ray Telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe possible applications of pixelized micro-well detectors (PMWDs) as three-dimensional charged particle trackers in advanced gamma-ray telescope concepts. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned gas proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with pixelized thin film transistor (TFT) array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this technique is the very low scattering that the charged particles experience in a gas tracking volume, and the very accurate determination of the initial particle momenta that is thus achieved. We consider two applications of PMWDs to gamma-ray astronomy: 1) A tracker for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) in which the recoil electron from the initial Compton scatter may be accurately tracked, greatly reducing the telescope's point spread function and increasing its polarization sensitivity; and 2) an Advanced Pair Telescope (APT) whose angular resolution is limited primarily by the nuclear recoil and which achieves useful polarization sensitivity near 100 MeV. We have performed Geant4 simulations of both these concepts to estimate their angular resolution and sensitivity for reasonable mission designs.

P. F. Bloser; S. D. Hunter

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Development and application of type curves for pressure transient analysis of horizontal wells in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even though significant progresses have been made in the past few years, there appears to be a lack of information regarding the characterisation of shale gas formations. A major purpose of this study is to demonstrate impacts of horizontal well geometries and gas flow parameters as well as shale gas reservoir system on horizontal well production behaviour and flow regime on pressure transient analysis (PTA). Extensive numerical simulations were conducted to model transient pressure behaviour of a horizontal well and apply the results to well test analysis in shale gas reservoirs. Based on the results from numerical simulations, a set of type curves have been developed in terms of dimensionless pseudopressure and time. Results from type curve matching for synthetic pressure data in shale gas reservoirs demonstrate that the conventional analysis approach may still be applicable for the quantitative analysis on the transient gas flow behaviour and determination of formation properties. [Received: June 21, 2013; Accepted: August 6, 2013

Sung Jun Lee; Tae Hong Kim; Kun Sang Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (MMcf)" Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1030_r5f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1030_r5f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:15 AM"

248

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Offshore Gross Withdrawals Offshore Gross Withdrawals Definitions Key Terms Definition Gas Well A well completed for the production of natural gas from one or more gas zones or reservoirs. Such wells contain no completions for the production of crude oil. Gross Withdrawals Full well-stream volume, including all natural gas plant liquids and all nonhydrocarbon gases, but excluding lease condensate. Also includes amounts delivered as royalty payments or consumed in field operations. Offshore Located in either State or Federal domains, seaward of the coastline. Oil Well (Casinghead) Gas Natural gas produced along with crude oil from oil wells. It contains either dissolved or associated gas or both. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources

249

US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 417,053 383,647 369,968 1980's 385,573 377,245 400,129 461,796 523,200 570,733 599,978 537,101 497,072 485,150 1990's 484,516 535,250 513,058 550,850 622,235 653,870 687,424 729,162 804,290 905,293 2000's 951,088 989,969 893,193 939,828 840,852 730,830 681,869 654,334 524,965 606,403 2010's 598,679 512,003 526,664 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

250

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 18,689 15,053 1980's 13,959 13,526 12,554 12,405 11,263 9,412 9,547 16,422 43,562 50,165 1990's 49,422 70,932 106,311 105,363 124,501 7,684 7,055 7,919 7,880 6,938 2000's 149,077 149,067 190,608 236,404 260,667 305,641 292,660 325,328 345,109 316,537 2010's 328,114 328,500 274,431 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

251

Unloading using auger tool and foam and experimental identification of liquid loading of low rate natural gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-pressure, low-producing natural gas wells commonly encounter liquid loading during production. Because of the decline in the reservoir pressure and the flow capacity, wells can fall below terminal velocity. Identifying and predicting the onset...

Bose, Rana

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well blowouts are one type of event in hydrocarbon exploration and production that generates health, safety, environmental and financial risk. Well blowouts are variously defined as 'uncontrolled flow of well fluids and/or formation fluids from the wellbore' or 'uncontrolled flow of reservoir fluids into the wellbore'. Theoretically this is irrespective of flux rate and so would include low fluxes, often termed 'leakage'. In practice, such low-flux events are not considered well blowouts. Rather, the term well blowout applies to higher fluxes that rise to attention more acutely, typically in the order of seconds to days after the event commences. It is not unusual for insurance claims for well blowouts to exceed US$10 million. This does not imply that all blowouts are this costly, as it is likely claims are filed only for the most catastrophic events. Still, insuring against the risk of loss of well control is the costliest in the industry. The risk of well blowouts was recently quantified from an assembled database of 102 events occurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the period 1991 to 2005, inclusive. This article reviews those findings, updates them to a certain extent and compares them with other well blowout risk study results. It also provides an improved perspective on some of the findings. In short, this update finds that blowout rates have remained constant from 2005 to 2008 within the limits of resolution and that the decline in blowout rates from 1991 to 2005 was likely due to improved industry practice.

Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models...

Song, Bo

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin BasinRates in California Oil and Gas District 4 Update andoccurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Development of general inflow performance relationships (IPR's) for slanted and horizontal wells producing heterogeneous solution-gas drive reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1968, the Vogel equation has been used extensively and successfully for analyzing the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of flowing vertical wells producing by solution-gas drive. Oil well productivity can be rapidly estimated by using the Vogel IPR curve and well outflow performance. With recent interests on horizontal well technology, several empirical IPRs for solution-gas drive horizontal and slanted wells have been developed under homogeneous reservoir conditions. This report presents the development of IPRs for horizontal and slanted wells by using a special vertical/horizontal/slanted well reservoir simulator under six different reservoir and well parameters: ratio of vertical to horizontal permeability, wellbore eccentricity, stratification, perforated length, formation thickness, and heterogeneous permeability. The pressure and gas saturation distributions around the wellbore are examined. The fundamental physical behavior of inflow performance for horizontal wells is described.

Cheng, A.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ground state and excitations of a Bose gas: From a harmonic trap to a double well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We determine the low-energy properties of a trapped Bose gas split in two by a potential barrier over the whole range of barrier heights and asymmetry between the wells. For either weak or strong coupling between the wells, our two-mode theory yields a two-site Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian with the tunneling, interaction, and bias parameters calculated simply using an explicit form of two mode functions. When the potential barrier is relatively low, most of the particles occupy the condensate mode and our theory reduces to a two-mode version of the Bogoliubov theory, which gives a satisfactory estimate of the spatial shape and energy of the lowest collective excitation. When the barrier is high, our theory generalizes the standard two-site Bose-Hubbard model into the case of asymmetric modes, and correctly predicts a full separation of the modes in the limit of strong separation of the wells. We provide explicit analytic forms for the number squeezing and coherence as a function of particle number and temperature. We compare our theory to other two-mode theories for bosons in a double well and discuss their validity in different parameter regimes.

Japha, Y. [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Band, Y. B. [Departments of Chemistry and Electro-Optics, and Ilse Katz Center for Nano-Science, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pub/oil/ Data_Catalog/Oil_and_Gas/Oil_?elds/CA_oil?elds.DAT.1993) A history of oil- and gas-well blowouts in California,Health Administration (2007), Oil and gas well drilling and

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Rate-transient analysis of 2-phase (gas+water) CBM wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent work, the authors (Clarkson etal., 2008, 2007; Jordan etal., 2006) demonstrated how modern production data analysis (PDA) methods, such as flowing material balance (FMB) and production type-curves, may be adapted to account for the unique reservoir characteristics of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs through the appropriate use of material balance and time transforms. Reservoir characteristics related to storage and fluid flow that were addressed included: adsorbed and free-gas storage; single-phase flow of water above desorption pressure (undersaturated coals); 2-phase flow of gas and water below desorption pressure (saturated coals); non-static absolute permeability during depletion; and multi-layer behavior. Example (field) applications of the new PDA methods were limited to vertical wells that were either openhole completed, or slightly stimulated with hydraulic fracturing methods. In this work, new workflows and analytical approaches are provided for analyzing vertical, hydraulically-fractured and horizontal CBM wells. The analysis and methodology for 2-phase flow reservoirs is complex, requiring modifications to account for desorption and changes in effective permeability. The proposed workflow for 2-phase CBM wells includes the transformation of the well production and flowing pressure data into dimensionless type-curve and straight line (ex. flowing material balance) coordinates using certain outputs (krg, pR) from the simulator used in turn to history-match the production data. Transient straight-line (pressure-transient analysis analog) techniques are applied for the first time to 2-phase CBM well production data. The type-curve and straight-line matches to actual production data are then used to retrieve reservoir properties (e.g. absolute permeability) and stimulation conditions (e.g. skin), which in turn are compared to reservoir simulation input as a consistency check. Both simulated and field cases are analyzed to illustrate the new procedures and analytical techniques. The primary contribution of the current work is the application of modern production analysis methods to 2-phase CBM reservoirs. These methods have been modified for CBM reservoir behavior and combined with analytical (or numerical) modeling to extract quantitative reservoir information from CBM reservoirs which exhibit a wide-range in production characteristics, and are completed in a variety of styles. The modifications proposed in this work to enable the use of single-phase flow techniques must be regarded as practical approximations. The methods rely heavily on late-time data because of the poor quality of water production and flowing pressure data that typically exists. The methods are expected to be used as a pre-cursor to or in parallel with field reservoir simulation, to assist with CBM development decisions.

C.R. Clarkson; C.L. Jordan; D. Ilk; T.A. Blasingame

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Combination gas-producing and waste-water disposal well. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, R.M.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

u' m .,. . Society of Petroleum Engineers u I SPE 49259 StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells R.M. Graves, SPE, Colorado School of Mines; and D.G. O'Brien, PE, SPE, Solutions Engineering Copyr@ht 1998, Scdety of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prapared for presentation at the 1998 SPE Annual Technicar Conference and Exhibition bald in New Orteans, Lcuisiana, 27-30 September 1998, This paper waa selected for presentation by en SPE Program Commiftee folrowing review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(a). Contents of the paper, as prasented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The materiar, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the .%ciety of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers prasented at SPE meetings

264

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Optimization of power generation from a set of low-temperature abandoned gas wells, using organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research article deals with the employment of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) to generate electricity from a set of low-temperature abandoned gas wells in Iran. At first a thermodynamic analysis was performed to select an appropriate power cycle; consequently organic Rankine cycle was chosen. Then a comprehensive investigation was carried out to find a typical low-temperature abandoned gas reservoir so an abandoned gas reservoir in the central part of Iran was considered. The next step was selecting the working fluid; in this regard a vast range of common organic fluids were studied and R125 was chosen. Finally the gas well and the power plant were simulated and then a parametric optimization of the ORC plant was performed in order to achieve optimum power generation and also to compute generated power at different operational parameters of gas wells and power cycle.

Mahyar Ebrahimi; Seyed Ebrahim Moussavi Torshizi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...two previously normal wells that displayed increased...tectonic (e.g., geothermal springs) or microbial...subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale...Domestic and Municipal Water Wells for Dissolved Gas Analysis...nitrate flux to the Gulf of Mexico. Ground Water 42...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Identification of parameters influencing the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing with the aid of a neural network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performing hydraulic fractures on gas storage wells to improve their deliverability is a common practice in the eastern part of the United States. Most of the fields in this part of the country being used for storage are old. Reservoir characteristic data necessary for most reservoir studies and hydraulic fracture design and evaluation are scarce for these old fields. This paper introduces a new methodology by which parameters that influence the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing may be identified in the absence of sufficient reservoir data. Control and manipulation of these parameters, once identified correctly, could enhance the outcome of frac jobs in gas storage fields. The study was conducted on a gas storage field in the Clinton formation of Northeastern Ohio. It was found that well performance indicators prior to a hydraulic fracture play an important role in how good the well will respond to a new frac job. Several other important factors were also identified.

McVey, D.S.; Mohaghegh, S.; Aminian, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from themodel included the oil reservoir and the well with a toppressures of the deep oil reservoir, to a two-phase oil-gas

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Determination of formation permeability using back-pressure test data from hydraulically-fractured, low-permeability gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACX-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AsJ4 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major subject: petroleum Engineering DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACK-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ...

Krawtz, John Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3,459 3,117 3,336 1,781 1,806 1,881 1,841 1,820 1,781 1,699 1,247 1,228 1992 4,284 3,872 4,141 4,027 4,047 3,883 3,964 3,957 3,892 4,169 4,146 4,334 1993 4,123 3,693 4,049 3,865 3,942 3,786 3,915 3,924 3,861 4,146 4,114 4,200 1994 3,639 3,242 3,557 3,409 3,488 3,384 3,552 3,643 3,597 3,796 3,818 3,991 1995 3,937 3,524 3,842 3,679 3,731 3,591 3,683 3,710 3,597 3,747 3,778 3,937 1996 3,960 4,174 4,704 4,202 3,860 4,239 4,285 4,447 4,978 4,585 4,564 4,512 1997 4,656 4,105 4,501 4,102 4,135 4,047 4,273 4,190 3,962 4,213 3,959 3,830

272

Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 5 well - Lorain County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. The program's objectives are as follows: (1) to evaluate recoverable reserves of gas contained in the shales; (2) to enhanced recovery technology for production from shale gas reservoirs; and (3) to stimulate interest among commercial gas suppliers in the concept of producing large quantities of gas from low-yield, shallow Devonian Shale wells. The EGSP-Ohio No. 5 well was cored under a cooperative cost-sharing agreement between the Department of Energy (METC) and Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation. Detailed characterization of the core was performed at the Eastern Gas Shale Project's Core Laboratory. At the well site, suites of wet and dry hole geophysical logs were run. Characterization work performed at the Laboratory included photographic logs, lithologic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition samples were tested for physical properties by Michigan Technological University. Physical properties data obtained were for: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength; strength in point load; and trends of microfractures.

none,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3 Desorption parameters for the Billi coalbed methane reservoir correspond to within an acceptable range with those of the Barnett shale. For the initial reservoir pressure used in this study these values correspond to an initial methane storage of 344 scf... media has been studied extensively in coalbed methane reservoirs , where adsorption can be the primary mode of gas storage. Many analytic and semi-analytic models have been developed from the study of gas desorption from coalbed methane reservoirs...

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

274

Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2/9/11 - 3/18/11) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2/9/11 - 3/18/11) Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2/9/11 - 3/18/11) Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

275

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analysis of pressure data from the horizontal wells with multiple hydraulic fractures in shale gas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the last several years, the unconventional gas reservoirs development has grown tremendously. Most of these unconventional reservoirs have very low permeability and are not (more)

Tabar, Essa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is mined. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

A new generation of multilateral well enhances small gas field economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the economic benefits of the new technology in the domain of offshore and small gas fields. This work also shows that this new generation of multilaterals brings new option values to the domain of multilateral technology....

Atse, Jean-Philippe

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12, 2014 (received for review November 27, 2013) Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. noble gas geochemistry | groundwater contamination and hydraulic fracturing have substantially increased hydrocarbon recovery from black shales and other

Jackson, Robert B.

280

Minimizing Water Production from Unconventional Gas Wells Using a Novel Environmentally Benign Polymer Gel System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excess water production is a major economic and environmental problem for the oil and gas industry. The cost of processing excess water runs into billions of dollars. Polymer gel technology has been successfully used in controlling water influx...

Gakhar, Kush

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of generating electricity from non-conventional low temperature (150 to 300 F) geothermal resources in oil and gas settings.

282

A statistical analysis of well production rates from UK oil and gas fields Implications for carbon capture and storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The number of wells required to dispose of global CO2 emissions by injection into geological formations is of interest as a key indicator of feasible deployment rate, scale and cost. Estimates have largely been driven by forecasts of sustainable injection rate from mathematical modelling of the CO2 injection process. Recorded fluid production rates from oil and gas fields can be considered an observable analogue in this respect. The article presents statistics concerning Cumulative average Bulk fluid Production (CBP) rates per well for 104 oil and gas fields from the UK offshore region. The term bulk fluid production is used here to describe the composite volume of oil, gas and water produced at reservoir conditions. Overall, the following key findings are asserted: (1) CBP statistics for UK offshore oil and gas fields are similar to those observed for CO2 injection projects worldwide. (2) 50% probability of non-exceedance (PNE) for CBP for oil and gas fields without water flood is around 0.35Mt/yr/well of CO2 equivalent. (3) There is negligible correlation between reservoir transmissivity and CBP. (4) Study of net and gross CBP for water flood fields suggest a 50% PNE that brine co-production during CO2 injection could lead to a 20% reduction in the number of wells required.

Simon A. Mathias; Jon G. Gluyas; Eric J. Mackay; Ward H. Goldthorpe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Identification of parameters influencing the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing with the aid of a neural network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performing hydraulic fractures on gas storage wells to improve their deliverability is a common practice in the eastern part of the US. Most fields used for storage in this region are old, and the reservoir characteristic data necessary for most reservoir studies and hydraulic fracture design and evaluation are scarce. This paper introduces a new method by which parameters that influence the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing may be identified in the absence of sufficient reservoir data. Control and manipulation of these parameters, once identified correctly, could enhance the outcome of frac jobs in gas storage fields. The authors conducted the study on a gas storage field in the Clinton formation of northeastern Ohio. They found that well-performance indicators before a hydraulic fracture play an important role in how good the well will respond to a new frac job. They also identified several other important factors. The identification of controlling parameters serves as a foundation for improved frac job design in the fields where adequate engineering data are not available. Another application of this type of study could be the enhancement of selection criteria among the candidate wells for hydraulic fracturing. To achieve the objective of this study, the authors designed, trained, and applied an artificial neural network. The paper will discuss the results of the incorporation of this new technology in hydraulic fracture design and evaluation.

McVey, D.S. [East Ohio Gas Co., North Canton, OH (United States); Mohaghegh, S.; Aminian, K.; Ameri, S. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Black Warrior: Sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion exploration and slim well drilling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: Discover a blind, low-moderate temperature resource: Apply a combination of detailed sub-soil gas, hydrocarbon, and isotope data to define possible upflow areas; Calibrate the sub-soil chemistry with down-hole fluid inclusion stratigraphy and fluid analyses to define a follow-up exploration drilling target; Create short term jobs and long term employment through resource exploration, development and power plant operation; Extend and adapt the DOE sub-soil 2 meter probe technology to gas sampling.

285

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Formulation, Grade, Sales Type U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Formulation, Grade, Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Conventional Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories.

286

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Prices by Formulation, Grade, Sales Type Motor Gasoline Prices by Formulation, Grade, Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Conventional Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories.

287

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas-phase chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiphysics modeling of carbon gasification processes in a well-stirred reactor with detailed gas: Coal gasification Carbon gasification Detailed chemistry Heterogeneous surface reactions Radiation Multi-physics numerical modeling a b s t r a c t Fuel synthesis through coal and biomass gasification

Qiao, Li

288

Analysis and forecasting of gas well performanc: a rigorous approach using decline curve analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3. 1. 2 Analytical Decline Curve Developments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3. 1. 2. 1 Development of the Exponential Decline Using van Everdingen and Hurst Approach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3. 1. 2. 2 Fetkovich... Pressure Profile . 66 4. 5 Constant Pressure Equivalent Analysis Using the Fetkovich Type Curve for Variable Rate/Variable Pressure Dmp Flow Data. 73 76 77 80 4. 6 CHAPIXR V 83 83 84 86 86 88 90 90 96 5. 1 5. 2 Verification of Gas Flow...

Palacio Uran, Juan Carlos

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Sustainable Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain and the Optimal Drilling Strategy for Nonconventional Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We present a long-term MINLP planning model for the development of shale gas fields. A key decision is the drilling/fracturing strategy yielding the freshwater consumption profile, which is critical in waterscarce regions with high cumulative demand for water. Results show that the model can help companies to reduce freshwater consumption by optimally planning drilling operations, at the expense of small reductions in the net present value of the projects.

Diego C. Cafaro; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Stimulated Scattering of Indirect Excitons in Coupled Quantum Wells: Signature of a Degenerate Bose-Gas of Excitons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe and analyze strongly nonlinear photoluminescence kinetics of indirect excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum wells at low bath temperatures, ?50 mK. The long recombination lifetime of indirect excitons promotes accumulation of these Bose particles in the lowest energy states and allows the photoexcited excitons to cool down to temperatures where the dilute 2D gas of indirect excitons becomes statistically degenerate. Our main resulta strong enhancement of the exciton scattering rate to the low-energy states with increasing concentration of the indirect excitonsreveals bosonic stimulation of exciton scattering, which is a signature of a degenerate Bose-gas of excitons.

L. V. Butov, A. L. Ivanov, A. Imamoglu, P. B. Littlewood, A. A. Shashkin, V. T. Dolgopolov, K. L. Campman, and A. C. Gossard

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Investigation of flow modifying tools for the continuous unloading of wet-gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decreasing backpressure on wells and increasing production. This thesis evaluates this technology for use in the wellbore, where a tool is introduced at the bottom of the tubing string. Laboratory experiments were conducted using a 125-ft vertical flow...

Ali, Ahsan Jawaid

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Two-phase pressure transient analysis for multi-stage fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most researches on shale gas production and pressure transient analysis placed more emphasis on single-phase flow, the two-phase flow caused by flowback after hydrofracture in shale gas reservoirs does not attract much attention. This paper presents a two-phase pressure transient analysis model of multi-stage fractured horizontal well with the consideration of wellbore storage, skin effect, two-phase saturation, hydraulic fractures parameters and desorption characteristics of shale gas reservoirs. Accurate solution to this flow model is obtained by the use of source function theory, Laplace transform, three-dimensional eigenvalue method and orthogonal transformation. Pseudo-pressure and pseudo-pressure derivative type curve is plotted by using the Stehfest algorithm. Seven different flow regimes have been identified and the effects of influence factors such as initial saturation, skin factor, absorption index, fracture stages, horizontal well lateral length and wellbore storage coefficient have also been discussed. The presents research could be used to interpret the pressure behavior more accurately and effectively of shale gas reservoirs.

Weiyang Xie; Xiaoping Li; Liehui Zhang; Junchao Wang; Lina Cao; Lin Yuan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Amgad Elgowainy and Michael Wang Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory LDV Workshop July26, 2010 2 2 2 Team Members 2  ANL's Energy Systems (ES) Division  Michael Wang (team leader)  Dan Santini  Anant Vyas  Amgad Elgowainy  Jeongwoo Han  Aymeric Rousseau  ANL's Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Division:  Guenter Conzelmann  Leslie Poch  Vladimir Koritarov  Matt Mahalik  Thomas Veselka  Audun Botterud  Jianhui Wang  Jason Wang 3 3 3 Scope of Argonne's PHEV WTW Analysis: Vehicle Powertrain Systems and Fuel Pathways 3  Vehicle powertrain systems:  Conventional international combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs)

296

Production-data analysis of single-phase (gas) coalbed-methane wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current work illustrates how single-well production-data-analysis (PDA) techniques, such as type curve, flowing material balance (FMB), and pressure-transient (PT) analysis, may be altered to analyze single-phase CBM wells. Examples of how reservoir inputs to the PDA techniques and subsequent calculations are modified to account for CBM-reservoir behavior are given. This paper demonstrates, by simulated and field examples, that reasonable reservoir and stimulation estimates can be obtained from PDA of CBM reservoirs only if appropriate reservoir inputs (i.e., desorption compressibility, fracture porosity) are used in the analysis. As the field examples demonstrate, type-curve, FMB, and PT analysis methods for PDA are not used in isolation for reservoir-property estimation, but rather as a starting point for single-well and multiwell reservoir simulation, which is then used to history match and forecast CBM-well production (e.g., for reserves assignment). To study the effects of permeability anisotropy upon production, a 2D, single-phase, numerical CBM-reservoir simulator was constructed to simulate single-well production assuming various permeability-anisotropy ratios. Only large permeability ratios ({lt} 16:1) appear to have a significant effect upon single-well production characteristics. Multilayer reservoir characteristics may also be observed with CBM reservoirs because of vertical heterogeneity, or in cases where the coals are commingled with conventional (sandstone) reservoirs. In these cases, the type-curve, FMB, and PT analysis techniques are difficult to apply with confidence. Methods and tools for analyzing multilayer CBM (plus sand) reservoirs are presented. Using simulated and field examples, it is demonstrated that unique reservoir properties may be assigned to individual layers from commingled (multilayer) production in the simple two-layer case.

Clarkson, C.R.; Bustin, R.M.; Seidle, J.P. [ConocoPhillips Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas.

298

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondoteam and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using theoil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dis-harmony in European Natural Gas Market(s)Discussion of Standards and Definitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All member states of the European Union with the exception of those who have no natural gas consumption at all (i.e. Malta and Cyprus) and those who do not have a...

Peter Drasdo; Michael Karasz; Andrej Pustisek

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the worlds natural gas hydrate

Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the worlds natural gas hydrate

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Temporal Changes in Microbial Ecology and Geochemistry in Produced Water from Hydraulically Fractured Marcellus Shale Gas Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These results provide insight into the temporal trajectory of subsurface microbial communities after fracking and have important implications for the enrichment of microbes potentially detrimental to well infrastructure and natural gas fouling during this process. ... Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. ... reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. ...

Maryam A. Cluff; Angela Hartsock; Jean D. MacRae; Kimberly Carter; Paula J. Mouser

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of general inflow performance relationships (IPR`s) for slanted and horizontal wells producing heterogeneous solution-gas drive reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1968, the Vogel equation has been used extensively and successfully for analyzing the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of flowing vertical wells producing by solution-gas drive. Oil well productivity can be rapidly estimated by using the Vogel IPR curve and well outflow performance. With recent interests on horizontal well technology, several empirical IPRs for solution-gas drive horizontal and slanted wells have been developed under homogeneous reservoir conditions. This report presents the development of IPRs for horizontal and slanted wells by using a special vertical/horizontal/slanted well reservoir simulator under six different reservoir and well parameters: ratio of vertical to horizontal permeability, wellbore eccentricity, stratification, perforated length, formation thickness, and heterogeneous permeability. The pressure and gas saturation distributions around the wellbore are examined. The fundamental physical behavior of inflow performance for horizontal wells is described.

Cheng, A.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Consumers Number of Consumers Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

305

A new technique to analyze simultaneous sandface flow rate and pressure measurements of gas wells with turbulence and damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the problems associated with conventional gas well test are related to the nonlinearity of the equations describing real gas flow, the presence of the rate dependent (non-Darcy) skin, and the long shut-in time periods required to collect the data for the analysis in tight reservoirs in which the wellbore storage period can be excessively long. This paper presents a new pressure buildup technique that reduces the wellbore storage effects, eliminates the long shut-in periods experienced with conventional tests by using afterflow rate and pressure data, and most importantly provides a direct method to estimate non-Darcy skin. The proposed technique uses normalized pseudofunctions to avoid the nonlinearities of the governing equations and involves using two different plots. The formation permeability is obtained from the slope of the first plot. The mechanical and non-Darcy skin factors are obtained respectively from the slope and intercept of the second plot. A field example and two simulated cases are presented to illustrate the application of the new technique.

Nashawi, I.S. [Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait); Al-Mehaideb, R.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

307

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

308

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

309

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

310

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area Area Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

311

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area Area Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

312

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area Area Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

313

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area Area Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

314

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007), Oil and gas well drilling and servicing etool.from minor oil spills limited to a drilling pad to saltingdrilling nonthermal nonthermal reworking plugging & abandoning thermal thermal a) oil

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Shares of U.S. Deliveries State Shares of U.S. Deliveries Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered (Gas) The physical transfer of natural, synthetic, and/or supplemental gas from facilities operated by the responding company to facilities operated by others or to consumers. Electric Power Consumption Gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

317

Coupled flow and geomechanical analysis for gas production in the Prudhoe Bay Unit L-106 well Unit C gas hydrate deposit in Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrate deposits that are desirable gas production targets almost invari- ably involve coarse, unlithified, unconsolidated media (such as sands

Kim, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alternate Representations for Numerical Modeling of Multi-Stage Hydraulically Fractured Horizontal Wells in Shale Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Increasing demand of oil and natural gas and depletion of production from conventional resources accelerate the advancement of technology to economically produce oil and natural (more)

Siripatrachai, Nithiwat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

S.1919: Federal Oil and Gas Stripper Well Preservation Act of 1998, introduced in the US Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 2, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this bill is to provide for the energy security of the Nation through encouraging the production of domestic oil and gas resources from stripper wells on Federal lands, and for other purposes. The law would authorize reduction of royalty rates for stripper wells on federal lands and suspend minimum royalty and per acre rental fees.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural gas in oil) STB Stock Tank Barrel ( one barrel oftank barrel (scf/STB). Gas solubility increases with pressure such that oilgas in oil is given by SGOR which has units of standard cubic feet per stock-tank

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Topic: Delivered for the Account of Others Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered for the Account of Others Gas that is not owned by the company that delivers it to the consumer. These deliveries include quantities covered by long-term contracts and gas involved in short-term or spot market sales. Industrial Consumption Natural gas used for heat, power, or chemical feedstock by manufacturing establishments or those engaged in mining or other mineral extraction as well as consumers in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries. Also included in industrial consumption are generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support the above-mentioned industrial activities.

322

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Proved Nonproducing Reserves Proved Nonproducing Reserves Definitions Key Terms Definition Associated Dissolved Gas The combined volume of natural gas which occurs in crude oil reservoirs either as free gas (associated) or as gas in solution with crude oil (dissolved). Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in the liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Crude oil may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in the gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators, and that subsequently are comingled with the crude stream without being separately measured.

323

Decision Matrix Screening Tool to Identify the Best Artificial Lift Method for Liquid-loaded Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the additional gas production resulted from simulation to calculate economic yardsticks (the third round), NPV and IRR. Moreover, we made the decision matrix more complete by adding three more liquid unloading techniques to the decision matrix: velocity string...

Soponsakulkaew, Nitsupon

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles trav

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Definition: Gamma Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gamma Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gamma Log Gamma logging is a method of measuring naturally occurring gamma radiation to characterize the rock or sediment in a borehole or drill hole. It is a wireline logging method used in mining, mineral exploration, water-well drilling, for formation evaluation in oil and gas well drilling and for other related purposes. Different types of rock emit different amounts and different spectra of natural gamma radiation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Gamma ray logging is a method of measuring naturally occurring gamma radiation to characterize the rock or sediment in a borehole or drill hole. It is a wireline logging method used in mining, mineral exploration,

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The definition of an alternative fuel includes natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electricity, hydrogen, fuel mixtures containing not less

327

Assessment and risk analysis of casing and cement impairment in oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, 20002012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacteriogenic ethane in near-surface aquifers: Implications for leaking hydrocarbon...the natural gas invasion of aquifers in Bainbridge Township of...2012 ) Years after evidence of fracking contamination, EPA to supply...years-after-evidence-of-fracking-contamination-epa-to-supply-drinking-water...

Anthony R. Ingraffea; Martin T. Wells; Renee L. Santoro; Seth B. C. Shonkoff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environmental costs and benefits of fracking . Annu Rev Environ Resour...SL ( 2014 ) Water resource impacts during unconventional shale gas development: The...the Nicholas School of the Environment. The authors declare no conflict...in marine and fresh-water environments- CO2 reduction vs acetate...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Assessment and risk analysis of casing and cement impairment in oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, 20002012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and/or casing impairment. Remedial action is often attempted once...contamination/gas migration investigations, but these types of inspections...annular vent" 20 Cement Squeeze Remedial cementing operation performed...patch", "perf" 34 Top Job Remedial cementing operation used to...

Anthony R. Ingraffea; Martin T. Wells; Renee L. Santoro; Seth B. C. Shonkoff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Influence of the Drilling Mud Formulation Process on the Bacterial Communities in Thermogenic Natural Gas Wells of the Barnett Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...number of problems that lead to significant costs for the oil and natural gas industries...acceptor and as a source of carbon and energy for microbial populations in drilling...Polyphasic analysis of Thermus isolates from geothermal areas in Iceland. Extremophiles 10...

Christopher G. Struchtemeyer; James P. Davis; Mostafa S. Elshahed

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Performance analysis of compositional and modified black-oil models for rich gas condensate reservoirs with vertical and horizontal wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been known that volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs cannot be modeled accurately with conventional black-oil models. One variation to the black-oil approach is the modified black-oil (MBO) model that allows the use of a simple...

Izgec, Bulent

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to the length of the well that was open to the...2010, the Macondo well MC252-1 drilled from...platform in the Gulf of Mexico suffered a blowout...normally convey oil from the well to the platform. Later...nonaqueous liquids, geothermal energy production, geologic...

Curtis M. Oldenburg; Barry M. Freifeld; Karsten Pruess; Lehua Pan; Stefan Finsterle; George J. Moridis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The effects of damage in and around a fracture upon the analysis of pressure data from low permeability gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, fracture penetration, fracture closure and proppant embedment, non-Darcy flow, and production rate upon these pressure data have been studied. These results have been analyzed using pseudo-radial flow theory, linear flow theory, and dimensionless... damage cases is presented for both infinite and finite reservoirs with varying formation permeability and fracture penetration. These results indicate that only minor effects on cumulative gas production are experienced. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author...

Fox, Thomas Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

335

Design of a high-pressure research flow loop for the experimental investigation of liquid loading in gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.5 (a) The optical acrylic and (b) inlet mixing section ................................... 16 2.6 (a) Slug catcher at the outlet of the test section and (b) gas/liquid (top) and oil/water separators... loops, the process is accompanied by the installation of major equipment and hardware that may include but is not limited to compressed air systems, water pumps, multiphase pumps and static vessels used as separators. Commercial and non...

Fernandez Alvarez, Juan Jose

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploratory and Development Wells Exploratory and Development Wells Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

337

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Drilling Activity Drilling Activity Definitions Key Terms Definition Active Well Service Rig Count The number of rigs doing true workovers (where tubing is pulled from the well), or doing rod string and pump repair operations, and that are, on average, crewed and working every day of the month. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

338

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Drilling Activity Drilling Activity Definitions Key Terms Definition Active Well Service Rig Count The number of rigs doing true workovers (where tubing is pulled from the well), or doing rod string and pump repair operations, and that are, on average, crewed and working every day of the month. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

339

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was via thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.

Jordan, Preston; Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos Canyon 21B well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ?2ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ?1.9km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gas hydrate saturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21 B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gas hydrate saturation in the target sand section in the AC21-B well can be constrained to the range of 828%, with 20% being our best estimate.

M.W. Lee; T.S. Collett; K.A. Lewis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gas Research Institute improved fracturing. Unconventional natural gas program, eastern devonian shales diagnostic program: Black No. 1 well experiment results. Third quarterly report, October 1979-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last quarter of 1979, Sandia National Laboratories participated in an experiment with Thurlow Weed and Associates and the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. This Devonian Shale gas stimulation experiment was conducted in an area north of Columbus, Ohio. One purpose of the experiment was to apply the diagnostic instrumentation that is available for fracture mapping and characterization to increase our understanding of the stimulation technique. The induced fracture apparently followed a pre-existing fracture vertically from the borehole with an orientation of the N 62/sup 0/ E and in the latter stages of the stimulation turned into a shallower horizontal fracture. This fracture behavior was confirmed by several diagnostic analyses and demonstrates the insight that can be gained by fully instrumented stimulation experiments.

Schuster, C.L. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for recharging PHEVs, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs.

343

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

345

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

346

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

347

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

LNG Storage Additions & Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions & Withdrawals Definitions Key Terms Definition Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Net Withdrawals The amount by which storage withdrawals exceed storage injections. Storage Additions Volumes of gas injected or otherwise added to underground natural gas reservoirs or liquefied natural gas storage. Storage Withdrawals Total volume of gas withdrawn from underground storage or from liquefied natural gas storage over a specified amount of time. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"

348

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil Definitions Key Terms Definition Composite The weighted average of domestic and imported crude oil costs. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

349

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Stocks at Tank Farms & Pipelines Crude Oil Stocks at Tank Farms & Pipelines Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

350

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Stream Crude Stream Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

351

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Stream Crude Stream Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

352

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Stream Crude Stream Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

353

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

354

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preliminary Crude Imports by Country of Origin Preliminary Crude Imports by Country of Origin Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

355

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Stream Crude Stream Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

356

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

357

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

358

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Stream Crude Stream Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

359

Subsurface definition of the Allegheny Group coalbed methane prospect interval in Southwestern Pennsylvania and new gas content results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary reconnaissance of coalbed methane gas content data from exploratory coal cores and pre-existing data implies that the greater the depth and rank, the greater the total and cumulative gas content. The coal seams studied, ranging in age from the Pennsylvanian-Permian Dunkard Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny Group, are from the Main Bituminous Field and two of the anthracite fields. Consequently, the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey conducted a mapping investigation to evaluate the regional geology of the coal-bearing intervals and its influence on coalbed methane potential. Phase I of this study involved the entire Pennsylvanian coal-bearing interval; Phase II focused on a stratigraphic delineation and evaluation of Allegheny coalbeds and associated sandstones. A variety of cross sections and isopach maps show several prospective coalbeds and facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones. This suggests that some of these sandstones may be traps for coalbed methane. Often overlooked in reservoir characterization is the quality of a coal seam. Coal rank, grade, and type influence the reserves and production of coalbed methane; the higher the rank, the greater adsorptive capacity of the coal. The integration of coal quality with other critical tools of exploration may increase the success rate of finding {open_quotes}sweet spots.{close_quotes} Additional Pennsylvania Geological Survey drilling occurred in Beaver, Lawrence, Somerset, and Washington counties. Gas contents were graphically displayed against depth, thickness, and time for a variety of samples from 21 coal seams; average gas composition and Btu values were determined for selected samples.

Markowski, A.K. [Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources-Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Harrisburg, PA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Inference of strata separation and gas emission paths in longwall overburden using continuous wavelet transform of well logs and geostatistical simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Prediction of potential methane emission pathways from various sources into active mine workings or sealed gobs from longwall overburden is important for controlling methane and for improving mining safety. The aim of this paper is to infer strata separation intervals and thus gas emission pathways from standard well log data. The proposed technique was applied to well logs acquired through the Mary Lee/Blue Creek coal seam of the Upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, using well logs from a series of boreholes aligned along a nearly linear profile. For this purpose, continuous wavelet transform (CWT) of digitized gamma well logs was performed by using Mexican hat and Morlet, as the mother wavelets, to identify potential discontinuities in the signal. Pointwise Hlder exponents (PHE) of gamma logs were also computed using the generalized quadratic variations (GQV) method to identify the location and strength of singularities of well log signals as a complementary analysis. \\{PHEs\\} and wavelet coefficients were analyzed to find the locations of singularities along the logs. Using the well logs in this study, locations of predicted singularities were used as indicators in single normal equation simulation (SNESIM) to generate equi-probable realizations of potential strata separation intervals. Horizontal and vertical variograms of realizations were then analyzed and compared with those of indicator data and training image (TI) data using the KruskalWallis test. A sum of squared differences was employed to select the most probable realization representing the locations of potential strata separations and methane flow paths. Results indicated that singularities located in well log signals reliably correlated with strata transitions or discontinuities within the strata. Geostatistical simulation of these discontinuities provided information about the location and extents of the continuous channels that may form during mining. If there is a gas source within their zone of influence, paths may develop and allow methane movement towards sealed or active gobs under pressure differentials. Knowledge gained from this research will better prepare mine operations for potential methane inflows, thus improving mine safety.

C. zgen Karacan; Ricardo A. Olea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-2014 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA...

363

Notes and Definitions  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Notes and Definitions Notes and Definitions This report tracks U.S. natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities. The weekly stocks generally are the volumes of working gas as of the report date. Changes in reported stock levels reflect all events affecting working gas in storage, including injections, withdrawals, and reclassifications between base and working gas. Totals may not match sum of components because of independent rounding. The complete documentation of EIA's estimation methodology is available in the report, Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates. Information about the method used to prepare weekly data to compute the 5-year averages, maxima, minima, and year-ago values for the weekly report can be found in Computing the 5-year Averages, Maxima, Minima, and Year-Ago

364

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Terminal A facility used primarily for the storage and/or marketing of petroleum products which has a total bulk storage capacity of 50,000 barrels or more and/or receives petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include:

365

Well-to-Wheel Analyses for Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Electric Vehicles Using Various Thermal Power Generation Technologies in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compared BEV with the conventional gasoline car, diesel car, and hybrid electric car in terms of total energy use and... According to definition from U.S. EPA, mid-size car is pointed to th...

Wei Shen; Weijian Han

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

369

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

370

Artificial neural network modeling and cluster analysis for organic facies and burial history estimation using well log data: A case study of the South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Intelligent and statistical techniques were used to extract the hidden organic facies from well log responses in the Giant South Pars Gas Field, Persian Gulf, Iran. Kazhdomi Formation of Mid-Cretaceous and Kangan-Dalan Formations of Permo-Triassic Data ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Burial history, Cluster analysis, Organic facies, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Well log data

Bahram Alizadeh; Saeid Najjari; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

372

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and/or changes in the safety culture in the oil and gasand/or changes in safety culture in the oil and gasand/or changes in safety culture in the oil and gas

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Using Decline Map Anlaysis (DMA) to Test Well Completion Influence on Gas Production Decline Curves in Barnett Shale (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant Counties)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing interest and focus on unconventional reservoirs is a result of the industry's direction toward exploring alternative energy sources. It is due to the fact that conventional reservoirs are being depleted at a fast pace. Shale gas...

Alkassim, Ibrahim

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Investigation of the Effect of Non-Darcy Flow and Multi-Phase Flow on the Productivity of Hydraulically Fractured Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic fracturing has recently been the completion of choice for most tight gas bearing formations. It has proven successful to produce these formations in a commercial manner. However, some considerations have to be taken into account to design...

Alarbi, Nasraldin Abdulslam A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included; Small amounts of nonhydrocarbons produced with the oil, such as sulfur and various metals; Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is refined to produce a wide array of petroleum products, including heating oils; gasoline, diesel and jet fuels; lubricants; asphalt; ethane, propane, and butane; and many other products used for their energy or chemical content.

376

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Reserves Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Reserves Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included; Small amounts of nonhydrocarbons produced with the oil, such as sulfur and various metals; Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is refined to produce a wide array of petroleum products, including heating oils; gasoline, diesel and jet fuels; lubricants; asphalt; ethane, propane, and butane; and many other products used for their energy or chemical content.

377

Simulation study on the CO2-driven enhanced gas recovery with sequestration versus the re-fracturing treatment of horizontal wells in the U.S. unconventional shale reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It is proposed that very low permeability formations are possible candidates for CO2 sequestration. Further, experimental studies have shown that shale formations have huge affinity to adsorb CO2, the order of 5 to 1 compared to the methane. Therefore, potential sequestration of CO2 in shale formations leading to enhanced gas recovery (EGR) will be a promising while challenging target for the oil and gas industry. On the other side, hydraulic re-fracturing treatment of shale gas wells is currently gaining more attention due to the poor performance of shale gas reservoirs after a couple years of production. Hence, investigating and comparing the performance of CO2-EGR with the re-fracturing treatment is essential for the future economic viability of depleted shale gas reservoirs. This paper presents a systematic comparison of the effect of these two processes on improving gas production performance of unconventional reservoirs, which is not well understood and has not been studied thoroughly in the literature. In this paper, a shale gas field data has been evaluated and incorporated in our simulations for both CO2-EGR and re-fracturing treatment purposes. Numerical simulations are performed using local grid refinement (LGR) in order to accurately model the non-linear pressure drop. Also, a dual-porosity/dual-permeability model is incorporated in the reservoir simulation model. Further, the uncertainties associated with inter-related set of geologic and engineering parameters are evaluated and quantified for re-fracturing treatment through several simulation runs. This comprehensive sensitivity study helps in understanding the key reservoir and fracture properties that affect the production performance and enhanced gas recovery in shale gas reservoirs. The results showed that re-fracturing treatment outperforms CO2-EGR due to the pronounced effect on cumulative methane gas production. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis showed that the characteristics of reservoir matrix including permeability and porosity are the most influential parameters for re-fracturing treatment. The findings of this study recommend hydraulic re-fracturing of shale reservoirs at first for enhancing gas production followed by CO2 injection at a later time. This work provides field operators with more insight into maximizing gas recovery from unconventional shale gas reservoirs using re-fracturing stimulation, CO2 injection, or a combination of both methods.

Mohammad O. Eshkalak; Emad W. Al-Shalabi; Alireza Sanaei; Umut Aybar; Kamy Sepehrnoori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Definition to someone by E-mail Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition Alternative fuel is defined as compressed natural gas, propane, ethanol, or any mixture containing 85% or more ethanol (E85) with gasoline or other

380

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Spot Prices Spot Prices Definitions Key Terms Definition Brent A blended crude stream produced in the North Sea region which serves as a reference or "marker" for pricing a number of other crude streams. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

382

Compressional and shear-wave velocities from gas hydrate bearing sediments: Examples from the India and Cascadia margins as well as Arctic permafrost regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shear wave velocity data have been acquired at several marine gas hydrate drilling expeditions, including the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 1 (NGHP-01), the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 (X311). In this study we use data from these marine drilling expeditions to develop an understanding of general grain-size control on the P- and S-wave properties of sediments. A clear difference in the downhole trends of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave (Vs) velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio from all three marine regions was observed: the northern Cascadia margin (IODP X311) shows the highest P-wave and S-wave velocity values overall and those from the India margin (Expedition NGHP-01) are the lowest. The southern Cascadia margin (ODP Leg 204) appears to have similar low P-wave and S-wave velocity values as seen off India. S-wave velocity values increase relative to the sites off India, but they are not as high as those seen on the northern Cascadia margin. Such regional differences can be explained by the amount of silt/sand (or lack thereof) occurring at these sites, with northern Cascadia being the region of the highest silt/sand occurrences. This grain-size control on P-wave and S-wave velocity and associated mineral composition differences is amplified when compared to the Arctic permafrost environments, where gas hydrate predominantly occurs in sand- and silt-dominated formations. Using a cross-plot of gamma ray values versus the Vp/Vs ratio, we compare the marine gas hydrate occurrences in these regions: offshore eastern India margin, offshore Cascadia margin, the Ignik-Sikumi site in Alaska, and the Mallik 5L-38 site in the Mackenzie Delta. The log-data from the Arctic permafrost regions show a strongly linear VpVs relationship, similar to the previously defined empirical relationships by Greenberg and Castagna (1992). P- and S-wave velocity data from the India margin and ODP Leg 204 deviate strongly from these linear trends, whereas data from IODP X311 plot closer to the trend of the Arctic data sets and previously published relationships. Three new linear relationships for different grain size marine sediment hosts are suggested:a) mud-dominated (Mahanadi Basin, ODP Leg 204 & NGHP-01-17): Vs=1.5854נVp?2.1649 b) silty-mud (KG Basin): Vs=0.8105נVp?1.0223 c) silty-sand (IODP X311): Vs=0.5316נVp?0.4916 We investigate the relationship of gas hydrate saturation determined from electrical resistivity on the Vp/Vs ratio and found that the sand-dominated Arctic hosts show a clearly decreasing trend of Vp/Vs ratio with gas hydrate saturation. Though limited due to lower overall GH saturations, a similar trend is seen for sites from IODP X311 and at the ash-dominated NGHP-01-17 sediment in the Andaman Sea. Gas hydrate that occurs predominantly in fractured clay hosts show a different trend where the Vp/Vs ratio is much higher than at sand-dominated sites and remains constant or increases slightly with increasing gas hydrate saturation. This trend may be the result of anisotropy in fracture-dominated systems, where P- and S-wave velocities appear higher and Archie-based saturations of gas hydrate are overestimated. Gas hydrate concentrations were also estimated in these three marine settings and at Arctic sites using an effective medium model, combining P- and S-wave velocities as equally weighted constraints on the calculation. The effective medium approach generally overestimates S-wave velocity in high-porosity, clay-dominated sediments, but can be accurately used in sand-rich formations.

M. Riedel; D. Goldberg; G. Guerin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline (Finished) A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories.

384

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residual Fuel Prices by Sales Type Residual Fuel Prices by Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD): PADD 1 (East Coast): PADD 1A (New England): Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont. PADD 1B (Central Atlantic): Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania.

385

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Underground Storage by Type U.S. Underground Storage by Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Base (cushion) gas The volume of gas needed as a permanent inventory to maintain adequate reservoir pressures and deliverability rates throughout the withdrawal season. All native gas is included in the base gas volume. Gas in storage The sum of base gas plus working gas. Injections The volume of gas injected into storage reservoirs. Natural Gas A gaseous mixture of hydrocarbon compounds, the primary one being methane. Net Withdrawals The amount by which storage withdrawals exceed storage injections. Salt Cavern Storage Field A storage facility that is a cavern hollowed out in either a salt "bed" or "dome" formation. Withdrawals The volume of gas withdrawn from storage reservoirs.

386

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Product Prices by Sales Type Petroleum Product Prices by Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline (Finished) A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories.

387

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Liquids Proved Reserves Plant Liquids Proved Reserves Definitions Key Terms Definition Natural Gas Liquids Those hydrocarbons in natural gas which are separated from the gas through the processes of absorption, condensation, adsorption, or other methods in gas processing or cycling plants. Generally such liquids consist of propane and heavier hydrocarbons and are commonly referred to as condensate, natural gasoline, or liquefied petroleum gases. Where hydrocarbon components lighter than propane are recovered as liquids, these components are included with natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Processing Plant A facility designed to recover natural gas liquids from a stream of natural gas which may or may not have passed through lease separators and/or field separation facilities. Another function of the facility is to control the quality of the processed natural gas stream. Cycling plants are considered natural gas processing plants.

388

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity Capacity Definitions Key Terms Definition Aquifer Storage Field A sub-surface facility for storing natural gas, consisting of water-bearing sands topped by an impermeable cap rock. Depleted Reservoir Storage Field A sub-surface natural geological reservoir, usually a depleted gas or oil field, used for storing natural gas. Natural Gas A gaseous mixture of hydrocarbon compounds, the primary one being methane. Salt Dome Storage Field (Salt Cavern) A storage facility that is a cavern hollowed out in either a salt "bed" or "dome" formation. Storage Capacity The present developed maximum operating capacity. Working Gas Capacity The volume of total natural gas storage capacity that contains natural gas available for withdrawal. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary.

389

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil, Gas, . . 81 and Geothermal Well Tests (abstract) W.has been testing geothermal wells for about three years, andof Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Well Tests W. E. Brigham

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems- A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A complete vehicle fuel-cycle analysis, commonly called a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis that examines the use and emissions associated with fuel production (or well-to-tank [WTT]) activities and energy use and emissions associated with vehicle operation (or tank-to-wheels [TTW]) activities.

391

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Supply & Disposition Balance U.S. Crude Oil Supply & Disposition Balance Definitions Key Terms Definition Alaskan in Transit Alaskan crude oil stocks in transit by water between Alaska and the other States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Crude Adjustments A balancing item to account for the difference between the supply and disposition of crude oil (formerly called "unaccounted for crude oil"). Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included;

392

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effects of oil and gas well-drilling fluids on the biomass and community structure of microbiota that colonize sands in running seawater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Well-drilling fluid and a number of the known components (barite, clay, Aldacide, Surflo, and Dowicide, were tested for effects on the biomass and community structure of the microbiota that colonize marine san...

Glen A. Smith; Janet S. Nickels

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Net Stocks Natural Gas Plant Net Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butylene (C4H8) An olefinic hydrocarbon recovered from refinery processes. Ethane (C2H6) A normally gaseous straight-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of -127.48º F. It is extracted from natural gas and refinery gas streams. Isobutane (C4H10) A normally gaseous branch-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of 10.9º F. It is extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) A group of hydrocarbon-based gases derived from crude oil refining or nautral gas fractionation. They include: ethane, ethylene, propane, propylene, normal butane, butylene, isobutane, and isobutylene. For convenience of transportation, these gases are liquefied through pressurization.

396

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wellhead Value & Marketed Production Wellhead Value & Marketed Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Marketed Production Gross withdrawals less gas used for repressuring, quantities vented and flared, and nonhydrocarbon gases removed in treating or processing operations. Includes all quantities of gas used in field and processing plant operations. Production The volume of natural gas withdrawn from reservoirs less (1) the volume returned to such reservoirs in cycling, repressuring of oil reservoirs, and conservation operations; less (2) shrinkage resulting from the removal of lease condensate; and less (3) nonhydrocarbon gases where they occur in sufficient quantity to render the gas unmarketable. Volumes of gas withdrawn from gas storage reservoirs and native gas, which has been transferred to the storage category, are not considered production. Flared and vented gas is also considered production. (This differs from "Marketed Production" which excludes flared and vented gas.)

397

Eastern Gas Shales Project: Ohio No. 5 well, Lorain County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Ohio No. 5 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 881 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Lorain County of north-central Ohio.

none,

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Processing Plant Processing Definitions Key Terms Definition Extraction Loss The reduction in volume of natural gas due to the removal of natural gas liquid constituents such as ethane, propane, and butane at natural gas processing plants. Natural Gas Processed Natural gas that has gone through a processing plant. Natural Gas Processing Plant A facility designed to recover natural gas liquids from a stream of natural gas which may or may not have passed through lease separators and/or field separation facilities. These facilities also control the quality of the natural gas to be marketed. Cycling plants are classified as natural gas processing plants. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources Natural Gas Processed, Total Liquids Extracted, and Extraction Loss Volume: Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production" . Estimated Heat Content of Extraction Loss: Estimated, assuming the makeup to total liquids production as reported on Form EIA-64A for each State was proportional to the components and products ultimately separated in the States as reported on the 12 monthly reports on Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," and applying the following conversion factors to the individual component and product production estimates (million Btu extraction loss per barrel of liquid produced): ethane - 3.082; propane - 3.836; normal butane - 4.326; isobutane - 3.974; pentanes plus - 4.620.

399

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Field Production Plant Field Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butylene (C4H8) An olefinic hydrocarbon recovered from refinery processes. Ethane (C2H6) A normally gaseous straight-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of -127.48º F. It is extracted from natural gas and refinery gas streams. Field Production Represents crude oil production on leases, natural gas liquids production at natural gas processing plants, new supply of other hydrocarbons/oxygenates and motor gasoline blending components, and fuel ethanol blended into finished motor gasoline. Isobutane (C4H10) A normally gaseous branch-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of 10.9º F. It is extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams.

400

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of ethanol from corn, sugarcane and cellulosic biomass for US use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globally, bioethanol is the largest volume biofuel used in the transportation sector, with corn-based ethanol production occurring mostly in the US and sugarcane-based ethanol production occurring mostly in Brazil. Advances in technology and the resulting improved productivity in corn and sugarcane farming and ethanol conversion, together with biofuel policies, have contributed to the significant expansion of ethanol production in the past 20years. These improvements have increased the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits of using bioethanol as opposed to using petroleum gasoline. This article presents results from our most recently updated simulations of energy use and GHG emissions that result from using bioethanol made from several feedstocks. The results were generated with the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model. In particular, based on a consistent and systematic model platform, we estimate life-cycle energy consumption and GHG emissions from using ethanol produced from five feedstocks: corn, sugarcane, corn stover, switchgrass and miscanthus.We quantitatively address the impacts of a few critical factors that affect life-cycle GHG emissions from bioethanol. Even when the highly debated land use change GHG emissions are included, changing from corn to sugarcane and then to cellulosic biomass helps to significantly increase the reductions in energy use and GHG emissions from using bioethanol. Relative to petroleum gasoline, ethanol from corn, sugarcane, corn stover, switchgrass and miscanthus can reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 1948%, 4062%, 90103%, 7797% and 101115%, respectively. Similar trends have been found with regard to fossil energy benefits for the five bioethanol pathways.

Michael Wang; Jeongwoo Han; Jennifer B Dunn; Hao Cai; Amgad Elgowainy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Definition: Cuttings Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cuttings Analysis Cuttings are small bits of a rock formation derived from a borehole, the rock chips are carried to the surface by the drilling fluid. As the hole is drilled, cuttings are collected and analyzed to identify lithology and fluids encountered at depth.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Drill cuttings are the broken bits of solid material removed from a borehole drilled by rotary, percussion, or auger methods. Boreholes drilled in this way include oil or gas wells, water wells, and holes drilled for geotechnical investigations or mineral exploration. The drill cuttings are commonly examined to make a record of the subsurface materials penetrated at various depths. In the oil industry, this is often called a mud log.

402

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

403

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves Summary Reserves Summary Definitions Key Terms Definition Dry Natural Gas Natural gas which remains after: 1) the liquefiable hydrocarbon portion has been removed from the gas stream (i.e., gas after lease, field, and/or plant separation); and 2) any volumes of nonhydrocarbon gases have been removed where they occur in sufficient quantity to render the gas unmarketable. (Note: Dry natural gas is also known as consumer-grade natural gas. The parameters for measurement are cubic feet at 60 degrees Fahrenheit and 14.73 pounds per square inch absolute.) Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved The combined volume of natural gas which occurs in crude oil reservoirs either as free gas (associated) or as gas in solution with crude oil (dissolved). Natural Gas Liquids Those hydrocarbons in natural gas which are separated from the gas through the processes of absorption, condensation, adsorption, or other methods in gas processing or cycling plants. Generally such liquids consist of propane and heavier hydrocarbons and are commonly referred to as condensate, natural gasoline, or liquefied petroleum gases. Where hydrocarbon components lighter than propane are recovered as liquids, these components are included with natural gas liquids.

404

Gas Companies Operating Within the State of Connecticut (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply a broad definition of gas company, which includes any person or entity involved in the manufacture or transportation of gas within Connecticut. The regulations set...

405

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas hydrate formation in a variable volume bed of silica sandamount of sand, gas, and water. Although methane hydrate has

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Horizontal well will be employed in hydraulic fracturing research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on 10-well research site, planned to enable more controlled experiments for better definition of hydraulic fracturing. One of the 10 wells will be a near-horizontal well that will monitor microseismic events along its length. The Gas Research Institute (GR) has begun evaluating a low-permeability, gas-bearing sandstone as the target stratum for experiments to be conducted at its hydraulic fracture test site (HFTS). During a 4-year period, GRI will use the HFTS as a field laboratory to conduct multi-disciplinary research projects to assess the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing. As a result of a screening process the Davis sandstone in the Ft. Worth basin has emerged as the tight gas sand which best fits the selected criteria established by GRI and its contractors, GRI says. The Ft. Worth basin is located approximately 50 miles northwest of Ft. Worth. GRI is planning a research well to fully characterize the Davis prior to making a final decision on the location of the HFTS. If data from the research well indicate the Davis sand does not adequately meet selection criteria, other candidates identified in the screening process will be investigated.

Not Available

1991-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

408

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements)...

409

Template:Definition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is the 'Definition' template. It is used to embed an existing definition in a wiki page of relevant content. This template is not used to define a term. To define a term, please use this form. Parameters Note: Parameters can be called in numerical order, or using parameter name. Term - The term whose definition will be displayed. Usage It should be called in one of the following formats: {{Definition|Brayton cycle}} {{Definition|Term=Brayton cycle}} Example This template will produce the following for an existing term: Dictionary.png Brayton cycle: A thermodynamic cycle using constant pressure, heat addition and rejection. Fuel and a compressor are used to heat and increase the pressure of a gas; the gas expands and spins the blades of a turbine, which, when connected to

410

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices Definitions Key Terms Definition Citygate A point or measuring station at which a distributing gas utility receives gas from a natural gas pipeline company or transmission system. Commercial Price The price of gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services such as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; and gas used by local, State and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Electric Power Price The price of gas used by electricity generators (regulated utilities and non-regulated power producers) whose line of business is the generation of power. Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries.

411

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

412

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

413

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

414

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

415

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

416

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Point of Entry Point of Entry Definitions Key Terms Definition Imports Natural Gas received in the Continental United States (including Alaska) from a foreign country. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from one point to another, usually from a point in or beyond the producing field or processing plant to another pipeline or to points of use. Also refers to a company operating such facilities. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary.

417

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country Country Definitions Key Terms Definition Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from one point to another, usually from a point in or beyond the producing field or processing plant to another pipeline or to points of use. Also refers to a company operating such facilities. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary.

418

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country Country Definitions Key Terms Definition Imports Natural Gas received in the Continental United States (including Alaska) from a foreign country. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from one point to another, usually from a point in or beyond the producing field or processing plant to another pipeline or to points of use. Also refers to a company operating such facilities. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary.

419

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Point of Exit Point of Exit Definitions Key Terms Definition Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from one point to another, usually from a point in or beyond the producing field or processing plant to another pipeline or to points of use. Also refers to a company operating such facilities. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary.

420

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2002-2013 2002-2013 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Texas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Wyoming NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Other States Other States Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 2006-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2013 Kentucky

422

Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and generation of different plots. The program can also be used to perform the simple calculations to calculate different parameters. The goal was to develop a friendly user interface that would facilitate reservoir analysis. Examples were shown for each flow...

Khan, Waqar A.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1-2014 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA...

424

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), md 0.15 Porosity (g102), fraction 0.1 Water Saturation (S w ), fraction 0.16 Initial Pressure (p i ), psi 3,900 Injection Pressure (p inj ), psi 3,910 Dewpoint Pressure (p d ), psi 3,500 Temperature (T), o F 200 Total Compressibility (c g... simulation ..........................13 3.4 Permeability reduction normal to fracture face .........................................14 3.5 Quarter model for 80 acre drainage area....................................................15 3.6 Fracture face...

Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,470 4,912 1967-2013 Mississippi 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 50,629 1967-2013 Missouri 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2013 Montana 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 20,085 23,152 1967-2013...

426

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Mississippi NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Missouri NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Montana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Nebraska NA NA NA NA...

427

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index in estimating reservoir performance. The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index in estimating reservoir performance. ? The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions ? The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rarest of cases, costs lives, as in the...mine drainage has cost taxpayers billions...storage, and even geothermal energy (1620). We have...The environmental costs and benefits of...Alberta, Canada . Energy Procedia 1 : 3531...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,999,748 2,022,228 2,010,171 1,916,762 1,779,055 1,539,395 ,999,748 2,022,228 2,010,171 1,916,762 1,779,055 1,539,395 2002-2012 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012 Alaska Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012 Louisiana 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012 Louisiana Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2012 New Mexico 616,485 485,682 458,805 414,894 386,262 368,682 2002-2012 Oklahoma 82,125 76,860 67,525 70,581 53,206 71,553 2002-2012 Texas 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2012 Texas State Offshore 0 2012-2012 Wyoming 445,665 563,274 590,205 569,667 508,739 429,731 2002-2012 Other States Other States Total 855,473 896,412 893,636 861,620 830,848 669,429 2002-2012 Alabama 114,994 112,222 107,699 103,060 95,727 90,325 2002-2012 Alabama Onshore 114,994 112,222 107,699 103,060 95,727 90,325 2007-2012

431

Definition: Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Drilling Techniques There are a variety of drilling techniques which can be used to sink a borehole into the ground. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, in terms of the depth to which it can drill, the type of sample returned, the costs involved and penetration rates achieved. There are two basic types of drills: drills which produce rock chips, and drills which produce core samples.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Well drilling is the process of drilling a hole in the ground for the extraction of a natural resource such as ground water, brine, natural gas, or petroleum, for the injection of a fluid from surface to a subsurface reservoir or for subsurface formations evaluation or monitoring.

432

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

433

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Futures Prices Futures Prices Definitions Key Terms Definition Contract 1 A futures contract specifying the earliest delivery date. Natural gas contracts expire three business days prior to the first calendar day of the delivery month. Thus, the delivery month for Contract 1 is the calendar month following the trade date. Contract 2-4 Represent the successive delivery months following Contract 1. Futures Price The price quoted for delivering a specified quantity of a commodity at a specified time and place in the future. Natural Gas A gaseous mixture of hydrocarbon compounds, the primary one being methane. NGL Composite Price The natural gas liquids (NGL) composite price is derived from daily Bloomberg spot price data for natural gas liquids at Mont Belvieu, Texas, weighted by gas processing plant production volumes of each product as reported on Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report."

434

Notices Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

742 Federal Register 742 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 27, 2012 / Notices Definitions ................................................................................................. https://eiaweb.inl.gov/clearance2012/eiaweb-frm886Defs.png Sanctions, Burden & Confidentiality ......................................................... https://eiaweb.inl.gov/clearance2012/eiaweb-frm886Info.png SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This information collection request contains: (1) OMB No. 1905-0191; (2) Information Collection Request Title: Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles; (3) Type of Request: Revision of currently approved collection; (4a) Purpose: Form EIA-886 is an annual survey that collects information on the number and type of AFVs and other advanced technology vehicles that

435

Urine definition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

definition definition Name: durwood Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What material is urine composed of? Replies: Urine is normally composed of water and wasted products filtered form the body. The kidney produces urine. The other main function of the kidney is to regulate fluid balance in the body. It performs this function by using a selective osmosis system. Basically, the way it works is that electrolytes (dissolved salts like sodium, potassium, calcium, carbonate, chloride) are pumped back into or out of urine and blood so that in the end, just the right amounts of electrolyte and water exit the kidney blood vein. The rest ends up in urine. Interestingly, normal urine is sterile and has no bacteria. psych Urine contains 95% water and 5% solids. More than 1000 different mineral salts and compounds are estimated to be in urine. So far, our scientific community knows of about 200 elements. Some substances are: vitamins, amino acids, antibodies, enzymes, hormones, antigens, interleukins, proteins, immunoglobulins, gastric secretory depressants, tolergens, immunogens, uric acid, urea, proteoses, directin, H-11 (a growth inhibitory factor in human cancer), and urokinase. Believe it or not, scientists have know for years that urine is antibacterial, anti-protozoal, anti-fungal, anti- viral, and anti-tuberculostatic!

436

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

437

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

438

Definition: Sustainability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Sustainability Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Sustainability An often broadly used term that refers to the study of future impacts of decisions made currently, and how we can best mitigate or eliminate negative impacts of activities today. Typically, sustainability is used to define choices made in energy and natural resource use. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Sustainability is the capacity to endure. In ecology the word describes how biological systems remain diverse and productive over time. Long-lived and healthy wetlands and forests are examples of sustainable biological systems. For humans, sustainability is the potential for long-term maintenance of well being, which has ecological, economic,

439

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Withdrawals and Production Gross Withdrawals and Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Coalbed Methane Methane is generated during coal formation and is contained in the coal microstructure. Typical recovery entails pumping water out of the coal to allow the gas to escape. Methane is the principal component of natural gas. Coalbed methane can be added to natural gas pipelines without any special treatment. Dry Natural Gas Production The process of producing consumer-grade natural gas. Natural gas withdrawn from reservoirs is reduced by volumes used at the production (lease) site and by processing losses. Volumes used at the production site include (1) the volume returned to reservoirs in cycling, repressuring of oil reservoirs, and conservation operations; and (2) gas vented and flared. Processing losses include (1) nonhydrocarbon gases (e.g., water vapor, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrogen) removed from the gas stream; and (2) gas converted to liquid form, such as lease condensate and plant liquids. Volumes of dry gas withdrawn from gas storage reservoirs are not considered part of production. Dry natural gas production equals marketed production less extraction loss.

440

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When maintained under hydrate-stable conditions, methane hydrate in laboratory samples is often considered a stable and immobile solid material. Currently, there do not appear to be any studies in which the long-term redistribution of hydrates in sediments has been investigated in the laboratory. These observations are important because if the location of hydrate in a sample were to change over time (e.g. by dissociating at one location and reforming at another), the properties of the sample that depend on hydrate saturation and pore space occupancy would also change. Observations of hydrate redistribution under stable conditions are also important in understanding natural hydrate deposits, as these may also change over time. The processes by which solid hydrate can move include dissociation, hydrate-former and water migration in the gas and liquid phases, and hydrate formation. Chemical potential gradients induced by temperature, pressure, and pore water or host sediment chemistry can drive these processes. A series of tests were performed on a formerly natural methane-hydrate-bearing core sample from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, in order to observe hydrate formation and morphology within this natural sediment, and changes over time using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Long-term observations (over several weeks) of methane hydrate in natural sediments were made to investigate spatial changes in hydrate saturation in the core. During the test sequence, mild buffered thermal and pressure oscillations occurred within the sample in response to laboratory temperature changes. These oscillations were small in magnitude, and conditions were maintained well within the hydrate stability zone.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Lattice Definitions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Orbit Stability Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Main Orbit Stability Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Main Parameters Lattice Definitions APS storage ring lattice consists of 40 almost identical sectors. Each sector contains two dipoles, ten quadrupoles, seven sextupoles and also has a 5-m-long straight section for placement of Insertion Devices (IDs) or other equipment. Four of these straight sections are occupied with rf cavities, one straight section is used for injection, all others are available for IDs. Also, each sector contains eight steering magnets with both horizontal and vertical correction coils and 11 beam position monitors (BPMs). Due to some space limitations, there are several sectors that have less steering magnets or BPMs. Simple lattice description - one typical sector (elegant input file)

442

Definition: Therm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Therm Therm Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Therm A unit of heat containing 100,000 British thermal units (Btu).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural Gas is usually measured by volume in the United States and is stated in cubic feet. A cubic foot of gas is the amount of gas needed to fill a volume of one cubic foot under set conditions of pressure and temperature. To measure larger amounts of natural gas, a "therm" is used to denote 100 cubic feet, and "mcf" is used to denote 1,000 cubic feet. To provide greater accuracy in comparing fuels, energy content is measured in terms of "British Thermal Units (BTU's). " A BTU is the amount of heat required to raise one pound of water (approximately a pint), one degree

443

Definition: Fossil fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Fossil fuels Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fossil fuels Fuels formed in the Earth's crust over millions of years from decomposed organic matter. Common fossil fuels include petroleum, coal, and natural gas.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Fossil fuels are fuels formed by natural processes such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms. The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes exceeds 650 million years. Fossil fuels contain high percentages of carbon and include coal, petroleum, and natural gas. They range from volatile materials with low carbon:hydrogen ratios like methane, to liquid petroleum

444

Definition: Heat exchanger | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Heat exchanger Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Heat exchanger A device for transferring thermal energy (heat) from one fluid (liquid or gas) to another, when the two fluids are physically separated; such as a radiator.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A heat exchanger is a piece of equipment built for efficient heat transfer from one medium to another. The media may be separated by a solid wall to prevent mixing or they may be in direct contact. They are widely used in space heating, refrigeration, air conditioning, power plants, chemical plants, petrochemical plants, petroleum refineries [bp, shell, sasol], natural gas processing, and sewage treatment. The classic example

445

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports & Exports by State Imports & Exports by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Exports Natural Gas deliveries out of the Continental United States and Alaska to foreign countries. Imports Natural Gas received in the Continental United States (including Alaska) from a foreign country. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure. Pipeline A continuous pipe conduit, complete with such equipment as valves, compressor stations, communications systems, and meters, for transporting natural and/or supplemental gas from one point to another, usually from a point in or beyond the producing field or processing plant to another pipeline or to points of use. Also refers to a company operating such facilities.

446

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Storage - All Operators Underground Storage - All Operators Definitions Key Terms Definition AGA Eastern Consuming Region All States east of the Mississippi River less Mississippi and Alabama, plus Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri. AGA Western Consuming Region All States west of the Mississippi River less the Producing Region and Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri. AGA Producing Region Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Base (cushion) Gas The volume of gas needed as a permanent inventory to maintain adequate reservoir pressures and deliverability rates throughout the withdrawal season. All native gas is included in the base gas volume. Natural Gas A gaseous mixture of hydrocarbon compounds, the primary one being methane. Net Withdrawals The amount by which storage withdrawals exceed storage injections.

447

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplemental Supplies Supplemental Supplies Definitions Key Terms Definition Biomass Gas A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. Blast-furnace Gas The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to metallic iron. It is commonly used as a fuel within steel works. British Thermal Unit (Btu) The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of liquid water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at the temperature at which water has its greatest density (approximately 39 degrees Fahrenheit). Coke-oven Gas The mixture of permanent gases produced by the carbonization of coal in a coke oven at temperatures in excess of 1,000 degrees Celsius.

448

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Used as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production Natural Gas Used as Feedstock for Hydrogen Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Hydrogen The lightest of all gases, occurring chiefly in combination with oxygen in water; exists also in acids, bases, alcohols, petroleum, and other hydrocarbons. Natural Gas A gaseous mixture of hydrocarbon compounds, the primary one being methane. Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts Geographic aggregations of the 50 States and the District of Columbia into five districts by the Petroleum Administration for Defense in 1950. These districts were originally defined during World War II for purposes of administering oil allocation. Description and maps of PAD Districts and Refining Districts. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary.

449

Definition: Brayton cycle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Brayton cycle Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Brayton cycle A thermodynamic cycle using constant pressure, heat addition and rejection. Fuel and a compressor are used to heat and increase the pressure of a gas; the gas expands and spins the blades of a turbine, which, when connected to a generator, generates electricity.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The Brayton cycle is a thermodynamic cycle that describes the workings of a constant pressure heat engine. Gas turbine engines and airbreathing jet engines use the Brayton Cycle. Although the Brayton cycle

450

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

451

Maryland Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 5 0 0 5 0 0 3 0 0 16 1992 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 1993 2 2 2 2 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 2 1994 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 1995 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1996 2 15 21 9 11 11 11 6 10 22 6 11 1997 2 13 18 8 10 10 9 5 9 20 5 9 1998 5 4 3 4 5 7 6 6 5 6 5 6 1999 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2000 3 2 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2001 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2002 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 4 2003 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 7 7 8 2004 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 0 0 3 3 2005 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2006 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 2007 4 4 4 4 3 3 7 3 3 1 1 1

452

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007-2013 2007-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Mississippi NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Missouri NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Montana NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Nebraska NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013

453

Kentucky Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 7,021 6,303 6,870 6,515 6,458 6,272 6,394 6,382 6,194 6,740 6,739 7,017 1992 5,425 7,142 6,716 7,270 7,191 6,365 6,320 7,295 6,011 6,813 6,684 6,458 1993 7,343 7,269 6,783 6,309 6,962 9,647 6,801 7,537 5,997 6,422 6,163 9,732 1994 6,171 6,109 5,700 5,302 5,850 8,107 5,715 6,333 5,040 5,397 5,179 8,179 1995 6,312 6,249 5,831 5,423 5,984 8,293 5,846 6,478 5,155 5,521 5,298 8,366 1996 5,729 7,191 8,680 6,217 8,243 6,676 5,513 6,535 5,882 6,640 8,145 5,984 1997 6,844 6,016 7,204 7,053 8,187 6,334 5,926 6,760 5,469 8,243 5,471 6,040 1998 8,383 5,955 6,862 6,614 6,643 5,688 8,358 5,342 6,732 8,609 5,064 7,618

454

Arkansas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 16,866 13,680 14,070 12,332 12,099 11,056 11,026 10,371 10,331 12,330 14,287 15,135 1992 15,200 13,585 14,653 14,124 14,047 13,604 13,853 13,859 13,695 14,761 14,748 15,414 1993 14,535 13,026 14,145 13,538 13,737 13,189 13,543 13,574 13,345 14,282 14,342 15,017 1994 14,159 12,688 13,779 13,188 13,381 12,847 13,193 13,223 12,999 13,912 13,971 14,628 1995 14,108 12,643 13,730 13,141 13,333 12,801 13,146 13,176 12,953 13,862 13,921 14,576 1996 15,751 14,930 16,440 14,871 14,590 14,284 14,767 14,955 14,643 15,324 16,281 16,058 1997 16,196 13,850 14,776 14,271 14,045 13,615 13,558 13,999 13,506 14,621 14,324 15,881

455

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 21 18 20 19 19 19 19 18 19 20 19 21 1992 15 14 15 14 14 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 1993 17 15 16 16 16 15 15 15 15 17 17 17 1994 9 8 9 9 9 8 9 9 8 9 9 10 1995 4 34 22 42 21 13 22 18 8 21 28 16 1996 14 15 28 33 34 30 30 29 27 33 45 41 1997 38 40 34 34 40 29 30 40 34 39 115 52 1998 37 52 51 45 11 21 85 75 74 69 66 28 1999 76 69 79 70 82 70 66 75 59 52 79 77 2000 75 60 76 77 73 74 85 82 76 77 68 76 2001 83 63 97 97 16 96 102 100 93 111 102 104 2002 110 96 114 103 97 103 97 101 92 132 119 146 2003 135 113 120 134 110 25 81 73 113 174 172 215 2004 306 264 285 279 296 302 296 281 268 290 267 267

456

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007-2013 2007-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Texas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Wyoming NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Other States Other States Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2013 Maryland

457

Nebraska Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9 10 11 6 9 8 10 9 8 13 11 23 1992 46 59 47 41 40 33 33 34 31 31 37 52 1993 119 116 103 89 88 79 79 73 83 146 158 257 1994 213 171 180 208 188 181 174 166 156 153 146 156 1995 147 136 144 139 138 126 126 124 119 125 116 117 1996 108 100 137 119 116 108 114 105 105 106 99 112 1997 89 99 111 99 61 105 102 96 85 98 94 104 1998 105 97 104 109 112 83 112 118 104 90 101 81 1999 85 84 105 95 96 84 86 86 82 81 78 77 2000 74 74 77 74 60 78 83 77 74 68 54 75 2001 78 67 78 75 77 70 77 78 66 77 68 74 2002 77 63 69 66 62 79 78 84 79 81 82 83 2003 104 90 104 100 104 94 103 105 89 104 92 99

458

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 13,569 12,155 14,518 13,903 13,980 13,164 14,474 13,957 14,372 15,939 15,385 14,826 1992 13,855 12,694 13,485 13,394 13,632 12,451 13,040 12,660 12,308 12,803 11,827 11,908 1993 10,609 9,472 10,246 9,812 9,913 9,522 9,694 9,711 9,579 10,363 10,401 10,884 1994 10,020 8,945 9,677 9,267 9,362 8,993 9,155 9,171 9,046 9,787 9,823 10,279 1995 8,280 7,392 7,996 7,657 7,736 7,431 7,565 7,578 7,475 8,087 8,117 8,494 1996 7,125 6,817 7,238 7,322 7,368 6,971 7,338 7,251 6,846 7,069 7,391 7,693 1997 6,819 6,285 6,903 6,715 6,822 6,365 6,330 6,206 6,100 6,415 7,108 6,731 1998 6,501 5,642 6,450 6,488 6,577 6,732 6,950 7,213 6,992 7,345 7,118 7,089

459

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 89,866 93,556 92,133 1970's 93,221 84,303 94,401 105,541 108,962 130,743 134,110 138,306 129,412...

460

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 15,390 18,697 18,642 19,833 17,163 17,617 17,647 18,387 17,297 18,230 18,875 25,131 1992 22,042 19,795 18,841 19,366...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6-2014 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA...

462

Ohio Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,291 33,742 38,540 1970's 39,694 61,845 72,765 76,931 77,114 85,810 89,780 99,657 115,239...

463

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 246 244 232 228 218 261 266 191 216 194 206 239 1992 224 211 224 202 236 243 245 226 191 123 223 233 1993 275 249 292 279...

464

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,298 1,089 1,225 1,077 1,037 1,084 1,198 1,127 869 901 1,239 1,215 1992 1,235 1,049 1,107 959 967 956 966 973 910 1,105...

465

Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,298 907 1,794 1970's 1,406 2 2,601 8,148 23,970 33,660 37,832 54,844 83,025 83,902 1980's...

466

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 287,681 505,605 294,026 1970's 296,001 293,254 304,049 291,984 222,673 173,499 174,477 171,600...

467

Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0...

468

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 425,704 369,500 394,133 375,706 368,379 343,024 341,136 345,609 348,857 382,865 382,974 405,804 1992 396,490 348,791...

469

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 106 234 171 1970's 153 537 355 276 176 346 192 183 163 350 1980's 463 330 233 135 394 367 365...

470

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15,134,644 14,414,287 13,247,498 12,291,070 12,504,227 11,255,616 1967-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 1,848,290 1,877,722 1,699,908 1,353,929 1,013,914 817,340 1997-2013...

471

Maryland Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 621 864 978 1970's 813 214 244 298 133 93 75 82 88 28 1980's 68 56 36 31 60 39 20 44 29 34...

472

West Virginia Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 209,545 234,361 229,815 1970's 239,787 232,205 213,845 207,702 202,306 154,484 153,322 152,767...

473

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 13,538 12,153 13,271 12,588 12,483 12,115 12,372 12,338 11,991 13,054 13,042 13,555 1992 12,329 11,001 11,762 11,377...

474

Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 5 5 3 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 4,200 2,520...

475

New York Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,740 4,632 4,861 1970's 3,358 2,202 3,679 4,539 4,990 7,628 9,235 10,682 13,900 15,500 1980's...

476

New York Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,960 1,748 1,905 1,806 1,792 1,725 1,759 1,759 1,723 1,875 1,873 1,952 1992 2,018 1,801 1,925 1,862 1,877 1,818 1,856...

477

Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 21,685 20,443 21,510 1970's 21,609 26,571 25,783 22,849 21,433 19,001 18,927 21,040 21,325...

478

Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 873 431 139 27 4 3 3 3 1980's 2 3 9 10 10 12 2 1,306 1990's 2,080 1,123 721 508 711 470 417 398...

479

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0...

480

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 89,751 87,627 763 1970's 76,716 74,081 71,498 76,234 82,735 84,772 89,485 91,792 97,763 96,313...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells definitions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 56,283 48,348 51,908 44,073 45,894 40,469 40,132 40,476 38,187 44,369 48,726 51,378 1992 57,280 49,740 47,203 41,861...

482

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9,579 8,593 10,675 11,095 11,996 9,880 10,164 9,701 9,907 9,316 9,490 10,452 1992 8,720 7,831 9,890 9,359 8,090 12,684...

483

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 19,603 17,374 18,242 16,811 13,749 15,213 15,490 15,533 14,062 15,744 17,704 17,979 1992 18,671 17,990 17,767 16,587...

484

Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0...

485

West Virginia Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 17,794 15,880 17,289 16,401 16,256 15,660 15,973 15,968 15,638 17,037 16,994 17,715 1992 16,181 14,439 15,437 14,931...

486

Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 42,688 48,933 77,816 1970's 130,491 125,169 126,198 123,986 125,349 138,153 142,944 150,409...