National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gas volume biomass

  1. Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass Volume I-Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas Produced by the Staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Office of Biomass Program (EERE) For the Office of the Biomass Program T. Werpy and G. Petersen, Editors U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable

  2. Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results ...

  3. DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  4. Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook...

  5. CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  6. CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CSL Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  7. BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility BJ Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  8. Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Sector Biomass...

  9. Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Facility Gas Utilization Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  10. Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility...

  11. Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  12. Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass...

  13. Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  14. Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Alameda County, California Coordinates...

  15. Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization...

  16. Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization...

  17. Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Balefill Landfill Gas...

  18. Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Lopez Landfill Gas...

  19. Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant...

  20. Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of Screening for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas | Department of Energy Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. 35523.pdf (1.41 MB) More Documents &

  1. Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Electric LLC BG E Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biomass Gas & Electric LLC (BG&E) Place: Norcross, Georgia Zip: 30092 Sector: Biomass Product: Project developer...

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  3. Gas turbine power generation from biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.A.; Litt, R.D.; Overend, R.P.; Bain, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Biomass Power Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as a major goal the development of cost-competitive technologies for the production of power from renewable biomass crops. The gasification of biomass provides the potential to meet this goal by efficiently and economically producing a renewable source of a clean gaseous fuel suitable for use in high efficiency gas turbines or as a substitute fuel in other combustion devices such as boilers, kilns, or other natural gas fired equipment. This paper discusses the development of the use of the Battelle high-throughput gasification process for power generation systems. Projected process economics are presented along with a description of current experimental operations coupling a gas turbine power generation system to the research scale gasifier.

  4. Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume II„Results of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume IIResults of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume IIResults of ...

  5. Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Anderson County, Tennessee Coordinates 36.0809574, -84.2278796 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Hot-gas conditioning of biomass derived synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.A.; Litt, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Battelle has tested selected catalysts to evaluate the potential for hot-gas conditioning of biomass gasifier product gas to modify the product gas to produce a gas suitable for methanol synthesis. The Battelle Process Research Unit (PRU) gasifier was utilized as a source of a stable supply of product gas that contained all of the trace constituents that might be present in a commercial scale gasification system. One goal of alternate fuel generation with renewable biomass fuels is the production of a liquid transportation fuel such as methanol. The hot-gas conditioning tests run were planned to evaluate commercial catalysts that would crack hydrocarbons and provide water gas shift activity to adjust the product gas composition for methanol synthesis. During the test program, a novel, low cost catalyst, was identified that showed high levels of activity and stability. The composition of this catalyst is such that it has the potential to be a disposable catalyst and is free from hazardous materials. The initial tests with this catalyst showed high levels of water gas shift activity superior to, and hydrocarbon cracking activity nearly as high as, a commercial cracking catalyst tested.

  7. Managing natural gas volume analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, J. ); Treat, R. ); Bergen, H. )

    1994-07-01

    In late 1992, Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America and BMP Energy Systems began the joint development of a system for the automated verification and statistical correction of gas volume data captured at meter locations by flow computers. NGPL required a single system that would provide functionality for both chart processing and automated EFM data validation and correction. The pipeline company was looking for a vendor that would help develop a system to handle EFM data. The NGAS 4[trademark] system implemented at NGPL made the bridge from monthly to daily gas volume processing. The automated and rapid validation of flow data within the NGAS 4 system minimizes human intervention for validation and correction. NGPL has moved from reliance on paper chart processing to the EFM capability required in the evolving US gas market.

  8. DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars February 6: Live Webinar on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies ...

  9. Biomass and Natural Gas to Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Josephine Elia, Graduate Student, Princeton University

  10. Engineering analysis of biomass gasifier product gas cleaning technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Moore, R.H.; Mudge, L.K.; Elliott, D.C.

    1986-08-01

    For biomass gasification to make a significant contribution to the energy picture in the next decade, emphasis must be placed on the generation of clean, pollutant-free gas products. This reports attempts to quantify levels of particulated, tars, oils, and various other pollutants generated by biomass gasifiers of all types. End uses for biomass gases and appropriate gas cleaning technologies are examined. Complete systems analysis is used to predit the performance of various gasifier/gas cleanup/end use combinations. Further research needs are identified. 128 refs., 20 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-01

    This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

  12. Biomass Gas Cleanup Using a Therminator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dayton, David C; Kataria, Atish; Gupta, Rabhubir

    2012-03-06

    The objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel fluidized-bed process module called a Therminator to simultaneously destroy and/or remove tar, NH3 and H2S from raw syngas produced by a fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The raw syngas contains as much as 10 g/m3 of tar, 4,000 ppmv of NH3 and 100 ppmv of H2S. The goal of the Therminator module would be to use promising regenerable catalysts developed for removing tar, ammonia, and H2S down to low levels (around 10 ppm). Tars are cracked to a non-condensable gas and coke that would deposit on the acid catalyst. We will deposit coke, much like a fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) in a petroleum refinery. The deposited coke fouls the catalyst, much like FCC, but the coke would be burned off in the regenerator and the regenerated catalyst would be returned to the cracker. The rapid circulation between the cracker and regenerator would ensure the availability of the required amount of regenerated catalyst to accomplish our goal. Also, by removing sulfur down to less than 10 ppmv, NH3 decomposition would also be possible in the cracker at 600-700°C. In the cracker, tar decomposes and lays down coke on the acid sites of the catalyst, NH3 is decomposed using a small amount of metal (e.g., nickel or iron) catalyst incorporated into the catalyst matrix, and H2S is removed by a small amount of a metal oxide (e.g. zinc oxide or zinc titanate) by the H2S-metal oxide reaction to form metal sulfide. After a tolerable decline in activity for these reactions, the catalyst particles (and additives) are transported to the regenerator where they are exposed to air to remove the coke and to regenerate the metal sulfide back to metal oxide. Sulfate formation is avoided by running the regeneration with slightly sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen. Following regeneration, the catalyst is transported back to the cracker and the cycling continues. Analogous to an FCC reactor system, rapid cycling will allow the use of very

  13. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Gas Technology Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gas Technology Institute will conduct research and development on hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion processes to make gasoline and diesel.

  14. Advanced systems demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume II. Technical specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This volume contains all of the technical specifications relating to materials and construction of the biomass cogeneration facility in the state of Maine. (DMC)

  15. Biomass gasification for gas turbine-based power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.A.; Anson, D.

    1998-04-01

    The Biomass Power Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as a major goal the development of cost-competitive technologies for the production of power from renewable biomass crops. The gasification of biomass provides the potential to meet this goal by efficiently and economically producing a renewable source of a clean gaseous fuel suitable for use in high-efficiency gas turbines. This paper discusses the development and first commercial demonstration of the Battelle high-throughput gasification process for power generation systems. Projected process economics are presented along with a description of current experimental operations coupling a gas turbine power generation system to the research scale gasifier and the process scaleup activities in Burlington, Vermont.

  16. Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

  17. First biomass conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this third volume deal with Environmental Issues, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. Concerning Environmental Issues, the following topics are emphasized: Global Climate Change, Biomass Utilization, Biofuel Test Procedures, and Commercialization of Biomass Products. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  19. Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived CO2 into Fuels and Chemicals Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived CO2 into Fuels and ...

  20. Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Energy Co-Evolution of Biofuels Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae ... HomeBiomass Permalink One-Pot-to-Prep Biomass for Biofuels Biofuels, Biomass, Energy, ...

  1. New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Underground Storage ... Underground Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New York Underground Natural Gas ...

  2. New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage ... Underground Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New Mexico Underground Natural Gas ...

  3. Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-22

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

  4. Natural gas annual 1992. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-22

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data for the Nation from 1930 to 1992, and by State from 1967 to 1992. The Supplement of this report presents profiles of selected companies.

  5. Bioenergy `96: Partnerships to develop and apply biomass technologies. Volume I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The conference proceedings consist of two volumes of papers detailing numerous issues related to biomass energy production and use. An author and keyword index are provided in the proceedings. A total of 143 papers were selected for the database. Papers were selected from the following areas from Volume 1: feedstock production, harvest, storage, and delivery; the DOE biomass power program; technical, economic, and policy barriers and incentives; new developments in biomass combustion; advancements in biomass gasification; liquid fuels production and use; and case studies of bioenergy projects. From Volume 2, subtopics selected included: bioenergy systems for distributed generation; assessment and use of biomass wastes; non-technical barriers to bioenergy implementation; improving commercial viability through integrated systems; and anaerobic digestion.

  6. A small scale biomass fueled gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, J.D.; Purvis, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWd) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The new power plants are also expected to economically utilize annual plant growth materials (such as rice hulls, cotton gin trash, nut shells, and various straws, grasses, and animal manures) that are not normally considered as fuel for power plants. This paper summarizes the new power generation concept with emphasis on the engineering challenges presented by the gas turbine component.

  7. Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume II„Results of Screening

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin | Department of Energy Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume II„Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume II„Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin This report evaluates lignins role as a renewable raw material resource. pnnl-16983.pdf (1006.18 KB) More Documents & Publications Low Cost Carbon Fiber from Renewable Resources

  8. East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

  9. ,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume ... 8:27:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume ...

  10. The potential for biomass to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in the Northeastern US. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernow, S.S.; Gurney, K.; Prince, G.; Cyr, M.

    1992-04-01

    This study, for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) of the Coalition of Northeast Governors (CONEG), evaluates the potential for local, state and regional biomass policies to contribute to an overall energy/biomass strategy for the reduction of greenhouse gas releases in the Northeastern United States. Biomass is a conditionally renewable resource that can play a dual role: by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in meeting our energy needs; and by removing carbon from the atmosphere and sequestering it in standing biomass stocks and long-lived products. In this study we examine the contribution of biomass to the energy system in the Northeast and to the region`s net releases of carbon dioxide and methane, and project these releases over three decades, given a continuation of current trends and policies. We then compare this Reference Case with three alternative scenarios, assuming successively more aggressive efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through strategic implementation of energy efficiency and biomass resources. Finally, we identify and examine policy options for expanding the role of biomass in the region`s energy and greenhouse gas mitigation strategies.

  11. Economic development through biomass system integration: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLong, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    This report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. Chapters describe alfalfa basics, production risks, production economics, transportation and storage, processing, products, market analysis, business analysis, environmental impact, and policy issues. 69 figs., 63 tabs.

  12. Co-conversion of Biomass, Shale-natural gas, and process-derived CO2 into Fuels and Chemicals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Suresh Babu, Senior Program Manager, Biomass Program Development, Brookhaven National Laboratory

  13. First Biomass Conference of the Americas: Energy, environment, agriculture, and industry. Proceedings, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This conference was designed to provide a national and international forum to support the development of a viable biomass industry. Although papers on research activities and technologies under development that address industry problems comprised part of this conference, an effort was made to focus on scale-up and demonstration projects, technology transfer to end users, and commercial applications of biomass and wastes. The conference was divided into these major subject areas: Resource Base, Power Production, Transportation Fuels, Chemicals and Products, Environmental Issues, Commercializing Biomass Projects, Biomass Energy System Studies, and Biomass in Latin America. The papers in this second volume cover Transportation Fuels, and Chemicals and Products. Transportation Fuels topics include: Biodiesel, Pyrolytic Liquids, Ethanol, Methanol and Ethers, and Commercialization. The Chemicals and Products section includes specific topics in: Research, Technology Transfer, and Commercial Systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated

  15. Estimating the variable cost for high-volume and long-haul transportation of densified biomass and biofuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Md. S. Roni; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01

    This article analyzes rail transportation costs of products that have similar physical properties as densified biomass and biofuel. The results of this cost analysis are useful to understand the relationship and quantify the impact of a number of factors on rail transportation costs of denisfied biomass and biofuel. These results will be beneficial and help evaluate the economic feasibility of high-volume and long-haul transportation of biomass and biofuel. High-volume and long-haul rail transportation of biomass is a viable transportation option for biofuel plants, and for coal plants which consider biomass co-firing. Using rail optimizes costs, and optimizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to transportation. Increasing bioenergy production would consequently result in lower GHG emissions due to displacing fossil fuels. To estimate rail transportation costs we use the carload waybill data, provided by Department of Transportation’s Surface Transportation Board for products such as grain and liquid type commodities for 2009 and 2011. We used regression analysis to quantify the relationship between variable transportation unit cost ($/ton) and car type, shipment size, rail movement type, commodity type, etc. The results indicate that: (a) transportation costs for liquid is $2.26/ton–$5.45/ton higher than grain type commodity; (b) transportation costs in 2011 were $1.68/ton–$5.59/ton higher than 2009; (c) transportation costs for single car shipments are $3.6/ton–$6.68/ton higher than transportation costs for multiple car shipments of grains; (d) transportation costs for multiple car shipments are $8.9/ton and $17.15/ton higher than transportation costs for unit train shipments of grains.

  16. Biomass Gas Clean-Up Using a Therminator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-04-01

    Clean-up and conditioning of syngas is a key technical barrier to the commercialization of biomass gasification systems. Current technologies do not meet the necessary performance, cost, and environmental criteria to achieve commercialization of biomass gasification technologies.

  17. Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will present a live webinar titled "The Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies" on Thursday, February 6, 2013, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. During the webinar, Mr. Zia Haq and Mr. Prasad Gupte, of BETO, and Mr. Timothy Skone, of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, will present an overview of Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids technology, advantages of using natural gas, and some key themes that were established at the September Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids Workshop.

  18. ,"Midwest Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at ...dnavnghistn5030852m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  19. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","22016" ...dnavnghistn5030us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  20. ,"East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at ...dnavnghistn5030832m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  1. ,"Pacific Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pacific Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or ...dnavnghistn5030912m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  2. ,"Mountain Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mountain Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or ...dnavnghistn5030862m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  3. International and Domestic Market Opportunities for Biomass Power: Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1998-09-01

    This report examines the domestic and international markets for biopower. Domestic and foreign markets present fundamentally different challenges to private power developers. Volume I focuses on the domestic market for biopower. The domestic challenge lies in finding economically viable opportunities for biopower. Vol. I outlines the current state of the U.S. biomass industry, discusses policies affecting biomass development, describes some demonstration projects currently underway, and discusses the future direction of the industry. Volume II focuses on the international market for biopower. Recent literature states that the electricity investment and policy climate in foreign markets are the key elements in successful private project development. Vol. II discusses the financing issues, policy climate, and business incentives and barriers to biopower development. As India and China are the largest future markets for biopower, they are the focus of this volume. Three other top markets- -Brazil, Indonesia, and the Philippines--are also discussed. Potential financial resources wrap up the discussion.

  4. Impact study on the use of biomass-derived fuels in gas turbines for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, C.A.; Bernstein, H.

    1994-01-01

    This report evaluates the properties of fuels derived from biomass, both gaseous and liquid, against the fuel requirements of gas turbine systems for gernating electrical power. The report attempts to be quantitative rather than merely qualitative to establish the significant variations in the properties of biomass fuels from those of conventional fuels. Three general categories are covered: performance, durability, and storage and handling.

  5. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  6. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  7. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mo2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  8. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ok2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  9. ,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  10. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  11. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  12. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  13. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030md2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  14. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ia2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  15. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  16. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  17. ,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030wa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  18. ,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mt2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  19. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  20. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  1. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030il2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  2. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ky2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  3. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  4. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  5. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  6. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  7. ,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  8. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030wy2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  9. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  10. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  11. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  12. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Reducing GHG emissions by co-utilization of coal with natural gas or biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, I.M.

    2004-07-01

    Energy reserves price and security of supply issues are discussed in the context of the prospects for coal and policies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Coal is projected to remain a major source of energy, with most of the demand growth in developing countries. Currently available power-generating technologies, deploying coal with natural gas or biomass, are examined. Examples of successful, partial substitution of coal by other fuels in power stations are highlighted, including the GHG emissions reductions achieved as well as the costs where available. Among various options, hybrid gasification and parallel cofiring of coal with biomass and natural gas appear to have the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions. Much may also be achieved by cofiring, reburning, and repowering with gas turbines. The best method differs between different power systems. Co-utilization of biomass with coal is a least-cost option to reduce GHG emissions where the fuel prices are comparable, usually due to subsidies or taxes. The role of biomass is likely to increase due to greater use of subsidies, carbon taxes, and emissions trading within the context of the Kyoto Protocol. This should provide opportunities for clean coal technology transfer and diffusion, including biomass co-utilization. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feldmann, Herman F.; Paisley, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

  16. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Gas lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes the fundamentals of gas lasers. It provides information and data on neutral gas lasers, ionized gas lasers, and molecular gas lasers. Concluding this volume is an extensive table of all gas laser wavelengths.

  17. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillion, Donald W.

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  18. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Paisley, M.A.

    1989-05-09

    A method is described for operating a gasifier which comprises: introducing inlet gas at a velocity of about 0.5 to 7 ft/sec to fluidize a bed in a gasifier vessel; forming the bed into a fluidized bed in a first space region by means of the inlet gas, the fluidized bed containing a circulating hot relatively fine and inert solid bed particle component; inputting and throughputting carbonaceous material into and through the first space region with fluidized bed at a rate from 500-4400 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr; endothermally pyrolyzing the carbonaceous material by means of the circulating hot inert particle component so as to form a product gas; forming contiguous to and above the fluidized bed a lower average density entrained space region containing an entrained mixture of inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material and the product gas; gradually and continuously removing the entrained mixture and the product gas from the lower average density entrained space region of the gasifier to a separator, residence time of the carbonaceous material in the gasifier not exceeding 3 minutes on average; separating the entrained mixture from the product gas; passing the entrained mixture containing inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material through an exothermic reaction zone to add heat; and returning at least the inert solid particles to the first space region.

  19. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.L.; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Jenkins, B.M.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.; Bryers, R.W.; Oden, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  20. Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 27,878 27,848 27,810 27,846 27,946 28,419 28,946 ...

  1. Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy

  2. Sustainable Transportation Fuels from Natural Gas (H{sub 2}), Coal and Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, Gerald

    2012-12-31

    This research program is focused primarily on the conversion of coal, natural gas (i.e., methane), and biomass to liquid fuels by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), with minimum production of carbon dioxide. A complementary topic also under investigation is the development of novel processes for the production of hydrogen with very low to zero production of CO{sub 2}. This is in response to the nation's urgent need for a secure and environmentally friendly domestic source of liquid fuels. The carbon neutrality of biomass is beneficial in meeting this goal. Several additional novel approaches to limiting carbon dioxide emissions are also being explored.

  3. Novel Approach for Biomass Synthesis Gas Cleaning for Liquid Fuel Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Approach for Biomass Synthesis Gas Cleaning for Liquid Fuel Applications WBS 3.2.5.9 May 22, 2013 Thermo-chemical Platform Review Presented by: Ben Phillips, Emery Energy Lyman Frost, Ceramatec 2 Project Overview * Start Date - 9/30/2008 * Completion Date - Dec 2012 * Construction - 100% complete * Project - 100% complete 1. Tt-C - Gasification of Wood, Biorefinery Residue Streams and Low Sugar Biomass 2. Tt-F - Syngas Cleanup & Conditioning 3. Tt-H - Validation of Syngas Quality Total

  4. One Step Biomass Gas Reforming-Shift Separation Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Souleimanova, Razima

    2012-12-28

    GTI developed a plan where efforts were concentrated in 4 major areas: membrane material development, membrane module development, membrane process development, and membrane gasifier scale-up. GTI assembled a team of researchers to work in each area. Task 1.1 Ceramic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by Arizona State University (ASU), Task 1.2 Metallic Membrane Synthesis and Testing was conducted by the U.S. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Task 1.3 was conducted by SCHOTT, and GTI was to test all membranes that showed potential. The initial focus of the project was concentrated on membrane material development. Metallic and glass-based membranes were identified as hydrogen selective membranes under the conditions of the biomass gasification, temperatures above 700C and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. Membranes were synthesized by arc-rolling for metallic type membranes and incorporating Pd into a glass matrix for glass membranes. Testing for hydrogen permeability properties were completed and the effects of hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide were investigated for perspective membranes. The initial candidate membrane of Pd80Cu20 chosen in 2008 was selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Although the H2A analysis results indicated a $1.96 cost per gge H2 based on a 5A (micron) thick PdCu membrane, there was not long-term operation at the required flux to satisfy the go/no go decision. Since the future PSA case yielded a $2.00/gge H2, DOE decided that there was insufficient savings compared with the already proven PSA technology to further pursue the membrane reactor design. All ceramic membranes synthesized by ASU during the project showed low hydrogen flux as compared with metallic membranes. The best ceramic membrane showed hydrogen permeation flux of 0.03 SCFH/ft2 at the required process conditions while the metallic membrane, Pd80Cu20 showed a flux of 47.2 SCFH/ft2 (3 orders of magnitude difference). Results from

  5. Gas in developing countries: Volume 2, Country studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains detailed case-studies of the history and prospects for natural gas utilization in eight developing countries: Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand and Tunisia. All of these countries have been visited by members of the research team, with the exception of Pakistan. Running through all the case-histories is the importance of defining a clear market for the gas. In some cases this can prove remarkably difficult, especially when the oil price is relatively low. In other cases a market does exist, but is very limited in relation to the size of available reserves. The other theme which recurs over and over again is the importance of the relationship between the government and its agencies, and the foreign oil companies which are involved in exploration and development of gas reserves. These two issues are addressed in detail in each case study. But it is also the case that each country highlights specific aspects of the gas story.

  6. Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced Biomass Feedstock Logistics Supply Chains in Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cafferty, Kara G.; Searcy, Erin M.; Nguyen, Long; Spatari, Sabrina

    2014-11-01

    To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels and access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver on-spec biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”, which densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The harvesting, preprocessing, and logistics (HPL) of biomass commodity supply chains thus could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn stover logisticsHPL within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the HPL gate-to-gate sequence. The results show that the transport of densified biomass introduces the highest variability and contribution to the carbon footprint of the logistics HPL supply chain (0.2-13 g CO2e/MJ). Moreover, depending upon the biomass availability and its spatial density and surrounding transportation infrastructure (road and rail), logistics HPL processes can increase the variability in life cycle environmental impacts for lignocellulosic biofuels. Within Kansas, life cycle GHG emissions could range from 24 to 41 g CO2e/MJ depending upon the location, size and number of preprocessing depots constructed. However, this

  7. Small scale biomass fueled gas turbine power plant. Report for February 1992--October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, C.R.; Craig, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper discusses a new-generation, small-scale (<20 MWe) biomass-fueled power plant that is being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. Such power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The new power plants are also expected to economically utilize annual plant growth material (e.g., straw, grass, rice hulls, animal manure, cotton gin trash, and nut shells) that are not normally considered as fuel for power plants. The paper summarizes the new power generation concept with emphasis on the engineering challenges presented by the gas turbine component.

  8. Investigating and Using Biomass Gases

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will be introduced to biomass gasification and will generate their own biomass gases. Students generate these everyday on their own and find it quite amusing, but this time they’ll do it by heating wood pellets or wood splints in a test tube. They will collect the resulting gases and use the gas to roast a marshmallow. Students will also evaluate which biomass fuel is the best according to their own criteria or by examining the volume of gas produced by each type of fuel.

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 377,554 379,627 371,519 372,188 379,245 393,418 407,240 421,000 435,705 450,886 459,955 452,883 1991 405,740 373,892 361,085 367,797 387,769 411,591 425,349 435,719 453,303 477,425 464,906 433,184 1992 387,456 358,639 345,049 348,097 369,129 388,728 403,713 413,375 432,171 452,989 447,115 411,919 1993 365,128 321,651

  10. Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 706,889 648,325 624,515 616,656 665,124 729,161 807,726 878,119 930,596 949,922 938,864 867,940 1991 743,402 679,102 654,930 682,092 729,387 786,753 845,224 891,823 911,554 952,843 894,499 818,602 1992 733,877 658,347 592,859 592,608 637,515 705,740 780,590 849,043 917,537 946,090 899,631 810,348 1993 710,139 607,908

  11. Mountain Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Mountain Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 558,453 523,122 503,750 502,309 519,323 541,977 562,863 580,527 598,135 610,882 598,284 573,155 2015 552,277 537,185 537,004 539,816 558,882 578,300 595,505 610,816 626,924 638,383 633,170 611,934 2016 582,516 569,950 570,852 578,589 603,180 623,304 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  12. AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 3,605,263 3,281,694 3,164,033 3,297,696 3,531,074 3,786,195 4,043,225 4,279,875 4,477,279 4,588,167 4,522,088 4,292,649 1995 3,905,789 3,514,201 3,360,765 3,369,823 3,576,559 3,812,014 3,968,751 4,159,006 4,362,855 4,483,271 4,279,539 3,905,710 1996 3,483,209 3,190,123 2,987,233

  13. AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 1,433,462 1,329,400 1,322,914 1,388,877 1,498,496 1,553,493 1,643,445 1,714,361 1,785,350 1,819,344 1,810,791 1,716,773 1995 1,601,428 1,510,175 1,467,414 1,509,666 1,586,445 1,662,195 1,696,619 1,688,515 1,768,189 1,818,098 1,757,160 1,613,046 1996 1,436,765 1,325,994 1,223,139 1,264,513 1,334,894

  14. California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 369,842 350,519 355,192 376,146 401,513 414,633 418,894 421,696 426,235 440,326 397,785 1991 376,267 376,879 359,926 380,826 407,514 431,831 445,387 448,286 448,383 448,081 441,485 417,177 1992 374,166 357,388 341,665 355,718 382,516 404,547 418,501 431,069 445,438 455,642 446,085 390,868 1993 357,095 337,817 348,097

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 806,109 754,941 721,785 717,863 749,618 782,498 812,054 847,731 881,760 900,526 903,640 870,265 1991 801,635 753,141 727,699 720,275 751,641 781,883 810,535 844,477 877,485 904,206 885,341 851,258 1992 791,129 743,484 716,909 709,150 742,812 774,578 805,097 843,543 878,334 905,597 887,454 844,108 1993 783,875 735,236

  16. Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 96,943 93,233 91,600 91,945 93,696 95,361 97,632 101,323 105,497 108,028 108,772 105,317 1991 99,409 90,625 87,381 86,706 88,659 89,700 93,022 97,673 102,161 119,470 106,066 101,121 1992 94,379 89,893 85,767 85,259 86,457 88,999 94,154 98,267 103,478 106,422 103,871 100,288 1993 95,109 90,016 87,368 88,414 89,388 91,515

  17. Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 245,145 234,971 229,066 227,002 227,589 232,695 244,279 256,395 272,036 278,715 307,106 283,959 1991 247,980 246,067 240,702 238,606 244,878 254,222 257,114 260,728 271,373 282,551 273,225 274,836 1992 267,254 254,115 244,632 239,589 241,818 244,415 248,599 260,231 270,362 273,183 262,414 247,855 1993 229,148 213,533 208,832

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 167,899 166,624 167,576 172,320 177,680 185,467 192,473 199,674 202,983 198,545 192,581 1991 183,697 180,169 176,535 181,119 183,491 186,795 192,143 195,330 198,776 198,351 191,831 189,130 1992 189,866 188,587 183,694 182,008 180,781 182,342 185,893 187,501 191,689 202,391 200,871 197,857 1993 192,736 181,774 172,140

  19. Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 799 683 623 539 539 539 673 807 919 1,022 1,126 1,127 1999 996 872 741 661 658 802 909 985 1,089 1,194 1,251 1,195 2000 1,031 855 792 729 711 711 711 711 711 760 874 959 2001 963 903 830 761 865 978 1,009 1,072 1,118 1,180 938 937 2002 987 988 990 990 965 962 949 945 942 940 852 852 2003 744

  20. Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 439,384 418,280 409,494 412,498 435,089 454,844 474,266 493,301 510,714 521,774 518,006 489,515 1991 477,781 454,923 439,191 448,258 461,362 490,259 505,168 523,544 538,399 546,343 533,483 506,672 1992 463,200 428,363 392,474 394,514 420,383 452,412 478,259 500,938 516,378 527,568 522,419 491,542 1993 452,510 407,121 368,376

  1. Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 296,629 281,511 286,917 279,978 298,202 307,083 317,720 325,432 332,591 338,392 353,804 327,277 1991 283,982 278,961 284,515 298,730 313,114 323,305 324,150 328,823 338,810 342,711 317,072 306,300 1992 288,415 280,038 276,287 282,263 290,192 301,262 318,719 326,705 339,394 346,939 330,861 299,990 1993 275,054 253,724

  2. Pacific Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Pacific Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 456,688 373,776 363,397 402,887 459,189 507,932 533,461 561,487 576,755 604,676 598,236 581,556 2015 535,012 532,186 534,713 552,592 584,491 595,030 603,251 606,862 617,976 638,832 628,206 579,071 2016 535,527 521,897 525,124 546,324 565,012 575,122 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  3. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 516,257 477,783 453,124 462,399 511,406 619,401 671,431 711,942 717,828 719,002 665,421 1991 543,808 501,265 471,608 482,628 527,550 545,866 569,927 607,093 651,148 669,612 658,358 627,857 1992 559,416 497,895 441,187 445,158 485,227 535,829 579,713 622,943 665,414 690,920 692,280 650,707 1993 580,189 479,149 417,953

  4. South Central Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) South Central Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 1,719,230 1,501,862 1,386,639 1,476,237 1,609,924 1,719,264 1,809,652 1,864,897 1,989,374 2,150,785 2,144,710 2,104,699 2015 1,889,028 1,633,827 1,629,734 1,804,453 1,977,770 2,061,225 2,109,107 2,154,799 2,265,050 2,381,950 2,393,620 2,359,631 2016 2,152,101 2,077,659 2,133,050 2,216,522 2,295,137

  5. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  6. [Inspection of gas cylinders in storage at TA-54, Area L]. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-06-23

    ERC sampled, analyzed, and rcontainerized when necessary gas cylinders containing various chemicals in storage at LANL TA-54 Area L. This report summarizes the operation. This is Volume 2 of five volumes.

  7. Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 50,980 47,820 48,924 49,656 52,214 53,271 55,370 58,030 60,465 61,702 59,577 58,586 1991 55,450 52,159 50,537 51,458 52,941 54,594 55,998 58,233 60,342 61,017 61,304 61,207 1992 56,350 51,413 48,752 47,855 51,162 53,850 55,670 58,057 60,123 61,373 61,882 59,775 1993 56,503 52,155 50,240 49,746 51,939 53,114 54,206 55,924

  8. Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 6,363 5,796 5,866 6,343 6,672 6,784 6,916 6,964 7,025 7,052 7,050 6,662 1991 6,206 5,968 5,862 6,017 6,274 6,586 6,878 6,869 6,962 6,928 6,846 6,789 1992 6,341 6,211 5,883 5,675 6,064 6,371 6,668 6,848 6,974 6,970 6,962 6,759 1993 6,363 5,945 5,527 5,479 5,796 6,140 6,549 6,678 6,916 6,999 6,923 6,612 1994 6,085 5,890

  9. Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 29,681 27,396 27,647 28,756 28,751 28,746 28,740 29,021 29,527 29,748 29,757 29,469 1991 29,271 27,475 26,419 28,555 29,238 29,338 29,633 29,935 30,147 30,365 30,564 30,552 1992 29,054 27,856 27,527 29,097 29,524 29,671 29,937 30,155 30,363 30,554 30,546 30,539 1993 29,448 27,637 26,552 28,101 29,150 29,601 29,704 30,020

  10. Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 82,538 81,491 81,181 82,095 83,472 85,002 83,477 83,923 85,020 84,918 81,317 1991 79,407 78,372 77,653 78,788 81,843 83,985 83,721 83,657 84,562 84,253 83,847 81,475 1992 79,888 78,880 78,837 79,448 81,080 83,708 85,758 86,968 88,154 87,853 85,260 81,824 1993 78,414 76,448 75,412 76,380 79,328 82,649 85,226 87,084 88,593

  11. Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 59,806 56,937 55,229 54,606 57,328 55,249 67,314 75,921 83,365 86,778 66,668 58,461 1991 61,574 54,369 50,745 51,761 54,314 60,156 66,484 70,498 74,646 75,367 70,399 63,453 1992 59,541 59,119 59,059 60,896 64,403 67,171 70,690 75,362 78,483 79,756 74,021 67,181 1993 61,308 56,251 52,595 52,028 58,713 65,349 69,968 75,120 80,183

  12. Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 3,654 3,215 2,903 3,108 3,416 3,720 3,906 4,241 4,507 4,731 4,691 4,330 1999 4,004 3,548 3,215 3,397 3,666 3,872 4,078 4,280 4,691 4,792 4,599 4,118 2000 3,398 3,283 3,289 3,456 3,735 3,941 4,160 4,366 4,357 4,785 4,434 3,720 2001 3,183 3,135 2,844 3,275 3,788 4,180 4,424 4,728 4,988 5,013 5,073

  13. Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 84,808 83,269 82,768 83,325 84,578 85,786 88,481 93,162 94,241 91,519 89,490 1991 88,736 88,074 88,116 88,232 88,856 90,844 93,067 94,814 95,931 96,017 94,024 91,897 1992 89,501 87,487 86,672 86,591 86,973 87,552 88,718 88,823 89,685 88,636 86,873 83,311 1993 79,912 77,520 77,152 77,647 78,635 80,704 82,755 84,356 85,549

  14. Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1995 1,379 1,377 1,113 1,113 1,140 1,182 1,218 1,436 2,028 1,955 1,766 1,365 1996 1,311 1,014 852 1,006 1,373 2,042 2,247 2,641 3,081 3,198 3,069 2,309 1997 1,778 1,594 1,619 1,749 2,020 2,113 2,156 2,443 2,705 2,956 2,713 2,713 1998 1,963 1,775 1,527 1,772 1,917 2,540 2,531 2,730 2,329 2,942 2,943 2,805 1999 1,992 1,878 1,566

  15. Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 66,554 61,757 56,567 52,684 52,375 56,614 62,829 68,028 73,035 74,259 80,053 1991 71,524 69,768 62,807 61,367 62,448 66,425 70,705 75,800 80,506 82,065 83,134 82,145 1992 78,319 74,888 68,199 64,030 63,685 65,682 69,830 76,095 82,007 84,134 81,041 78,303 1993 73,838 68,733 66,224 62,799 65,511 70,157 73,322 77,155 81,457

  16. Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 6,996 5,657 4,959 6,140 7,648 8,892 9,656 10,292 10,664 10,853 10,808 10,057 1991 8,982 8,017 6,250 5,271 5,985 7,539 8,997 10,089 10,763 11,102 11,125 10,638 1992 9,070 7,530 5,944 5,502 7,074 8,614 9,809 10,819 11,272 11,445 10,346 9,766 1993 7,848 6,452 5,724 5,298 6,942 8,240 9,421 10,463 11,041 11,531 10,800 9,697 1994

  17. Gas in developing countries: Volume 1, Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-17

    When gas is discovered in a developing country, and there is either insufficient to justify an Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) export project, or a surplus over-and-above LNG requirements, what are the problems that hinder its development for the internal market in that country. Are there positive steps that can be taken to facilitate such development. The major focus of this study is therefore on the problems that arise in negotiating and implementing agreements between companies and governments. The asymmetries and differences between the behavior and perceptions of the two groups impinge on the conduct of negotiations and the nature of agreements reached between the parties. Objectives are examined for each group as well as the procedures they follow and the constraints under which they operate. The effect of differences on exploration contracts, on pricing and on fiscal regimes are examined and practical ways in which the different objectives of governments and companies can be reconciled to their mutual advantage are suggested. The report is divided into two parts. This Volume, Part One of the report, contains a synthesis of our views on the issues raised by research, and the main conclusions.

  18. Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume II„Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass Volume II-Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin 1 JE Holladay 2 JJ Bozell 1 JF White 3 D Johnson 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 University of Tennessee 3 National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 2007 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-16983 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

  19. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass

  20. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J., Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents an exploration of the relationships between biomass feedstocks and the conversion processes that utilize them. Specifically, it discusses the effect of the physical and chemical structure of biomass on conversion yields, rates, and efficiencies in a wide variety of available or experimental conversion processes. A greater understanding of the complex relationships between these conversion systems and the production of biomass for energy uses is required to help optimize the complex network of biomass production, collection, transportation, and conversion to useful energy products. The review of the literature confirmed the scarcity of research aimed specifically at identifying the effect of feedstock properties on conversion. In most cases, any mention of feedstock-related effects was limited to a few brief remarks (usually in qualitative terms) in the conclusions, or as a topic for further research. Attempts to determine the importance of feedstock parameters from published data were further hampered by the lack of consistent feedstock characterization and the difficulty of comparing results between different experimental systems. Further research will be required to establish quantitative relationships between feedstocks and performance criteria in conversion. 127 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. No-migration variance petition: Draft. Volume 4, Appendices DIF, GAS, GCR (Volume 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-31

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by national defense-related activities. Approximately 2.6 million cubic feet of the se waste have been generated and are stored at various facilities across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), was sited and constructed to meet stringent disposal requirements. In order to permanently dispose of TRU waste, the DOE has elected to petition the US EPA for a variance from the Land Disposal Restrictions of RCRA. This document fulfills the reporting requirements for the petition. This report is volume 4 of the petition which presents details about the transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags; gas generation reactions and rates during long-term WIPP operation; and geological characterization of the WIPP site.

  2. Biomass torrefaction mill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.

    2016-05-17

    A biomass torrefaction system includes a mill which receives a raw biomass feedstock and operates at temperatures above 400 F (204 C) to generate a dusty flue gas which contains a milled biomass product.

  3. Radiation from Large Gas Volumes and Heat Exchange in Steam Boiler Furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2015-09-15

    Radiation from large cylindrical gas volumes is studied as a means of simulating the flare in steam boiler furnaces. Calculations of heat exchange in a furnace by the zonal method and by simulation of the flare with cylindrical gas volumes are described. The latter method is more accurate and yields more reliable information on heat transfer processes taking place in furnaces.

  4. The use of flue gas for the growth of microalgal biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeiler, K.G.; Kadam, K.L.; Heacox, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    Capture and utilization of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by microalgae is a promising technology to help reduce emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Microalgae are of particular interest because of their rapid growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions. Laboratory work is directed toward investigating the effects of simulated flue gas on microalgae, while engineering studies have focused on the economics of the technology. One strain of a green algae, Monoraphidium minutum, has shown excellent tolerance and growth when exposed to simulated flue gas which meets the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (1990 CAAA). Biomass concentrations of {similar_to}2g/L have been measured in batch culture. Several other microalgae have also shown tolerance to simulated flue gas; however, the growth of these strains is not equivalent to that observed for M. minutum. Coupling the production of biodiesel or other microalgae-derived commodity chemicals with the use of flue gas carbon dioxide is potentially a zero-cost method of reducing the amount of carbon dioxide contributed to the atmosphere by fossil fuel-fired power plants. We have identified two major biological performance parameters which can provide sufficient improvement in this technology to render it cost-competitive with other existing CO{sub x} mitigation technologies. These are algal growth rate and lipid content. An updated economic analysis shows that growth rate is the more important of the two, and should be the focus of near term research activities. The long term goal of achieving zero cost will require other, non-biological, improvements in the process.

  5. Industrial co-generation through use of a medium BTU gas from biomass produced in a high throughput reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Ball, D.A.; Paisley, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A high-throughput gasification system has been developed for the steam gasification of woody biomass to produce a fuel gas with a heating value of 475 to 500 Btu/SCF without using oxygen. Recent developments have focused on the use of bark and sawdust as feedstocks in addition to wood chips and the testing of a new reactor concept, the so-called controlled turbulent zone (CTZ) reactor to increase gas production per unit of wood fed. Operating data from the original gasification system and the CTZ system are used to examine the preliminary economics of biomass gasification/gas turbine cogeneration systems. In addition, a ''generic'' pressurized oxygen-blown gasification system is evaluated. The economics of these gasification systems are compared with a conventional wood boiler/steam turbine cogeneration system.

  6. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage ... 8:27:56 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage ...

  7. Fuel cycle evaluations of biomass-ethanol and reformulated gasoline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, K.S.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is using the total fuel cycle analysis (TFCA) methodology to evaluate energy choices. The National Energy Strategy (NES) identifies TFCA as a tool to describe and quantify the environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits associated with energy alternatives. A TFCA should quantify inputs and outputs, their impacts on society, and the value of those impacts that occur from each activity involved in producing and using fuels, cradle-to-grave. New fuels and energy technologies can be consistently evaluated and compared using TFCA, providing a sound basis for ranking policy options that expand the fuel choices available to consumers. This study is limited to creating an inventory of inputs and outputs for three transportation fuels: (1) reformulated gasoline (RFG) that meets the standards of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE); (2) gasohol (E10), a mixture of 10% ethanol made from municipal solid waste (MSW) and 90% gasoline; and (3) E95, a mixture of 5% gasoline and 95% ethanol made from energy crops such as grasses and trees. The ethanol referred to in this study is produced from lignocellulosic material-trees, grass, and organic wastes -- called biomass. The biomass is converted to ethanol using an experimental technology described in more detail later. Corn-ethanol is not discussed in this report. This study is limited to estimating an inventory of inputs and outputs for each fuel cycle, similar to a mass balance study, for several reasons: (1) to manage the size of the project; (2) to provide the data required for others to conduct site-specific impact analysis on a case-by-case basis; (3) to reduce data requirements associated with projecting future environmental baselines and other variables that require an internally consistent scenario.

  8. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030wv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  9. Kakira Sugar Works (1985) Limited, Kakira biomass cogeneration: Volume 3 -- Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    This report, conducted by John H. Payne, Inc., was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study concerns the technical and financial feasibility of the Kakira Sugar Works Limited to increase its capacity to 5,000 TCD and to sell its surplus power to the Uganda Electricity Board. This is Volume 3, the Purchase Energy Contract between Kakira Cogeneration Company Limited and Uganda Electricity Board.

  10. Analysis on storage off-gas emissions from woody, herbaceous, and torrefied biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Kuang, Xingya; Melin, Staffan; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2015-03-02

    Wood chips, torrefied wood chips, ground switchgrass, and wood pellets were tested for off-gas emissions during storage. Storage canisters with gas-collection ports were used to conduct experiments at room temperature of 20 °C and in a laboratory oven set at 40 °C. Commercially-produced wood pellets yielded the highest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions at both 20 and 40 °C (1600 and 13,000 ppmv), whereas torrefied wood chips emitted the lowest of about <200 and <2000 ppmv. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions from wood pellets were 3000 ppmv and 42,000 ppmv, whereas torrefied wood chips registered at about 2000 and 25,000 ppmv, at 20 and 40 °C at the end of 11 days of storage. CO emission factors (milligrams per kilogram of biomass) calculated were lowest for ground switchgrass and torrefied wood chips (2.68 and 4.86 mg/kg) whereas wood pellets had the highest CO of about 10.60 mg/kg, respectively, at 40 °C after 11 days of storage. In the case of CO₂, wood pellets recorded the lowest value of 55.46 mg/kg, whereas switchgrass recorded the highest value of 318.72 mg/kg. This study concludes that CO emission factor is highest for wood pellets, CO₂ is highest for switchgrass and CH₄ is negligible for all feedstocks except for wood pellets, which is about 0.374 mg/kg at the end of 11-day storage at 40 °C.

  11. Analysis on storage off-gas emissions from woody, herbaceous, and torrefied biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Kuang, Xingya; Melin, Staffan; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2015-03-02

    Wood chips, torrefied wood chips, ground switchgrass, and wood pellets were tested for off-gas emissions during storage. Storage canisters with gas-collection ports were used to conduct experiments at room temperature of 20 °C and in a laboratory oven set at 40 °C. Commercially-produced wood pellets yielded the highest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions at both 20 and 40 °C (1600 and 13,000 ppmv), whereas torrefied wood chips emitted the lowest of about <200 and <2000 ppmv. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions from wood pellets were 3000 ppmv and 42,000 ppmv, whereas torrefied wood chips registered at about 2000 and 25,000 ppmv, atmore » 20 and 40 °C at the end of 11 days of storage. CO emission factors (milligrams per kilogram of biomass) calculated were lowest for ground switchgrass and torrefied wood chips (2.68 and 4.86 mg/kg) whereas wood pellets had the highest CO of about 10.60 mg/kg, respectively, at 40 °C after 11 days of storage. In the case of CO₂, wood pellets recorded the lowest value of 55.46 mg/kg, whereas switchgrass recorded the highest value of 318.72 mg/kg. This study concludes that CO emission factor is highest for wood pellets, CO₂ is highest for switchgrass and CH₄ is negligible for all feedstocks except for wood pellets, which is about 0.374 mg/kg at the end of 11-day storage at 40 °C.« less

  12. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-06-08

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.

  13. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-06-08

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a methodmore » for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.« less

  14. Randolph Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Facility Randolph Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Norfolk County,...

  15. Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Westchester Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  16. San Marcos Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marcos Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name San Marcos Biomass Facility Facility San Marcos Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County,...

  17. Sunset Farms Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farms Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunset Farms Biomass Facility Facility Sunset Farms Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Travis County, Texas...

  18. East Bridgewater Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bridgewater Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name East Bridgewater Biomass Facility Facility East Bridgewater Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  19. Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lyons Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Lyons Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Lyons Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County,...

  20. Reliant Conroe Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conroe Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Reliant Conroe Biomass Facility Facility Reliant Conroe Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Montgomery...

  1. Otay Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Otay Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Otay Biomass Facility Facility Otay Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County, California...

  2. Biodyne Peoria Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Peoria Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Peoria Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Peoria Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Peoria County,...

  3. Biodyne Springfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springfield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biodyne Springfield Biomass Facility Facility Biodyne Springfield Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  4. Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Kiefer Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  5. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netter, J.

    2013-08-01

    The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

  7. Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

  8. Estimating retained gas volumes in the Hanford tanks using waste level measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, P.D.; Chen, G.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Miller, N.E.

    1997-09-01

    The Hanford site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Safety and environmental concerns surround these tanks and their contents. One such concern is the propensity for the waste in these tanks to generate and trap flammable gases. This report focuses on understanding and improving the quality of retained gas volume estimates derived from tank waste level measurements. While direct measurements of gas volume are available for a small number of the Hanford tanks, the increasingly wide availability of tank waste level measurements provides an opportunity for less expensive (than direct gas volume measurement) assessment of gas hazard for the Hanford tanks. Retained gas in the tank waste is inferred from level measurements -- either long-term increase in the tank waste level, or fluctuations in tank waste level with atmospheric pressure changes. This report concentrates on the latter phenomena. As atmospheric pressure increases, the pressure on the gas in the tank waste increases, resulting in a level decrease (as long as the tank waste is {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} enough). Tanks with waste levels exhibiting fluctuations inversely correlated with atmospheric pressure fluctuations were catalogued in an earlier study. Additionally, models incorporating ideal-gas law behavior and waste material properties have been proposed. These models explicitly relate the retained gas volume in the tank with the magnitude of the waste level fluctuations, dL/dP. This report describes how these models compare with the tank waste level measurements.

  9. Biomass power and conventional fossil systems with and without CO2 sequestration - Comparing the energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spath, Pamela L.; Mann, Margaret K.

    2004-01-01

    Lifecycle analysis of coal-, natural gas- and biomass-based power generation systems with and without CO2 sequestration. Compares global warming potential and energy balance of these systems.

  10. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thies, C.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G.

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  11. Impact of Contaminants Present in Coal-Biomass Derived Synthesis Gas on Water-gas Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2013-02-15

    Co-gasification of biomass and coal in large-scale, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants increases the efficiency and reduces the environmental impact of making synthesis gas ("syngas") that can be used in Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes for producing transportation fuels. However, the water-gas shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts used in these processes may be poisoned by multiple contaminants found in coal-biomass derived syngas; sulfur species, trace toxic metals, halides, nitrogen species, the vapors of alkali metals and their salts (e.g., KCl and NaCl), ammonia, and phosphorous. Thus, it is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of poisoning/inhibition mechanisms before investing in the development of any costly mitigation technologies. We therefore investigated the impact of potential contaminants (H2S, NH3, HCN, AsH3, PH3, HCl, NaCl, KCl, AS3, NH4NO3, NH4OH, KNO3, HBr, HF, and HNO3) on the performance and lifetime of commercially available and generic (prepared in-house) WGS and FT catalysts.

  12. ,"AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2014" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  13. ,"AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2014" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","09/30/2016"

  14. ,"AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","12/2014" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  15. ,"South Central Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Central Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","09/30/2016"

  16. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  17. New market potential: Torrefaction of woody biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Hess, J. Richard

    2015-06-02

    Biomass was the primary source of energy worldwide until a few generations ago, when the energy-density, storability and transportability of fossil fuels enabled one of the most rapid cultural transformations in the history of humankind: the industrial revolution. In just a few hundred years, coal, oil and natural gas have prompted the development of highly efficient, high-volume manufacturing and transportation systems that have become the foundation of the world economy. But over-reliance on fossil resources has also led to environmental and energy security concerns. In addition, one of the greatest advantages of using biomass to replace fossil fuels is reduced greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprint.

  18. Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process. Volume 2, Parts 4--8: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; Wolf, D.

    1991-10-01

    As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE`s Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt% wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3000 psi. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor by the University to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a high pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed and following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. By July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350{degree}C to 430{degree}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt% residual oxygen were produced. 38 refs., 82 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lignocellulosic Biomass - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  20. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  1. Economic and Technical Assessment of Wood Biomass Fuel Gasification for Industrial Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia M. Gribik; Ronald E. Mizia; Harry Gatley; Benjamin Phillips

    2007-09-01

    This project addresses both the technical and economic feasibility of replacing industrial gas in lime kilns with synthesis gas from the gasification of hog fuel. The technical assessment includes a materials evaluation, processing equipment needs, and suitability of the heat content of the synthesis gas as a replacement for industrial gas. The economic assessment includes estimations for capital, construction, operating, maintenance, and management costs for the reference plant. To perform these assessments, detailed models of the gasification and lime kiln processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The material and energy balance outputs from the Aspen Plus model were used as inputs to both the material and economic evaluations.

  2. Small Modular Biomass Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-12-01

    This fact sheet provides information about modular biomass systems. Small modular biomass systems can help supply electricity to rural areas, businesses, and the billions of people who live without power worldwide. These systems use locally available biomass fuels such as wood, crop waste, animal manures, and landfill gas.

  3. Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume I. Scope and design criteria and project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    The information in this document is the result of an intensive engineering effort to demonstrate the feasibility of biomass-fueled boilers in cogeneration applications. This design package is based upon a specific site in the State of Maine. However, the design is generic in nature and could serve as a model for other biomass conversion facilities located anywhere biomass is abundant. The project's purpose and summary information are presented: the plant, its concept of operation; and other overall information are described. The capital cost estimate for the plant, and the basis upon which it was obtained are given; a schedule of key milestones and activities required to construct the plant and put it into operation is presented; and the general findings in areas that affect the viability of the project are discussed. The technical design, biomass study, environmental impact, commercialization, and economic factors are addressed. Each major plant area and the equipment and facilities that each includes are discussed in depth. Some overall plant requirements, including noise control, reliability, maintainability, and safety, are detailed. The results of each study relating to alternatives considered for optimizing plant operation parameters and specific system process schemes are briefly presented. All economic factors that affect the feasibility and viability of the biomass project are defined and evaluated.

  4. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  5. Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Ocean County Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

  6. Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Facility Pearl Hollow Landfil Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

  7. Newby Island I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Newby Island I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Newby Island I Biomass Facility Facility Newby Island I Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Santa...

  8. Elk City Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Elk City Station Biomass Facility Facility Elk City Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Douglas...

  9. Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Facility Johnston LFG (MA RPS Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  10. ,"California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030ca2m.xls"

  11. Managing and controlling gas volume analysis in the post FERC 636 environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treat, R.; Bergen, H.; Parker, J.

    1995-12-31

    Late in 1992, Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America (NGPL) and BMP Energy Systems (BMP) initiated a project to jointly develop a system for the automated verification and statistical correction of electronic flow measurement data. When NGPL and BMP began their original discussions, the primary purpose was for NGPL to evaluate the possibility of using BMP`s NGAS (Natural Gas Accounting System) software for handling Electronic Flow Meter (EFM) data. During these discussions, it became apparent that there was a unique opportunity to provide a business solution for both NGPL and BMP. NGPL faced the challenge of re-engineering their monthly chart processing organization to a daily volume analysis organization. BMP faced the challenge of re-engineering its chart processing system to a volume process system. The paper describes the challenges, the existing system, the decision process, and cost justification.

  12. Opportunities for Micropower and Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial Applications - Volume I

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Micropower and Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Systems in Industrial Applications Volume I: Main Text Subcontract No. 85X-TA009V Final Report to Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation and the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies January 2000 Notice: This report was prepared by Arthur D. Little for the account of Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation and the DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies. This report represents Arthur D. Little's best judgment in light of information made

  13. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  14. Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume IIResults of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holladay, John E.; White, James F.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Johnson, David

    2007-10-01

    This report evaluates lignins role as a renewable raw material resource. Opportunities that arise from utilizing lignin fit into one of three categories: 1)power, fuel and syngas (generally near-term opportunities) 2) macromolecules (generally medium-term opportunities) 3) aromatics and miscellaneous monomers (long-term opportunities). Biorefineries will receive and process massive amounts of lignin. For this reason, how lignin can be best used to support the economic health of the biorefinery must be defined. An approach that only considers process heat would be shortsighted. Higher value products present economic opportunities and the potential to significantly increase the amount of liquid transportation fuel available from biomass. In this analysis a list of potential uses of lignin was compiled and sorted into product types which are broad classifications (listed above as powerfuelsyngas; macromolecules; and aromatics). In the first product type (powerfuelgasification) lignin is used purely as a carbon source and aggressive means are employed to break down its polymeric structure. In the second product type (macromolecules) the opposite extreme is considered and advantage of the macromolecular structure imparted by nature is retained in high-molecular weight applications. The third product type (aromatics) lies somewhere between the two extremes and employs technologies that would break up lignins macromolecular structure but maintain the aromatic nature of the building block molecules. The individual opportunities were evaluated based on their technical difficulty, market, market risk, building block utility, and whether a pure material or a mixture would be produced. Unlike the Sugars Top 10 report it was difficult to identify the ten best opportunities, however, the potential opportunities fell nicely into near-, medium- and long-term opportunities. Furthermore, the near-, medium- and long-term opportunities roughly align with the three

  15. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01

    This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

  16. Lower 48 States Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 6,608,635 6,024,215 5,879,115 6,092,050 6,491,219 6,831,426 7,075,486 7,319,424 7,716,989 8,105,566 8,142,609 7,763,772 2012 7,219,136 6,758,315 6,794,584 6,936,421 7,219,444 7,453,546 7,588,106 7,753,994 8,044,851 8,294,299 8,171,574 7,785,322 2013 7,060,122 6,455,260 6,074,255 6,207,882 6,625,168 6,996,862

  17. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  18. Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2010-12-31

    Today, nearly all liquid fuels and commodity chemicals are produced from non-renewable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Because of increasing scrutiny of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions produced using traditional fossil-fuel resources, the utilization of alternative feedstocks for the production of power, hydrogen, value-added chemicals, and high-quality hydrocarbon fuels such as diesel and substitute natural gas (SNG) is critical to meeting the rapidly growing energy needs of modern society. Coal and biomass are particularly attractive as alternative feedstocks because of the abundant reserves of these resources worldwide. The strategy of co-gasification of coal/biomass (CB) mixtures to produce syngas for synthesis of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels offers distinct advantages over gasification of either coal or biomass alone. Co-feeding coal with biomass offers the opportunity to exploit economies of scale that are difficult to achieve in biomass gasification, while the addition of biomass to the coal gasifier feed leverages proven coal gasification technology and allows CO{sub 2} credit benefits. Syngas generated from CB mixtures will have a unique contaminant composition because coal and biomass possess different concentrations and types of contaminants, and the final syngas composition is also strongly influenced by the gasification technology used. Syngas cleanup for gasification of CB mixtures will need to address this unique contaminant composition to support downstream processing and equipment. To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants

  19. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

  20. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  1. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  2. Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass via Integrated Pyrolysis, Catalytic Hydroconversion and Co-processing with Vacuum Gas Oil

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pilot-Scale Biorefinery: Sustainable Transport Fuels from Biomass via Integrated Pyrolysis, Catalytic Hydroconversion and Co-processing with Vacuum Gas Oil Raymond G. Wissinger Manager, Renewable Energy & Chemicals Development UOP, LLC This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information © Copyright 2015 UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company 2 File Number Goal Statement * Demonstrate a technically and economically viable approach for converting

  3. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  4. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01

    This volume contains maps, well logging, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plots, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence, and reservoir characterization sheet for the following fields in southwest Alabama: North Smiths Church oil field; North Wallers Creek oil field; Northeast Barnett oil field; Northwest Range oil field; Pace Creek oil field; Palmers Crossroads oil field; Perdido oil field; Puss Cuss Creek oil field; Red Creek gas condensate field; Robinson Creek oil field; Silas oil field; Sizemore Creek gas condensate field; Smiths Church gas condensate field; South Burnt Corn Creek oil field; South Cold Creek oil field; South Vocation oil field; South Wild Fork Creek gas condensate field; South Womack Hill oil field; Southeast Chatom gas condensate field; Southwest Barrytown oil field; and Souwilpa Creek gas condensate field.

  5. Application of a dry-gas meter for measuring air sample volumes in an ambient air monitoring network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.

    2009-05-24

    Ambient air monitoring for non-research applications (e.g. compliance) occurs at locations throughout the world. Often, the air sampling systems employed for these purposes employee simple yet robust equipment capable of handling the rigors of demanding sampling schedules. At the Hanford Site (near Richland, Washington) concentrations of radionuclides in ambient air are monitored continuously at 44 locations. In 2004, mechanical dry-gas meters were incorporated into the Hanford Site ambient air sample collection system to allow the direct measurement of sample volumes. These meters replaced a portable airflow measurement system that required two manual flow measurements and a sample duration measurement to determine sample volume. A six-month evaluation of the dry-gas meters compared sample volumes calculated using the original flow rate method to the direct sample volume measurement (new method). The results of the evaluation indicate that use of the dry-gas meters result in accurate sample volume measurements and provide greater confidence in the measured sample volumes. In several years of in-network use, the meters have proven to be reliable and have resulted in an improved sampling system.

  6. Survey and Down-Selection of Acid Gas Removal Systems for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol with a Detailed Analysis of an MDEA System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, California

    2011-05-01

    The first section (Task 1) of this report by Nexant includes a survey and screening of various acid gas removal processes in order to evaluate their capability to meet the specific design requirements for thermochemical ethanol synthesis in NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007, NREL/TP-510-41168). MDEA and selexol were short-listed as the most promising acid-gas removal agents based on work described in Task 1. The second report section (Task 2) describes a detailed design of an MDEA (methyl diethanol amine) based acid gas removal system for removing CO2 and H2S from biomass-derived syngas. Only MDEA was chosen for detailed study because of the available resources.

  7. Woodlake Sanitary Services Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name Woodlake Sanitary Services Biomass Facility Facility Woodlake Sanitary Services Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hennepin County, Minnesota...

  8. Penrose Power Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Penrose Power Station Biomass Facility Facility Penrose Power Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County,...

  9. Ridgewood Providence Power Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name Ridgewood Providence Power Biomass Facility Facility Ridgewood Providence Power Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Providence County, Rhode Island...

  10. Toyon Power Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Toyon Power Station Biomass Facility Facility Toyon Power Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County,...

  11. KMS Joliet Power Partners LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name KMS Joliet Power Partners LP Biomass Facility Facility KMS Joliet Power Partners LP Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Will County, Illinois...

  12. Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name Marsh Road Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Marsh Road Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Mateo County,...

  13. Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I -- Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werpy, T.; Petersen, G.

    2004-08-01

    This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol.

  14. Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume I, Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-08-01

    This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol.

  15. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate

  16. Power-Gen `95. Book III: Generation trends. Volume 1 - current fossil fuel technologies. Volume 2 - advanced fossil fuel technologies. Volume 3 - gas turbine technologies I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This document is Book III of Power-Gen 1995 for the Americas. I contains papers on the following subjects: (1) Coal technologies, (2) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, (3) repowering, (4) pressurized fluidized bed combustion, (5) combined cycle facilities, and (6) aeroderivitive and small gas turbines.

  17. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

  18. Biomass pretreatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  19. CASCADER: An m-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 2, User`s manual for CASCADR8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Been, K.B.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or diffusion. Furthermore, parent and daughter radionuclides may decay as they are transported in the soil. This is volume two to the CASCADER series, titled CASCADR8. It embodies the concepts presented in volume one of this series. To properly understand how the CASCADR8 model works, the reader should read volume one first. This volume presents the input and output file structure for CASCADR8, and a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas.

  20. Biomass Logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Ian Bonner; David J. Muth

    2015-04-01

    Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

  1. BIOMASS-TO-ENERGY FEASIBILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cecil T. Massie

    2002-09-03

    The purpose of this study was to assess the economic and technical feasibility of producing electricity and thermal energy from biomass by gasification. For an economic model we chose a large barley malting facility operated by Rahr Malting Co. in Shakopee, Minnesota. This plant provides an excellent backdrop for this study because it has both large electrical loads and thermal loads that allowed us to consider a wide range of sizes and technical options. In the end, eleven scenarios were considered ranging from 3.1 megawatts (MWe) to 19.8 MWe. By locating the gasification and generation at an agricultural product processing plant with large electrical and thermal loads, the expectation was that some of the limitations of stand-alone biomass power plants would be overcome. In addition, since the process itself created significant volumes of low value biomass, the hope was that most of the biomass gathering and transport issues would be handled as well. The development of low-BTU gas turbines is expected to fill a niche between the upper limit of multiple spark ignited engine set systems around 5 MWe and the minimum reasonable scale for steam turbine systems around 10 MWe.

  2. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  3. Top Value Added Chemicals From Biomass: I. Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werpy, Todd A.; Holladay, John E.; White, James F.

    2004-11-01

    This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol. In addition to building blocks, the report outlines the central technical barriers that are preventing the widespread use of biomass for products and chemicals.

  4. Proceedings of the natural gas RD&D contractors review meeting, Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.D.

    1995-04-01

    This report contains papers which were presented at the natural gas contractors review meeting held on April 4-6, 1995. Topics were concerned with resource and reserves, low permeability reservoir characterization, natural fracture detection, drilling, completion, and stimulation, and natural gas upgrading. Individual papers were processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  5. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning medium-enriched uranium/thorium once-through fuel cycle; medium-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle fuel; high-enrichment uranium-235/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; high-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; and gas-turbine high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  6. Biomass Program Factsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    The emerging U.S. bioindustry is using a range of biomass resources to provide a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels and electric power. Displacing an increasing portion of our imported oil with renewable, domestic bioenergy will provide clear benefits:Reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; A cleaner, more secure energy future; Sustainable transportation fuels; Opportunities for economic growth

  7. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  8. Logistics, Costs, and GHG Impacts of Utility Scale Cofiring with 20% Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, Richard D.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Nichol, Corrie; Searcy, Erin M.; Westover, Tyler; Wood, Richard; Bearden, Mark D.; Cabe, James E.; Drennan, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Male, Jonathan L.; Muntean, George G.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2014-07-22

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of utility-scale biomass cofiring in large pulverized coal power plants. The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the cost and greenhouse gas reduction benefits of substituting relatively high volumes of biomass in coal. Two scenarios for cofiring up to 20% biomass with coal (on a lower heating value basis) are presented; (1) woody biomass in central Alabama where Southern Pine is currently produced for the wood products and paper industries, and (2) purpose-grown switchgrass in the Ohio River Valley. These examples are representative of regions where renewable biomass growth rates are high in correspondence with major U.S. heartland power production. While these scenarios may provide a realistic reference for comparing the relative benefits of using a high volume of biomass for power production, this evaluation is not intended to be an analysis of policies concerning renewable portfolio standards or the optimal use of biomass for energy production in the U.S.

  9. Biomass One Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA Biomass National Map Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBiomassOneBiomassFacility&oldid397204" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  10. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grady, James L.; Chen, Guang Jiong

    1998-01-01

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

  11. Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

    1998-10-13

    A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

  12. Enahancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved demonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit W, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. At each site where the techno!o@es were to

  13. Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where the technologies were

  14. Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Volume 1, Public design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-24

    This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design -information for the ``Innovative Coke Oven Gas Cleaning System for Retrofit Applications`` Demonstration Project at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s Sparrows Point, Maryland coke oven by-product facilities. This project demonstrates, for the first time in the United States, the feasibility of integrating four commercially available technologies (processes) for cleaning coke oven gas. The four technologies are: Secondary Gas Cooling, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Removal, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Recovery, and Ammonia Destruction and Sulfur Recovery. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project and the role of the US Department of,Energy are briefly discussed. Actual plant capital and projected operating costs are also presented. An overview of the integration (retrofit) of the processes into the existing plant is presented and is followed by detailed non-proprietary descriptions of the four technologies and their overall effect on reducing the emissions of ammonia, sulfur, and other pollutants from coke oven gas. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control monitoring, and safety considerations are also addressed for each process.

  15. Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy announced the conditional authorization for Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC to export liquefied natural gas to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement with the U.S. This is the fifth conditional authorization the Department has announced.

  16. Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

  17. Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 2, Heating season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.

    1995-11-01

    The Federal Government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US Government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer; Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

  18. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  19. Methods for pretreating biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir; Sousa, Leonardo

    2015-03-03

    A method of alkaline pretreatment of biomass, in particular, pretreating biomass with gaseous ammonia.

  20. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Assessment of fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for Fischer-Tropsch diesel from coal and cellulosic biomass.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, X.; Wang, M.; Han, J.

    2011-04-01

    This study expands and uses the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model to assess the effects of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and cellulosic biomass and coal cofeeding in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of FT diesel (FTD). To demonstrate the influence of the coproduct credit methods on FTD life-cycle analysis (LCA) results, two allocation methods based on the energy value and the market revenue of different products and a hybrid method are employed. With the energy-based allocation method, fossil energy use of FTD is less than that of petroleum diesel, and GHG emissions of FTD could be close to zero or even less than zero with CCS when forest residue accounts for 55% or more of the total dry mass input to FTD plants. Without CCS, GHG emissions are reduced to a level equivalent to that from petroleum diesel plants when forest residue accounts for 61% of the total dry mass input. Moreover, we show that coproduct method selection is crucial for LCA results of FTD when a large amount of coproducts is produced.

  2. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  3. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  4. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-30

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  5. Feasibility study for the construction of a new LNG receiving terminal, turkey. Volume 2. Appendix. Export trade information. [LNG (liquified natural gas)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The report was prepared by The M. W. Kellogg Co. for BOTAS Petroleum Pipeline Corporation of Ankara, Turkey. The study was undertaken to evaluate the cost and economics of constructing a second liquified natural gas (LNG) terminal in Turkey to meet future requirements for natural gas. Volume 2 contains the following appendices: LNG Storage Tanks; Vaporizers; Compressors; Pumps; Loading Arms; Marine Installations; Shipping; and Seismic Study.

  6. Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Biomass Facility Facility Lyonsdale Biomass LLC Sector Biomass Location Lewis County, New York...

  7. Biomass One LP Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Biomass One LP Biomass Facility Facility Biomass One LP Sector Biomass Location Jackson County, Oregon Coordinates 42.334535,...

  8. Biomass Feed and Gasification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the feeding and conversion of biomass and coal-biomass mixtures as essential upstream ... Activities support research for handling and processing of coal-biomass mixtures, ensuring ...

  9. Star Biomass | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Jump to: navigation, search Name: Star Biomass Place: India Sector: Biomass Product: Plans to set up biomass projects in Rajasthan. References: Star Biomass1 This article...

  10. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).