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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 5,426 5,547 5,508 5,613 6,064 5,964 1949-2008 Crude Oil 4,783 4,829 4,836 4,846 5,111 5,094 1949-2008 Natural Gas 5,616 5,757 5,777 5,961 6,522 6,500 1949-2008 Dry Holes 5,744 5,848 5,405 5,382 5,578 5,540 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 6,744 6,579 6,272 6,187 6,247 6,322 1949-2008 Crude Oil 6,950 8,136 8,011 7,448 7,537 7,778 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,589 5,948 5,732 5,770 5,901 5,899 1949-2008 Dry Holes 6,809 6,924 6,437 6,340 6,307 6,232 1949-2008

2

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Thousand Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 176,867 203,997 240,969 285,398 308,210 331,740 1949-2008 Crude Oil 38,495 42,032 51,511 63,649 66,527 88,382 1949-2008 Natural Gas 115,833 138,503 164,353 193,595 212,753 212,079 1949-2008 Dry Holes 22,539 23,462 25,104 28,154 28,931 31,280 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 17,785 22,382 25,955 29,630 36,534 35,585 1949-2008 Crude Oil 2,453 3,141 4,262 4,998 6,271 7,389 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,569 9,998 12,347 14,945 19,982 17,066 1949-2008 Dry Holes

3

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA...

4

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploratory and Development Wells Exploratory and Development Wells Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series Jul-12 Aug-12 Sep-12 Oct-12 Nov-12 Dec-12 View History Wells Drilled (Number) Exploratory and Development NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Exploratory NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Dry Holes NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Development Wells Drilled NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Crude Oil NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012 Natural Gas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2012

5

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Thousand Dollars per Well All (Real*) 1,011.9 1,127.4 1,528.5 1,522.3 1,801.3 3,481.8 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 1,054.2 1,199.5 1,673.1 1,720.7 2,101.7 4,171.7 1960-2007 Crude Oil (Nominal) 882.8 1,037.3 1,441.8 1,920.4 2,238.6 4,000.4 1960-2007 Natural Gas (Nominal) 991.9 1,106.0 1,716.4 1,497.6 1,936.2 3,906.9 1960-2007 Dry Holes (Nominal) 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9 2,664.6 6,131.2 1960-2007 Dollars per Foot All (Real*) 187.46 203.25 267.28 271.16 324.00 574.46 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 195.31 216.27 292.57 306.50 378.03 688.30 1960-2007

6

U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

7

U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0...

8

U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

9

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Active Well Service Rigs in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Active Well Service Rigs in operation (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

10

Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

11

Table 4.6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

12

Table 4.7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Footage Drilled" in Glossary. R=Revised. 2 See "Crude Oil Well" in Glossary. Notes: · 2011 data for this table were not available in time for publication.

13

Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well Productivity, 1954-2011: Year: Crude Oil Production: Crude Oil Well 1 Productivity: 48 States 2: ...

14

U.S. Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov ... Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and ...

15

Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well Productivity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

16

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Period: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Data Series: Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 ...

17

Nigeria: after crude, the gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Misinterpretation of the laws of the marketplace have already brought Nigeria to the brink of a catastrophe in 1978, when the government had built up heavy stocks expecting a substantial increase in price. When it did not materialize and the production had to be dropped to 50% of the previous rate, in a country where crude constitutes 90% of the export revenues, the system was changed. The new plan is intended to reduce the dependence of Nigeria on oil exports. The production rate is set at between 2.2 and 2.5 million bpd. Due to a significant increase in domestic demand, the 2 existing refineries cannot fill the gap; 2 more refineries are planned. There also are substantial gas reserves; the associated gas, now flared, is to be recovered. A gas liquefaction plant also is in operation, with one-half of the output going to Europe and one-half to the US. Some of the oil and gas is earmarked for local petrochemical plants.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)

19

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

20

Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals From Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Coalbed, ... Total (Gross Withdrawals ... natural gas wells divided by the number of producing wells, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2000 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2000, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2000.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1998, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1998.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2002 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2002, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2002.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2006 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2006

Information Center

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1996 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2005 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2005

Rafi Zeinalpour

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1997 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1995 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1993 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1993, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1993.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2003 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2003, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2003.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2007 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2007

Information Center

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1999 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1999, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1999.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2001 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2001, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2001.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1994 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1994, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1994.

Rafi Zeinalpour

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2004 Annual Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 2004, as well as production volumes for the United States and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 2004.

Rafi Zeinalpour

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well Productivity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Crude Oil Well" in Glossary. R=Revised. P=Preliminary. E=Estimate. NA=Not available. 2 United States excluding Alaska and Hawaii. Includes State onshore, State ...

38

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

39

The Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 2 Introduction Economic theory suggests that natural gas and crude oil prices should be related ...

40

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

43

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0...

44

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

45

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

eia/doe-021698, natural gas, crude oil, natural gas liquids reserves. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 Annual Report. Special Files.

46

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1999 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

47

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

48

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

49

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2001 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

50

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2003 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

51

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2000 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

52

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

53

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

54

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

55

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 ... produce unconventional gas economically. Production.

56

"U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Summary Data Tables, 2011" "Contents" "Table 1: Changes to Proved Reserves, 2011" "Table 2: Principal Tight Oil Plays: Oil...

57

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2003 Annual Report DOE/EIA-0216(2003) November 2004

58

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA–0216(2007) Distribution Category UC–950 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2007 Annual Report February 2009

59

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface The U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 1998 Annual Report is the 22nd prepared by the Energy Information Administration

60

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

62

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

63

Crude oil, natural gas, and petroleum products prices all fell ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

So oil prices averaged over the year decreased sharply while year-end price ... Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, 1972-2009

64

Sunco Oil manufactures three types of gasoline (gas 1, gas 2 and gas 3). Each type is produced by blending three types of crude oil (crude 1, crude 2 and crude 3). The sales price per barrel of gasoline and the purchase price per  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunco Oil manufactures three types of gasoline (gas 1, gas 2 and gas 3). Each type is produced by blending three types of crude oil (crude 1, crude 2 and crude 3). The sales price per barrel of gasoline and the purchase price per barrel of crude oil are given in following table: Gasoline Sale Price per barrel Gas 1

Phillips, David

65

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

66

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

67

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

68

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

69

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

70

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

71

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

72

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

73

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

74

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

75

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

76

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

77

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

78

Propane Prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Propane prices have been high this year for several reasons. Propane usually follows crude oil prices more closely than natural gas prices. As crude oil prices rose beginning in 1999, propane has followed. In addition, some early cold weather this year put extra pressure on prices. However, more recently, the highly unusual surge in natural gas prices affected propane supply and drove propane prices up. Propane comes from two sources of supply: refineries and natural gas processing plants. The very high natural gas prices made it more economic for refineries to use the propane they normally produce and sell than to buy natural gas. The gas processing plants found it more economic to leave propane in the natural gas streams than to extract it for sale separately.

79

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summary. In 2011, oil and gas exploration and production companies operating in the United States added almost 3.8 billion barrels of crude oil and lease condensate ...

80

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7. Total U.S. Proved Reserves of Crude Oil, Dry Natural Gas, and Lease Condensate, 2001-2009 Revisionsa Net of Salesb New Reservoir Provedd Change

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Testing for market integration crude oil, coal, and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Prompted by the contemporaneous spike in coal, oil, and natural gas prices, this paper evaluates the degree of market integration both within and between crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets. Our approach yields parameters that can be readily tested against a priori conjectures. Using daily price data for five very different crude oils, we conclude that the world oil market is a single, highly integrated economic market. On the other hand, coal prices at five trading locations across the United States are cointegrated, but the degree of market integration is much weaker, particularly between Western and Eastern coals. Finally, we show that crude oil, coal, and natural gas markets are only very weakly integrated. Our results indicate that there is not a primary energy market. Despite current price peaks, it is not useful to think of a primary energy market, except in a very long run context.

Bachmeier, L.J.; Griffin, J.M. [Texas A& amp; M Univ, College Station, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 1 The Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices by Jose A. Villar Natural Gas Division Energy Information Administration and Frederick L. Joutz Department of Economics The George Washington University Abstract: This paper examines the time series econometric relationship between the Henry Hub natural gas price and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price. Typically, this relationship has been approached using simple correlations and deterministic trends. When data have unit roots as in this case, such analysis is faulty and subject to spurious results. We find a cointegrating relationship relating Henry Hub prices to the WTI and trend capturing the relative demand and supply effects over the 1989-through-2005 period. The dynamics of the relationship

83

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

84

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

85

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

86

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

87

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

88

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

89

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

90

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

91

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

92

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

93

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

94

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

95

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

96

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

97

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

98

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

99

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

100

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

102

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

103

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

104

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

105

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

106

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

107

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

108

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

109

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

110

U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

111

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

112

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

113

Figure 41. U.S. Brent crude oil and Henry Hub natural gas spot ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 41. U.S. Brent crude oil and Henry Hub natural gas spot market prices in three cases, 2005-2040 Natural Gas Crude Oil Reference

114

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? A measure of the total cost to produce crude oil and natural gas is the upstream costs.

115

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

116

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

117

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

118

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

119

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

120

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

122

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

123

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

124

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

125

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

126

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

127

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

128

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

129

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

130

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

131

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

132

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

133

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

134

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

135

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

136

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

137

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

138

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

139

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

140

Gas importers still resisting price parity with crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pricing of natural gas on a parity with crude oil has become an important issue in the international energy market. A prime example of the hostility that can arise over this issue is the ongoing argument between the US and Algeria over the price of SONATRACH's LNG exports to El Paso Co. Because LNG shipping and regasification costs add substantially to its delivered (c.i.f.) cost, price parity at the point of export (f.o.b.) would put LNG's price far above that of crude oil or natural gas. Other LNG exporters, such as Indonesia and Libya, seem to be adopting Algeria's pricing stance. Most European LNG customers believe that if f.o.b. price parity - or even some of the c.i.f. price-calculation methods - becomes the established formula, LNG will be priced out of many industrial markets. Without the big contracts from industry, existing LNG projects might not be economical.

Vielvoye, R.

1981-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Exploratory Wells (Thousand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's...

142

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Developmental Wells (Thousand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

143

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

144

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1940's: 4,232 ...

145

Price ratio of crude oil to natural gas continues to increase ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

146

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: Proved Reserves: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves, 2010 (August 2012).

147

Price ratio of crude oil to natural gas increasing - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

148

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2011 August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2011 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. August 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves, 2011 ii

149

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 4. Total U.S. Proved Reserves of Wet Natural Gas, and Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate, 2001-2009 Revisionsa Net of Salesb New Reservoir Provedd Change

150

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves With Data for 2011 | Release Date: August 1, 2013 | Next Release Date: Early 2014 | full report Previous Issues: Year: 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 Go Summary In 2011, oil and gas exploration and production companies operating in the United States added almost 3.8 billion barrels of crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves, an increase of 15 percent, and the greatest volume increase since the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) began publishing proved reserves estimates in 1977 (Table 1). Proved reserves of crude oil and lease condensate increased by 2.9 billion barrels in 2010, the previous record. Proved reserves of U.S. wet natural gas1 rose

151

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

152

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

153

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

154

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

155

Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix C Dry Gas-Well Capacity per New Gas-Well Completion Dry gas-well gas productive capacity of about one billion cubic feet per day is added per 1,000 new gas ...

156

United States Producing and Nonproducting Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States Producing and Nonproducing Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves From 1985 Through 2004 By Philip M. Budzik Abstract The Form EIA-23 survey of crude oil and natural gas producer reserves permits reserves to be differentiated into producing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are available to the crude oil and natural gas markets, and nonproducing reserves, i.e., those reserves which are unavailable to the crude oil and natural gas markets. The proportion of nonproducing reserves relative to total reserves grew for both crude oil and natural gas from 1985 through 2004, and this growth is apparent in almost every major domestic production region. However, the growth patterns in nonproducing crude oil and natural gas reserves are

157

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

158

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

159

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota 1995 Vintage Gas Well History. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

160

How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. ... How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Proved Reserves, Crude Oil," "Proved Reserves, Lease Condensate," and "Proved Reserves, Natural Gas" in Glossary. 7 Includes Federal offshore and State ...

162

Spot crude prices near 12-month high; natural gas and power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Key wholesale energy price benchmarks for crude oil, natural gas, and electric power reflect contrasting trends over the past year. International events have ...

163

The relationship between crude oil and natural gas spot prices and its stability over time.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The historical basis for a link between crude oil and natural gas prices was examined to determine whether one has existed in the past and… (more)

Ramberg, David J. (David John)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices and its effect on demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overall theme of the three chapters is the relationship between the prices of natural gas and crude oil, and the factors that cause short… (more)

Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Table 4.4 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 4.4 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation, 1949-2011 (Number of Rigs) Year: By Site : By Type: Total 1: Onshore

166

Crude oil and crude oil derivatives transactions by oil and gas producers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study attempts to resolve two important issues. First, it investigates the diversification benefit of crude oil for equities. Second, it examines whether or not… (more)

Xu, He

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

context, defined as the average, +- 2 standard deviations). EIA's forecast has natural gas prices gradually declining after the winter heating season, but still remaining high...

168

Gas well deliquification. 2nd. ed.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Recognizing Symptoms of Liquid Loading in Gas Wells; Chapter 3: Critical Velocity; Chapter 4: Systems Nodal Analysis; Chapter 5: Sizing Tubing; Chapter 6: Compression; Chapter 7: Plunger Lift; Chapter 8: Use of Foam to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 9: Hydraulic Pumping; Chapter 10: Use of Beam Pumps to Deliquefy Gas Wells; Chapter 11: Gas Lift; Chapter 12: Electric Submersible Pumps; Chapter 13: Progressing Cavity Pumps; Chapter 14: Coal Bed Methane; Chapter 15: Production Automation. Chapter 14, by David Simpson, based in the San Juan Basin, addresses issues in coal bed methane, low pressure operations, gas compression, gas measurement, oil field construction, gas well deliquification and project management.

James Lea; Henry Nickens; Mike Wells [Texas Technical University, TX (United States). Petroleum Engineering Department

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 40 37 39 38 37 36 35...

170

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

171

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

172

Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

173

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

174

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

175

Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

176

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach to evaluate horizontal well performance for fractured or unfractured gas wells and a sensitivity study of gas well performance in a low permeability formation. A newly developed Distributed Volumetric Sources (DVS) method was used to calculate dimensionless productivity index for a defined source in a box-shaped domain. The unique features of the DVS method are that it can be applied to transient flow and pseudo-steady state flow with a smooth transition between the boundary conditions. In this study, I conducted well performance studies by applying the DVS method to typical tight sandstone gas wells in the US basins. The objective is to determine the best practice to produce horizontal gas wells. For fractured wells, well performance of a single fracture and multiple fractures are compared, and the effect of the number of fractures on productivity of the well is presented based on the well productivity. The results from this study show that every basin has a unique ideal set of fracture number and fracture length. Permeability plays an important role on dictating the location and the dimension of the fractures. This study indicated that in order to achieve optimum production, the lower the permeability of the formation, the higher the number of fractures.

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Table 4.5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. 2 See "Crude Oil Well" in Glossary. Notes: - 2011 data for this table were not available in time for publication. - Data are estimates.

178

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

179

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998 ... gas prices gradually declining after the winter heating . ...

180

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Average depth may ...

182

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Geographic coverage ...

183

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Geographic coverage is ...

184

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 99: 89: 90: 79: 72 ...

185

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

186

The relationship between crude oil and natural gas spot prices and its stability over time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The historical basis for a link between crude oil and natural gas prices was examined to determine whether one has existed in the past and exists in the present. Physical bases for a price relationship are examined. An ...

Ramberg, David J. (David John)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 1,219: 1,126: 1,049: 993 ...

188

Factors Affecting the Relationship between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the 1995-2005 period, crude oil prices and U.S. natural gas prices tended to move together, which supported the conclusion that the markets for the two commodities were connected. Figure 26 illustrates the fairly stable ratio over that period between the price of low-sulfur light crude oil at Cushing, Oklahoma, and the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub on an energy-equivalent basis.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas...

190

Ohio Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 34,291: 33,742 ...

191

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:28:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9011NM2"...

192

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

193

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

194

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

195

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

196

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

197

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

198

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

199

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

200

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

202

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

203

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

204

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

205

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

206

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

207

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

208

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

209

Experimental studies of steam-propane and enriched gas injection for the Minas light crude oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental studies were carried out to compare the benefits of propane as an additive in steam injection and in lean gas injection to enhance production for the Minas light crude oil (34?API). The studies on steam-propane were specifically conducted to better understand production mechanisms involved in steam-propane injection and to investigate effects of expected field pressure and temperature conditions on steam-propane injection for the light Minas crude oil. The steam-propane experiments involved injecting steam or a mixture of steam and propane into a cell in which was tamped a mixture of sand, oil and water. The cell was placed inside a vacuum jacket set at a reservoir temperature of 200?F. Superheated steam at 490?F was injected at 4.5 ml/min (cold-water equivalent) while the cell outlet pressure was maintained at 450 psig. A total of four runs were successfully performed with two different propane:steam mass ratios, namely, 0:100 (pure steam) and 5:100 (steam-propane). Produced liquids were collected from the bottom of the cell and analyzed to determined oil and water volumes as well as oil density and viscosity after being treated to break the emulsion. The gas injection experiments involved injecting reconstituted Minas field production gas or Minas gas enriched with propane into a cell saturated with live Minas oil. The live oil was prepared in an oil-gas recombination apparatus, and closely replicated oil properties at current reservoir conditions (solution GOR of 134 SCF/STB, bubble-point pressure of 280 psig.) Minas gas was injected at 500 ml/min into the cell set at reservoir temperature of 200?F. A total of four runs were successfully performed with two different propane:gas mass ratios, namely, 0:100 (pure lean gas) and 5:100 (enriched gas). The main results of the study are as follows. First, with steam-propane injection, no improvement on production acceleration time, oil recovery or steam injectivity was observed compared with pure steam injection. Second, with enriched gas injection, oil recovery increased from 61% OOIP with lean gas injection up to 74% OOIP with enriched gas (5:100 propane:gas mass ratio). Analysis of produced oil gravity and viscosity indicate little change in values compared to that of the original oil. Of the processes investigated (pure steam, steam-propane, lean gas, and enriched gas injection), enriched gas injection appears to be technically the most feasible EOR method for Minas field. It is recommended therefore to conduct research on possible application of water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection with propane-enriched Minas gas to enhance production from the Minas field.

Yudishtira, Wan Dedi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing from a gas condensate reservoir. Questions were raised about whether flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. In the most recent work done by Adedeji Ayoola Adeyeye, this subject was studied when the effects of reservoir depletion were minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. He also used an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture along with a linear model as an adequate analogy. He concluded that the skin due to liquid build-up is not enough to prevent lower flowing bottomhole pressures from producing more gas. This current study investigated the condensate damage at the face of the hydraulic fracture in transient and boundary dominated periods when the effects of reservoir depletion are taken into account. As a first step, simulation of liquid flow into the fracture was performed using a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gas lift utilizing a liquefiable gas introduced into a well  

SciTech Connect

A gas lift method is disclosed for lifting a well fluid from a well, the method comprising feeding liquid lifting medium into a first well conduit of the well to maintain a liquid column of liquid lifting medium in the first well conduit to provide a significant liquid column pressure at the downhole region of the well for lifting medium to pass into a second well conduit to mix with well fluid therein and cause lifting of well fluid in the second well conduit.

Kalina, A.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. Previous attempts to answer these questions have been from the perspective of a radial model. Condensate builds up in the reservoir as the reservoir pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. As a result, the gas moving to the wellbore becomes leaner. With respect to the study by El-Banbi and McCain, the gas production rate may stabilize, or possibly increase, after the period of initial decline. This is controlled primarily by the condensate saturation near the wellbore. This current work has a totally different approach. The effects of reservoir depletion are minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. It also assumes an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture and uses a linear model. During the research, gas condensate simulations were performed using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Table 4.5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Footage Drilled" in Glossary. R=Revised. 2 See "Crude Oil Well" in Glossary. Notes: · 2011 data for this table were not available in time for publication.

215

Advanced Technologies For Stripper Gas Well Enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Stripper gas and oil well operators frequently face a dilemma regarding maximizing production from low-productivity wells. With thousands of stripper wells in the United States covering extensive acreage, it is difficult to identify easily and efficiently marginal or underperforming wells. In addition, the magnitude of reviewing vast amounts of data places a strain on an operator's work force and financial resources. Schlumberger DCS, in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has created software and developed in-house analysis methods to identify remediation potential in stripper wells relatively easily. This software is referred to as Stripper Well Analysis Remediation Methodology (SWARM). SWARM was beta-tested with data pertaining to two gas fields located in northwestern Pennsylvania and had notable results. Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC (Great Lakes) and Belden & Blake Corporation (B&B) both operate wells in the first field studied. They provided data for 729 wells, and we estimated that 41 wells were candidates for remediation. However, for reasons unbeknownst to Schlumberger these wells were not budgeted for rework by the operators. The second field (Cooperstown) is located in Crawford, Venango, and Warren counties, Pa and has more than 2,200 wells operated by Great Lakes. This paper discusses in depth the successful results of a candidate recognition study of this area. We compared each well's historical production with that of its offsets and identified 339 underperformers before considering remediation costs, and 168 economically viable candidates based on restimulation costs of $50,000 per well. From this data, we prioritized a list based on the expected incremental recoverable gas and 10% discounted net present value (NPV). For this study, we calculated the incremental gas by subtracting the volumes forecasted after remediation from the production projected at its current configuration. Assuming that remediation efforts increased production from the 168 marginal wells to the average of their respective offsets, approximately 6.4 Bscf of gross incremental gas with a NPV approximating $4.9 million after investment, would be made available to the domestic market. Seventeen wells have successfully been restimulated to date and have already obtained significant production increases. At the time of this report, eight of these wells had enough post-rework production data available to forecast the incremental gas and verify the project's success. This incremental gas is estimated at 615 MMscf. The outcome of the other ten wells will be determined after more post-refrac production data becomes available. Plans are currently underway for future restimulations. The success of this project has shown the value of this methodology to recognize underperforming wells quickly and efficiently in fields containing hundreds or thousands of wells. This contributes considerably to corporate net income and domestic natural gas and/or oil reserves.

Ronald J. MacDonald; Charles M. Boyer; Joseph H. Frantz Jr; Paul A. Zyglowicz

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only to conventional consolidated reservoirs (with constant formation compressibility) but also to unconsolidated reservoirs (with variable formation compressibility) by including geomechanics, permeability deterioration and compartmentalization to estimate the OGIP and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability reduction. The geomechanics calculations were combined with gas material balance equation and pseudo-steady state equation and the model was used to predict well performance. Simulated production data from a conventional gas Simulator was used for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each compartment in a compartmentalized gas reservoir and predict the subsequent reservoir performance. The analysis was done by history-matching gas rate with the model using an optimization technique. The model gave satisfactory results with both consolidated and unconsolidated reservoirs for single and multiple reservoir layers. It was demonstrated that for unconsolidated reservoirs, reduction in permeability and reservoir compaction could be very significant especially for unconsolidated gas reservoirs with large pay thickness and large depletion pressure.

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

218

Controlling annular gas flow in deep wells  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on the phenomenon of annular gas channeling. It can occur during primary cementing in wells with formations containing gas. Such channeling may lead to interzonal communication down hole, or even gas migration to the surface. Formation gas is normally contained by the cement slurry's hydrostatic pressure. Annular gas channeling usually results from volumetric changes associated with: cement hydration and fluid loss, poor cement placement techniques, high cement free water, cementing gelling properties, and excessive thickening times. Initially, the cement slurry acts as a true fluid, transmitting hydrostatic pressure to the formation gas and preventing its flow into the cement matrix. However, as the cement begins to set, changing from a fluid state to a rigid state, it gradually begins to lose its ability to transmit hydrostatic pressure. This period of change is usually referred to as the ''transition period.'' Shrinkage of the cement volume compounds the problem and eventually can lead to poor binding between the cement and formation, thereby allowing gas to flow through gaps at the formation-cement interface.

Matthews, S.M.; Copeland, J.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

220

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

222

H. R. 4564: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to provide a deduction and special net operating loss rules with respect to certain losses on domestic crude oil, to increase tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, to require the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to be filled with stripper well oil, and to eliminate certain restrictions on the sale of natural gas and on the use of natural gas and oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 10, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Secure Energy Supply Act of 1986 amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. Title I provides a deduction and special net operating loss treatment for certain losses on crude oil. Title II increases tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, the revenues of which will cover authorized refunds. Title III provides that only stripper well oil or oil exchanged for stripper well oil will be used to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Title IV removes wellhead price controls and repeals Natural Gas Act jurisdiction over certain first sales of natural gas. Later titles repeal certain restrictions on the use of natural gas and petroleum, repeal incremental pricing requirements, and promote flexibility in rescheduling or marking down troubled loans. The bill was referred to the House Committees on Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

224

Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important to understand best fracture and stimulation practice to increase productivity of wells. These objectives require that accurate production analysis be performed. For accurate production analysis, it is important to analyze the production behavior of wells, and field production data should be interpreted in such a way that it will identify well parameters. This can be done by performing a detailed analysis on a number of wells over whole reservoirs. This study is an approach that will lead to identifying different flow regions in shale gas wells that include linear and bilinear flow. Important field parameters can be calculated from those observations to help improve future performance. The detailed plots of several wells in this study show some good numbers for linear and bilinear flow, and some unique observations were made. The purpose of this work is to also manage the large amount of data in such a way that they can be used with ease for future studies. A program was developed to automate the analysis and generation of different plots. The program can also be used to perform the simple calculations to calculate different parameters. The goal was to develop a friendly user interface that would facilitate reservoir analysis. Examples were shown for each flow period, i.e. linear and bilinear flow. Different plots were generated (e.g; Bob Plot (square root of time plot) and Fourth Root of Time Plot, that will help in measuring slopes and thus reservoir parameters such as fracture permeability and drainage area. Different unique cases were also observed that show a different behavior of well in one type of plot from another.

Khan, Waqar A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Rod Pumping, Gas Well Dewatering and Gas Lift  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new in artificial new in artificial lift? Production technology Part 1: In this first of two monthly reports, new innovations that improve operations and/or reduced expenses are described in the categories of Beam/ Rod Pumping, Gas Well Dewatering and Gas Lift Ĺť Ĺť JAMES F. LEA, PL Tech LLC; and HERALD W. WINKLER, Texas Tech University It has been another banner year for ar- tificial lift innovations. The offerings have been prolific enough, that we have split this year's report into two halves. This first-half report will cover eight develop- ments in Beam/Rod Pumping, Gas Lift and Gas Well Dewatering. In beam/rod pumping, a "three-in- one" solution is discussed, whereby coiled tubing is not only used as a pumping string, but as a means for the operator to preventively treat the well. Another item

226

Natural Gas and Crude Oil Prices in AEO (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

If oil and natural gas were perfect substitutes in all markets where they are used, market forces would be expected to drive their delivered prices to near equality on an energy-equivalent basis. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil generally is denominated in terms of barrels, where 1 barrel has an energy content of approximately 5.8 million Btu. The price of natural gas (at the Henry Hub), in contrast, generally is denominated in million Btu. Thus, if the market prices of the two fuels were equal on the basis of their energy contents, the ratio of the crude oil price (the spot price for WTI, or low-sulfur light, crude oil) to the natural gas price (the Henry Hub spot price) would be approximately 6.0. From 1990 through 2007, however, the ratio of natural gas prices to crude oil prices averaged 8.6; and in the AEO2009 projections from 2008 through 2030, it averages 7.7 in the low oil price case, 14.6 in the reference case, and 20.2 in the high oil price case.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Date: 8302013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from...

228

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

312013 Next Release Date: 8302013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

229

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Next Release Date: 11292013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

230

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Next Release Date: 11292013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

231

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Next Release Date: 11292013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Gross...

232

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Overview National Summary The United States had the following proved reserves as of December 31, 1999: Crude Oil — 21,765 million barrels Dry ...

233

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1. Introduction Background The principal focus of this report is to provide accurate annual estimates of U.S. proved reserves of crude oil, natural ga ...

234

Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...

235

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...

236

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

237

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 standard deviations). Past price surges have been of short duration. The possibility of a downward price adjustment before the end of next winter is a source of considerable risk for storage operators who acquire gas at recent elevated prices. Storage levels in the Lower 48 States were 7.5 percent below the 5-year average (1995-1999) by mid-August (August 11), although the differential is only 6.4 percent in the East, which depends most heavily on storage to meet peak demand. Low storage levels are attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices combined with only small price

238

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals...

239

,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes to proved reserves, 2011" Changes to proved reserves, 2011" ,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas" ,"(billion barrels)","(trillion cubic feet)" "U.S. proved reserves at December 31, 2011",25.18,317.647 " Total discoveries",3.68,49.9 " Net revisions",1.41,-0.1 " Net Adjustments, Sales, Acquisitions",0.74,6 " Production",-2.06,-24.6 "Net additions to U.S. proved reserves",3.77,31.2 "Reserves at December 31, 2011",28.95,348.8 "Percentage change in proved reserves",0.15,0.098 "Notes: Wet natural gas includes natural gas plant liquids. Columns may not add to total due to independent rounding." "Percent change calculated from unrounded numbers."

240

Oil and Gas Well Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Well Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Oil and Gas Well Drilling Author Jeff Tester Published NA, 2011 DOI Not...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

242

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

243

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

244

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

245

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

246

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

247

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

248

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

249

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

250

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

251

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

252

Table 19. Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, nonassociated gas, associated dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, : Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, nonassociated gas, associated dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2011 a Lease Nonassociated Associated Total Crude Oil Condensate Gas Dissolved Gas Gas State and Subdivision (Million bbls) (Million bbls) (Bcf) (Bcf) (Bcf) Alaska 566 0 288 63 351 Lower 48 States 8,483 880 104,676 13,197 117,873 Alabama 1 0 101 1 102 Arkansas 0 0 5,919 0 5,919 California 542 2 267 128 395 Coastal Region Onshore 248 0 0 20 20 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 69 0 0 23 23 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 163 0 265 54 319 State Offshore 62 2 2 31 33 Colorado 208 30 5,316 1,478 6,794 Florida 4 0 4 0 4 Kansas 4 0 244 39 283 Kentucky 0 0 75 0 75 Louisiana 152 29 14,905 257 15,162 North 30 10 13,820 12 13,832 South Onshore 113 17 1,028 232 1,260 State Offshore 9 2 57 13 70 Michigan 0

253

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... This category excludes natural gas plant liquids, ...

254

Crude Oil Watch - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Watch April 19, 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil & Gas A large stockbuild in crude oil inventories contributed to blunt crude oil inputs ...

255

Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fuel Distributor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation having possession or control of any natural gas well, oil well or coalbed natural gas well, whether as a contractor, owner, lessee, agent or manager, to use or permit the use of gas by direct well pressure. Any person or persons, firm, company or corporation violating any of the provisions of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be fined in any

256

STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS Gisle Otto Eikrem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS Gisle Otto Eikrem Bjarne Foss Lars Imsland Bin Hu Michael, e-mail: (hubin mgolan)@ipt.ntnu.no Abstract: Increased production from gas lifted oil wells can be achieved by use of feedback control. Without control the well system may have large oscillations

Foss, Bjarne A.

257

Mixed Integer Model Predictive Control of Multiple Shale Gas Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Horizontal wells with multistage hydraulic fracturing are today the most important drilling technology for shale gas extraction. Considered unprofitable before, the production has now… (more)

Nordsveen, Espen T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

259

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

260

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

262

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

263

186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, 186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies ..... 202 Microstructure Exploration of High Strength High Ductility Iron-Based Glassy

264

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

265

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

266

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

267

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

268

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

269

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

270

South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr...

271

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

272

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Release date: January 7, 2011 | Next Release Date: To be determined Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are now available for most states for the years 1995 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. To download data for all states and all years, including years prior to 1995, in an Excel spreadsheet XLS (4,000 KB). The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available.

273

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

274

Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1...

275

Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling [Laser Applications Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Today, a typical land-based oil or gas well costs around 400,000 to drill, while costs for an offshore well average...

276

Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

277

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

278

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

279

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

280

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, Carol T. (Orinda, CA); Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Bowman, Barry R. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Comfort, III, William J. (Livermore, CA); Guymon, Lloyd G. (Livermore, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Pedersen, Knud B. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA); Strauch, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

283

A New Parameter Identification Method for Hydraulic Fractured Gas Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relaxation search algorithm to identify the parameters of hydraulic fractured gas wells is developed in this paper based on the inductive matrix. According to the optimization theory and parallel computation method, the parameters to be identified ... Keywords: Gas Wells, hydraulic fracturing, formation parameters, parameter identification, historic fitting

Li Tiejun; Guo Dali; Min Chao

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

285

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Effect of Well Trajectory on Production Performance of Tight Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are a very important element in oil and gas industry due to their distinguished advantages. Horizontal wells are not technically horizontal. This is because of the structural nature of reservoir formations and drilling procedures. In response to the reservoir rock’s strength, the horizontal well deviates upward and downward while being drilled forming an undulating path instead of a horizontal. In this study, horizontal wells with an undulating trajectory within a gas reservoir have been studied. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of the trajectory angle on pressure drop in horizontal wells. In addition, the contribution of water flow to pressure drop is a part of this research. Generally, water comes from different sources like an aquifer or a water flood job. In low permeability horizontal wells, hydraulic fracturing introduces water to gas wells. Water distribution is an important issue in gas wells production. In order to achieve the goal of this study, a model has been developed to simulate different situations for a horizontal well with an undulating trajectory in gas reservoirs. This study is a step forward to understand well performance in low permeability gas reservoirs.

Aldousari, Mohammad

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

288

Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal well placement determination within a reservoir is a significant and difficult step in the reservoir development process. Determining the optimal well location is a complex problem involving many factors including geological considerations, reservoir and fluid properties, economic costs, lateral direction, and technical ability. The most thorough approach to this problem is that of an exhaustive search, in which a simulation is run for every conceivable well position in the reservoir. Although thorough and accurate, this approach is typically not used in real world applications due to the time constraints from the excessive number of simulations. This project suggests the use of a genetic algorithm applied to the horizontal well placement problem in a gas reservoir to reduce the required number of simulations. This research aims to first determine if well placement optimization is even necessary in a gas reservoir, and if so, to determine the benefit of optimization. Performance of the genetic algorithm was analyzed through five different case scenarios, one involving a vertical well and four involving horizontal wells. The genetic algorithm approach is used to evaluate the effect of well placement in heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs on reservoir recovery. The wells are constrained by surface gas rate and bottom-hole pressure for each case. This project's main new contribution is its application of using genetic algorithms to study the effect of well placement optimization in gas reservoirs. Two fundamental questions have been answered in this research. First, does well placement in a gas reservoir affect the reservoir performance? If so, what is an efficient method to find the optimal well location based on reservoir performance? The research provides evidence that well placement optimization is an important criterion during the reservoir development phase of a horizontal-well project in gas reservoirs, but it is less significant to vertical wells in a homogeneous reservoir. It is also shown that genetic algorithms are an extremely efficient and robust tool to find the optimal location.

Gibbs, Trevor Howard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Spot crude prices near 12-month high; natural gas and power prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Note: WTI represents West Texas Intermediate crude oil. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Thomson Reuters and SNL Energy. ...

290

Interaction between crude oil price and Dow Jones Index on integrated oil and gas company.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The crude oil is one of the major energy resources in our lifetime and plays its crucial role in our economy. How the stock prices… (more)

Houng, Chi-yao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS BASED ON STATE ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS BASED ON STATE ESTIMATION Gisle Otto Eikrem Lars Imsland Bjarne well. Two different controllers are investigated, PI control using the estimated downhole pressure in the well, and nonlinear model based control of the total mass in the system. Both control structures rely

Foss, Bjarne A.

292

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas...

293

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

294

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

295

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:28:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012NM2"...

296

Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensate blockage negatively impacts large natural gas condensate reservoirs all over the world; examples include Arun Field in Indonesia, Karachaganak Field in Kazakhstan, Cupiagua Field in Colombia,Shtokmanovskoye Field in Russian Barents Sea, and North Field in Qatar. The main focus of this thesis is to evaluate condensate blockage problems in the North Field, Qatar, and then propose solutions to increase well productivity in these gas condensate wells. The first step of the study involved gathering North Field reservoir data from previously published papers. A commercial simulator was then used to carry out numerical reservoir simulation of fluid flow in the North Field. Once an accurate model was obtained, the following three solutions to increasing productivity in the North Field are presented; namely wettability alteration, horizontal wells, and reduced Non Darcy flow. Results of this study show that wettability alteration can increase well productivity in the North Field by adding significant value to a single well. Horizontal wells can successfully increase well productivity in the North Field because they have a smaller pressure drawdown (compared to vertical wells). Horizontal wells delay condensate formation, and increase the well productivity index by reducing condensate blockage in the near wellbore region. Non Darcy flow effects were found to be negligible in multilateral wells due to a decrease in fluid velocity. Therefore, drilling multilateral wells decreases gas velocity around the wellbore, decreases Non Darcy flow effects to a negligible level, and increases well productivity in the North Field.

Miller, Nathan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

An economic analysis of crude oil exploration in Saskatchewan and Alberta .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The International market of crude oil and natural gas is well established and very competitive. Knowledge about costs is important in helping to understand the… (more)

Kamsari, Haul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Well Productivity in Gas-Condensate and Volatile Oil Reservoirs:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wells in gas condensate reservoirs usually exhibit complex behaviours due to condensate deposit as the bottomhole pressure drops below the dew point. The formation of this liquid saturation can lead to a severe loss of well productivity and therefore lower gas recovery. A similar behaviour is observed in volatile oil reservoirs below the bubble point. Understanding these behaviours and extracting values of controlling parameters is necessary to evaluate well potential and design effective programmes to improve productivity. The Centre of Petroleum Studies at Imperial College London has been involved in research in these areas since 1997, sponsored mainly by consortia of oil companies. Results from this work have already greatly improved the understanding of well behaviour in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs and the ability to interpret well tests in such reservoirs. Work to-date has focused on vertical and horizontal wells in sandstone reservoirs. Much work remains to understand the behaviours of fractured wells and wells in naturally fractured reservoirs. The objective of this proposal is to complete the work performed to-date in sandstone reservoirs and to extend it to new well and reservoir characteristics, in order to develop a better understanding of near-wellbore effects in gas condensate and volatile oil reservoirs from well testing, and to use this understanding to develop new methods for predicting and improving well productivity in such reservoirs. The work will be performed by staff, MSc and PhD students from the Centre for Petroleum Studies at Imperial College, with input and guidance from industry partners.

Prof A. C. Gringarten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Proved reserves of crude oil and natural gas in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. proved crude oil reserve additions in 2011 set a record volumetric increase for the second year in a row, according to newly published estimates in EIA's U.S ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience from the natural gas storage industry. In: Rokkeof the underground natural gas storage wells in operation inof the underground natural gas storage wells in the EU. The

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

FIELD OBSERVATIONS OF GAS-CONDENSATE WELL TESTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a commercial simulator was used to perform phase- equilibrium and property calculations based on the PengFIELD OBSERVATIONS OF GAS- CONDENSATE WELL TESTING A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY-point pressure is impacted severely due to condensate banking around the wellbore. Condensate banking also

303

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS 9.0 to ArcGIS 9.2) of the polygon smoothing algorithm described below. A bug that occurred when multiple wells had the same location was also fixed. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINE POLYGONS MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS Why smooth buffered field outlines? See the issues in the figure below: [pic] The smoothing application provided as VBA code below does the following: Adds area to the concave portions; doesn't add area to convex portions to maintain buffer spacing Fills in non-field "islands" smaller than buffer size Joins separate polygon rings with a "bridge" if sufficiently close Minimizes increase in total field area Methodology: creates trapezoids between neighboring wells within an oil/gas

305

Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterwards, the site was shut down, then remediated and the emplacement well (R-E) and reentry well (R-Ex) plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

306

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the viscosity of crude oil systems, J. Pet. Tech. (Sep. ),gases released from the BP oil well blowout, Natureof reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Active Well Service Rigs in operation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 1,549 1,677 1,805 1,898 1,991 1,994 1,997 2,112 2,227 2,247 2,266 2,334 1974 2,401 2,436 2,470 2,513 2,555 2,525 2,494 2,483 2,473 2,488 2,503 2,543 1975 2,582 2,549 2,568 2,549 2,374 2,426 2,344 2,369 2,459 2,434 2,505 2,675 1976 2,612 2,490 2,521 2,597 2,575 2,607 2,606 2,656 2,652 2,639 2,601 2,660 1977 2,474 2,628 2,695 2,804 2,760 2,895 2,929 2,942 2,964 2,973 2,968 2,898 1978 2,810 2,906 2,899 2,997 2,996 2,987 3,006 3,089 3,073 3,078 2,958 3,063 1979 3,094 2,698 2,765 3,034 3,369 3,506 3,572 3,621 3,673 3,954 3,795 3,709 1980 3,855 3,923 4,010 3,871 4,032 4,112 4,092 4,155 4,277 4,290 4,281 4,172

308

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 1,510: 1,372: 1,598: 1,406: 1,697: 1,654: 1,680: 1,923: 1,673: 1,828: 1,777: 1,641: 1974: 1,832: 1,597 ...

309

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

241: NA: NA-= No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 5/31/2013:

310

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Active Well Service Rigs in operation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,008 2,490 2,486 2,601 2,828 2,989 3,399 1980's 4,089 4,849 4,249 3,733 4,659 4,716 3,037 3,059...

311

Resolving discrepancies in predicting critical rates in low pressure stripper gas wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The minimum gas rate for unloading liquids from a gas well has been the subject of much interest, especially in old gas producing fields with… (more)

Awolusi, Olufemi S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Horizontal underbalanced drilling of gas wells with coiled tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coiled tubing drilling technology is gaining popularity and momentum as a significant and reliable method of drilling horizontal underbalanced wells. It is quickly moving into new frontiers. To this point, most efforts in the Western Canadian Basin have been focused towards sweet oil reservoirs in the 900--1300 m true vertical depth (TVD) range, however there is an ever-increasing interest in deeper and gas-producing formations. Significant design challenges on both conventional and coiled tubing drilling operations are imposed when attempting to drill these formations underbalanced. Coiled tubing is an ideal technology for underbalanced drilling due to its absence of drillstring connections resulting in continuous underbalanced capabilities. This also makes it suitable for sour well drilling and live well intervention without the risk of surface releases of reservoir gas. Through the use of pressure deployment procedures it is possible to complete the drilling operation without need to kill the well, thereby maintaining underbalanced conditions right through to the production phase. The use of coiled tubing also provides a means for continuous wireline communication with downhole steering, logging and pressure recording devices.

Cox, R.J.; Li, J.; Lupick, G.S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blowout rates for oil and gas wells in operation in theWF, A history of oil- and gas-well blowouts in California,California Oil and Gas District 4 Inactive wells Blowouts/

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 20,182 27,443 33,331 31,799 31,380 31,236 38,545 1990's 34,332 35,391 41,284 41,532 42,497 46,916 61,276 69,084 71,019 75,034 2000's 68,752 67,034 64,735 56,363 53,805 53,404 38,313 43,379 43,300 40,023 2010's 39,444 35,020 12,703 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

315

Well fracturing method using liquefied gas as fracturing fluid  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for fracturing an oil well or gas well with a mixture of liquid carbon dioxide and liquid petroleum gas. The objective is to be able to inject the liquid into the well bore at a relatively high pumping rate without causing the liquid to boil. Prior to injection, both the liquid CO/sub 2/ and the LPG are held in separate supply tanks at a temperature and pressure at which the liquid phase will not boil. The temperature of the LPG is substantially higher than the liquid CO/sub 2/. During the pumping operation, part of the liquid CO/sub 2/ and all of the LPG are fed through a heat exchanger. In the exchanger, the amount of heat transferred from the LPG to the liquid CO/sub 2/ is enough to vaporize the liquid. The CO/sub 2/ vapor is then circulated back into the CO/sub 2/ tank. The recycled vapor thus maintains the liquid-vapor phase in the tank at equilibrium, so that the liquid will not boil at the desired pumping rate. (4 claims)

Zingg, W.M.; Grassman, D.D.

1974-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Direct gas in mud measurement at the well site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A patented process developed by Datalog provides a direct quantitative gas measurement from the drilling fluid, eliminates the gas trap (degasser) and the conversion to gas-in-air measurements associated with traditional gas detection methods. Quantitative hydrocarbon gas measurement can be performed at the wellsite through the use of this gas detection system called GasWizard. This is achieved with a passive device containing a gas permeable membrane that is immersed in the drilling fluid. The device extracts a gas sample that is directly proportional to the actual gas concentration in the drilling fluid. Through this simple process, the gas measurement is equally effective in conventional water or oil-base drilling muds or in underbalanced drilling fluids such as foam, air or nitrogen.

Hawker, D. [Datalog, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Data Bias in Rate Transient Analysis of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superposition time functions offer one of the effective ways of handling variable-rate data. However, they can also be biased and misleading the engineer to the wrong diagnosis and eventually to the wrong analysis. Since the superposition time functions involve rate as essential constituent, the superposition time is affected greatly with rate issues. Production data of shale gas wells are usually subjected to operating issues that yield noise and outliers. Whenever the rate data is noisy or contains outliers, it will be hard to distinguish their effects from common regime if the superposition time functions are used as plotting time function on log-log plots. Such deceiving presence of these flow regimes will define erroneous well and reservoir parameters. Based on these results and with the upsurge of energy needs there might be some costly decisions will be taken such as refracting or re-stimulating the well especially in tight formations. In this work, a simple technique is presented in order to rapidly check whether there is data bias on the superposition-time specialized plots or not. The technique is based on evaluating the kernel of the superposition time function of each flow regime for the maximum production time. Whatever beyond the Kernel-Equivalent Maximum Production Time (KEMPT) it is considered as biased data. The hypothesis of this technique is that there is no way to see in the reservoir more than what has been seen. A workflow involving different diagnostic and filtering techniques has been proposed to verify proposed notion. Different synthetic and field examples were used in this study. Once the all problematic issues have been detected and filtered out, it was clear that whatever went beyond the KEMPT is a consequence of these issues. Thus, the proposed KEMPT technique can be relied on in order to detect and filter out the biased data points on superposition-time log-log plots. Both raw and filtered data were analyzed using type-curve matching of linear flow type-curves for calculating the original gas in-place (OGIP). It has been found that biased data yield noticeable reduced OGIP. Such reduction is attributed to the early fictitious onset of boundary dominated flow, where early false detection of the drainage boundaries defines less gas in-place occupied in these boundaries.

Agnia, Ammar Khalifa Mohammed

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Assessment of API Thread Connections Under Tight Gas Well Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern oil and gas industry of America has seen most of the high quality, easily obtainable resources, already produced, thus causing wells to be drilled deeper in search for unconventional resources. This means Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) must improve in order to withstand harsher conditions; especially the ability of connections to effectively create leak tight seals. This study investigates the use of thread connections in tight gas fields; therefore, an insight into their potential to contribute to fulfilling the energy demands is necessary. Also, a survey of completed projects done in tight gas fields can provide vital information that will establish the minimum requirements thread connection must meet to perform its functions. To make suitable adjustments to ensure safe and efficient operations we must thoroughly understand the many aspects of thread connections. To have this understanding, a review of previous works was carried out that highlights the capabilities and imitations of thread connections. In addition to reviewing previous work done on thread connections; this study measured the viscosity of thread compounds under variable conditions. It was found that viscosity of thread compound falls in the range of 285,667 cP and 47,758 cP when measured between 32.9 degrees F and 121.5 degrees F. This can be very important because thread compound is essential to the function of thread connections. The knowledge of its viscosity can help choose the most suitable compound. By knowing the value of the viscosity of a thread compound it can also be used to form an analytical assessment of the grooved plate method by providing a means to calculate a pressure gradient which impacts the leakage.

Bourne, Dwayne

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Combination gas producing and waste-water disposal well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, Raymond M. (McKeesport, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

U.S. Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Distribution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are available from the EIA for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

322

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge Water Management for Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development Final Report Start Date: October 1, 2009 End Date: March 31, 2012 Authors: Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD Jennifer Hause Raymond Lovett, PhD David Locke Harry Johnson Doug Patchen, PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award #: DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV 26506-6064 FilterSure, Inc. PO Box 1277 McLean, VA 22101 ShipShaper, LLP PO Box 2 Morgantown, WV 26507 2 | P a g e Acknowledgment "This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001466." Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

323

Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is a special analysis report on hurricanes and their effects on oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico region.

Information Center

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Natural Gas Development and Grassland Songbird Abundance in Southwestern Saskatchewan: The Impact of Gas Wells and Cumulative Disturbance .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The quantity and quality of remaining grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, are threatened by expansion of natural gas development. The number of natural gas wells… (more)

Bogard, Holly Jayne Kalyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

FLOW BEHAVIOR OF GAS-CONDENSATE WELLS A DISSERTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation Input File 149 xi #12;xii #12;List of Tables 2.1 Four gas-condensate systems with different. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 5.1 Fluid characterization for a multicomponent gas-condensate system. . 113 xiii #12;xiv #12;List

326

Economic analysis of shale gas wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas produced from shale formations has increased dramatically in the past decade and has altered the oil and gas industry greatly. The use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has enabled the production ...

Hammond, Christopher D. (Christopher Daniel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

328

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 5,335 4,954 5,465 5,228 5,405 5,163 4,817 5,652 5,165 5,347 4,814 5,420 2004 5,684 5,278 5,822 5,570 5,758 5,500 5,132 6,022 5,502 5,697 5,129 5,774 2005 5,889 5,469 6,033 5,771 5,967 5,699 5,318 6,240 5,702 5,903 5,315 5,983 2006 65,302 59,484 66,007 63,071 65,663 63,437 65,249 65,951 62,242 65,271 63,215 64,841 2007 72,657 65,625 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 72,657 70,313 72,657 70,313 72,657 2008 75,926 71,027 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926 75,926 73,476 75,926 73,476 75,926

329

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 54,124 56,893 1980's 49,396 57,951 54,298 56,371 57,052 53,042 53,460 53,234 57,878 72,430 1990's 94,642 100,733 110,067 127,834 99,801 105,867 118,996 115,934 125,231 118,902 2000's 114,881 113,870 102,972 85,606 73,457 74,928 62,156 48,876 43,079 40,954 2010's 42,034 36,202 32,875 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

330

Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,428,342 3,725,728 3,902,074 1980's 3,839,367 3,854,440 3,522,247 2,904,722 3,288,820 2,784,091 2,542,447 2,913,949 2,992,004 2,970,536 1990's 3,140,870 2,946,749 2,867,842 2,883,761 2,995,676 2,937,666 3,166,015 3,194,743 3,115,154 3,009,296 2000's 2,919,128 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

331

Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 86,801 246,367 550,072 1980's 677,414 758,982 850,497 811,729 875,842 799,468 1,015,811 1,197,326 1,239,657 1,303,479 1990's 1,405,634 1,351,194 1,297,602 1,234,121 1,249,914 1,199,326 1,235,419 1,192,672 1,091,583 1,049,619 2000's 1,006,022 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

332

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a… (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Predicting the performance of horizontal wells in unconventional gas reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional gas has become an increasingly important component of total U.S. domestic production for the past decade. Currently, only numerical models (simulators) can be used… (more)

Drinkard, Dylan Todd.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

335

Production decline analysis of horizontal well in gas shale reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The major factor influencing the increase of natural gas use is the rise in its global demand. Due to the relentlessly increasing demand, there have… (more)

Adekoya, Folarin.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,515,143 3,972,095 4,452,146 1980's 4,516,781 4,613,422 4,372,744 3,720,437 4,183,582 3,614,786 3,585,537 4,134,700 4,249,592 4,286,261 1990's 4,562,144 4,314,407 4,258,686 4,215,015 4,373,962 4,288,219 4,558,997 4,586,352 4,381,022 4,225,452 2000's 4,092,681 4,146,993 3,722,249 3,565,614 3,214,488 2,474,076 2,272,669 2,204,379 1,849,891 1,878,928 2010's 1,701,665 1,355,489 1,028,474 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

337

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well below unity accounts for the broad trends we see in the share of oil purchases in totalWells. ” Middle panel: percent of U.S. total crude oil

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. Near-term tightness in crude oil ...

339

Underground Natural Gas Storage Wells in Bedded Salt (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to natural gas underground storage and associated brine ponds, and includes the permit application for each new underground storage tank near surface water bodies and springs.

340

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2/9/11 - 3...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2911 - 31811) The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This...

342

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

343

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 72,328 63,451 67,732 63,118 62,276 59,557 61,217 60,722 59,142 65,119 67,627 70,643 1992 66,374 62,007 65,284 63,487 63,488 60,701 62,949 63,036 61,442 66,259 65,974 68,514 1993 66,943 61,161 64,007 60,709 61,964 63,278 60,746 62,204 59,969 64,103 63,410 70,929 1994 65,551 60,458 63,396 60,438 60,965 61,963 60,675 62,160 59,730 63,444 62,373 68,990 1995 64,205 59,095 62,006 58,918 60,063 60,885 58,713 59,803 57,421 61,243 60,372 67,498 1996 64,824 61,742 66,951 60,806 62,653 59,952 61,102 62,970 61,239 65,475 67,324 68,206

344

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

345

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

346

Mobil completes deep, tight, horizontal gas well in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A completion and fracturing program for stimulating a horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes sand onshore Germany included casing design, completion fluid selection, overbalanced perforation, analysis of the stimulation treatment, design modification, zone and fracture isolation, well testing and acid stimulation. This paper reviews the field geology, the well design, casing design, describes the completion fluids, perforation techniques, fracture treatment, and methods for zone isolation.

Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Chambers, M.R. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mueller, M.W. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated June 23, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/EPreports/Shale_Gas_Primer_2009.pdf Good of shale gas drilling in New York State, as well as the most comprehensive collection of data and consultant-supplied analyses Addressing the Environmental Risks from Shale Gas Development (2010) Worldwatch

349

Control structure design for stabilizing unstable gas-lift oil wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control structure design for stabilizing unstable gas-lift oil wells Esmaeil Jahanshahi, Sigurd valve is the recommended solution to prevent casing-heading instability in gas-lifted oil wells. Focus to be effective to stabilize this system. Keywords: Oil production, two-phase flow, gas-lift, controllability, H

Skogestad, Sigurd

350

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

351

Current Natural Gas Spot Prices:. Well Above the Recent Price ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub since April has taken prices well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 ...

352

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

353

Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005...

354

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells already producing oil and gas and drilling operations for new wells. One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells

355

The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal wells have been used to increase reservoir recovery, especially in unconventional reservoirs, and hydraulic fracturing has been applied to further extend the contact with the reservoir to increase the efficiency of development. In the past, many models, analytical or numerical, were developed to describe the flow behavior in horizontal wells with fractures. Source solution is one of the analytical/semi-analytical approaches. To solve fractured well problems, source methods were advanced from point sources to volumetric source, and pressure change inside fractures was considered in the volumetric source method. This study aims at developing a method that can predict horizontal well performance and the model can also be applied to horizontal wells with multiple fractures in complex natural fracture networks. The method solves the problem by superposing a series of slab sources under transient or pseudosteady-state flow conditions. The principle of the method comprises the calculation of semi-analytical response of a rectilinear reservoir with closed outer boundaries. A statistically assigned fracture network is used in the study to represent natural fractures based on the spacing between fractures and fracture geometry. The multiple dominating hydraulic fractures are then added to the natural fracture system to build the physical model of the problem. Each of the hydraulic fractures is connected to the horizontal wellbore, and the natural fractures are connected to the hydraulic fractures through the network description. Each fracture, natural or hydraulically induced, is treated as a series of slab sources. The analytical solution of superposed slab sources provides the base of the approach, and the overall flow from each fracture and the effect between the fractures are modeled by applying superposition principle to all of the fractures. It is assumed that hydraulic fractures are the main fractures that connect with the wellbore and the natural fractures are branching fractures which only connect with the main fractures. The fluid inside of the branch fractures flows into the main fractures, and the fluid of the main fracture from both the reservoir and the branch fractures flows to the wellbore. Predicting well performance in a complex fracture network system is extremely challenged. The statistical nature of natural fracture networks changes the flow characteristic from that of a single linear fracture. Simply using the single fracture model for individual fracture, and then adding the flow from each fracture for the network could introduce significant error. This study provides a semi-analytical approach to estimate well performance in a complex fracture network system.

Lin, Jiajing

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Utah History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

357

Pennsylvania History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

358

Maryland History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maryland History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

359

Federal Gulf History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

360

North Dakota History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range. Previous slide: Next slide: Back to first slide: ... (generally borne out so far ...

362

Ohio History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

363

Texas History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas History of Stripper (< 15 BOE/Day) Gas Wells by Year. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

364

Ratio of produced gas to produced water from DOE's EDNA Delcambre No. 1 geopressured-geothermal aquifer gas well test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A paper presented by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) at the Third Geopressured-Geothermal Energy Conference hypothesized that the high ratio of produced gas to produced water from the No. 1 sand in the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well was due to free gas trapped in pores by imbibition over geological time. This hypothesis was examined in relation to preliminary test data which reported only average gas to water ratios over the roughly 2-day steps in flow rate. Subsequent public release of detailed test data revealed substantial departures from the previously reported computer simulation results. Also, data now in the public domain reveal the existence of a gas cap on the aquifier tested. This paper describes IGT's efforts to match the observed gas/water production with computer simulation. Two models for the occurrence and production of gas in excess of that dissolved in the brine have been used. One model considers the gas to be dispersed in pores by imbibition, and the other model considers the gas as a nearby free gas cap above the aquifier. The studies revealed that the dispersed gas model characteristically gave the wrong shape to plots of gas production on the gas/water ratio plots such that no reasonable match to the flow data could be achieved. The free gas cap model gave a characteristically better shape to the production plots and could provide an approximate fit to the data of the edge of the free gas cap is only about 400 feet from the well.Because the geological structure maps indicate the free gas cap to be several thousand feet away and the computer simulation results match the distance to the nearby Delcambre Nos. 4 and 4A wells, it appears that the source of the excess free gas in the test of the No. 1 sand may be from these nearby wells. The gas source is probably a separate gas zone and is brought into contact with the No. 1 sand via a conduit around the No. 4 well.

Rogers, L.A.; Randolph, P.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Integrated Multi-Well Reservoir and Decision Model to Determine Optimal Well Spacing in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing well spacing in unconventional gas reservoirs is difficult due to complex heterogeneity, large variability and uncertainty in reservoir properties, and lack of data that increase the production uncertainty. Previous methods are either suboptimal because they do not consider subsurface uncertainty (e.g., statistical moving-window methods) or they are too time-consuming and expensive for many operators (e.g., integrated reservoir characterization and simulation studies). This research has focused on developing and extending a new technology for determining optimal well spacing in tight gas reservoirs that maximize profitability. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated multi-well reservoir and decision model that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. The reservoir model is based on reservoir simulation technology coupled with geostatistical and Monte Carlo methods to predict production performance in unconventional gas reservoirs as a function of well spacing and different development scenarios. The variability in discounted cumulative production was used for direct integration of the reservoir model with a Bayesian decision model (developed by other members of the research team) that determines the optimal well spacing and hence the optimal development strategy. The integrated model includes two development stages with a varying Stage-1 time span. The integrated tools were applied to an illustrative example in Deep Basin (Gething D) tight gas sands in Alberta, Canada, to determine optimal development strategies. The results showed that a Stage-1 length of 1 year starting at 160-acre spacing with no further downspacing is the optimal development policy. It also showed that extending the duration of Stage 1 beyond one year does not represent an economic benefit. These results are specific to the Berland River (Gething) area and should not be generalized to other unconventional gas reservoirs. However, the proposed technology provides insight into both the value of information and the ability to incorporate learning in a dynamic development strategy. The new technology is expected to help operators determine the combination of primary and secondary development policies early in the reservoir life that profitably maximize production and minimize the number of uneconomical wells. I anticipate that this methodology will be applicable to other tight and shale gas reservoirs.

Ortiz Prada, Rubiel Paul

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's...

367

U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

368

US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

369

Table 19: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

onassociated","Associated","Total" ,"Crude Oil","Condensate","Gas","Dissolved Gas","Gas" "State and Subdivision","(Million bbls)","(Million bbls)","(Bcf)","(Bcf)","(Bcf)"...

370

Some theoretical results useful in analyzing well performance under solution-gas drive  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results pertinent to the analysis of well performance in solution-gas-drive systems. The characteristics of wells producing solution-gas-drive systems are documented. Procedures to correlate multiphase flow solutions with single-phase flow systems for both transient and boundary-dominated flows are presented.

Camacho, R.G. (National Univ. of Mexico/PEMEX (MX)); Raghavan, R. (Phillips Petroleum Co. (US))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

New and existing gas wells promise bountiful LPG output in Michigan  

SciTech Connect

Michigan remains the leading LP-gas producer in the Northeast quadrant of the U.S. This paper reports that boosted by a number of new natural gas wells and a couple of new gas processing plants, the state is firmly anchored in the butane/propane production business. Since 1981, more than 100 deep gas wells, most in excess of 8000 feet in depth, have been completed as indicated producers in the state. Many of these are yielding LPG-grade stock. So, combined with LPG-grade production from shallower geologic formations, the supply picture in this area looks promising for the rest of the country.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Optimal fracture treatment design for dry gas wells maximizes well performance in the presence of non-Darcy flow effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a methodology based on Proppant Number approach for optimal fracture treatment design of natural gas wells considering non-Darcy flow effects in the design process. Closure stress is taken into account, by default, because it is the first factor decreasing propped pack permeability at in-situ conditions. Gel damage was also considered in order to evaluate the impact of incorporating more damaging factors on ultimate well performance and optimal geometry. Effective fracture permeability and optimal fracture geometry are calculated through an iterative process. This approach was implemented in a spreadsheet. Non-Darcy flow is described by the ? factor. All ? factor correlations available in the literature were evaluated. It is recommended to use the correlation developed specifically for the given type of proppant and mesh size, if available. Otherwise, the Pursell et al. or the Martins et al. equations are recommended as across the board reliable correlations for predicting non-Darcy flow effects in the propped pack. The proposed methodology was implemented in the design of 11 fracture treatments of 3 natural tight gas wells in South Texas. Results show that optimal fracture design might increase expected production in 9.64 MMscf with respect to design that assumes Darcy flow through the propped pack. The basic finding is that for a given amount of proppant shorter and wider fractures compensate the non-Darcy and/or gel damage effect. Dynamic programming technique was implemented in design of multistage fractures for one of the wells under study for maximizing total gas production. Results show it is a powerful and simple technique for this application. It is recommended to expand its use in multistage fracture designs.

Lopez Hernandez, Henry De Jesus

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

U.S. Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells Dataset Summary Description Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are available from the EIA for most states for the years 1919 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available. Source EIA Date Released January 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

374

Crude Oil Watch - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spot market crude oil prices continued higher last week despite light trading volume due to Hurricane Floyd. ... Guide, Oil and Gas Journal, Wall Street Journal.

375

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31 March 2011 31 March 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the seven gas wells sampled are between 0.75 and 0.90 mile from the Project Rulison detonation point. All wells sampled are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected: * 7 gas samples from 7 wells * 7 produced water samples from 6 wells and 1 drip tank; one well was dry Findings:

376

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

377

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

378

CASING-HEADING PHENOMENON IN GAS-LIFTED WELL AS A LIMIT CYCLE OF A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, France CSTJF, TOTAL Exploration-Production, Pau, France Abstract: Oil well instabilities cause activation to maintain the oil output at a commercial level. In the gas-lift activation technique (Brown). High yield setpoints (low gas and high oil output) lie in an unstable region (Jansen et al., 1999

379

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments and are very salty, like the Marcellus shale and other oil and gas formations underlying the areaUnderground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies), Region 3. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar, February 18, 2010 (Answers provide below by Karen Johnson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

380

Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was observed that many hydraulically fractured horizontal shale gas wells exhibit transient linear flow behavior. A half-slope on a type curve represents this transient linear flow behavior. Shale gas wells show a significant skin effect which is uncommon in tight gas wells and masks early time linear behavior. Usually 70-85 percent of frac water is lost in the formation after the hydraulic fracturing job. In this research, a shale gas well was studied and simulated post hydraulic fracturing was modeled to relate the effect of frac water to the early significant skin effect observed in shale gas wells. The hydraulically fractured horizontal shale gas well was described in this work by a linear dual porosity model. The reservoir in this study consisted of a bounded rectangular reservoir with slab matrix blocks draining into neighboring hydraulic fractures and then the hydraulic fractures feed into the horizontal well that fully penetrates the entire rectangular reservoir. Numerical and analytical solutions were acquired before building a 3D 19x19x10 simulation model to verify accuracy. Many tests were conducted on the 3D model to match field water production since initial gas production was matching the analytical solutions before building the 3D simulation model. While some of the scenarios tested were artificial, they were conducted in order to reach a better conceptual understanding of the field. Increasing the water saturation in the formation resulted in increasing water production while lowering gas production. Adding a fractured bottom water layer that leaked into the hydraulic fracture allowed the model to have a good match of water and gas production rates. Modeling trapped frac water around the fracture produced approximately the same amount of water produced by field data, but the gas production was lower. Totally surrounding the fracture with frac water blocked all gas production until some of the water was produced and gas was able to pass through. Finally, trapped frac water around the fracture as combined with bottom water showed the best results match. It was shown that frac water could invade the formation surrounding the hydraulic fracture and could cause formation damage by blocking gas flow. It was also demonstrated that frac water could partially block off gas flow from the reservoir to the wellbore and thus lower the efficiency of the hydraulic fracturing job. It was also demonstrated that frac water affects the square root of time plot. It was proven by simulation that the huge skin at early time could be caused by frac water that invades and gets trapped near the hydraulic fractures due to capillary pressure.

Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Texas earthquakes may be linked to wells for gas mining By Dan Vergano, USA TODAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas earthquakes may be linked to wells for gas mining By Dan Vergano, USA TODAY -- Saltwater study. "We usually only get small ones." Some suspicions centered on wells involved in "hydraulic. About 13 fracture wells have been drilled since 2002 near the locale, but the team found the epicenter

Huang, Shaopeng

383

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; ...

384

North American spot crude oil benchmarks likely diverging ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

385

What is the difference between crude oil, petroleum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

386

Bakken crude oil price differential to WTI narrows over ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

387

Integrated adsorption system for the purification of separate crude gases  

SciTech Connect

An adsorption installation is employed for the purification of several crude gas streams. The individual crude gas streams are conducted separately from one another through the adsorbers in cyclic alternation. Preferably, an adsorber is regenerated only after all crude gas streams have been passed through the adsorber. The number of adsorbers utilized can be kept lower than in the separate purification of each individual crude gas stream.

Becker, H.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

Analysis of selected energy security issues related to US crude oil and natural gas exploration, development, production, transportation and processing. Final report, Task 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 1989, President Bush directed the Secretary of Energy to initiate the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES) built upon a national consensus. The overall principle for the NES, as defined by the President and articulated by the Economic Policy Council (EPC), is the continuation of the successful policy of market reliance, consistent with the following goals: Balancing of energy, economic, and environmental concerns; and reduced dependence by the US and its friends and allies on potentially unreliable energy suppliers. The analyses presented in this report draw upon a large body of work previously conducted for DOE/Office of Fossil Energy, the US Department of Interior/Minerals Management Service (DOI/MMS), and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), referenced throughout the text of this report. This work includes assessments in the following areas: the potential of advanced oil and gas extraction technologies as improved through R&D, along with the successful transfer of these technologies to the domestic petroleum industry; the economic and energy impacts of environmental regulations on domestic oil and gas exploration, production, and transportation; the potential of tax incentives to stimulate domestic oil and gas development and production; the potential environmental costs associated with various options for leasing for US oil and gas resources in the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS); and the economic impacts of environmental regulations affecting domestic crude oil refining.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Coproduced Fluids for Oil and Gas Wells Project Description The geothermal organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system will be installed at an oil field operated by Encore Acquisition in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. The data and knowledge acquire during the O & M phase can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

391

Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models and approaches special for estimating rate decline and recovery of shale gas wells were developed. As the strategy of the horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures (MTFHW) was discovered and its significance to economic shale gas production was understood, rate decline and pressure transient analysis models for this type of well were developed to reveal the well behavior. In this thesis, we considered a “Triple-porosity/Dual-permeability” model and performed sensitivity studies to understand long term pressure drawdown behavior of MTFHWs. A key observation from this study is that the early linear flow regime before interfracture interference gives a relationship between summed fracture half-length and permeability, from which we can estimate either when the other is known. We studied the impact of gas desorption on the time when the pressure perturbation caused by production from adjacent transference fractures (fracture interference time) and programmed an empirical method to calculate a time shift that can be used to qualify the gas desorption impact on long term production behavior. We focused on the field case Well A in New Albany Shale. We estimated the EUR for 33 wells, including Well A, using an existing analysis approach. We applied a unified BU-RNP method to process the one-year production/pressure transient data and performed PTA to the resulting virtual constant-rate pressure drawdown. Production analysis was performed meanwhile. Diagnosis plots for PTA and RNP analysis revealed that only the early linear flow regime was visible in the data, and permeability was estimated both from a model match and from the relationship between fracture halflength and permeability. Considering gas desorption, the fracture interference will occur only after several centuries. Based on this result, we recommend a well design strategy to increase the gas recovery factor by decreasing the facture spacing. The higher EUR of Well A compared to the vertical wells encourages drilling more MTFHWs in New Albany Shale.

Song, Bo

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

In situ experiments of geothermal well stimulation using gas fracturing technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an experimental study of gas fracturing technology for geothermal well stimulation demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link water-filled boreholes with existing fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by mineback as well as flow tests. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. Simple scaling laws for gas fracturing and a brief discussion of the application of this technique to actual geothermal well stimulation are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

Chu, T.Y.; Warpinski, N.; Jacobson, R.D.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects to Improve 'Stripper' Gas Well  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 13, 2000 June 13, 2000 DOE Selects Project to Improve 'Stripper' Gas Well Economics By Using Low-Cost Clean Coal Product to Filter Waste Water In its third and final round of competition for projects that can help sustain natural gas production from "stripper" wells, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected a proposal to test a coal-based filtering material that could sharply reduce the costs of disposing of waste water from these low-volume wells. The Western SynCoal Clean Coal Plant The Rosebud SynCoal® demonstration plant near Colstrip, Montana, was built in DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. Its upgraded coal product, originally intended as a high quality fuel for power plants, may also be a low cost filter material for oil and gas well waste water.

394

Microsoft Word - RUL_2Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells_23June2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

23 June 2011 23 June 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the DOE's directive to protect human health and the environment, sample are collected and analyzed from producing gas wells to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institution control boundary. Using the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan as guidance, samples are collected on a frequency based on their respective distance from the site. The monitoring plan also specifies the type of analysis and the reporting thresholds. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations.

395

A new generation of multilateral well enhances small gas field economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this study is to investigate the applicability of a new multilateral well architecture in the domain of small size and offshore gas fields. The new architecture completely reverses the current multilateral technology. The innovative concept suggests that laterals can be achieved like any conventional wells. They could be drilled from the surface and tied back to a common wellbore referred to as the mother well. Production would go through the toe of laterals into the mother well. The mother well could be as simple as a large diameter casing equipped with prepared connections to tie in feeder wells. This study looked past the mechanical challenge of achieving the new architecture. I demonstrated important benefits in terms of cost reduction, well completion and operations, and reservoir drainage. I looked at a typical field case, Phoenix, located in West Africa. Its actual development plan targets an ultimate recovery of 600 BCF with a total of four sub-vertical wells. I implemented a new development scenario with the innovative multilateral architecture. For comparison purposes, I achieved a reservoir simulation and a production forecast with both scenarios. The only simulation variable was the well architecture definition. As a main result, the new multilateral structure could produce as many as four vertical wells with three slim-hole laterals. I achieved a quantitative risk analysis on both development plans. I assessed the development cost of each scenario and performed a Monte Carlo simulation to account for cost uncertainties. In addition to the actual 70 MMSCFD gas contract, I simulated a progressive gas demand increase of 20 MMSCFD every five years and a 150 MMSCFD gas market. The study demonstrates the economic benefits of the new technology in the domain of offshore and small gas fields. This work also shows that this new generation of multilaterals brings new option values to the domain of multilateral technology.

Atse, Jean-Philippe

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Crude oils have different quality characteristics - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

397

State Ranking - Crude Oil Production - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

398

Crude oil distillation and the definition of refinery capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

399

Price difference between Brent and WTI crude oil narrowing - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

400

Table 8. Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 Author: Energy Information Administration Created Date

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NEW AND NOVEL FRACTURE STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF EXISTING GAS STORAGE WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage wells are prone to continued deliverability loss at a reported average rate of 5% per annum (in the U.S.). This is a result of formation damage due to the introduction of foreign materials during gas injection, scale deposition and/or fines mobilization during gas withdrawal, and even the formation and growth of bacteria. As a means to bypass this damage and sustain/enhance well deliverability, several new and novel fracture stimulation technologies were tested in gas storage fields across the U.S. as part of a joint U.S. Department of Energy and Gas Research Institute R&D program. These new technologies include tip-screenout fracturing, hydraulic fracturing with liquid CO{sub 2} and proppant, extreme overbalance fracturing, and high-energy gas fracturing. Each of these technologies in some way address concerns with fracturing on the part of gas storage operators, such as fracture height growth, high permeability formations, and fluid sensitivity. Given the historical operator concerns over hydraulic fracturing in gas storage wells, plus the many other unique characteristics and resulting stimulation requirements of gas storage reservoirs (which are described later), the specific objective of this project was to identify new and novel fracture stimulation technologies that directly address these concerns and requirements, and to demonstrate/test their potential application in gas storage wells in various reservoir settings across the country. To compare these new methods to current industry deliverability enhancement norms in a consistent manner, their application was evaluated on a cost per unit of added deliverability basis, using typical non-fracturing well remediation methods as the benchmark and considering both short-term and long-term deliverability enhancement results. Based on the success (or lack thereof) of the various fracture stimulation technologies investigated, guidelines for their application, design and implementation have been developed. A final research objective was to effectively deploy the knowledge and experience gained from the project to the gas storage industry at-large.

Unknown

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small number of analytical models and published numerical studies there is currently little consensus regarding the large-scale flow behavior over time in such systems. The purpose of this work is to construct a fit-for-purpose numerical simulator which will account for a variety of production features pertinent to these systems, and to use this model to study the effects of various parameters on flow behavior. Specific features examined in this work include hydraulically fractured horizontal wells, multiple porosity and permeability fields, desorption, and micro-scale flow effects. The theoretical basis of the model is described in Chapter I, along with a validation of the model. We employ the numerical simulator to examine various tight gas and shale gas systems and to illustrate and define the various flow regimes which progressively occur over time. We visualize the flow regimes using both specialized plots of rate and pressure functions, as well as high-resolution maps of pressure distributions. The results of this study are described in Chapter II. We use pressure maps to illustrate the initial linear flow into the hydraulic fractures in a tight gas system, transitioning to compound formation linear flow, and then into elliptical flow. We show that flow behavior is dominated by the fracture configuration due to the extremely low permeability of shale. We also explore the possible effect of microscale flow effects on gas effective permeability and subsequent gas species fractionation. We examine the interaction of sorptive diffusion and Knudsen diffusion. We show that microscale porous media can result in a compositional shift in produced gas concentration without the presence of adsorbed gas. The development and implementation of the micro-flow model is documented in Chapter III. This work expands our understanding of flow behavior in tight gas and shale gas systems, where such an understanding may ultimately be used to estimate reservoir properties and reserves in these types of reservoirs.

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Microsoft Word - RUL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_18Wells.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring Results Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells near the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 July 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 18 gas wells sampled are within 1.1 miles of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison is the Plowshare Program code name for the detonation of a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device on 10 September 1969. The detonation point was 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. The purpose of the test

404

Target-rate Tracking for Shale-gas Multi-well Pads by Scheduled Shut-ins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target-rate Tracking for Shale-gas Multi-well Pads by Scheduled Shut-ins Brage R. Knudsen Bjarne, Yorktown Heights, NY, USA. Abstract: The recent success of shale-gas production relies on drilling of long caused by water accumulation in the wells. Shale-gas recovery requires a large number of wells in order

Foss, Bjarne A.

405

Investigation of flow modifying tools for the continuous unloading of wet-gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid loading in low production gas wells is a common problem faced in many producing regions around the world. Once gas rates fall below the minimum lift velocity, it is essential that some action be taken to maintain continuous operation of the well. Commonly applied solutions include: 1) reduction in wellhead pressure (compression); 2) reduction of tubing diameter (velocity strings); and 3) installation of artificial lift (plunger lift or sucker rod pumping). This thesis examines the use of a patented vortex flow modifier to lift liquids from low rate (stripper) gas wells. Vortex Flow LLC has developed a flow modifying tool using the patented EcoVeyor technology developed by EcoTech. This technology has been used successfully for almost a decade to transport solids in the coal and potash industries and is now being adapted to the oil and gas industries. Recent field tests in horizontal production pipelines have shown the ability to alter basic flow characteristics, significantly decreasing backpressure on wells and increasing production. This thesis evaluates this technology for use in the wellbore, where a tool is introduced at the bottom of the tubing string. Laboratory experiments were conducted using a 125-ft vertical flow loop of 2-in diameter clear PVC. In these experiments, the effects of the vortex device on gas and water flow was examined and compared with the behavior in normal pipe flow. An optimized tool was developed that alters the flow patterns in the pipe resulting in improved liquid unloading accompanied by a decrease in the tubing pressure loss by more than 15 percent. The optimized tool also lowered the minimum lift velocity required for liquid unloading. Visual observations at four locations along the test loop confirmed that the liquid phase is transported in an upward helical manner along the pipe wall, providing an improved flow path for the gas phase. Apart from assisting liquid unloading, the flow modifying tool enhances the operational envelope at low gas rates as well as forming smaller slugs during liquid unloading. Therefore the flow modifier can also reduce gas requirements during artificial gas lift and can also serve as a flow stabilizing device.

Ali, Ahsan Jawaid

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2009_Gas_Samp_Results_6wells_22Jan09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 22 January 2009 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) directive to protect human health and the environment, samples are collected from producing gas wells and analyzed to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institutional-control boundary. These samples were collected before the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan was released in July 2010. The Rulison Monitoring Plan provides guidance for sample collection frequency, based on distance from the Rulison

407

Microsoft Word - RUL_4Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_8Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the Project Rulison Horizon the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 21 October 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 8 gas wells sampled are within 0.75 and 1.0 mile of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program to try stimulation natural gas in tight sandstone formations using a nuclear device. On 10 September 1969, a 40- nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected:

408

Methods of cracking a crude product to produce additional crude products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a crude product is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce one or more crude products. At least one of the crude products has a boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. as determined by ASTM Method D5307. The crude product having the boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. is catalytically cracked to produce one or more additional crude products. At least one of the additional crude products is a second gas stream. The second gas stream has a boiling point of at most 38.degree. C. at 0.101 MPa.

Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

Application of new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells  

SciTech Connect

Based on the information presented in this report, our conclusions regarding the potential for new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells are as follows: New and improved gas storage well revitalization methods have the potential to save industry on the order of $20-25 million per year by mitigating deliverability decline and reducing the need for costly infill wells Fracturing technologies have the potential to fill this role, however operators have historically been reluctant to utilize this approach due to concerns with reservoir seal integrity. With advanced treatment design tools and methods, however, this risk can be minimized. Of the three major fracturing classifications, namely hydraulic, pulse and explosive, two are believed to hold potential to gas storage applications (hydraulic and pulse). Five particular fracturing technologies, namely tip-screenout fracturing, fracturing with liquid carbon dioxide, and fracturing with gaseous nitrogen, which are each hydraulic methods, and propellant and nitrogen pulse fracturing, which are both pulse methods, are believed to hold potential for gas storage applications and will possibly be tested as part of this project. Field evidence suggests that, while traditional well remediation methods such as blowing/washing, mechanical cleaning, etc. do improve well deliverability, wells are still left damaged afterwards, suggesting that considerable room for further deliverability enhancement exists. Limited recent trials of hydraulic fracturing imply that this approach does in fact provide superior deliverability results, but further RD&D work is needed to fully evaluate and demonstrate the benefits and safe application of this as well as other fracture stimulation technologies.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Essential elements of modeling gas generation from well defined plutonium materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Processing of excess plutonium oxide (and related) materials intended for long-term storage is addressed in DOE standard 3013-2000. The essential elements addressed by this standard are eliminating or reducing to an acceptable level the entities that lead to gas evolution and consequent pressurization of the intended storage container system. Based upon the need to adequately understand and quantify these relevant parameters we briefly describe the current scientific knowledge of gas evolution from such systems. These associated research efforts have included fundamental kinetic and thermodynamic studies of water interactions at actinide oxide surfaces, radiolytic reactions of adsorbed water, interfacial reactions of hydrogen and oxygen, and radiolytic helium production. Utilizing, where possible, experimental parameters for many of the aforementioned processes we have developed a mathematical model with a minimum number of essential components that successfully models gas generation from well-defined PuO{sub 2} materials with known amounts of deliberately added water. In this work we verify this model against real pressure versus time data (described at greater length in another manuscript in these conference proceedings) and subsequently assure the safety envelope of design criteria for both short- and long-term storage and transportation of these material classes. These modeling results predict pressures and gas phase mole fractions over well-defined DOE 3013 container test cases well in advance of actual long-term surveillance information and provide confidence in safe storage of plutonium oxide material classes.

Paffett, M. T. (Mark T.); Kelly, D. (Daniel)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Geothermal Power Production from Brine Co-Produced from Oil and Gas Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Millions of barrels of water (brine) per day are co-produced from oil and gas wells. Currently, the oil and gas industry views this as a waste stream that costs millions of dollars per year to manage, through either treatment or disposal/reinjection. A significant percentage of the co-produced brine, however, flows at sufficient rate and temperature to generate power using a binary power plant, and this is viewed by some as a potential value stream. The value lies in that the co-produced water is "free" ...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Oil and Gas Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization (Minnesota) Oil and Gas Wells: Rules Relating to Spacing, Pooling, and Unitization (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Natural Resources is given the authority to create and promulgate regulations related to spacing, pooling, and utilization of oil

417

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil-Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1980. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, a summary of microseismic activity before and during 1980, and a description of the monitoring of a liquid tiltmeter at the test well site are included.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Gas, Condensate, Brine, and Solids: Pleasant Bayou Well Test, 1988-Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This section covers analyses performed on gas. Chemical analyses can only be related to well performance if the quantity of the various fluids are known. The IGT on-line data computer system measures the flowrate, the pressures, and the temperatures every 10 seconds. These values are automatically recorded over operator selected intervals both on magnetic media and on paper. This allows review of samples versus operating conditions. This paper covers analyses performed on gas, including: An approximate sampling schedule during flow tests; On-site sample handling and storage of gas samples; Addresses of laboratories that perform off site analyses; Sample shipping instructions; Data archiving; and Quality Control/Quality Assurance. It is expected that the above procedures will change as the flow test progresses, but deviations from the written procedures should be approved by C. Hayden of IGT and noted on the results of the analysis.

Hayden, Chris

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

California Crude Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of different quality crudes vary over time based on the value the market places on such quality attributes. A heavy crude oil has more heavy, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microsoft Word - RBL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_3Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 September 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor natural gas wells for radionuclides from Project Rio Blanco. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the 3 gas wells sampled are within 1.4 miles of the Project Rio Blanco detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Mesaverde Group. Background: Project Rio Blanco is the Plowshare Program code name for the near-simultaneous detonation of a three 33-kiloton-yield nuclear devices in one emplacement well (RB-E-01) on 17 May 1973. The devices were detonated at 5,839-feet, 6,230-feet, and 6,689-feet below the ground surface. The shallowest device (at 5,839 feet) was detonated in the lower part of the Fort Union Formation, the

422

Use of inhibitors for scale control in brine-producing gas and oil wells  

SciTech Connect

Field and laboratory work have shown that calcium-carbonate scale formation in waters produced with natural gas and oil can be prevented by injection of phosphonate inhibitor into the formation, even if the formation is sandstone without calcite binging material. Inhibitor squeeze jobs have been carried out on DOE's geopressured-geothermal Gladys McCall brine-gas well and GRI's co-production wells in the Hitchcock field. Following the inhibitor squeeze on Gladys McCall, the well produced over five million barrels of water at a rate of approximately 30,000 BPD without calcium-carbonate scaling. Before the inhibitor squeeze, the well could not be produced above 15,000 BPD without significant scale formation. In the GRI brine-gas co-production field tests, inhibitor squeezes have been used to successfully prevant scaling. Laboratory work has been conducted to determine what types of oil field waters are subject to scaling. This research has led to the development of a saturation index and accompanying nomographs which allow prediction of when scale will develop into a problem in brine production.

Tomson, M.B.; Prestwich, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas reservoirs provide almost one quarter of the current U.S. domestic gas production, with significant projected increases in the next several decades in both the U.S. and abroad. These reservoirs constitute an important play type, with opportunities for improved reservoir simulation & management, such as simulation model design, well placement. Our work develops robust and efficient strategies for improved tight gas reservoir simulation and management. Reservoir simulation models are usually acquired by upscaling the detailed 3D geologic models. Earlier studies of flow simulation have developed layer-based coarse reservoir simulation models, from the more detailed 3D geologic models. However, the layer-based approach cannot capture the essential sand and flow. We introduce and utilize the diffusive time of flight to understand the pressure continuity within the fluvial sands, and develop novel adaptive reservoir simulation grids to preserve the continuity of the reservoir sands. Combined with the high resolution transmissibility based upscaling of flow properties, and well index based upscaling of the well connections, we can build accurate simulation models with at least one order magnitude simulation speed up, but the predicted recoveries are almost indistinguishable from those of the geologic models. General practice of well placement usually requires reservoir simulation to predict the dynamic reservoir response. Numerous well placement scenarios require many reservoir simulation runs, which may have significant CPU demands. We propose a novel simulation-free screening approach to generate a quality map, based on a combination of static and dynamic reservoir properties. The geologic uncertainty is taken into consideration through an uncertainty map form the spatial connectivity analysis and variograms. Combining the quality map and uncertainty map, good infill well locations and drilling sequence can be determined for improved reservoir management. We apply this workflow to design the infill well drilling sequence and explore the impact of subsurface also, for a large-scale tight gas reservoir. Also, we evaluated an improved pressure approximation method, through the comparison with the leading order high frequency term of the asymptotic solution. The proposed pressure solution can better predict the heterogeneous reservoir depletion behavior, thus provide good opportunities for tight gas reservoir management.

Zhou, Yijie

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Demonstration of the enrichment of medium quality gas from gob wells through interactive well operating practices. Final report, June--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane released to the atmosphere during coal mining operations is believed to contribute to global warming and represents a waste of a valuable energy resource. Commercial production of pipeline-quality gob well methane through wells drilled from the surface into the area above the gob can, if properly implemented, be the most effective means of reducing mine methane emissions. However, much of the gas produced from gob wells is vented because the quality of the gas is highly variable and is often below current natural gas pipeline specifications. Prior to the initiation of field-testing required to further understand the operational criteria for upgrading gob well gas, a preliminary evaluation and assessment was performed. An assessment of the methane gas in-place and producible methane resource at the Jim Walter Resources, Inc. No. 4 and No. 5 Mines established a potential 15-year supply of 60 billion cubic feet of mien methane from gob wells, satisfying the resource criteria for the test site. To understand the effect of operating conditions on gob gas quality, gob wells producing pipeline quality (i.e., < 96% hydrocarbons) gas at this site will be operated over a wide range of suction pressures. Parameters to be determined will include absolute methane quantity and methane concentration produced through the gob wells; working face, tailgate and bleeder entry methane levels in the mine; and the effect on the economics of production of gob wells at various levels of methane quality. Following this, a field demonstration will be initiated at a mine where commercial gob gas production has not been attempted. The guidelines established during the first phase of the project will be used to design the production program. The economic feasibility of various utilization options will also be tested based upon the information gathered during the first phase. 41 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

Blackburn, S.T.; Sanders, R.G.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.; Stevenson, J.W.; Mills, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 APPENDIX1 Contents A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1 A3. GHG FOR FLOWBACK GAS CAPTURE IN SHALE PLAYS..9 A5. REFERENCES

426

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

released from the BP oil well blowout, Nature Geoscience, 4:for the Deepwater Horizon /Macondo Well oil spill. Flow Ratecolumn of oil and gas in the well, it would imply the

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11,226 12,829 1980's 11,634 11,759 12,222 12,117 12,525 13,378 12,935 10,962 9,728 8,243 1990's 7,743 7,610 7,242 6,484 7,204 5,904 6,309 7,171 6,883 6,738 2000's 7,808 7,262 7,068 6,866 6,966 6,685 6,654 6,977 6,764 5,470 2010's 5,483 4,904 4,411 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil

428

Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Black Warrior: Sub-soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project area encompasses 6,273 acres of both private and federal lands including water and surface rights. It is reasonable to expect a capacity of about 20 MW. GeothermEx estimated a potential capacity of 40 MW. Black Warrior is a large blind geothermal prospect near the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation that was identified by reconnaissance temperature gradient drilling in the 1980s by Philips Petroleum but was never tested through deep exploration drilling. Although the 10 square miles of high heat flow in the area reveals significant energy potential it also makes selection of an optimal exploration drilling target difficult.

429

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 30,264 26,439 1980's 22,965 22,153 23,654 26,510 30,099 29,904 33,453 28,698 23,950 22,673 1990's 20,948 19,538 21,631 23,750 21,690 14,528 19,414 16,002 22,744 17,510 2000's 17,089 13,513 11,711 9,517 11,299 8,294 8,822 9,512 4,137 4,108 2010's 6,614 6,778 5,443 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil

430

Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 410,179 375,593 360,533 1980's 360,906 348,113 357,671 408,632 461,821 502,000 529,453 470,493 426,945 403,144 1990's 408,654 455,052 436,493 467,340 518,305 522,437 523,155 566,210 643,886 722,750 2000's 752,296 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil

431

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas formations are known to have low permeability. This low permeability can be as low as 100 nano darcies. Without stimulating wells drilled in the shale gas formations, it is hard to produce them at an economic rate. One of the stimulating approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient drainage from the formation matrix toward the hydraulic fracture. This flow could extend up to years of production and it can be identified by half slop on the log-log plot of the gas rate against time. It could be utilized to evaluate the hydraulic fracture surface area and eventually evaluate the effectiveness of the completion job. Different models from the literature can be used to evaluate the completion job. One of the models used in this work assumes a rectangular reservoir with a slab shaped matrix between each two hydraulic fractures. From this model, there are at least five flow regions and the two regions discussed are the Region 2 in which bilinear flow occurs as a result of simultaneous drainage form the matrix and hydraulic fracture. The other is Region 4 which results from transient matrix drainage which could extend up to many years. The Barnett shale production data will be utilized throughout this work to show sample of the calculations. This first part of this work will evaluate the field data used in this study following a systematic procedure explained in Chapter III. This part reviews the historical production, reservoir and fluid data and well completion records available for the wells being analyzed. It will also check for data correlations from the data available and explain abnormal flow behaviors that might occur utilizing the field production data. It will explain why some wells might not fit into each model. This will be followed by a preliminary diagnosis, in which flow regimes will be identified, unclear data will be filtered, and interference and liquid loading data will be pointed. After completing the data evaluation, this work will evaluate and compare the different methods available in the literature in order to decide which method will best fit to analyze the production data from the Barnett shale. Formation properties and the original gas in place will be evaluated and compared for different methods.

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

435

Decision matrix for liquid loading in gas wells for cost/benefit analyses of lifting options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field-proven solutions already exist to reduce the loss of gas production when liquid loading begins to occur. However, the choice of remedial technique, its feasibility, and its cost, vary considerably depending on a field's location, size export route, and the individual operator's experience. The selection of the best remedial technique and the timeframe within which the remedial action is undertaken are critical to a project's profitability. Although there are literature reviews available regarding solutions to liquid loading problems in gas wells, a tool capable of helping an operator select the best remedial option for a specific field case still does not exist. This thesis proposes a newly developed decision matrix to screen the possible remedial options available to the operator. The matrix can not only provide a critical evaluation of potential solutions to the problem of liquid loading in gas wells vis-a?-vis the existing technical and economic constraints, but can also serve as a reference to operators for investment decisions and as a quick screening tool for the selection of production optimisation strategies. Under its current status of development, this new tool consists of a decision algorithm built around a decision tree. Unlike other data mining techniques, decision trees quickly allow for subdividing large initial datasets into successively smaller sets by a series of decision rules. The rules are based on information available in the public domain. The effectiveness of the matrix is now ready to be tested against real field datasets.

Park, Han-Young

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Numerical modeling of well performance in shale gas reservoirs: the impact of fracture spacing on production of adsorbed gas .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Shale gas became an important source of natural gas in the United States and is expected to contribute significantly to worldwide energy supply. This has… (more)

Kalantarli, A.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (MMcf)" Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1030_r5f_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1030_r5f_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:15 AM"

438

Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 18,689 15,053 1980's 13,959 13,526 12,554 12,405 11,263 9,412 9,547 16,422 43,562 50,165 1990's 49,422 70,932 106,311 105,363 124,501 7,684 7,055 7,919 7,880 6,938 2000's 149,077 149,067 190,608 236,404 260,667 305,641 292,660 325,328 345,109 316,537 2010's 328,114 328,500 274,431 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

439

US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 417,053 383,647 369,968 1980's 385,573 377,245 400,129 461,796 523,200 570,733 599,978 537,101 497,072 485,150 1990's 484,516 535,250 513,058 550,850 622,235 653,870 687,424 729,162 804,290 905,293 2000's 951,088 989,969 893,193 939,828 840,852 730,830 681,869 654,334 524,965 606,403 2010's 598,679 512,003 526,664 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas

440

Method for production of hydrocarbon diluent from heavy crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of producing a hydrocarbon diluent from a heavy crude oil extracted from an underground petroleum formation via a production well. It comprises: preheating a quantity of heavy crude oil extracted from the production well to yield a heated crude oil; separating in a separator vessel by flashing the heated crude oil to produce a first vapor fraction and a first liquid fraction; thermally cracking in a cracking unit at least a portion of the first liquid fraction to produce a first liquid effluent; quenching the first liquid effluent; introducing at least a portion of the quenched fist liquid effluent into a separator; condensing the first vapor fraction; separating in a separator vessel the condensed vapor fraction to produce a liquid hydrocarbon diluent middle fraction characterized in having a boiling range between about 400{degrees}-700{degrees}F. and a gas; and, directing the liquid hydrocarbon diluent into the formation via an injection well for enhancing production of petroleum from the formation via the production well.

McCants, M.F.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

2012 Brief: Coal and mid-continent crude oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal and mid-continent crude oil (WTI) led energy commodity price declines in 2012. Natural gas was the only key energy commodity with a significant ...

444

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Consistent with OECD inventories, U.S. inventories are low. They have been well below the normal range for over one year. Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to increase of late toward more normal levels, remain well below average. At the end of December, crude oil stocks were near 289 million barrels, about 4% below the 5-year average, and slightly higher than at the end of 1999. The latest weekly data, for the week ending January 19, show U.S. crude oil stocks at 286 million barrels, just about a million barrels above their level a year ago. Near-term tightness in U.S. crude oil markets have kept current prices above forward prices, reflecting current strength in crude oil demand relative to supply. Relatively strong U.S. oil demand next year should keep crude oil

445

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin BasinRates in California Oil and Gas District 4 – Update andoccurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is… (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.state.nj.us/drbc/ Hydrologic conditions #12; Policies & regulations Natural gas related water withdrawal information associated with the industry The Future of Natural Gas (2011) MIT http://web.mit.edu/mitei/research/studies/natural-gas-2011.shtml An analysis of the role of natural gas in our energy future under a variety of possible

Manning, Sturt

448

Combination gas-producing and waste-water disposal well. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, R.M.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

449

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pub/oil/ Data_Catalog/Oil_and_Gas/Oil_?elds/CA_oil?elds.DAT.1993) A history of oil- and gas-well blowouts in California,Health Administration (2007), Oil and gas well drilling and

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Coal gas openhole completion well effectiveness in the Piceance Basin, Colorado: Preliminary results, South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well  

SciTech Connect

Since 1983, the Deep Coal Seam Project (DCSP) and the Western Cretaceous Coal Seam Project (WCCSP) of the Gas Research institute has funded research efforts in the Piceance and San Juan basins of Colorado and New Mexico to further the knowledge of all facets of commercial coalbed natural gas reservoir development. Because of WCCSP research into openhole completion well effectiveness in the Fruitland play, and the need to complete a successful Cameo coal openhole well, the South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well was deemed to be an excellent chance for technology transfer and evaluation. Because of implementation of carefully designed air mist drilling and controlled openhole completion techniques, along with a sufficient magnitude of cleat permeability, it appears that the [number sign]11-15 well is commercial. The cavity was installed without major problems. The initial gas production test rate of roughly 280 MCFGPD is one of the best in South Shale Ridge. The [number sign]11-15 well case study is quite important in that it may serve to emphasize the point that the conservative attitude towards commercialization of previously untapped petroleum resources is often not correct. It is now an open question as to whether the conventional wisdom that most of the Cameo coal gas play is too tight to enable commercial production is indeed true, or if by analogy with Fruitland openhole wells, Cameo coal wells that have been hydraulic fracture stimulated are commonly very poorly connected to the cleat permeability of the reservoir. There is no significant reason to believe that the South Shale Ridge area is geologically unique, and thus there is a distinct possibility that more widespread Cameo coal production than has been previously recorded can be achieved.

Close, J.C. (Resource Enterprises, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Dowden, D. (Conquest Oil Co., Greeley, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

u' m .,. . Society of Petroleum Engineers u I SPE 49259 StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells R.M. Graves, SPE, Colorado School of Mines; and D.G. O'Brien, PE, SPE, Solutions Engineering Copyr@ht 1998, Scdety of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prapared for presentation at the 1998 SPE Annual Technicar Conference and Exhibition bald in New Orteans, Lcuisiana, 27-30 September 1998, This paper waa selected for presentation by en SPE Program Commiftee folrowing review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(a). Contents of the paper, as prasented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The materiar, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the .%ciety of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers prasented at SPE meetings

452

Stimulation rationale for shale gas wells: a state-of-the-art report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the large quantities of gas contained in the Devonian Shales, only a small percentage can be produced commercially by current production methods. This limited production derives both from the unique reservoir properties of the Devonian Shales and the lack of stimulation technologies specifically designed for a shale reservoir. Since October 1978 Science Applications, Inc. has been conducting a review and evaluation of various shale well stimulation techniques with the objective of defining a rationale for selecting certain treatments given certain reservoir conditions. Although this review and evaluation is ongoing and much more data will be required before a definitive rationale can be presented, the studies to date do allow for many preliminary observations and recommendations. For the hydraulic type treatments the use of low-residual-fluid treatments is highly recommended. The excellent shale well production which is frequently observed with only moderate wellbore enlargement treatments indicates that attempts to extend fractures to greater distances with massive hydraulic treatments are not warranted. Immediate research efforts should be concentrated upon limiting production damage by fracturing fluids retained in the formation, and upon improving proppant transport and placement so as to maximize fracture conductivity. Recent laboratory, numerical modeling and field studies all indicate that the gas fracturing effects of explosive/propellant type treatments are the predominate production enhancement mechanism and that these effects can be controlled and optimized with properly designed charges. Future research efforts should be focused upon the understanding, prediction and control of wellbore fracturing with tailored-pulse-loading charges. 36 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Young, C.; Barbour, T.; Blanton, T.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf January - June 2013 | Release Date: August 29, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 27, 2014 2013 Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf Highlights It should be noted that several factors influence the source of a company's crude oil imports. For example, a company like Motiva, which is partly owned by Saudi Refining Inc., would be expected to import a large percentage from the Persian Gulf, while Citgo Petroleum Corporation, which is owned by the Venezuelan state oil company, would not be expected to import a large percentage from the Persian Gulf, since most of their imports likely come from Venezuela. In addition, other factors that influence a specific company's sources of crude oil imports would include the characteristics of various crude oils as well as a company's economic

454

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir Data, Using Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sand. The Clinton is a tight gas-bearing sandstone. Natural fracturing is thought to account storage field located in Northeastern Ohio. The formation is a tight gas sandstone known as the Clinton for production in economic quantities. Sand occurs in lenses and is largely discontinuous from one well

Mohaghegh, Shahab

456

Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

457

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3,459 3,117 3,336 1,781 1,806 1,881 1,841 1,820 1,781 1,699 1,247 1,228 1992 4,284 3,872 4,141 4,027 4,047 3,883 3,964 3,957 3,892 4,169 4,146 4,334 1993 4,123 3,693 4,049 3,865 3,942 3,786 3,915 3,924 3,861 4,146 4,114 4,200 1994 3,639 3,242 3,557 3,409 3,488 3,384 3,552 3,643 3,597 3,796 3,818 3,991 1995 3,937 3,524 3,842 3,679 3,731 3,591 3,683 3,710 3,597 3,747 3,778 3,937 1996 3,960 4,174 4,704 4,202 3,860 4,239 4,285 4,447 4,978 4,585 4,564 4,512 1997 4,656 4,105 4,501 4,102 4,135 4,047 4,273 4,190 3,962 4,213 3,959 3,830

459

Evidence of Reopened Microfractures in Production Data of Hydraulically Fractured Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequently a discrepancy is found between the stimulated shale volume (SSV) estimated from production data and the SSV expected from injected water and proppant volume. One possible explanation is the presence of a fracture network, often termed fracture complexity, that may have been opened or reopened during the hydraulic fracturing operation. The main objective of this work is to investigate the role of fracture complexity in resolving the apparent SSV discrepancy and to illustrate whether the presence of reopened natural fracture network can be observed in pressure and production data of shale gas wells producing from two shale formations with different well and reservoir properties. Homogeneous, dual porosity and triple porosity models are investigated. Sensitivity runs based on typical parameters of the Barnett and the Horn River shale are performed. Then the field data from the two shales are matched. Homogeneous models for the two shale formations indicate effective infinite conductivity fractures in the Barnett well and only moderate conductivity fractures in the Horn River shale. Dual porosity models can support effectively infinite conductivity fractures in both shale formations. Dual porosity models indicate that the behavior of the Barnett and Horn River shale formations are different. Even though both shales exhibit apparent bilinear flow behavior the flow behaviors during this trend are different. Evidence of this difference comes from comparing the storativity ratio observed in each case to the storativity ratio estimated from injected fluid volumes during hydraulic fracturing. In the Barnett shale case similar storativity ratios suggest fracture complexity can account for the dual porosity behavior. In the Horn River case, the model based storativity ratio is too large to represent only fluids from hydraulic fracturing and suggests presence of existing shale formation microfractures.

Apiwathanasorn, Sippakorn

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Reservoir characteristics in Uinta basin gas wells. Final report, September 1, 1978-January 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Volumes of 29 lenticular tight gas sandstone reservoirs in the Uinta Basin, Utah have been approximated from long-term pressure buildups on 6 wells. Average reservoir volume was interpreted to be about 240,000 ft/sup 3/ per ft of net pay. Outcrop reservoir geometry studies indicate an average reservoir volume (without any reservoir interconnection assumed) of about 30% less than the average based upon production analysis. Therefore, some reservoir interconnection may exist. Results of this study are consistent with the Knutson lenticular reservoir model in which average reservoir width is 22 times the gross sand thickness, length is 10 times the width, and reservoir interconnection is a function of the sand fraction in the productive interval. Apparent reservoir permeabilities, assuming radial flow, range from .009 to .052 millidarcies and actual sandstone matrix permeabilities are interpreted to range from .06 to .21 millidarcies. Fracture half lengths are interpreted to be about 0.1 ft/bbl of fluid with an average proppant load of 1.2 to 1.7 lb/gal at injection rates of 18 to 24 BPM and injection pressures of 2,500 to 4,600 psi for each 100 ft of gross sand in the fracced interval.

Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

1979-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling Using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mark Hunt; Mahlon Dennis

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Heating oil prices rise due to winter demand and crude oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

465

Drop in U.S. gasoline prices reflects decline in crude oil costs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

466

Gasoline prices rise due to increased crude oil costs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

467

Attributes of crude oil at U.S. refineries vary by region - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

468

Refinery receipts of crude oil by rail, truck, and barge continue ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

469

WTI-Brent crude oil price spread has reached unseen levels - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

470

New data show record growth in U.S. crude oil reserves and strong ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

471

Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2/9/11 - 3/18/11) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2/9/11 - 3/18/11) Alabama State Oil and Gas Board: Oil Well Records (2/9/11 - 3/18/11) Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

472

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED HORIZONTAL WELLS IN TIGHT GAS SANDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing demand on fossil fuels and the decline in their production promote producing hydrocarbon from unconventional sources. Natural gas existing in tight reservoirs has a… (more)

Kulga, Ihsan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Analysis of pressure data from the horizontal wells with multiple hydraulic fractures in shale gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last several years, the unconventional gas reservoirs development has grown tremendously. Most of these unconventional reservoirs have very low permeability and are not… (more)

Tabar, Essa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6. 11. Skalle P, Podio AL, Trends extracted from 1,200 GulfGas District 4 – Update and Trends a report by P r e s t o nDistrict 4 – Update and Trends Figure 2: Oil and Gas Fields

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Application of Paraffin Deposition Model of Wellbore for Condensate Gas Well  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safety hazard caused by paraffin precipitation to normal oil and gas production cannot be ignored. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the paraffin precipitation, deposition mechanism, and variation discipline of phase state, prediction technology ... Keywords: deposition mechanism, paraffin precipitation, condensate gas reservoir

Xi-an Wang; Min Yang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

An analytical solution for transient gas flow in a multi-well system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with extraction and injection wells. The transient solutionthe extraction (or injection) well as a line sink (orwill be applied at the injection well. Although (11) and (

Shan, Chao

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

479

Crude Price & Differential  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... , making it more competitive with other boiler fuels, and the price of residual fuel relative to crude oil increases. Thus, both the light ...

480

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait, inday. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.Arabia PRODUCTION QUOTA Iran PRODUCTION QUOTA Venezuela

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas wells crude" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

482

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

483

Crude Oil Prices  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

484

Crude Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 41 Table 21. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued Year Month PAD District II...

485

Crude Oil Price Forecast  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We believe crude oil prices will strengthen somewhat, but prices will rise much more slowly than they fell, and they are expected to remain lower in ...

486

Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

injected oil, gas and water, produced/injected produced/injected oil, gas and water, produced oil, gas (at welland cyclically produced oil/water/steam (at well head) Steam

Jordan, Preston D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

IMPROVED TUBULARS FOR BETTER ECONOMICS IN DEEP GAS WELL DRILLING USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Originally, it was proposed to accomplish this by developing an efficient and economically viable continuous microwave process to sinter continuously formed/extruded steel powder for the manufacture of seamless coiled tubing and other tubular products. However, based on the results and faced with insurmountable difficulties in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program has been slightly changed. In the continuation proposal an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) is adopted. This process can be developed into a semi-continuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. Originally, the entire program was spread over three phases with the following goals: Phase I: Demonstration of the feasibility concept of continuous microwave sintering process for tubular steel products. Phase II: Design, building and testing of a prototype microwave system which shall be combined with a continuous extruder for steel tubular objects. Phase III: Execution of the plan for commercialization of the technology by one of the industrial partners. However, since some of the goals of the phase I were not completed, an extension of nine months was granted and we continued extrusion experiments, designed and built semicontinuous microwave sintering unit.

Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mahlon Dennis; Roderic Stanley

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

489

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook 1/12/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Costs U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Retail Motor Gasoline Prices* U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Working Gas in Storage (Percentage Difference fron Previous 5-Year Average)

490

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State: Part II. Experience of locating and drilling four shale-gas wells in New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the south-central area of New York State as part of this project. The four wells that were drilled are: the Rathbone well, in Steuben County, was located on the north side of a graben, in an old shale-gas field; it penetrated the Rhinestreet, Geneseo and Marcellus shales. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Rhinestreet, without marked success, and in the Marcellus; the latter formation has a calculated open flow of 110 Mcf/day and appears capable of initial production of 100 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 500 psi. The Dansville well, in Livingston County, tested the Geneseo and Marcellus shales at shallower depth. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Marcellus. The calculated open flow is 95 Mcf/day, and the well appears capable of initial production of 70 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 300 psi. The Erwin and N. Corning wells, both near Corning in Steuben County, were designed to test the possibility of collecting gas from a fractured conduit layer connecting to other fracture systems in the Rhinestreet shale. The N. Corning well failed; the expected conduit was found to be only slightly fractured. The Erwin well encountered a good initial show of gas at the conduit, but the gas flow was not maintained; even after artificial stimulation the production is only 10 Mcf/day. The present conclusion is that the most likely source of shale gas in south-central New York is the Marcellus shale formation. Important factors not yet established are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the potential of the Geneseo after stimulation.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consistent with OECD inventories, U.S. inventories are low. They have been well below the normal range for over one year. Crude oil stocks in the United States, while tending to...

492

UNITAR boosts cogeneration for heavy crude production  

SciTech Connect

The UNITAR/UNDP Information Center for Heavy Crude and Tar Sands publicized the favorable effect of cogeneration on the economics of generating steam for in situ recovery of heavy oil. Although cogeneration of electricity with the production of steam for heavy crude production is a rapidly growing activity in California, it is still unknown in other countries where heavy crude is produced. The study concentrated on two specific cases: a heavy crude cogeneration plant in Kern County in California and a heavy crude production plant at Wolf Lake in Alberta, Canada. A comparison of the two cases showed that due to the specific conditions in California, cogeneration can reduce, in this specific case, the cost of production of heavy crude by $4.80 per barrel whereas in the case of Wolf Lake, cogeneration would not be economic (electricity prices in relation to natural gas prices are much lower in Canada). One of the purposes of the UNITAR study was to direct attention in other countries producing heavy crude to the advantages of cogeneration.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high density of steam injection wells for thermal recovery.kilometres 20 miles Steam-injection wells per km 2 (mi 2 )average number of steam injection well blowouts and blowouts

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Natural gas stripper wells accounted for over 11% of U.S. natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(In contrast, the number of oil stripper wells remained comparatively flat, as did their share of total oil well production until 2003, ...

495

Regional long-term production modeling from a single well test, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the results from the open-hole formation pressure response test in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert well) using Schlumberger’s Modular Dynamics Formation Tester (MDT) wireline tool, the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison project performed long-term reservoir simulations on three different model reservoirs. These descriptions were based on 1) the Mount Elbert gas hydrate accumulation as delineated by an extensive history-matching exercise, 2) an estimation of the hydrate accumulation near the Prudhoe Bay L-pad, and 3) a reservoir that would be down-dip of the Prudhoe Bay L-pad and therefore warmer and deeper. All of these simulations were based, in part, on the results of the MDT results from the Mount Elbert Well. The comparison group’s consensus value for the initial perme- ability of the hydrate-filled reservoir (k = 0.12 mD) and the permeability model based on the MDT history match were used as the basis for subsequent simulations on the three regional scenarios. The simulation results of the five different simulation codes, CMG STARS, HydrateResSim, MH-21 HYDRES, STOMP-HYD, and TOUGHţHYDRATE exhibit good qualitative agreement and the variability of potential methane production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs is illustrated. As expected, the pre- dicted methane production rate increased with increasing in situ reservoir temperature; however, a significant delay in the onset of rapid hydrate dissociation is observed for a cold, homogeneous reservoir and it is found to be repeatable. The inclusion of reservoir heterogeneity in the description of this cold reservoir is shown to eliminate this delayed production. Overall, simulations utilized detailed information collected across the Mount Elbert reservoir either obtained or determined from geophysical well logs, including thickness (37 ft), porosity (35%), hydrate saturation (65%), intrinsic permeability (1000 mD), pore water salinity (5 ppt), and formation temperature (3.3–3.9 ?C). This paper presents the approach and results of extrapolating regional forward production modeling from history-matching efforts on the results from a single well test.

Anderson, Brian; Kurihara, Masanori; White, Mark D.; Moridis, George J.; Wilson, Scott J.; Pooladi-Darvish, Mehran; Gaddipati, Manohar; Masuda, Yoshihiro; Collett, T. S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Narita, Hideo; Rose, Kelly K.; Boswell, Ray

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

496

Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 51 Table 29. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) - Continued...

497

U.S. monthly crude oil production reaches highest level since 1998 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, ... U.S. crude oil production ... The last time the United States produced 6.5 million barrels per day or more of crude oil was in January 1998.

498

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a given facility were divided by its throughput to develop emissions factors Distribution curves were and Storage (99%) Transportation, Storage, and Distribution of Gasoline (99.5%) MTBE or EtOH for Gasoline.5%) Steam or Electricity Export NA: North American nNA: non-North American NG: natural gas G.H2 Compression

Argonne National Laboratory

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Cumulative Crude Production Additions (Annual)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This graph shows the cumulative growth of the Atlantic Basin light sweet crude oil production relative to the growth in crude oil production from the rest of the ...

500

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzed distribution of vehicles by last trip ending time for each region Generated PHEVs load profiles PSAT were adjusted to on-road values for this analysis PHEV miles driven by grid electricity and onWell-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Amgad