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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, William F. (West Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect

A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

Frye, Lowell D. (Kingston, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

Frye, L.D.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification  

SciTech Connect

Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Welding of NOREM Iron-Base Hardfacing Alloy Wire Products: Procedures for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New wire products have been successfully fabricated and procedures developed for automatic gas tungsten arc welding of wear-resistant NOREM iron-base alloys. Research demonstrated that sound multi-layer welds on carbon and stainless steel substrates can be obtained without the use of preheating. These developments point to the advantages of NOREM alloys for field applications, such as valve refurbishing.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)  

SciTech Connect

The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

Nunes, A.C. Jr.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu [Mechanical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032 (India)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

NOREM Applications Guidelines: Procedures for Gas Tungsten Arc and Plasma Transferred Arc Welding of NOREM Cobalt-Free Hardfacing Al loys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wire products have been successfully fabricated and new procedures developed for machine and manual gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of the iron-base NOREM hardfacing alloys. These developments enhance the attractiveness of NOREM alloys both in replacement valves and in field repairs of installed valves. This report describes the GTAW procedures and summarizes plasma transferred arc welding (PTAW) parameters for shop applications of NOREM alloys.

1996-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

Penik, M.A. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Elements of arc welding  

SciTech Connect

This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Welding arc initiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

Correy, T.B.

1989-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Welding arc initiator  

SciTech Connect

An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

Correy, Thomas B. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

Method for controlling gas metal arc welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Method for controlling gas metal arc welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Einerson, Carolyn J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Exhaust-gas measurements from NASAs HYMETS arc jet.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc-jet wind tunnels produce conditions simulating high-altitude hypersonic flight such as occurs upon entry of space craft into planetary atmospheres. They have traditionally been used to study flight in Earth's atmosphere, which consists mostly of nitrogen and oxygen. NASA is presently using arc jets to study entry into Mars' atmosphere, which consists of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. In both cases, a wide variety of chemical reactions take place among the gas constituents and with test articles placed in the flow. In support of those studies, we made measurements using a residual gas analyzer (RGA) that sampled the exhaust stream of a NASA arc jet. The experiments were conducted at the HYMETS arc jet (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) located at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. This report describes our RGA measurements, which are intended to be used for model validation in combination with similar measurements on other systems.

Miller, Paul Albert

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Gas Metal Arc Welding Lessons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern gas metal arc welding (GMAW) systems no longer operate with a symmetric, fixed pulse. The new systems have closed-loop feedback and are waveform-controlled systems that vary the arc characteristics hundreds of times per second to stabilize the arc. The main advantage of these systems is the ease of operation when manual applications are required or out-of-position welding is applied. The systems allow flexibility in the stand-off distance (contact tip to work distance) while maintaining an ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are presented. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a DC electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

1989-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Low Power Laser Hybrid Gas Metal Arc Welding on A36 Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Low Power Laser Hybrid Gas Metal Arc Welding on A36 Steel. Author(s), Caleb Roepke, Stephen Liu, Shawn Kelly, Rich Martukanitz. On-Site ...

26

Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

R. D. Kolasinski; D. F. Cowgill; D. C. Donovan; M. Shimada

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Visual-based Intelligent Control System for Robotic Gas Metal Arc Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensing and control the weld pool is a crucial problem for robotic gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) process. In present research, a special vision sensing system, assisted by a narrow-band filter which could overcome the influence of the strong arc light ...

Shi Yu; Xue Cheng; Fan Ding; Chen Jianhong

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Exhaust-gas measurements from NASAs HYMETS arc jet.  

SciTech Connect

Arc-jet wind tunnels produce conditions simulating high-altitude hypersonic flight such as occurs upon entry of space craft into planetary atmospheres. They have traditionally been used to study flight in Earth's atmosphere, which consists mostly of nitrogen and oxygen. NASA is presently using arc jets to study entry into Mars' atmosphere, which consists of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. In both cases, a wide variety of chemical reactions take place among the gas constituents and with test articles placed in the flow. In support of those studies, we made measurements using a residual gas analyzer (RGA) that sampled the exhaust stream of a NASA arc jet. The experiments were conducted at the HYMETS arc jet (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) located at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. This report describes our RGA measurements, which are intended to be used for model validation in combination with similar measurements on other systems.

Miller, Paul Albert

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram Sharafatb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

silicon carbide (SiC) substrate coated with tungsten. Although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is being method for coating preparation. Another example application is the tungsten-plasma spray- ing coated SiC-fiber (foam) for high heat-resistance. It is helpful to enhance the SiC-fiber heat-resistance that tungsten

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

30

Standard Practice for Measuring Plasma Arc Gas Enthalpy by Energy Balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice covers the measurement of total gas enthalpy of an electric-arc-heated gas stream by means of an overall system energy balance. This is sometimes referred to as a bulk enthalpy and represents an average energy content of the test stream which may differ from local values in the test stream. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

High-power laser and arc welding of thorium-doped iridium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The arc and laser weldabilities of two Ir-0.3% W alloys containing 60 and 200 wt ppM Th have been investigated. The Ir-.03% W alloy containing 200 wt ppM Th is severely prone to hot cracking during gas tungsten-arc welding. Weld metal cracking results from the combined effects of heat-affected zone liquation cracking and solidification cracking. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the fractured surface revealed patches of low-melting eutectic. The cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and thorium content. The alloy has been welded with a continuous-wave high-power CO/sub 2/ laser system with beam power ranging from 5 to 10 kW and welding speeds of 8 to 25 mm/s. Successful laser welds without hot cracking have been obtained in this particular alloy. This is attributable to the highly concentrated heat source available in the laser beam and the refinement in fusion zone microstructure obtained during laser welding. Efforts to refine the fusion zone structure during gas tungsten-arc welding of Ir-0.3 % W alloy containing 60 wt ppM Th were partially successful. Here transverse arc oscillation during gas tungsten-arc welding refines the fusion zone structure to a certain extent. However, microstructural analysis of this alloy's laser welds indicates further refinement in the fusion zone microstructure than in that from the gas tungsten-arc process using arc oscillations. The fusion zone structure of the laser weld is a strong function of welding speed.

David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

High-power laser and arc welding of thorium-doped iridium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The arc and laser weldabilities of two Ir-0.3% W alloys containing 60 and 200 wt ppM Th have been investigated. The Ir-.03% W alloy containing 200 wt ppM Th is severely prone to hot cracking during gas tungsten-arc welding. Weld metal cracking results from the combined effects of heat-affected zone liquation cracking and solidification cracking. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the fractured surface revealed patches of low-melting eutectic. The cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and thorium content. The alloy has been welded with a continuous-wave high-power CO/sub 2/ laser system with beam power ranging from 5 to 10 kW and welding speeds of 8 to 25 mm/s. Successful laser welds without hot cracking have been obtained in this particular alloy. This is attributable to the highly concentrated heat source available in the laser beam and the refinement in fusion zone microstructure obtained during laser welding. Efforts to refine the fusion zone structure during gas tungsten-arc welding of Ir-0.3 % W alloy containing 60 wt ppM Th were partially successful. Here transverse arc oscillation during gas tungsten-arc welding refines the fusion zone structure to a certain extent. However, microstructural analysis of this alloy's laser welds indicates further refinement in the fusion zone microstructure than in that from the gas tungsten-arc process using arc oscillations. The fusion zone structure of the laser weld is a strong function of welding speed.

David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A model-based approach to intelligent control of gas metal arc welding  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses work on a model-based intelligent process controller for gas metal arc welding. Four sensors input to a neural network, which communicates to a reference model-based adaptive controller that controls process parameters. Reference model derivation and validation are discussed. The state of an arch weld is determined by the composition of the weld and base metal and the weld's thermomechanical history. The composition of the deposited weld metal depends primarily on the amount of filler metal dilution; heat input to the weld, comprising pre-heat and process heat, is the controlling factor in the thermal cycle. Thus, control of the arc welding process should focus on rational specification and in-process control of the heat and mass input to the weld. A control model has been developed in which the governing equations are solved for the process parameters as functions of the desired heat input (in terms of heat input unit weld length) and mass input (in terms of transverse reinforcement area) to the weld. The model includes resistive and arc heating of the electrode wire, characteristics of the welding power supply, and a volumetric heat balance on the electrode material, as well as latent and superheat of the electrode material. Extension of the model to include dynamics of individual droplet transfer events, based on incorporating a nonlinear, lumped parameter droplet analysis, is discussed. A major emphasis has been placed on computational simplicity; model solutions are required at the rate of about 10 Hz during welding. Finally, a process control scheme has been developed for the gas metal arc welding process using the above nonlinear model with a proportional-integral controller with adaptive coefficients to control the weld heat input and reinforcement area independently. Performance of the resulting control method is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.; Carlson, N.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mechanical Characteristics of Submerged Arc Weldment in API Gas Pipeline Steel of Grade X65  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of submerged arc weldment (SAW) in gas transportation pipeline steel of grade API X65 (65 ksi yield strength) were investigated. This steel is produced by thermo mechanical control rolled (TMC), and is largely used in Iran gas piping systems and networks. The results from laboratory study on three different regions; i.e. base metal (BM), fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were used to compare weldment mechanical characteristics with those specified by API 5L (revision 2004) standard code. Different laboratory experiments were conducted on test specimens taken from 48 inch outside diameter and 14.3 mm wall thickness gas pipeline. The test results showed a gradient of microstructure and Vickers hardness data from the centerline of FZ towards the unaffected MB. Similarly, lower Charpy absorbed energy (compared to BM) was observed in the FZ impact specimens. Despite this, the API specifications were fulfilled in three tested zones, ensuring pipeline structural integrity under working conditions.

Hashemi, S. H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birjand, POBOX 97175-376, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadyani, D. [Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC) POBOX 14155-4777, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Spectrographic temperature measurement of a high power breakdown arc in a high pressure gas switch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure for obtaining an approximate temperature value of conducting plasma generated during self-break closure of a RIMFIRE gas switch is described. The plasma is in the form of a breakdown arc which conducts approximately 12 kJ of energy in 1 {mu}s. A spectrographic analysis of the trigger-section of the 6-MV RIMFIRE laser triggered gas switch used in Sandia National Laboratory's ''Z-Machine'' has been made. It is assumed that the breakdown plasma has sufficiently approached local thermodynamic equilibrium allowing a black-body temperature model to be applied. This model allows the plasma temperature and radiated power to be approximated. The gas dielectric used in these tests was pressurized SF{sub 6}. The electrode gap is set at 4.59 cm for each test. The electrode material is stainless steel and insulator material is poly(methyl methacrylate). A spectrum range from 220 to 550 nanometers has been observed and calibrated using two spectral irradiance lamps and three spectrograph gratings. The approximate plasma temperature is reported.

Yeckel, Christopher; Curry, Randy [Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering, Center for Physical and Power Electronics, University of Missouri--Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fabrication of Tungsten, Tungsten-Rhenium and Tungsten-CeO2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... kernels such as uranium dioxide (UO2) are encapsulated within a tungsten matrix. ... in the pre-exponential frequency factor for gas diffusion through such materials. ... Functional Composites: Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes in Silica Aerogel.

37

Removal of nitrogen oxides from a gas stream by using monatomic nitrogen induced by a pulsed arc  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effectiveness of N atoms, nitrogen, induced by a pulsed electric arc, in reducing nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) was studied. Goal is reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from automobile emissions by this alternative technique, which can be cost-effective and has the potential to reduce NO{sub x} in exhaust containing up to 10% oxygen. Initial tests with 100, 500, and 1,000 ppM NO in pure nitrogen have shown that a greater than 50% reduction of NO/NO{sub x} is readily achievable. At an NO concentration of 100 ppM, a greater than 90% NO/NO{sub x} reduction was recorded. Different flow rates of the monatomic nitrogen and the gas stream were tested. The flow rate of the monatomic nitrogen did not have a significant effect on the reduction efficiency, unlike the flow rate of the gas stream. The cross-sectional flow area of the gas stream was varied in order to assess whether the proximity of the gas stream to the arc would affect NO/NO{sub x} reduction. Results of the tests revealed that the smallest cross-sectional area had the best reduction, but also the highest chance of contacting the arc. The composition of the gas stream was also varied to elucidate the effects of N0{sub 2} and 0{sub 2} on the NO/NO{sub x} reduction efficiency. When N0{sub 2} and 0{sub 2} are present in the gas stream, both gases lower the reduction efficiency significantly by creating more NO or N0{sub 2}. Experiments are continuing to improve the reduction efficiency. The electrical power, a function of pulse frequency, voltage, and current, was treated as a key parameter in the investigation. The power consumption of the high-voltage purser apparatus for a 100-kW engine was estimated to be 3 kW.

Ng, H.K.; Novick, V.J.; Sekar, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Pierucci, K.A. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Geise, M.F. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique  

SciTech Connect

A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto 2600, Santa Fe (Argentina); Artana, G. [Laboratorio de Fluidodinamica, Departamento Ing. Mecanica, Facultad de Ingenieria (UBA), Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto 2600, Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA), Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Arc Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...work surface Radiation from the arc Thermal conduction from the arc plasma to the workpiece The first two mechanisms constitute the major source of energy to the

40

Evaluation Of Four Welding Arc Processes Applied To 6061 Aluminium Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At a time when greenhouse gas emissions must be reduced, the use of the aluminium alloys is expanding, in particular in the transportation industry. In order to extend the possibilities of aluminium assembly design, new Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding processes have been conceived. They work at lower temperatures than usual arc processes (classic MIG or Tungsten Inert Gas). This study compares four arc welding processes, applied to the 6061 aluminium alloy. These four weld processes have been studied through the metallurgical analysis of the weld beads. Metallography, micro-hardness testings, X Ray radiography have been carried out on the produced weld beads. The processes are classified according to the quality of the beads like geometry of beads, size of the heat affected zone and presence of defects.

Benoit, A. [Univ Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l'Etat Solide, UMR 8182, 91405 Orsay, F-91405 (France); Laboratoire de Genie des Materiaux et Procedes Associes (LGMPA), Ecole Polytechnique de l'Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, rue Christian Pauc, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Paillard, P. [Laboratoire de Genie des Materiaux et Procedes Associes (LGMPA), Ecole Polytechnique de l'Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, rue Christian Pauc, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Baudin, T. [Univ Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l'Etat Solide, UMR 8182, 91405 Orsay, F-91405 (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 (France); Jobez, S.; Castagne, J.-F. [SNECMA-Usine d'Evry-Corbeil Snecma Evry-Corbeil-Route Henri Auguste Desbrueres-91000 Evry (France)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Atomic Data for Tungsten (W )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tungsten (W) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Tungsten (W). ...

42

Strong Lines of Tungsten ( W )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tungsten (W) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Strong Lines of Tungsten ( W ). ...

43

Development of an intelligent system for cooling rate and fill control in GMAW. [Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)  

SciTech Connect

A control strategy for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is developed in which the welding system detects certain existing conditions and adjusts the process in accordance to pre-specified rules. This strategy is used to control the reinforcement and weld bead centerline cooling rate during welding. Relationships between heat and mass transfer rates to the base metal and the required electrode speed and welding speed for specific open circuit voltages are taught to a artificial neural network. Control rules are programmed into a fuzzy logic system. TRADITOINAL CONTROL OF THE GMAW PROCESS is based on the use of explicit welding procedures detailing allowable parameter ranges on a pass by pass basis for a given weld. The present work is an exploration of a completely different approach to welding control. In this work the objectives are to produce welds having desired weld bead reinforcements while maintaining the weld bead centerline cooling rate at preselected values. The need for this specific control is related to fabrication requirements for specific types of pressure vessels. The control strategy involves measuring weld joint transverse cross-sectional area ahead of the welding torch and the weld bead centerline cooling rate behind the weld pool, both by means of video (2), calculating the required process parameters necessary to obtain the needed heat and mass transfer rates (in appropriate dimensions) by means of an artificial neural network, and controlling the heat transfer rate by means of a fuzzy logic controller (3). The result is a welding machine that senses the welding conditions and responds to those conditions on the basis of logical rules, as opposed to producing a weld based on a specific procedure.

Einerson, C.J.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Taylor, P.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Moore, K.L. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Tungsten Cladding of Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide (W-UO2) Composites by Deposition from Tungsten Hexafluoride (WF6)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

?A program is being conducted to develop a process for cladding tungsten and tungsten cermet fuels with tungsten deposited from the vapor state by the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Early work was performed using recrystallized, high purity, commercial tungsten as the substrate material. Temperatures in the range 660 to 12950F (350 to 1700°C) and pressures from 10 to 350 mm Hg were investigated. Hydrogen to WF 6 ratios of 10: 1 to 150: 1 were utilized. Efforts were directed toward optimizing deposition process parameters to attain control of qualities such as coating thickness, uniformity, density, impurity content, and surface quality. Substrate penetration methods have been investigated in the interest of completely eliminating the interface between the fueled substrate and cladding. In addition, the effects of process parameters and post-cladding heat treatments on the fuel retention properties of clad composites at 4500 degrees F (2480 degrees C) in hydrogen for 2 hours have been evaluated. As a result of work performed during the first phase of the program it has been shown that the rate of deposition of tungsten from WF 6 and the uniformity of the deposit can be varied in a predictable and reproducible manner by exercising control over the temperature, pressure, and gas flow rates at which the deposits are produced. A significant result of the study is the discovery that substrate nucleation and epitaxial growth in deposits made on both unfueled tungsten and fueled substrates may be effected by pretreating the substrates in hydrogen. High temperature fuel retention testing of tungsten clad W-U02 at 45000F (2480 degrees C) in hydrogen for 2 hours has demonstrated that the vapor deposited layer effectively and consistently restricts fuel loss.

Lamartine, J.T.; Hoppe, A.W.

1965-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

The influence of the external circuit on arc-discharge of a spark-gap: Its application to a pulsed gas laser  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of the influence of the driving circuit on the arc-discharge of a spark-gap takes place in this work. The two most common types of circuits used in pulsed gas lasers have been studied for all possible combinations of capacitance allocation. In these circuits the spark-gap is used as ignition system and participates in the electric circuit through its resistance and inductance. This consideration shows that capacitances act as charge containers and feed the arc-discharge in the spark-gap independently of their positions in the circuit. Their values influence the total charge contained in the arc-discharge and this, in its turn, influences the discharge resistance. On the other hand, total charge flows through the discharge at a rate determined by the coupling of the circuit loops, namely, by the circuit type. Thus, circuit type influences the drift velocity and this, in its turn, influences the channel radius, which determines the discharge inductance.

Persephonis, P.; Giannetas, V.; Georgiades, C.; Parthenios, J.; Ioannou, A. [Univ. of Patras (Greece). Dept. of Physics

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

TUNGSTEN-ARC WELDING OF THE TANTALUM IS FOUND TO BE THE MOST VERSATILE WELDING METHOD FOR JOINING THIS MATERIAL: BUT GREATER PREPARATION IS REQUIRED TO PROVIDE GOOD PROTECTION AND QUICK CHILLING  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical and welding properties of tantalum are given and welding processes are reviewed. Various types of shielding, machine welding equipment, and closed chambers for welding in an inert gas are compared. A variety of operating conditions under which tantalum can be welded is discussed. (C.J.G.)

Haslip, L.R.; Payne, B.S.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Tungsten Cathode Catalyst for PEMFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report for project to evaluate tungsten-based catalyst as a cathode catalyst for PEM cell applications.

Joel B. Christian; Sean P. E. Smith

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Distribution Arc Flash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flash from faults on 480-V circuits is a safety issue that can impact utility work. This report covers results from tests of arc flash and fabric performance from faults in 480-V network protectors and padmounted transformers. It supplements EPRI report 1018694, Distribution Arc Flash: Industry Practices and EPRI report 1018693, Distribution Arc Flash: Analysis Methods and Arc Characteristics.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

Rooney, Stephen J.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

Rooney, Stephen J. (East Berne, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, R.S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

Hawke, R.S.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Tungsten spectroscopy relevant to the diagnostics development of ITER divertor plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ITER tokamak will have tungsten divertor tiles and, consequently, the divertor plasmas are expected to contain tungsten ions. The spectral emission from these ions can serve to diagnose the divertor for plasma parameters such as tungsten concentrations, densities, ion and electron temperatures, and flow velocities. The ITER divertor plasmas will likely have densities around 10{sup 14-15} cm{sup -3} and temperatures below 150 eV. These conditions are similar to the plasmas at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) in Livermore. To simulate ITER divertor plasmas, a tungsten impurity was introduced into the SSPX spheromak by prefilling it with tungsten hexacarbonyl prior to the usual hydrogen gas injection and initiation of the plasma discharge. The possibility of using the emission from low charge state tungsten ions to diagnose tokamak divertor plasmas has been investigated using a high-resolution extreme ultraviolet spectrometer.

Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; McLean, H S; Wood, R D

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

It's Elemental - The Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

melting point of all metallic elements and is used to make filaments for incandescent light bulbs, fluorescent light bulbs and television tubes. Tungsten expands at nearly the...

58

M-25, BUTT WELDS IN PROCESS PIPING  

SciTech Connect

Metal-arc and inert-gas shielded tungsten-arc processes were compared for circumferential butt welding of austenitic stainless steel process pipe. Inert-gas tungsten-arc welding was superior to other techniques. (C.J.G.)

Litman, A.P.

1958-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

ELEVATED TEMPERATURE DIFFUSION BONDING OF TUNGSTEN TO TUNGSTEN UNDER PRESSURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state diffusion bonding of tungsten to tungsten was investigated at temperatures ranging from 1700 to 2600 nif- C, under surface contact pressures up to 3000 psi, while under high vacuum or hydrogen atmosphere. Various interface coatings were employed to promote diffusion, including graphite, oxide, metal slurries, electroplates, direct surface oxidation, and Mo - -W deposits from carbonyl decompositions. Thorough metallurgical bonding was achieved, particularly with the latter two surface coatings, after 2 hours at 2350 nif- C in H/sub 2/ under 1400 psi. Corresponding tensile strengths of 30,000 psi were obtained. Powder-compacted tungsten sheet containing 50 vo1% UO/sub 2/, spray-coated with an outer layer of tungsten, was effectively bonded to itself and to tungsten metal under 2 hour diffusion treatments at 2000 nif- C and moderate pressures of the order of 1000 psi. (auth)

Batista, R.I.; Hanks, G.S.; Murphy, D.J.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Weld arc simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

Burr, M.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

High strength uranium-tungsten alloys  

SciTech Connect

Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process  

SciTech Connect

Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

Frazer, J.W.

1962-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Dc arc weld starter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

Campiotti, R.H.; Hopwood, J.E.

1989-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

68

DC arc weld starter  

SciTech Connect

A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

Campiotti, Richard H. (Tracy, CA); Hopwood, James E. (Oakley, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non-thermal arc discharge for syngas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thermal arc discharge for syngas production A. Lebouvier1,2 , F. Fresnet2 , F. Fabry1 , V. Boch2 , V. Rohani1% and a conversion rate of 95% have been reached which correspond to a syngas dry molar fraction of 25%. For the most and promote H2O and CO2 production. Keywords: Plasma reformer, syngas, diesel fuel reforming, NOx trap. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

Laser assisted non-consumable arc welding process development  

SciTech Connect

The employment of Laser Beam Welding (LBW) for many traditional arc welding applications is often limited by the inability of LBW to compensate for variations in the weld joint gap. This limitation is associated with fluctuations in the energy transfer efficiency along the weld joint. Since coupling of the laser beam to the workpiece is dependent on the maintenance of a stable absorption keyhole, perturbations to the weld pool can lead to decreased energy transfer and resultant weld defects. Because energy transfer in arc welding does not similarly depend on weld pool geometry, it is expected that combining these two processes together will lead to an enhanced fusion welding process that exhibits the advantages of both arc welding and LBW. Laser assisted non-consumable arc welds have been made on thin section aluminum. The welds combine the advantages of arc welding and laser welding, with enhanced penetration and fusion zone size. The use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with the combined process appears to be advantageous since this laser is effective in removing the aluminum oxide and thereby allowing operation with the tungsten electrode negative. The arc appears to increase the size of the weld and also to mitigate hot cracking tendencies that are common with the pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

Fuerschach, P.W.; Hooper, F.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ELEVATED TEMPERATURE DIFFUSION BONDING OF TUNGSTEN TO TUNGSTEN UNDER PRESSURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid state diffusion bonding of tungsten to tungsten was investigated at temperatures ranging from 1700 to 2600 nif- C, under surface contact pressures up to 3000 psi, while under high vacuum or hydrogen atmosphere. Various interface coatings were employed to promote diffusion, including graphite, oxide, and metai slurries, electro-plates, direct surface oxidation, and Mo-W deposits from carbonyl decompositions. Thorough metallurgical bonding was achieved, particularly with the latter two surface coatings, after 2 hours at 2350 nif- C in H/sub 2/ under 1400 psi. Corresponding tensile strengths of 30000 psi were obtained. (auth)

Batista, R.I.; Hanks, G.S.; Murphy, D.J.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Distribution Arc Flash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flash from faults on distribution circuits is a safety issue that can impact work practices, protection requirements for line and substation workers, and relay and other overcurrent protection settings and practices. This report describes analysis methods and test results for EPRI-sponsored research on arc flash conducted in 2008.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

77

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

Deichelbohrer, Paul R. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Application to low-pressure deposition of tungsten  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a mode for the simultaneous reaction kinetics and transport processes in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors extended to treat deposition of materials that have a broad range of surface characteristics, e.g. sites with multiple dangling bonds and adsorbates with multiple bonding configurations. The model uses the nature of the surface to determine the elementary processes that can take place during growth. Rate constants for these processes are calculated from first principles using statistical thermodynamics, transition state theory, and bond dissociation enthalpies. In this way, deposition rates are determined without either assuming the reaction mechanism or arbitrarily choosing any kinetic parameter values. The utility of the approach is illustrated by modeling low-pressure CVD of tungsten from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The treatment considers 14 species and eight reactions in the gas together with 21 species and 65 processes at the surface.

Arora, R.; Pollard, R. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX (US))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Filtered cathodic arc source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45{degrees} to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Filtered cathodic arc source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

Deichelbohrer, P.R.

1983-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

83

Distribution Arc Flash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flash from faults on distribution circuits is a safety issue that can impact work practices, protection requirements for line and substation workers, and relay and other overcurrent protection settings and practices. Highlights of the research results are the following: Arcs did not sustain in any of the tests at 120/208 V in network protectors or meters. Because of low incident energies, only single-layer flame-retardant clothing is needed. Testing on medium-voltage equipment showed wide variability...

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems connected with gas side corrosion for the design of the lA4 (POC) channel hardware are explored and results of gas side wear rate tests in the Textron Mark VII facility are presented. It is shown that the proposed designs meet a 2000 hour lifetime criterion based upon these materials tests. Improvement in cathode lifetime is demonstrated with lower voltage intercathode gaps. The corrosion of these materials is discussed and it is shown how lifetimes are dependent upon gap voltage and average metal temperature. The importance of uniformity of slagging to the durability of the anode wall is demonstrated. The wear mechanism of the anodes in the MHD channel is analyzed. In addition to gas-side corrosion, the results of specific water corrosion tests of sidewall materials are discussed. All of the tests reported here were carried out to confirm the gas-side performance and the manufacturability of anode and sidewall designs and to address questions posed about the durability of tungsten-copper on the waterside. the results of water corrosion tests of the tungsten copper alloy sidewall material are presented to show that with proper control of waterside pH and, if necessary, dissolved oxygen, one can obtain reliable performance with no degradation of heat transfer with this material. The final choice of materials was determined primarily by the outcome of these tests and also by the question of the manufacturability of the prospective designs.

Rosa, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Failure Origins in Arc Welds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...tungsten inclusions, oxide inclusions Lack of fusion (LOF) and lack of penetration (LOP) Geometric discontinuities, such as poor weld contours, undercut,

86

The Symposium Imaging of Dynamic Processes: Multimedia Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

“Increased Understanding of Gas Atomization from Gas Flow Imaging and High .... A technique for imaging the solid-liquid interface in gas-tungsten-arc welds at

87

Soft arc consistency revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Valued Constraint Satisfaction Problem (VCSP) is a generic optimization problem defined by a network of local cost functions defined over discrete variables. It has applications in Artificial Intelligence, Operations Research, Bioinformatics and ... Keywords: Constraint optimization, Graphical model, Local consistency, Soft arc consistency, Soft constraints, Submodularity, Valued constraint satisfaction problem, Weighted constraint satisfaction problem

M. C. Cooper; S. de Givry; M. Sanchez; T. Schiex; M. Zytnicki; T. Werner

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hall-effect arc protector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hall-effect arc protector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics. 4 figs.

Hardt, D.E.; Lee, S.G.

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

VIDEO: Vacuum Arc Remelting - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2007 ... Video excerpts from Superalloys: Melting and Conversion showing the vacuum arc remelting process. SOURCE: TMS. Last Update: February ...

93

Influence of process parameters on properties of reactively sputtered tungsten nitride thin films  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) thin films were produced by reactive dc magnetron sputtering of tungsten in an Ar-N{sub 2} gas mixture. The influence of the deposition power on the properties of tungsten nitride has been analyzed and compared with that induced by nitrogen content variation in the sputtering gas. A combined analysis of structural, electrical and optical properties on thin WN{sub x} films obtained at different deposition conditions has been performed. It was found that at an N{sub 2} content of 14% a single phase structure of W{sub 2}N films was formed with the highest crystalline content. This sputtering gas composition was subsequently used for fabricating films at different deposition powers. Optical analysis showed that increasing the deposition power created tungsten nitride films with a more metallic character, which is confirmed with resistivity measurements. At low sputtering powers the resulting films were crystalline whereas, with an increase of power, an amorphous phase was also present. The incorporation of an excess of nitrogen atoms resulted in an expansion of the W{sub 2}N lattice and this effect was more pronounced at low deposition powers. Infrared analysis revealed that in WN{sub x} films deposited at low power, chemisorbed N{sub 2} molecules did not behave as ligands whereas at high deposition power they clearly appeared as ligands around metallic tungsten. In this study, the influence of the most meaningful deposition parameters on the phase transformation reaction path was established and deposition conditions suitable for producing thermally stable and highly crystalline W{sub 2}N films were found.

Addonizio, Maria L.; Castaldo, Anna; Antonaia, Alessandro; Gambale, Emilia; Iemmo, Laura [ENEA, Portici Research Centre, Piazzale E. Fermi 1, I-80055, Portici (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

Lingafelter, J.W.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

96

Comparison of Bond Scission Sequence of Methanol on Tungsten Monocarbide and Pt-Modified Tungsten Monocarbide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to control the bond scission sequence of O-H, C-H, and C-O bonds is of critical importance in the effective utilization of oxygenate molecules, such as in reforming reactions and in alcohol fuel cells. In the current study, we use methanol as a probe molecule to demonstrate the possibility to control the decomposition pathways by supporting monolayer coverage of Pt on a tungsten monocarbide (WC) surface. Density functional theory (DFT) results reveal that on the WC and Pt/WC surfaces CH{sub 3}OH decomposes via O-H bond scission to form the methoxy (*CH{sub 3} O) intermediate. The subsequent decomposition of methoxy on the WC surface occurs through the C-O bond scission to form *CH{sub 3}, which reacts with surface *H to produce CH{sub 4}. In contrast, the decomposition of methoxy on the Pt/WC surface favors the C-H bond scission to produce *CH{sub 2} O, which prevents the formation of the *CH{sub 3} species and leads to the formation of a *CO intermediate through subsequent deprotonation steps. The DFT predictions are validated using temperature programmed desorption to quantify the gas-phase product yields and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy to determine the surface intermediates from methanol decomposition on Pt, WC, and Pt/WC surfaces.

Liu, P.; Stottlemyer, A.L.; Chen, J.G.

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

97

GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub-micron filter assemblies. There was no aerosol generation for the case of all air, so the plateout, condensate and smoke were all zero. For the case of all steam, there was very little plateout in the superheated regions (several percent) and the rest of the aerosol was collected in the condensate from the condenser. There was no smoke discharge into the filters. For the experiments with intermediate air-steam fractions, there was some aerosol plateout, considerable aerosol in the condensate and aerosol smoke discharged from the condenser with the escaping air.

GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electric arc welding gun  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

Luttrell, Edward (Clinton, TN); Turner, Paul W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

Fatigue Failure in Tungsten Carbide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury porosimetry can be applied to determine the percent interconnected porosity. ... Failure Analysis of Duplex Stainless Steel Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization ... The Role of Corrosion and Oxidation in High Temperature Failures: Valuable ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

Jha, K.N.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Tungsten Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients  

SciTech Connect

The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

John Scott O'Dell

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problems connected with gas side corrosion for the design of the lA4 (POC) channel hardware are explored and results of gas side wear rate tests in the Textron Mark VII facility are presented. It is shown that the proposed designs meet a 2000 hour lifetime criterion based upon these materials tests. Improvement in cathode lifetime is demonstrated with lower voltage intercathode gaps. The corrosion of these materials is discussed and it is shown how lifetimes are dependent upon gap voltage and average metal temperature. The importance of uniformity of slagging to the durability of the anode wall is demonstrated. The wear mechanism of the anodes in the MHD channel is analyzed. In addition to gas-side corrosion, the results of specific water corrosion tests of sidewall materials are discussed. All of the tests reported here were carried out to confirm the gas-side performance and the manufacturability of anode and sidewall designs and to address questions posed about the durability of tungsten-copper on the waterside. the results of water corrosion tests of the tungsten copper alloy sidewall material are presented to show that with proper control of waterside pH and, if necessary, dissolved oxygen, one can obtain reliable performance with no degradation of heat transfer with this material. The final choice of materials was determined primarily by the outcome of these tests and also by the question of the manufacturability of the prospective designs.

Rosa, R.J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Pollina, R.J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering]|[EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Percussive arc welding apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

Hollar, Jr., Donald L. (Overland Park, KS)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Series II. Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry vol. 88, I.Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter depositionleading to arcs and the physics of the arcing events

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys  

SciTech Connect

A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Injection Molding of Tungsten Powder Treated by Jet Mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten powder was firstly treated by jet mill, resulting in the improvement of ... and Welding Conditions of Monopile and Transition for Offshore Wind Plant.

111

High in Sodium: Highly Charged Tungsten Ions May Diagnose ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... D” spectral lines, but they are at far higher energy levels than ... like tungsten, confirming theoretical predictions of their energies and intensities. ...

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tungsten-Rhenium Super Alloy Development for Ultra High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tungsten-Rhenium Super Alloy Development for Ultra High Temperature Space Fission and Fusion Reactors. Author(s), Jonathan Webb, ...

113

Publications Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... AR Marder Abstract: Dissimilar metal welds were prepared ... 6XN alloy, and two Ni-base filler metals ... the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process. ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

Silica-alumina trihydrate filled epoxy castings resistant to arced SF.sub.6  

SciTech Connect

A cured, insulating, casting composition, having a coefficient of linear thermal expansion of below about 38 .times. 10.sup.-6 in./in./.degree. C and being resistant to arced sulfur hexafluoride gas, in contact with a metal surface in a sulfur hexafluoride gas environment, is made from hydantoin epoxy resin, anhydride curing agent and a filler combination of fused silica and alumina trihydrate.

Chenoweth, Terrence E. (Monroeville, PA); Yeoman, Frederick A. (Murrysville, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Measurement and finite element analysis of temperature distribution in arc welding process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation describes both the experimental measurement and finite element analysis used to study the temperature distribution during a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process, including the cooling down period. Welding was carried out on ... Keywords: FEA, MIG welding, arc welding, cracking, finite element analysis, metal inert gas welding, residual stress, simulation, temperature distribution, weldment temperature

C. K. Lee; J. Candy; C. P. H. Tan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ARC4461kit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

talk about a Disaster Supplies Kit? talk about a Disaster Supplies Kit? After a disaster, local officials and relief workers will be on the scene, but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours, or it may take days. Basic services, such as electricity, gas, water, and tele- phones, may be cut off, or you may have to evacuate at a moment's notice. You probably won't have time to shop or search for the supplies you'll need. Your family will cope best by preparing for disaster before it strikes. What is a Disaster Supplies Kit? Assembling the supplies you might need following a disaster is an impor- tant part of your Family Disaster Plan. Following a disaster, having extra sup- plies at home or supplies to take with you in the event of an evacuation can help your family endure evacuation

117

Filters for cathodic arc plasmas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activity during this Quarter has included the following: Several more electrodes and side wall pegs have been received from Avco. Some of these are being prepared for optical and electron microscope examination. Some literature on sulfidation under MHD conditions has been found. A method for inferring the magnitude of the leakage current flowing through the slag layer has been devised and applied to the analysis of many CDIF runs and a few Avco Mark 6 runs. A critical issue currently being investigated is the viability of tungsten, or tungsten-containing alloys such as W-Cu, and WC-CU in the MHD environment. On the anode wall, as an electrode cladding, tungsten could provide a cost-saving alternative to Pt, especially for a grooved, slagging anode design which is prohibitively costly when fabricated out of Pt. On the cathode, W-Cu has been used to extend the life of cathode leading edges as well as the anodic edges of pegs on the cathode end, and one or two pegs up from there, on the sidewalls. Lifetimes have been extended well beyond that of pure copper alone. Past work at Avco demonstrates that the life of these claddings appears to depend upon the tungsten content of the alloy used. The more tungsten in the tungsten-copper alloy, the longer-wearing they appear to be. There is however no quantitative data available comparing these materials in terms of lifetime or in their corrosion resistance.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

Hilsenbeck, Shane J. (Ames, IA); McCarley, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA); Xie, Xiaobing (College Station, TX)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

Plasma Arc Technology Dedicated to Solving Military Waste Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal plasma is an electrically conductive gas capable of generating temperatures up to 10,000°C near its column. The energy generated by plasma arcs has recently been applied to hazardous waste disposal. Since 1989 the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories have been active participants in research and development toward establishing plasma arc technology (PAT) as an efficient, economical and safe hazardous waste immobilization tool. In the U.S. the removal and disposal of asbestos contaminated material (ACM) generate significant amounts of hazardous waste. Recently, PAT has been used to convert ACM safely and efficiently into an innocuous ceramic substance no longer requiring Class I disposal. In addition to ACM waste disposal, PAT meets the waste disposal needs of pyrotechnic smoke assemblies, thermal batteries, proximity fuses, and contaminated soil. This paper will provide an overview of PAT and discuss Army and Department of Defense hazardous waste disposal needs.

Smith, E. D.; Zaghloul, H. H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

122

Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mtn Geothermal Project Mtn Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.723055555556°, -118.08027777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.723055555556,"lon":-118.08027777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed  

SciTech Connect

A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

Hooper, Frederick M (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Prototype arc saw design and cutting trials  

SciTech Connect

A program was initiated to develop the arc saw as a tool capable of removing the end fittings from spent nuclear fuel bundles. A special arc saw for this purpose was designed, installed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and satisfactorily operated to remove end fittings from simulated, nonradioactive fuel bundles. The design of the arc saw included consideration of the cutting environment, power supply size, control equipment, and work piece size. Several simulated fuel bundles were cut to demonstrate that the arc saw met design specifications. Although the arc saw development program was curtailed before significant performance data could be collected, tests indicate that the arc saw is a good means of cropping spent fuel bundles and is well suited to remote operation and maintenance.

Allison, G.S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Ambient pressure synthesis of nanostructured tungsten oxide crystalline films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures ...

H. X. Zhang; B. Q. Yang; P. X. Feng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Study on Visible Light Photocatalytic Performance of Nano Tungsten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a new environment for energy technology, it has low energy consumption, ... Tungsten trioxide thin films are widely used in electrochromic, solar energy ... of Rolled AZ31 Magnesium under Quasi-Static and High Rate Loading .... Step-

127

Tungsten carbide-cobalt by Three Dimensional Printing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three Dimensional Printing is an additive manufacturing process for rapid prototyping ceramic and metallic parts [Sachs, et al, 1990]. Green (not sintered) tungsten carbide-cobalt parts must have a density greater than 50% ...

Kelley, Andrew, III

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Characterization of the impurities in tungsten/silicon-germanium contacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Secondary ion mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectrometry depth profiling were used to determine impurity distributions in sputter deposited tungsten films over N-type and P-type 80/20 silicon-germanium elements of thermoelectric devices. These analyses showed that silicon, oxygen, sodium, boron, and phosphorous were present as impurities in the tungsten film. All these impurities except oxygen and sodium came from the substrate. Oxygen was gettered by the tungsten films, while sodium was possibly the result of sample handling. Further, the results from this study indicate that an oxide build-up, primarily at the tungsten/silicon-germanium interface of the N-type materials, is the major contributor to contact resistance in thermoelectric devices.

Gregg, H.A. Sr.

1986-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Surface plasma-arc cutting of stainless steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This danger does not exist when plasma-arc cutting is used. Plasma-arc cutting also increases productivity and produces better quality gouged surfaces [2].

131

An arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn, opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

Jha, Kamal N.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Molecular dynamics simulation of deuterium trapping and bubble formation in tungsten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulation of deuterium trapping and bubble formation in tungsten Xue Yang using classical molecular dynamic methods. " Low energy deuterium atoms tend to affix to high environment. The deuterium bombardment of monocrystalline tungsten was modeled by molecular dynamics

Harilal, S. S.

134

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN B. B.Temperature Nonnal-State Heat Capacity of Tungsten* B. n.single crystal This work, heat capacity 57,000a 4 d' 1&11.

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spectroscopy Of Highly Charged Tungsten Relevant To Fusion Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation emitted from highly charged tungsten ions has been measured at the Berlin Electron Beam Ion trap using high-resolution x-ray and EUV spectrometers. Highly charged tungsten ions ranging from Pm-like W{sup 13+} to N-like W{sup 67+} have been produced and excited in EBIT. The line emission originating from electric and magnetic dipole transitions is studied in a wide wavelength range from 0.12 to 80 nm. The results of our measurements are compared with predicted transition wavelengths from atomic structure calculations and observations at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Here we focus on the quasi-continuum emission around 5 nm from tungsten ions with an open 4 d shell (In-like W{sup 25+} to Rb-like W{sup 37+}) and the L-shell spectra of ions with configurations close to Ne-like one.

Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R. [Institut fuer Physik der Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Lehrstuhl Plasmaphysik, Newtonstr 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

2009-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for producing an energetic gas arc discharge employing the use of gas-fed hollow cathode and anode electrodes is reported. The rate of feed of the gas to the electrodes is regulated to cause complete space charge neutralization to occur within the electrodes. The arc discharge is closely fitted within at least one of the electrodes so tint the gas fed to this electrode is substantially completely ionized before it is emitted into the vacuum chamber. It is this electrode design and the axial potential gradient that exists in the arc which permits the arc to be operated in low pressures and at volthges and currents that permit the arc to be energetic. The use of the large number of energetic ions that are accelerated toward the cathode as a propulsion device for a space vehicle is set forth.

Bell, P.R.; Luce, J.S.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Arc Flash Issues in Transmission and Substation Environments: Modeling of Incident Thermal Energy of Long Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flashes are a serious hazard that may put people in life-threatening situations and cause great damage to existing assets. The National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) introduced requirements for electric utilities to perform arc flash hazard assessment of their facilities operating at and above 1000 V. Most methods available at this time for analyzing the incident thermal energy of arc flash were developed for low and medium-voltage industri...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

AdaptiveARC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AdaptiveARC AdaptiveARC Jump to: navigation, search Name AdaptiveARC Address 7683 Sitio Manana Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92009 Sector Biomass Product Waste-to-clean-energy startup is developing an arc-plasma reactor Website http://www.adaptivearc.com/ Coordinates 33.07959°, -117.22539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.07959,"lon":-117.22539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Detection of arcs in automotive electrical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present time, there is no established method for the detection of DC electric arcing. This is a concern for forthcoming advanced automotive electrical systems which consist of higher DC electric power bus voltages, ...

Mishrikey, Matthew David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

RADIATION HAZARDS ENCOUNTERED IN ARC MELTING THORIUM  

SciTech Connect

A project to provide information on the hazards associated wlth arc melting of Th is described. A general airsampling analysis was made to determine the separation, concentration, and distribution of Th daughter (decay) products throughout arc melting, machining, and forging processes found in a handling facility. The value of well coordinated health physics program is stressed in connection with potential health hazards and personnel protection. Building, equipment, and exhaust ventilation requirements for such a facility are discussed, along wlth special handling methods. (auth)

Lowery, R.R.

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Groundwater Data Modeling for Arc Hydro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the years 1999–2002, a consortium for geographic information systems (GIS) in water resources, led by the Center for Research in Water Resources (CRWR) and the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), developed a data model, named Arc Hydro, for the presentation of surface water data in ArcGIS. This model was published in the summer of 2002 (Maidment, 2002) and has since been adopted as a common framework by data producing agencies, such as the USGS, and by creators of hydrologic models requiring GIS data such as the Hydrologic Engineering Center and the Danish Hydraulic Institute. The Design of Arc Hydro revealed that it is possible to define a “hydrologic information system ” which is a synthesis of geospatial and temporal data supporting hydrologic analysis and modeling (Maidment, 2002). This is an exciting new concept because rather than simply applying GIS in water resources, it provides a new way of thinking about how information technology can be used to support water resources planning, modeling and management. While the first Arc Hydro data model focused on describing surface water behavior, it has become apparent that a similar effort is needed to define an ArcGIS data model for groundwater, as part of Arc Hydro. This need is emphasized by the lack of a well understood and generally agreed

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the subducted slab on Aleutian Island Arc magma sources:2006. Revised age of Aleutian Island arc formation impliesCrustal recycling and the Aleutian arc. Geochim Cosmochim.

Yogodzinski, Gene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Magnetic Method to Characterize the Current Densities in Breaker Arc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to use magnetic induction measurements from a low voltage breaker arc, to reconstruct the arc's current density. The measurements were made using Hall effect sensors, which were placed close to, but outside the breaking device. The arc was modelled as a rectangular current sheet, composed of a mix of threadlike current segments and with a current density varying across the propagation direction. We found the magnetic induction of the arc is a convolution product of the current density, and a function depending on the breaker geometry and arc model. Using deconvolution methods, the current density in the electric arc was determined.The method is used to study the arc behavior into the breaker device. Notably, position, arc size, and electric conductivity could all be determined, and then used to characterize the arc mode, diffuse or concentrated, and study the condition of its mode changing.

Machkour, Nadia [National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ion source with improved primary arc collimation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1983-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10{sup 4} Bq cm{sup -3} at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10{sup 6} Bq cm{sup -3} after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase due to {sup 179}Ta with a half-life of 1.82 yr and thus require prolonged storage for activity cooling. The H*(10) near the patient side of the tungsten block is about 100 {mu}Sv/h and is 27 times higher at the upstream side of the block. This would lead to an accumulated dose for therapists in a year that may exceed occupational maximum permissible dose (50 mSv/yr). The value of H*(10) at the upstream surface of the tungsten block is about 220 times higher than that of the brass. Conclusions: MLC is an efficient way for beam shaping and overall cost reduction device in proton therapy. However, based on this study, tungsten seems to be not an optimal material for MLC in proton beam therapy. Usage of tungsten MLC in clinic may create unnecessary risks associated with the secondary neutrons and induced radioactivity for patients and staff depending on the patient load. A careful selection of material for manufacturing of an optimal MLC for proton therapy is thus desired.

Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States) and Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (Formerly Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

The High-Temperature Properties of Welded Cast Co-Base Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

lOYS, FSX-414 and MM-509, using the Gas-Tungsten-Arc. (GTA) and .... and be free of liquid-metal embrittling .... owing to the combustion of natural gas, and (ii).

148

arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControl...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate.

Rosa, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Avco-Everett Research Lab., Everett, MA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

American Ref Fuel Corporation ARC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ref Fuel Corporation ARC Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel Corporation (ARC) Place Montvale, NJ, New Jersey Zip 76450 Product Focused on waste-to-energy facilities...

152

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » SCI-Arc/Caltech  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCI-ArcCaltech Below you will find Solar Decathlon news from the SCI-ArcCaltech archive, sorted by date. New Zealand Takes First in Engineering Contest Thursday, September 29,...

153

Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

LITTLEWOOD TYPE PROBLEMS ON SUB ARCS Peter ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LITTLEWOOD TYPE. PROBLEMS ON SUB ARCS. Peter Borwein. Simon Fraser University Centre for. Constructive and Experimental. Mathematics.

156

Toughened Graphite Electrode for High Heat Electric Arc ...  

Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... To reduce the failure rate, ... Applications and Industries. Electric arc furnace steel manufacturing;

157

Synthesis of Elementary Net Systems with Context Arcs and Localities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the synthesis problem for ENCL-systems, defined as Elementary Net Systems extended with context (inhibitor and activator) arcs and explicit event localities. Since colocated events are meant to be executed synchronously, the behaviour ... Keywords: Petri nets, activator arcs, context arcs, elementary net systems, inhibitor arcs, localities, net synthesis, step sequence semantics, structure and behaviour of nets, theory of concurrency, theory of regions, transition systems

Maciej Koutny; Marta Pietkiewicz-Koutny

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Published on Web 08/16/2003 Vapor Phase Synthesis of Tungsten Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor phase methods for synthesizing metal nanowires directly without the help of templates have not been studied extensively. Even though there have been few reports with one dating back to 1877 on metal whisker synthesis from the vapor phase, the inconclusive growth mechanism did not lead to any serious developments for nanowires. 1 Recently, there are also two reports with one using hydrogen on tungsten oxide for tungsten nanowires, and another using decomposition of tungsten complexed organic precursors for amorphous carbon sheathed, polycrystalline tungsten nanowires. 2 In this context, we report a novel method in which nucleation and growth of metal oxides at temperatures higher than the oxide decomposition temperatures lead to the respective metal nanowires. Specifically, we demonstrate this concept with the bulk synthesis of tungsten nanowires. The chemical vapor transport of tungsten in the presence of oxygen onto substrates kept at temperatures

Sreeram Vaddiraju; Hari Ch; Mahendra K. Sunkara

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Out-arc pancyclicity of vertices in tournaments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yao, Guo and Zhang [T. Yao, Y. Guo, K. Zhang, Pancyclic out-arcs of a vertex in a tournament, Discrete Appl. Math. 99 (2000) 245-249.] proved that every strong tournament contains a vertex u such that every out-arc of u is pancyclic. In this paper, we ... Keywords: Cycles, Out-arcs, Pancyclicity, Tournaments

Qiaoping Guo; Shengjia Li; Yubao Guo; Hongwei Li

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

y CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURECritical Field for Superconductivity and Low-Temperaturemagnetic field for superconductivity In tungsten from 5.5 to

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Spark Plasma Sintering of Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys for Very High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the tungsten-rhenium microstructure was optimized using alternative techniques such as high energy ball milling and spark plasma sintering, which ...

162

A Review on Alloying in Tungsten Heavy Alloys - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The review will concentrate on the alloying additions that have been made to the classic liquid phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys primarily based on W-Ni-Fe ...

163

arcControlTower, the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract content Panda, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the panda server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with t...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effect of ion mass and charge state on transport of vacuum ARC plasmas through a biased magnetic filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of ion mass and charge state on plasma transport through a 90{sup o}-curved magnetic filter is experimentally investigated using a pulsed cathodic arc source. Graphite, copper, and tungsten were selected as test materials. The filter was a bent copper coil biased via the voltage drop across a low-ohm, ''self-bias'' resistor. Ion transport is accomplished via a guiding electric field, whose potential forms a ''trough'' shaped by the magnetic guiding field of the filter coil. Evaluation was done by measuring the filtered ion current and determination of the particle system coefficient, which can be defined as the ratio of filter ion current, divided by the mean ion charge state, to the arc current. It was found that the ion current and particle system coefficient decreased as the mass-to-charge ratio of ions increased. This result can be qualitatively interpreted by a very simply model of ion transport that is based on compensation of the centrifugal force by the electric force associated with the guiding potential trough.

Byon, Eungsun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Kwon, Sik-Chol; Anders, Andre

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hybrid Arc Cell Studies: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

I report on the status, at the end of FY12, of the studies of an arc cell for a hybrid synchrotron accelerating from 375 GeV/c to 750 GeV/c in momentum. Garren produced a complete lattice that gives a good outline of the structure of a hybrid synchrotron lattice. It is, however, lacking in some details: it does not maintain a constant time of flight, it lacks chromaticity correction, its cell structure is not ideal for removing aberrations from chromaticity correction, and it probably needs more space between magnets. I have begun studying cell structures for the arc cells to optimize the lattice performance and cost. I present some preliminary results for two magnets per half cell. I then discuss difficulties encountered, some preliminary attempts at resolving them, and the future plans for this work.

Berg J. S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

Bayless, John R. (Malibu, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-CHANNEL, HELIUM-COOLED, TUNGSTEN HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-CHANNEL, HELIUM-COOLED, TUNGSTEN HEAT EXCHANGER Dennis L. Youchison-cooled, refractory heat exchangers are now under consideration for first wall and divertor applications-channel, helium-cooled heat exchanger made almost entirely of tungsten was designed and fabricated by Thermacore

California at Los Angeles, University of

168

Tungsten Lamps as an Affordable Light Source for Testing of Photovoltaic Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved Tungsten light source system for photovoltaic cell testing made from low-cost, commercially available materials is presented as an alternative to standard expensive testing equipment. In this work, spectral correction of the Tungsten light ... Keywords: I-V measurement, Light source, Photovoltaic, Testing

Jeydmer Aristizabal; Badr Omrane; Clint Landrock; Sasan Vosoogh-Grayli; Yindar Chuo; Jasbir N. Patel; Bozena Kaminska; Carlo Menon

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Molecular dynamics simulation of erosion and surface evolution of tungsten due to bombardment with deuterium and carbon in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulation of erosion and surface evolution of tungsten due to bombardment Available online 24 May 2013 Keywords: Molecular dynamic simulation Carbon irradiation on tungsten t The behavior of tungsten as plasma facing material in fusion environment is investigated using molecular

Harilal, S. S.

170

Simulation of Armor Penetration by Tungsten Rods: ALEGRA Validation Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from simulations of the impact and penetration of tungsten alloy rods into thick rolled armor plates are presented. The calculations were performed with the CTH and ALEGRA computer codes using the DOE massively parallel TFLOPS computer co-developed by Sandia National Laboratory and Intel Corporation. Comparisons with experimental results are presented. Agreement of the two codes with each other and with the empirical results for penetration channel depth and radius is very close. Other shock physics and penetration features are also compared to simulation results. Distribution Category UC-705 ii Intentionally Left Blank iii Contents List of Figures ....................................................................................................... p. iv List of Tables ..........................................................................................................p. v Executive Summary ..............................................................................

Daniel E. Carroll; Eugene S. Hertel, Jr.; Timothy G. Trucano; Category Uc

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Simulation of armor penetration by tungsten rods: ALEGRA validation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from simulations of the impact and penetration of tungsten alloy rods into thick rolled armor plates are presented. The calculations were performed with the CTH and ALEGRA computer codes using the DOE massively parallel TFLOPS computer co-developed by Sandia National Laboratory and Intel Corporation. Comparisons with experimental results are presented. Agreement of the two codes with each other and with the empirical results for penetration channel depth and radius is very close. Other shock physics and penetration features are also compared to simulation results.

Carroll, D.E.; Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Trucano, T.G.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer  

SciTech Connect

A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

Vivekanandan, Nagarajan, E-mail: viveknaren@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India); Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Thermal oxidation of tungsten-based sputtered coatings  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the addition of nickel, titanium, and nitrogen on the air oxidation behavior of W-based sputtered coatings in the temperature range 600 to 800 C was studied. In some cases these additions significantly improved the oxidation resistance of the tungsten coatings. As reported for bulk tungsten, all the coatings studied were oxidized by layers following a parabolic law. Besides WO{sub 3} and WO{sub x} phases detected in all the oxidized coatings, TiO{sub 2} and NiWO{sub 4} were also detected for W-Ti and W-Ni films, respectively. WO{sub x} was present as an inner protective compact layer covered by the porous WO{sub 3} oxide. The best oxidation resistance was found for W-Ti and W-N-Ni coatings which also presented the highest activation energies (E{sub a} = 234 and 218 kJ/mol, respectively, as opposed to E{sub a} {approx} 188 kJ/mol for the other coatings). These lower oxidation weight gains were attributed to the greater difficulty of the inward diffusion of oxygen ions for W-Ti films, owing to the formation of fine particles of TiO{sub 2}, and the formation of the external, more protective layer of NiWO{sub 4} for W-N-Ni coatings.

Louro, C.; Cavaleiro, A. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica-Polo II, Coimbra (Portugal)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Arc Flash Issues in Transmission and Substation Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flashes are a serious hazard that may potentially put people in life-threatening situations and cause great damage to existing assets. National Electrical Safety Code and Occupational Safety and Health Administration safety rules have introduced requirements for electric utilities to perform arc-flash hazard analysis of all electric facilities operating at and above 1000 volts. Most methods available at this time for analyzing the arc-flash incident thermal energy were developed for low- and medium-v...

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Recovering Zinc and Lead from Electric Arc Furnace Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price: 10.00. Product In Stock. Description Increasing amounts of electric arc furnace dust ...

176

Effects of Arc Welding Process on Microstructure and Morphology of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Effects of Arc Welding Process on Microstructure and Morphology of Flake Graphite in Grey Cast Iron. Author(s), Arash Elhami Khorasani, ...

177

Combinatorics of Arc Diagrams, Ferrers Fillings, Young ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 22, 2009 ... I Generalization of permutation matrices: fill each row & column of a Ferrers shape ... Standard Young Tableaux. Arc Diagrams,. Nesting and.

178

Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Inconel Coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Inconel Coating. Author(s), Sofiane Djeraf, Yamina Mebdoua, Hadj Lahmar, Rachid Lakhdari.

179

Theory of Parabolic Arcs in Interstellar Scintillation Spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our theory relates the secondary spectrum, the 2D power spectrum of the radio dynamic spectrum, to the scattered pulsar image in a thin scattering screen geometry. Recently discovered parabolic arcs in secondary spectra are generic features for media that scatter radiation at angles much larger than the rms scattering angle. Each point in the secondary spectrum maps particular values of differential arrival-time delay and fringe rate (or differential Doppler frequency) between pairs of components in the scattered image. Arcs correspond to a parabolic relation between these quantities through their common dependence on the angle of arrival of scattered components. Arcs appear even without consideration of the dispersive nature of the plasma. Arcs are more prominent in media with negligible inner scale and with shallow wavenumber spectra, such as the Kolmogorov spectrum, and when the scattered image is elongated along the velocity direction. The arc phenomenon can be used, therefore, to constrain the inner scale and the anisotropy of scattering irregularities for directions to nearby pulsars. Arcs are truncated by finite source size and thus provide sub micro arc sec resolution for probing emission regions in pulsars and compact active galactic nuclei. Multiple arcs sometimes seen signify two or more discrete scattering screens along the propagation path, and small arclets oriented oppositely to the main arc persisting for long durations indicate the occurrence of long-term multiple images from the scattering screen.

James M. Cordes; Barney J. Rickett; Daniel R. Stinebring; William A. Coles

2004-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stress, aging electrical wiring systems, arc-physics, electrostatic dis- charge, and TEMPEST. R. Kevin Howard is a principle technologist with the Electromagnetic Technologies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Documentation of the operation of an arc-heated hydrogen atom source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed description of the operation is given including establishment of an argon arc, changeover to hydrogen, and parameters of the hydrogen arc. A table of arc parameters for an 18 hour period is included. (GHT)

Way, K.R.; Yang, S.C.; Stwalley, W.C.

1976-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

Physical characteristics of gliding arc discharge plasma generated in a laval nozzle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic behavior of gliding arc discharge generated in a Laval nozzle has been investigated by electrical diagnostics and a high-speed camera. The results show that the voltage waveform keeps the initial shape as the gas flow rate is small, while it becomes less stable with increasing flow rate. During the first half of a cycle, the voltage rises and after that it decreases. In nitrogen and oxygen, the break down voltage for the arc is between 3.3 and 5.5 kV, while it is between 3.3-7.5 kV in air. The waveform of current I remains almost stable; and for nitrogen and oxygen, the maximum value of current I is between 0.28 and 0.46 A. With increasing flow rate, the power consumption in air first increases and then decreases; it remains in the range of 110-217 W, and gradually increases in nitrogen and oxygen. The power consumption in oxygen is lower than that in nitrogen; the input of the energy density decreases with increasing flow rate for all the three gases. The development of the arc is tracked and recorded by a high-speed camera. The cycle is stable at 10 ms for flow rates up to 1 m{sup 3} h{sup -1}. At a higher flow rate, the cycle becomes unstable.

Lu, S. Y.; Sun, X. M.; Li, X. D.; Yan, J. H. [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Institute for Thermal Power Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Du, C. M. [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

What makes an electric welding arc perform its required function  

SciTech Connect

The physics of direct current and alternating current welding arcs, the heat transfer of direct current welding arcs, the characteristics of dc welding and ac welding power supplies and recommendations for the procurement and maintenance of precision power supplies are discussed. (LCL)

Correy, T.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site W. E. Clements and L. Jones Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico T. Baldwin Special Services Unit Australian Bureau of Meteorology Melbourne, Australia K. Nitschke South Pacific Regional Environment Programme Apia, Samoa Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998 a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. See Figure 1 for

185

Microsoft Word - Lamellae tungsten tile design thermal and electromagnetic stress analysis_Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lamellae tungsten tile design transient Lamellae tungsten tile design transient thermal/ electromagnetic stress analysis Thomas Willard*, Rui Vieira, Samuel Pierson MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 8 June 2006 Abstract A transient thermal/ electromagnetic stress analysis of the lamellae tungsten tile design has been performed to determine if the design is adequate to meet the maximum design load conditions of 12 MW/ m 2 uniform heat flux for 5 seconds (single pulse, no Diverter Plate temperature ratcheting) , superimposed on the electromagnetic body load due to eddy currents generated by disruptions. The results show that the design is adequate, with the stresses in the tungsten lamellae and the TZM molybdenum hardware less than the ultimate strength of

186

Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose.

Benson, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose. 2 figs.

Benson, D.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Blewer, R.S.

1990-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

188

An arc flash is the result of a rapid release of energy due to an arcing fault between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace requires that a flash hazard analysis be conductedAn arc flash is the result of a rapid release of energy due to an arcing fault between conductors. The conductive material usually burns away from the intense heat. If conditions are right, the flow of energy can

189

Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submerged Arc Furnaces are used to produce high temperature alloys. These furnaces typically run at 3000°F using high voltage electricity along with metallurgical carbon to reduce metal oxides to pure elemental form. The process as currently designed consumes power and fuel that yields an energy efficiency of approximately 40% (Total Btu’s required to reduce to elemental form/ Btu Input). The vast majority of heat is lost to the atmosphere or cooling water system. The furnaces can be modified to recover this heat and convert it to power. The system will then reduce the amount of purchased power by approximately 25% without any additional use of fuel. The cost of this power is virtually unchanged over the life of the project because of the use of capital to displace fuel consumed from the purchased power source.

O'Brien, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Automatic welding comes of age. [Offshore  

SciTech Connect

Automatic pipe welding systems today fall into three main categories: gas metal arc welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, and flash-butt welding. The first automatic welding devices used offshore were the CRC and H.C. Price systems. Both use gas metal arc welding with a consumable steel filler wire. The recently developed McDermott flash-butt welding system is described. (DLC)

Turner, D.L. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Back arc extension and collision: An experimental approach of the tectonics of Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arc basins (Japan Sea, Okinawa Trough, South China Sea) and continental grabens (North China grabens

193

Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

O' Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W. (AJT Enterprises, Inc.)

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

194

Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace  

SciTech Connect

A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

O' Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Independence, OR); Addison, Gerald W. (St. Stephen, SC)

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » SCI-Arc/Caltech  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCI-Arc/Caltech SCI-Arc/Caltech Below you will find Solar Decathlon news from the SCI-Arc/Caltech archive, sorted by date. CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) Friday, May 13, 2011 By April Saylor Editor's Note: This entry has been cross-posted from DOE's Energy Blog. In honor of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon-which challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive-we are profiling each of the 20 teams participating in the competition. The students from the Southern California Institute of Architecture and California Institute of Technology, otherwise known as the SCI-Arc/Caltech team, have teamed up to take an interesting approach to the design of their

196

Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument ARCS Overview The wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample position with a large solid angle of detector coverage. The instrument incorporates modern neutron instrumentation, such as an elliptically focused neutron guide, high speed magnetic bearing choppers, and a massive array of 3He linear position sensitive detectors. Novel features of the spectrometer include the use of a large gate valve between the sample and detector vacuum chambers and the placement of the detectors within the vacuum, both of which provide a window-free final flight path to minimize background scattering while allowing rapid changing of the sample and

197

Ohmic contacts for solar cells by arc plasma spraying  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of applying ohmic contacts to a semiconductor, such as a silicon body or wafer used in solar cells, by the use of arc plasma spraying, and solar cells resulting therefrom.

Narasimhan, Mandayam C. (Seekonk, MA); Roessler, Barton (Barrington, RI); Loferski, Joseph J. (Providence, RI)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Arc Flash Phase II Work Practices Survey Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arc Flash Phase II Work Practices Survey was conducted as part of an EPRI project aimed at helping utilities understand and prepare for changing National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) and Occupational Safety and Safety Administration (OSHA) arc flash regulations. These changes can have significant implications for utility work practices, protective schema, and personal protection. The results of this survey are summarized in this report. The Phase II Survey is the second of two surveys EPRI has condu...

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Tunable, self-powered integrated arc plasma-melter vitrification system for waste treatment and resource recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a relatively compact self-powered, tunable waste conversion system and apparatus which has the advantage of highly robust operation which provides complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The system provides the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or by an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a self-powered or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production.

Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Enhanced catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid molar fuels by means of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composition is enhanced by the addition of molybdenum, tungsten or a combination thereof as an additional component of said composition. The presence of the additive component increases the olefinic content of the hydrocarbon products produced. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of the engineering and economic feasibility study of utilizing geothermal energy for the mining and processing of tungsten ore at the Union Carbide-Metals Division Pine Creek tungsten complex near Bishop, Calfironia is reviewed. Results of geophysical data analysis including determination of assumed resource parameters are presented. The energy utilization evaluation identifies potential locations for substituting geothermal energy for fossil fuel energy using current technology. Preliminary analyses for local environmental and institutional barriers to development of a geothermal system are also provided.

Lane, C.K.; Erickson, M.V.; Lowe, G.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Treatment studies of plutonium-bearing INEEL waste surrogates in a bench-scale arc furnace  

SciTech Connect

Since 1989, the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) has been included on the National Priority List for remediation. Arc- and plasma-heated furnaces are being considered for converting the radioactive mixed waste buried in the SDA to a stabilized-vitreous form. Nonradioactive, surrogate SDA wastes have been melted during tests in these types of furnaces, but data are needed on the behavior of transuranic (TRU) constituents, primarily plutonium, during thermal treatment. To begin collecting this data, plutonium-spiked SDA surrogates were processed in a bench-scale arc furnace to quantify the fate of the plutonium and other hazardous and nonhazardous metals. Test conditions included elevating the organic, lead, chloride, and sodium contents of the surrogates. Blends having higher organic contents caused furnace power levels to fluctuate. An organic content corresponding to 50% INEEL soil in a soil-waste blend was the highest achievable before power fluctuations made operating conditions unacceptable. The glass, metal, and off-gas solids produced from each surrogate blend tested were analyzed for elemental (including plutonium) content and the partitioning of each element to the corresponding phase was calculated.

Freeman, C.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Miocene volcanic complex of the Takashibiyama Formation consists largely of subalkali, subaqueous basalt to andesite lavas and andesite to dacite subaqueous volcaniclastic flow deposits. Most of subaqueous lavas are moderately to intensely brecciated with rugged rough surfaces and ramp structures similar to subaerial block lava. Volcaniclastic flow deposits commonly include basalt to andesite lava fragments and/or pyroclastic materials, and are similar in internal

205

Advanced RenewableEnergy Company ARC Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced RenewableEnergy Company ARC Energy Advanced RenewableEnergy Company ARC Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced RenewableEnergy Company (ARC Energy) Place Nashua, New Hampshire Product New Hampshire-based stealth mode LED substrate manufacture equipment provider which aims to lower the cost of LEDs. Coordinates 42.758365°, -71.464209° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.758365,"lon":-71.464209,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ArcSafe® ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge  2007 R&D 100 Award Entry Form ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge  Joint Submitters Submitting Organization Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS 1181 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1181 USA Larry Schneider Phone: (505) 845-7135 Fax: (505) 845-7685 Email: lxschne@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate represen- tation of this product. (Signature)______________________________________ Astronics-Advanced Electronic Systems, Inc. 9845 Willows Rd NE City: Redmond State: WA Zip/Postal: 98052-2540 USA Contact Name: Michael Ballas, Program Manager Phone: (425) 895-4304 Fax: (425)702.4930 Email: michael.ballas@astronics.com

207

Muon Acceleration with RLA and Non-scaling FFAG Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

Vasiliy Morozov,Alex Bogacz,Dejan Trbojevic

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natural gas transmission and distribution module (NGTDM) of NEMS represents the natural gas market and determines regional market-clearing prices for natural gas supplies and for end-use consumption, given the information passed from other NEMS modules. A transmission and distribution network (Figure 15), composed of nodes and arcs, is used to simulate the interregional flow and pricing of gas in the contiguous United States and Canada in both the peak (December through March) and offpeak (April through November) period. This network is a simplified representation of the physical natural gas pipeline system and establishes the possible interregional flows and associated prices as gas moves from supply sources to end users. natural gas transmission and distribution module (NGTDM) of NEMS represents the natural gas market and determines regional market-clearing prices for natural gas supplies and for end-use consumption, given the information passed from other NEMS modules. A transmission and distribution network (Figure 15), composed of nodes and arcs, is used to simulate the interregional flow and pricing of gas in the contiguous United States and Canada in both the peak (December through March) and offpeak (April through November) period. This network is a simplified representation of the physical natural gas pipeline system and establishes the possible interregional flows and associated prices as gas moves from supply sources to end users. Figure 15. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Network

209

An ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the duel purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Multi-cathode metal vapor arc ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. One embodiment of the appaatus utilizes a multi-cathode arrangement for interaction with the anode.

Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tungsten nano-tendril growth in the Alcator C-Mod divertor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth of tungsten nano-tendrils ('fuzz') has been observed for the first time in the divertor region of a high-power density tokamak experiment. After 14 consecutive helium L-mode discharges in Alcator C-Mod, the tip of ...

Baldwin, M.J.

212

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Tungsten uptake kinetics and trophic1 transfer into a novel gastropod model2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

some27 siderophilic tendencies that are very similar to uranium and thorium, and which have similar it a unique29 element. Tungsten has one of the greatest densities (19.25 g/cm3 ), after only uranium for industrial37 applications such as mine drilling heads and grinding bits. Considering its weight and relative

Jawitz, James W.

214

SPS Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys in Support of NTR Fuels Development  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Tungsten metal slugs were fabricated via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of powdered metals at temperatures ranging from 1575 K to 1975 K and hold times of 5 minutes to 30 minutes, using powders with an average diameter of 7.8 ?m. Sintered tungsten specimens were found to have relative densities ranging from 83 % to 94 % of the theoretical density for tungsten. Consolidated specimens were also tested for their Vickers Hardness Number (VHN), which was fitted as a function of relative density; the fully consolidated VHN was extrapolated to be 381.45 kg/mm2. Concurrently, tungsten and rhenium powders with average respective diameters of 0.5 ?m and 13.3 ?m were pre-processed either by High-Energy-Ball-Milling (HEBM) or by homogeneous mixing to yield W-25at.%Re mixtures. The powder batches were sintered at temperatures of 1975 K and 2175 K for hold times ranging from 0 minutes to 60 minutes yielding relative densities ranging from 94% to 97%. The combination of HEBM and sintering showed a significant decrease in the inter-metallic phases compared to that of the homogenous mixing and sintering.

Jonathan A. Webb; Indrajit Charit; Cory Sparks; Darryl P. Butt; Megan Frary; Mark Carroll

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Burgardt, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Emission spectra analysis of arc plasma for synthesis of carbon nanostructures in various magnetic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field in arc plasmas, high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and large-scale graphene flakes can be obtained in a single step. In this paper, ultraviolet-visible emission spectra of arc in different spots under various magnetic conditions are analyzed to provide an in situ investigation for transformation processes of evaporated species and growth of carbon nanostructures in arc. Based on the arc spectra of carbon diatomic Swan bands, vibrational temperature in arc is determined. The vibrational temperature in arc center was measured around 6950 K, which is in good agreement with our simulation results. Experimental and simulation results suggest that SWCNT are formed in the arc periphery region. Transmission electronic microscope and Raman spectroscope are also employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures.

Li Jian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparison of Numerical Simulators for Greenhouse Gas Storage in Coalbeds, Part I: Pure Carbon Dioxide Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Numerical Simulators for Greenhouse Gas Storage Comparison of Numerical Simulators for Greenhouse Gas Storage in Coalbeds, Part I: Pure Carbon Dioxide Injection David H.-S. Law (law@arc.ab.ca; 780-450-5034) Alberta Research Council (ARC) Inc. 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6N 1E4 L.H.G. (Bert) van der Meer (l.vandermeer@nitg.tno.nl; +31-30-256-4635) Netherlands Institute of Applied Geoscience TNO P.O. Box 80015, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands W.D. (Bill) Gunter (gunter@arc.ab.ca; 780-450-5467) Alberta Research Council (ARC) Inc. 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6N 1E4 Abstract The injection of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep, unmineable coalbeds is a very attractive option for geologic CO 2 storage: the CO 2 is stored and at the same time the recovery of

219

New novel cleaning technique for extending mean time between mechanical cleans in a Genus tungsten CVD reactor  

SciTech Connect

During the chemical vapor deposition of blanket tungsten from the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF{sub 6}), metallic parts within the reaction chamber accumulate metallic tungsten, tungsten oxyfluorides, and other related tungsten species. The usual method for removal of the chamber deposits is to open the chamber and perform a labor intensive mechanical clean, which involves the use of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and deionized (DI) water, or an in-situ fluorine-base plasma clean. The authors have investigated the use of repetitive in-situ nitrogen trifluoride (NF{sub 3}) plasma cleans during the course of operating a Genuse 8721 tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor. The Genuse reactor has been retrofitted with self-ratchetting linear slides, which allow the wafer clamps to be extended into the NF{sub 3} plasma. They have extended the mean time between failures (MTBF) due to the use of 10 minute plasma clean every 75--100 wafers. Deposition for this process is 8,000 angstroms per wafer, using 6 deposition sites. The total tungsten deposition for a 0.5 micron tungsten plug is 4 microns, per a 25 wafer lot. Instead of a total removal of the accumulated tungsten from the chamber hardware, a partial etchback of the deposition from the wafer clamps and wafer chucks was performed. With this, sources for particles and backside deposition were eliminated. They see an increase in wafer-to-wafer uniformity, lot-to-lot repeatability, and particle reduction due to the use of frequent plasma clean. Recovery time after a plasma clean is excellent and no detrimental effects from hydrogen fluoride ``poisoning`` were seen.

Lujan, R.D.; Fleming, J.G.; Baird, J.L.; Gentry, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Microelectronics Technologies

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Proposal of an Arc Detection Technique Based on RF Measurements for the ITER ICRF Antenna  

SciTech Connect

RF arc detection is a key operational and safety issue for the ICRF system on ITER. Indeed the high voltages inside the antenna put it at risk of arcing, which could cause substantial damage. This paper describes the various possibilities explored by circuit simulation and the strategy now considered to protect the ITER ICRF antenna from RF arcs.

Huygen, S.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Vrancken, M. [LPP/ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels (Belgium); Wooldridge, E. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

222

An optimal coarse-grained arc consistency algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of constraint propagation is the main feature of any constraint solver. It is thus of prime importance to manage the propagation in an efficient and effective fashion. There are two classes of propagation algorithms for general constraints: fine-grained ... Keywords: Arc consistency, Constraint networks, Constraint programming systems, Non-binary constraints, Path consistency

Christian Bessière; Jean-Charles Régin; Roland H. C. Yap; Yuanlin Zhang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arc pyrolysis of methane at supersonic conditions, representative of conditions in the reformer is then reformed or cracked to produce hydrogen. The hy- drocarbon of choice is methane because of its highest material instead of as a fuel. Amongst various hydrogen production technologies,7 steam reformation

Texas at Arlington, University of

224

Pulse thermal processing of functional materials using directed plasma arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of thermally processing a material includes exposing the material to at least one pulse of infrared light emitted from a directed plasma arc to thermally process the material, the pulse having a duration of no more than 10 s.

Ott, Ronald D. (Knoxville, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Harper, David C. (Kingston, TN)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

225

Modern Control Strategies for Vacuum Arc Remelting of Segregation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

variable becomes too large, the arc will search for a less resistive path to ground ... process can enter a mode where T,, remains constant as g, opens. ... term (-20 minutes) averaging; however, this causes the system to be highly damped and.

226

A hybrid meta-heuristic approach for natural gas pipeline network optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a hybrid heuristic solution procedure for fuel cost minimization on gas transmission systems with a cyclic network topology, that is, networks with at least one cycle containing two or more compressor station arcs. Our heuristic ... Keywords: dynamic programming, natural gas, non-convex problem, steady state, tabu search, transmission networks

Conrado Borraz-Sánchez; Roger Z. Ríos-Mercado

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Manual Plasma Welding (PTAW) Evaluation with Powder Hardfacing Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repair practices for hardfacing alloys using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) have been evaluated in the past on hardfacing applied with various automated welding processes. Accessibility often limits the use of these welding processes in manual repair applications. Recent developments in plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW) powder welding systems have prompted evaluations of manual repair practices for hardfacing materials. The PTAW powder welding process feeds the fil...

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

228

Investigation of the effect of welding parameters on weld quality of plasma arc keyhole welding of structural steels  

SciTech Connect

In the present investigation, the individual and interactive effects of the main welding parameters on weld quality of plasma arc keyhole welding of conventional structural steel, high strength microalloyed steel and strong formable microalloyed steel have been examined using welding of butt joints with a square groove in various welding positions, and welding of joint roots with a single-V-groove and the root face in the flat position. The most important welding parameters are welding current, welding speed and welding gases, especially plasma gas flow rate. Welding parameter combinations producing the best quality welds are presented. It is shown that it is possible to achieve defect-free high-quality welds with good strength and toughness properties, but the allowable range of variation of welding parameters, especially for the highest weld quality, is narrow. An argonhydrogen mixture for the plasma gas together with argon as shielding and backing gases give the best results with respect to weld quality.

Martikainen, J.K.; Moisio, T.J.I. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland). Welding Technology Lab.)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "To test if it would have been possible to find the Tungsten Mountain geothermal system with a shallow temperature survey, more than 80 2-meter-deep temperatures were recorded during a two week period in late June and early July, 2007. These measurements spanned an 8-km-long zone parallel to the range front and extended eastward from the range front up to 2 km towards the playa's edge (Figure 1). Two-meter temperatures ranged from 14.0°C up to a maximum of 26.7° C. The higher temperatures correspond to the area of exploration drilling, although anomalously high temperatures extend northeastward beyond the area of drilling. These

230

2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Coolbaugh et al. (2007), Sladek et al. (2007), and Kratt, et al. (2008, this volume) describe a shallow temperature survey system in which temperatures can be measured quickly and inexpensively at 2 m depths. This system was tested at Desert Queen based on its structural setting and availability of thermal gradient well data obtained in the 1970's from which to make thermal anomaly comparisons. The system was subsequently used at Tungsten Mountain and Teels and Rhodes Marshes to help locate blind geothermal systems. Of the new, blind geothermal sites identified through collaboration with the minerals industry, shallow temperature surveys were

231

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Figure 1) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web site (www.nbmg.unr.edu/geothermal/gtmap.pdf), and from a PowerPoint presentation titled 'Geothermal Exploration Short Stories' posted on the Geothermal Resources Council web site

232

X-ray And EUV Spectroscopy Of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions  

SciTech Connect

The Berlin EBIT has been established by the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik to generate atomic physics data in support of research in the field of controlled nuclear fusion, by measuring the radiation from highly charged ions in the x-ray, extreme ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges and providing valuable diagnostics for high temperature plasmas. In future fusion devices, for example ITER, currently being constructed at Cadarache, France, the plasma facing components will be armored with high-Z materials, most likely tungsten, due to the favorable properties of this element. At the same time the tremendous radiation cooling of these high-Z materials represents a threat to fusion and obliges one to monitor carefully the radiation. With EBIT a selected ensemble of ions in specific charge states can be produced, stored and excited for spectroscopic investigations. Employing this technique, we have for example resolved the wide structure observed around 5 nm at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak as originating from E1-transitions into the open 4d shell of tungsten ions in charge states 25+ to 37+ producing a band-like emission pattern. Further, these ions emit well-separated M1 lines in the EUV range around 65 nm suitable for plasma diagnostics. Kr-like to Cr-like tungsten ions (38+ to 50+) show strong soft-x-ray lines in the range 0.5 to 2 and 5 to 15 nm. Lines of even higher charged tungsten ions, up to Ne-like W{sup 64+}, abundant in the core plasma of present and future fusion test devices, have been investigated with high resolution Bragg-crystal spectroscopy at 0.13 nm. Recently, x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the dielectronic recombination LMn resonances of W{sup 60+} to W{sup 67+} ions have been preformed and compare well with atomic structure calculations.

Biedermann, Christoph; Radtke, Rainer [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald, and Institut fuer Physik der Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Arbeitsgruppe Plasmaphysik, Newtonstr 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

Wallace, S.A.

1981-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tungsten oxide ( WO 3 ) thin films for application in advanced energy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inherent processes in coal gasification plants produce hazardous hydrogen sulfide ( H 2 S ) which must be continuously and efficiently detected and removed before the fuel is used for power generation. An attempt has been made in this work to fabricate tungsten oxide ( WO 3 ) thin films by radio-frequency reactive magnetron-sputter deposition. The impetus being the use of WO 3 films for H 2 S sensors in coal gasification plants. The effect of growth temperature

S. K. Gullapalli; R. S. Vemuri; F. S. Manciu; J. L. Enriquez; C. V. Ramana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electrical conductivities of aluminum, copper, and tungsten observed by an underwater explosion  

SciTech Connect

Conductivities of dense aluminum, copper, and tungsten are evaluated using exploding wire discharges in water. Evolutions of the radius and the electrical resistance of exploding wire are measured together with direct pyrometric estimation of the temperature. The conductivities are evaluated based on the measurements and their density dependence is compared with theoretical predictions at a fixed temperature. The results indicate that regardless of materials, the conductivity has a minimum around 3% of solid density at temperature of 5000 K.

Sasaki, Toru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kamitomioka 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Measurements of the Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in a Scintillator-Tungsten HCAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For calorimeter applications requiring precise time stamping, the time structure of hadronic showers in the detector is a crucial issue. This applies in particular to detector concepts for CLIC, where a hadronic calorimeter with tungsten absorbers is being considered to achieve a high level of shower containment while satisfying strict space constraints. The high hadronic background from gamma gamma to hadrons processes at 3 TeV in combination with the 2 GHz bunch crossing frequency at CLIC requires good time stamping in the detectors. To provide first measurements of the time structure in a highly granular scintillator-tungsten calorimeter, T3B, a dedicated timing experiment, was installed behind the last layer of the CALICE WHCAL prototype, a 30 layer tungsten scintillator calorimeter. T3B consists of 15 small scintillator cells with embedded silicon photomultipliers, read out with fast digitizers over a time window of 2.4 us, and provides detailed measurements of the time structure of the signal. The offline data reconstruction performs an automatic gain calibration using noise events recorded between physics triggers and allows the determination of the arrival time of each photon at the photon sensor. The T3B setup, its calibration and data reconstruction, as well as first results of the time structure of the calorimeter response for 10 GeV pions recorded at the CERN PS confronted with Geant4 simulations using different physics lists are discussed.

Frank Simon; for the CALICE Collaboration

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

A filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus are described for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

Krauss, Alan R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Interpretation of parabolic arcs in pulsar secondary spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsar dynamic spectra sometimes show organised interference patterns; these patterns have been shown to have power spectra which often take the form of parabolic arcs, or sequences of inverted parabolic arclets whose apexes themselves follow a parabolic locus. Here we consider the interpretation of these arc and arclet features. We give a statistical formulation for the appearance of the power spectra, based on the stationary phase approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchoff integral. We present a simple analytic result for the power-spectrum expected in the case of highly elongated images, and a single-integral analytic formulation appropriate to the case of axisymmetric images. Our results are illustrated in both the ensemble-average and snapshot regimes. Highly anisotropic scattering appears to be an important ingredient in the formation of the observed arclets.

Mark Walker; Don Melrose; Dan Stinebring; Chengmin Zhang

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

Properties of vacuum arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous hard carbon films formed by vacuum arc deposition are hydrogen-free, dense, and very hard. The properties of amorphous hard carbon films depend strongly on the energy of the incident ions. A technique which is called Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation can be applied to vacuum arc deposition of amorphous hard carbon films to influence the ion energy. The authors have studied the influence of the ion energy on the elastic modulus determined by an ultrasonic method, and have measured the optical gap for films with the highest sp{sup 3} content they have obtained so far with this deposition technique. The results show an elastic modulus close to that of diamond, and an optical gap of 2.1 eV which is much greater than for amorphous hard carbon films deposited by other techniques.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Raoux, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

Correy, T.B.

1962-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Stability of very-high pressure arc discharges against perturbations of the electron temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the stability of the energy balance of the electron gas in very high-pressure plasmas against longitudinal perturbations, using a local dispersion analysis. After deriving a dispersion equation, we apply the model to a very high-pressure (100 bar) xenon plasma and find instability for electron temperatures, T{sub e}, in a window between 2400 K and 5500-7000 K x 10{sup 3} K, depending on the current density (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2}). The instability can be traced back to the Joule heating of the electron gas being a growing function of T{sub e}, which is due to a rising dependence of the electron-atom collision frequency on T{sub e}. We then analyze the T{sub e} range occurring in very high-pressure xenon lamps and conclude that only the near-anode region exhibits T{sub e} sufficiently low for this instability to occur. Indeed, previous experiments have revealed that such lamps develop, under certain conditions, voltage oscillations accompanied by electromagnetic interference, and this instability has been pinned down to the plasma-anode interaction. A relation between the mechanisms of the considered instability and multiple anodic attachments of high-pressure arcs is discussed.

Benilov, M. S. [Departamento de Fisica, Ciencias Exactas e Engenharia, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Municipio, Funchal 9000 (Portugal); Hechtfischer, U. [Philips Lighting, BU Automotive Lamps, Technology, Philipsstrasse 8, Aachen 52068 (Germany)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Decathlon 2011 Project Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHIP CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 1 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2011 Team SCI-Arc/Caltech CHIP COMPACT HYPER_INSULATED PROTOTYPE Project Manual August 11,2011 Project Manager (Design and Construction): Reed Finlay (reed_finlay@sciarc.edu) Project Manager (PR and Development): Elisabeth Neigert (elisabeth_neigert@sciarc.edu) CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 2 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 Table o f C ontents Summary o f C hanges 2 Rules C ompliance C hecklist 3 Structural C alculations 6 Detailed W ater B udget 7 Summary o f U nlisted E lectrical C omponents 9 Summary o f R econfigurable F eatures 10 Interconnection A pplication F orm 11 Energy A nalysis R esults a nd D iscussion

246

Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activity during this Quarter has included the following: Several more electrodes and side wall pegs have been received from Avco. Some of these are being prepared for optical and electron microscope examination. Some literature on sulfidation under MHD conditions has been found. A method for inferring the magnitude of the leakage current flowing through the slag layer has been devised and applied to the analysis of many CDIF runs and a few Avco Mark 6 runs. A critical issue currently being investigated is the viability of tungsten, or tungsten-containing alloys such as W-Cu, and WC-CU in the MHD environment. On the anode wall, as an electrode cladding, tungsten could provide a cost-saving alternative to Pt, especially for a grooved, slagging anode design which is prohibitively costly when fabricated out of Pt. On the cathode, W-Cu has been used to extend the life of cathode leading edges as well as the anodic edges of pegs on the cathode end, and one or two pegs up from there, on the sidewalls. Lifetimes have been extended well beyond that of pure copper alone. Past work at Avco demonstrates that the life of these claddings appears to depend upon the tungsten content of the alloy used. The more tungsten in the tungsten-copper alloy, the longer-wearing they appear to be. There is however no quantitative data available comparing these materials in terms of lifetime or in their corrosion resistance.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc. 11 figs.

Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

1988-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

248

Enhanced catalyst and process for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid molar fuels by means of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composition is enhanced by the addition of molybdenum, tungsten or a combination thereof as an additional component of said composition. The presence of the additive component increases the olefinic content of the hydrocarbon products produced. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Voltage Node Arcing in the ICRH Antenna Vacuum Transmission Lines at JET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observation of parasitic low-VSWR activity during operations of JET RF plant and the damage caused by arcing at the voltage-node in the vacuum transmission line (VTL) in 2004 highlight the importance of the problem of low-voltage breakdown in the ICRH systems. Simulations demonstrate little response of the RF circuit to the voltage-node arcing which explains why it remains largely unnoticed and complicates the design of protection systems. Analysis of the damage pattern produced by the voltage-node arcing suggests that multipactor-related phenomena occurring at elevated voltage thresholds in conditions of unfavorable VTL geometry are most plausible arc-provoking factors.

Monakhov, I.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Nicholls, K.; Walden, A. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Pulse Thermal Processing of Functional Materials Using a Directed Plasma Arc  

Using pulses of high density infrared light from a directed plasma arc, ORNL researchersinvented a method to thermally process thin films and other ...

252

Feature based cost and carbon emission modelling for wire and arc additive manufacturing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) is a CNC and welding deposition based additive manufacturing method. This novel manufacturing technique has potential cost and… (more)

Guo, Jianing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Synthesis and studies of molybdenum and tungsten complexes for dinitrogen reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of monopyrroletriamine ligands [Arpyr(Ar')2]H3 of the form ArC4H2NHCH2N(CH2CH2NHAr')2 (Ar = 2,4,6-mesityl (Mes), 2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl (TRIP); Ar' = C6F5, 2-tolyl (o-tol), naphthyl, 3,5-(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)phenyl ...

Chin, Jia Min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A dimensionless parameter model for arc welding processes  

SciTech Connect

A dimensionless parameter model previously developed for C0{sub 2} laser beam welding has been shown to be applicable to GTAW and PAW autogenous arc welding processes. The model facilitates estimates of weld size, power, and speed based on knowledge of the material`s thermal properties. The dimensionless parameters can also be used to estimate the melting efficiency, which eases development of weld schedules with lower heat input to the weldment. The mathematical relationship between the dimensionless parameters in the model has been shown to be dependent on the heat flow geometry in the weldment.

Fuerschbach, P.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of Cracks in ABB HK Arc Chutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has a number of medium voltage (5 Kv-15 Kv) ABB HK air-magnetic circuit breakers with cracks in various places on the ceramic liner plate and cold-molded asbestos portions of the arc chutes. These cracks may or may not be cosmetic. This "jump gap crack" issue has been discussed in several ABB circuit breaker users group meetings. Five utilities (Brunswick, Seabrook, TVA, Duke, and Vogtle) have previously expressed interest in this issue. The present ABB Quality Assurance Proced...

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Study of the interactions of pions in the CALICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter prototype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A prototype silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for an ILC detector was tested in 2007 at the CERN SPS test beam. Data were collected with electron and hadron beams in the energy range 8 to 80 GeV. The analysis described here focuses on the interactions of pions in the calorimeter. One of the main objectives of the CALICE program is to validate the Monte Carlo tools available for the design of a full-sized detector. The interactions of pions in the Si-W calorimeter are therefore confronted with the predictions of various physical models implemented in the GEANT4 simulation framework.

C. Adloff; Y. Karyotakis; J. Repond; J. Yu; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; N. K. Watson; J. A. Wilson; T. Goto; G. Mavromanolakis; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; W. Yan; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; J. Apostolakis; A. Ribon; V. Uzhinskiy; M. Benyamna; C. Cârloganu; F. Fehr; P. Gay; G. C. Blazey; D. Chakraborty; A. Dyshkant; K. Francis; D. Hedin; J. G. Lima; V. Zutshi; J. -Y. Hostachy; K. Krastev; L. Morin; N. D'Ascenzo; U. Cornett; D. David; R. Fabbri; G. Falley; K. Gadow; E. Garutti; P. Göttlicher; T. Jung; S. Karstensen; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; B. Lutz; N. Meyer; V. Morgunov; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; A. Vargas-Trevino; N. Wattimena; O. Wendt; N. Feege; M. Groll; J. Haller; R. -D. Heuer; S. Morozov; S. Richter; J. Samson; A. Kaplan; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; A. Tadday; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; Y. Onel; E. J. Kim; G. Kim; D-W. Kim; K. Lee; S. C. Lee; K. Kawagoe; Y. Tamura; P. D. Dauncey; A. -M. Magnan; H. Yilmaz; O. Zorba; V. Bartsch; M. Postranecky; M. Warren; M. Wing; M. G. Green; F. Salvatore; M. Bedjidian; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; M. -C. Fouz; D. S. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; M. Kelly; R. J. Thompson; M. Danilov; E. Tarkovsky; N. Baranova; D. Karmanov; M. Korolev; M. Merkin; A. Voronin; A. Frey; S. Lu; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; L. Weuste; J. Bonis; B. Bouquet; S. Callier; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; M. Faucci Giannelli; J. Fleury; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Poeschl; L. Raux; N. Seguin-Moreau; F. Wicek; M. Anduze; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; G. Gaycken; D. Jeans; P. Mora de Freitas; G. Musat; M. Reinhard; A. Rougé; M. Ruan; J-Ch. Vanel; H. Videau; K-H. Park; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; B. Belhorma; M. Belmir; S. W. Nam; I. H. Park; J. Yang; Jong-Seo Chai; Jong-Tae Kim; Geun-Bum Kim; J. Kang; Y. -J. Kwon

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gallium arsenide thin films on tungsten/graphite substrates. Phase II. Quarterly project report No. 2, December 1, 1977-February 28, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this contract are to investigate thin films of gallium arsenide on tungsten/graphite substrates and to prepare solar cells with an AM1 efficiency of 6% or higher by August 1978. Efforts during this quarter have been directed to: (1) the deposition and characterization of gallium arsenide films on tungsten/graphite substrates by the arsenic and arsine processes, (2) the construction and operation of an apparatus for the deposition of titanium dioxide films, and (3) the fabrication and evaluation of MOS solar cells on tungsten/graphite substrates. Gallium arsenide films have been deposited on tungsten/graphite substrates by the reaction of gallium, hydrogen chloride, and arsenic in a hydrogen flow. The structural and electrical properties of these films are very similar to those obtained by the arsine process. The initial stage of the deposition of gallium arsenide films on tungsten/graphite substrates has been investigated by the scanning electron microscopy.

Chu, S.S.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Implementation of an Outer Can Welding System for Savannah River Site FB-Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper details three phases of testing to confirm use of a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) system for closure welding the 3013 outer container used for stabilization/storage of plutonium metals and oxides. The outer container/lid closure joint was originally designed for laser welding, but for this application, the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process has been adapted. The testing progressed in three phases: (1) system checkout to evaluate system components for operational readiness, (2) troubleshooting to evaluate high weld failure rates and develop corrective techniques, and (3) pre-installation acceptance testing.

Howard, S.R.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Underwater cladding with laser beam and plasma arc welding  

SciTech Connect

Two welding processes, plasma arc (transferred arc) (PTA) and laser beam, were investigated to apply cladding to austenitic stainless steels and Inconel 600. These processes have long been used to apply cladding layers , but the novel feature being reported here is that these cladding layers were applied underwater, with a water pressure equivalent to 24 m (80 ft). Being able to apply the cladding underwater is very important for many applications, including the construction of off-shore oil platforms and the repair of nuclear reactors. In the latter case, being able to weld underwater eliminates the need for draining the reactor and removing the fuel. Welding underwater in reactors presents numerous challenges, but the ability to weld without having to drain the reactor and remove the fuel provides a huge cost savings. Welding underwater in reactors must be done remotely, but because of the radioactive corrosion products and neutron activation of the steels, remote welding would also be required even if the reactor is drained and the fuel removed. In fact, without the shielding of the water, the remote welding required if the reactor is drained might be even more difficult than that required with underwater welds. Furthermore, as shall be shown, the underwater welds that the authors have made were of high quality and exhibit compressive rather than tensile residual stresses.

White, R.A.; Fusaro, R.; Jones, M.G.; Solomon, H.D. [General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Milian-Rodriguez, R.R. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thermal Treatment of Solid Wastes Using the Electric Arc Furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermal waste treatment facility has been developed at the Albany Research Center (ARC) over the past seven years to process a wide range of heterogeneous mixed wastes, on a scale of 227 to 907 kg/h (500 to 2,000 lb/h). The current system includes a continuous feed system, a 3-phase AC, 0.8 MW graphite electrode arc furnace, and a dedicated air pollution control system (APCS) which includes a close-coupled thermal oxidizer, spray cooler, baghouse, and wet scrubber. The versatility of the complete system has been demonstrated during 5 continuous melting campaigns, ranging from 11 to 25 mt (12 to 28 st) of treated wastes per campaign, which were conducted on waste materials such as (a) municipal incinerator ash, (b) simulated low-level radioactive, high combustible-bearing mixed wastes, (c) simulated low-level radioactive liquid tank wastes, (d) heavy metal contaminated soils, and (e) organic-contaminated dredging spoils. In all cases, the glass or slag products readily passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Program (TCLP) test. Additional studies are currently under way on electric utility wastes, steel and aluminum industry wastes, as well as zinc smelter residues. Thermal treatment of these solid waste streams is intended to produce a metallic product along with nonhazardous glass or slag products.

O'Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Capital requirements for the transportation of energy materials: 1979 ARC estimates. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains TERA's estimates of capital requirements to transport natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, and coal in the United States by 1990. The low, medium, and high world-oil-price scenarios from the EIA's Mid-range Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), as used in the 1979 Annual Report to Congress (ARC), were provided as a basis for the analysis and represent three alternative futures. TERA's approach varies by energy commodity to make best use of the information and analytical tools available. Summaries of transportation investment requirements through 1990 are given. Total investment requirements for three modes (pipelines, rails, waterways and the three energy commodities can accumulate to a $49.9 to $50.9 billion range depending on the scenario. The scenarios are distinguished primarily by the world price of oil which, given deregulation of domestic oil prices, affects US oil prices even more profoundly than in the past. The high price of oil, following the evidence of the last year, is projected to hold demand for oil below the recent past.

Not Available

1980-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

Carbon nanotubes and other fullerenes produced from tire powder injected into an electric arc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method of growing multiwall carbon nanotubes by injecting tire powder into an electric arc has been developed. The process is optimized using a DC electric arc in pressurized helium. The multiwall carbon nanotube product and the optimization process are characterized by transmission electron microscopy.

Murr, L.E. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)]. E-mail: fekberg@utep.edu; Brown, D.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Esquivel, E.V. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Ponda, T.D. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Martinez, F. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Virgen, A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Simulation of the flicker phenomenon based on modeling the electric arc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) is a very large power load, determining the negative effects on the power quality like flicker effect, harmonics currents, and reactive power. These effects are due to the nonlinear characteristic of the electric arc. In ... Keywords: flicker, harmonics, interharmonics, power quality, simulation and modeling

Manuela Panoiu; Caius Panoiu; Ioan Sora; Raluca Rob

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ArcMine: A GIS extension to support mine reclamation planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new GIS extension, named ArcMine, developed to support reclamation planning in abandoned mining areas. ArcMine provides four tools to (a) assess mine subsidence hazards, (b) estimate the erosion of mine wastes, (c) analyze flow ... Keywords: GIS, Mine reclamation, Mine wastes, Mine water, Reforestation, Subsidence

Sung-Min Kim; Yosoon Choi; Jangwon Suh; Sungchan Oh; Hyeong-Dong Park; Suk-Ho Yoon; Wa-Ra Go

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Thermionic energy conversion research analysis. Annual progress report. [Study on plasma arc-drop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the major results presented in ''Preliminary Report on Plasma Arc-Drop in Thermionic Energy Converters,'' (COO-2533-1), and includes additional discussions on the magnitude of the normalized plasma resistance required to achieve low arc-drop converter operation.

Lam, S.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Conceptual Multi-Megawatt System Based on a Tungsten CERMET Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. A conceptual reactor system to support Multi-Megawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion is investigated within this paper. The reactor system consists of a helium cooled Tungsten-UN fission core, surrounded by a beryllium neutron reflector and 13 B4C control drums coupled to a high temperature Brayton power conversion system. Excess heat is rejected via carbon reinforced heat pipe radiators and the gamma and neutron flux is attenuated via segmented shielding consisting of lithium hydride and tungsten layers. Turbine inlet temperatures ranging from 1300 K to 1500 K are investigated for their effects on specific powers and net electrical outputs ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW. The reactor system is estimated to have a mass, which ranges from 15 Mt at 1 MWe and a turbine inlet temperature of 1500 K to 1200 Mt at 100 MWe and a turbine temperature of 1300 K. The reactor systems specific mass ranges from 32 kg/kWe at a turbine inlet temperature of 1300 K and a power of 1 MWe to 9.5 kg/kW at a turbine temperature of 1500 K and a power of 100 MWe.

Jonathan A. Webb; Brian Gross

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Weld Overlay Claddings by Gas-metal-arc Welding Process for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Process for Extending Plant Lives in Power Generation, Refinery & Petrochemical, ... and coal-fired boilers, and on vessels in refinery and pulp & paper plants.

268

Puzzling differences in bismuth and lead plasmas: evidence for the significant role of neutrals in cathodic vacuum arcs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ionization energy (eV) Electrical resistivity, (n? m) @ 20°Crod, the given electrical resistivity, and an arc current of

Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS 9.0 to ArcGIS 9.2) of the polygon smoothing algorithm described below. A bug that occurred when multiple wells had the same location was also fixed. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINE POLYGONS MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS Why smooth buffered field outlines? See the issues in the figure below: [pic] The smoothing application provided as VBA code below does the following: Adds area to the concave portions; doesn't add area to convex portions to maintain buffer spacing Fills in non-field "islands" smaller than buffer size Joins separate polygon rings with a "bridge" if sufficiently close Minimizes increase in total field area Methodology: creates trapezoids between neighboring wells within an oil/gas

270

Numerical investigations on the pressure wave absorption and the gas cooling interacting in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Numerical investigations on the pressure wave absorption and the gas cooling interacting understanding of the physical phenomena involved, as for example the cooling and the shock wave absorption volume method, variable porosity, arc cooling I. INTRODUCTION Medium voltage cells have to be designed

Sart, Remi

271

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

273

Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered a blackbody radiator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1 Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered frequency is that of infrared electromagnetic radiation, the light bulb radiates more energy in the infrared. The light from a flashlight can be considered as the emission of many photons of the same frequency

Kioussis, Nicholas

274

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

Solidification of Alloy 718 During Vacuum Arc Remelting With ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of helium gas pressure on the solidification behavior of ... If liquids or gasses having a good thermal conductivity are introduced in the gap

276

Shielding of mirror FERF plasma by arc discharges  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of shielding a mirror-confined fusion plasma against erosion by incident neutrals with a plasma blanket generated by an array of hollow-cathode arc discharges was studied. Such a plasma blanket could also be used for linetying stabilization of a single mirror confined plasma as well as to provide a warm plasma stream for stabilization of microinstabilities. The requirements for the plasma blanket are dependent on the parameter ..gamma.., the ratio of the actual cross-field diffusion coefficient to the classical value. The power requirement compares favorably with power loss due to change exchange without shielding. More importantly, the blanket permits a relaxation of vacuum requirements to prevent erosion of the hot plasma by background neutrals.

Woo, J.T.

1976-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Filtered cathodic arc deposition with ion-species-selectivebias  

SciTech Connect

A dual-cathode arc plasma source was combined with acomputer-controlled bias amplifier such as to synchronize substrate biaswith the pulsed production of plasma. In this way, bias can be applied ina material-selective way. The principle has been applied to the synthesismetal-doped diamond-like carbon films, where the bias was applied andadjusted when the carbon plasma was condensing, and the substrate was atground when the metal was incorporated. In doing so, excessive sputteringby too-energetic metal ions can be avoided while the sp3/sp2 ratio can beadjusted. It is shown that the resistivity of the film can be tuned bythis species-selective bias. The principle can be extended tomultiple-material plasma sources and complex materials

Anders, Andre; Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Lim, SunnieH.N.

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Method of operating a centrifugal plasma arc furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal plasma arc furnace is used to vitrify contaminated soils and other waste materials. An assessment of the characteristics of the waste is performed prior to introducing the waste into the furnace. Based on the assessment, a predetermined amount of iron is added to each batch of waste. The waste is melted in an oxidizing atmosphere into a slag. The added iron is oxidized into Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Time of exposure to oxygen is controlled so that the iron does not oxidize into Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Slag in the furnace remains relatively non-viscous and consequently it pours out of the furnace readily. Cooled and solidified slag produced by the furnace is very resistant to groundwater leaching. The slag can be safely buried in the earth without fear of contaminating groundwater. 3 figs.

Kujawa, S.T.; Battleson, D.M.; Rademacher, E.L. Jr.; Cashell, P.V.; Filius, K.D.; Flannery, P.A.; Whitworth, C.G.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Static Heat Loads in the LHC Arc Cryostats: Final Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note presents the final assessment of the static heat loads in the LHC arc cryostats, using different experimental methods during the first commissioning period in 2007. This assessment further develops and completes previous estimates made during the commissioning of sector 7_8 [1]. The estimate of the helium inventory, a prerequisite for the heat load calculation, is also presented. Heat loads to the cold mass are evaluated from the internal energy balance during natural as well as powered warm-ups of the helium baths in different subsector. The helium inventory is calculated from the internal energy balance during powered warm-ups and matched with previous assessments. Furthermore, heat loads to the thermal shield are estimated from the non-isothermal cooling of the supercritical helium in line E. The comparison of measured heat loads with previous estimates and with budgeted values is then presented, while their correlation with some important parameters like insulation vacuum pressure and some heat ...

Parma, V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Biological Optimization in Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the potential benefits achievable with biological optimization for modulated volumetric arc (VMAT) treatments of prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate patient plans were studied retrospectively. For each case, planning target volume, rectum, and bladder were considered. Three optimization schemes were used: dose-volume histogram (DVH) based, generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) based, and mixed DVH/gEUD based. For each scheme, a single or dual 6-MV, 356 Degree-Sign VMAT arc was used. The plans were optimized with Pinnacle{sup 3} (v. 9.0 beta) treatment planning system. For each patient, the optimized dose distributions were normalized to deliver the same prescription dose. The quality of the plans was evaluated by dose indices (DIs) and gEUDs for rectum and bladder. The tallied DIs were D{sub 1%}, D{sub 15%}, D{sub 25%}, and D{sub 40%}, and the tallied gEUDs were for a values of 1 and 6. Statistical tests were used to quantify the magnitude and the significance of the observed differences. Monitor units and treatment times for each optimization scheme were also assessed. Results: All optimization schemes generated clinically acceptable plans. The statistical tests indicated that biological optimization yielded increased organs-at-risk sparing, ranging from {approx}1% to more than {approx}27% depending on the tallied DI, gEUD, and anatomical structure. The increased sparing was at the expense of longer treatment times and increased number of monitor units. Conclusions: Biological optimization can significantly increase the organs-at-risk sparing in VMAT optimization for prostate carcinoma. In some particular cases, however, the DVH-based optimization resulted in superior treatment plans.

Mihaylov, Ivaylo B., E-mail: imihaylov@Lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital/Brown Medical Center, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AK (United States); Fatyga, Mirek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Bzdusek, Karl [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI (United States); Gardner, Kenneth; Moros, Eduardo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AK (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Creating dynamic equivalent PV circuit models with impedance spectroscopy for arc-fault modeling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Article 690.11 in the 2011 National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}) requires new photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed arc fault protection device. Currently there is little experimental or empirical research into the behavior of the arcing frequencies through PV components despite the potential for modules and other PV components to filter or attenuate arcing signatures that could render the arc detector ineffective. To model AC arcing signal propagation along PV strings, the well-studied DC diode models were found to inadequately capture the behavior of high frequency arcing signals. Instead dynamic equivalent circuit models of PV modules were required to describe the impedance for alternating currents in modules. The nonlinearities present in PV cells resulting from irradiance, temperature, frequency, and bias voltage variations make modeling these systems challenging. Linearized dynamic equivalent circuits were created for multiple PV module manufacturers and module technologies. The equivalent resistances and capacitances for the modules were determined using impedance spectroscopy with no bias voltage and no irradiance. The equivalent circuit model was employed to evaluate modules having irradiance conditions that could not be measured directly with the instrumentation. Although there was a wide range of circuit component values, the complex impedance model does not predict filtering of arc fault frequencies in PV strings for any irradiance level. Experimental results with no irradiance agree with the model and show nearly no attenuation for 1 Hz to 100 kHz input frequencies.

Johnson, Jay Dean; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Strauch, Jason E.; Schoenwald, David Alan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

283

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

284

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

285

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

286

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

287

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

288

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

289

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

290

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

291

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

292

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes twenty-three gold exploration holes were drilled by Newcrest Resources, Inc. during 2005 and 2006 along the range front. These holes approached or exceeded 300 m in depth and all holes encountered hot water and/or steam. Despite the high temperatures encountered at relatively shallow depths, there are no active geothermal features such as hot springs or steam vents at the surface. The presence of small outcrops of argillic alteration containing anomalous gold attracted the interest of exploration geologists. References Christopher Kratt, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Robin

293

Nanostructuring of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces by low-energy helium ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of metallic nanostructures by exposure of molybdenum and tungsten surfaces to high fluxes of low energy helium ions is studied as a function of the ion energy, plasma exposure time, and surface temperature. Helium plasma exposure leads to the formation of nanoscopic filaments on the surface of both metals. The size of the helium-induced nanostructure increases with increasing surface temperature while the thickness of the modified layer increases with time. In addition, the growth rate of the nanostructured layer also depends on the surface temperature. The size of the nanostructure appears linked with the size of the near-surface voids induced by the low energy ions. The results presented here thus demonstrate that surface processing by low-energy helium ions provides an efficient route for the formation of porous metallic nanostructures.

De Temmerman, Gregory; Bystrov, Kirill; Zielinski, Jakub J.; Balden, Martin; Matern, Gabriele; Arnas, Cecile; Marot, Laurent [FOM Institute DIFFER, Ducth Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Laboratoire PIIM, CNRS/Aix-Marseille Universit, 13397 Marseille (France); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, CH-4056 (Switzerland)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Catalytic ionic hydrogenation of ketones using tungsten or molybdenum organometallic species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present invention is a process for the catalytic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols at low temperatures and pressures using organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes. The functional group is selected from groups represented by the formulas R(C.dbd.O)R' and R(C.dbd.O)H, wherein R and R' are selected from hydrogen or any alkyl or aryl group. The active catalyst for the process has the form: [CpM(CO).sub.2 (PR*.sub.3) L].sup.+ A.sup.-, where Cp=.eta..sup.5 -R.sup..tangle-solidup..sub.m C.sub.5 H.sub.5-m and R.sup..tangle-solidup. represents an alkyl group or a halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =OR' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =CO.sub.2 R' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) and m=0 to 5; M represents a molybdenum atom or a tungsten atom; R*.sub.3 represents three hydrocarbon groups selected from a cyclohexyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.11), a methyl group (CH.sub.3), and a phenyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.5) and all three R* groups can be the same or different or two of the three groups can be the same; L represents a ligand; and A.sup.- represents an anion. In another embodiment, one, two or three of the R* groups can be an OR*.

Voges, Mark (Leverkusen, DE); Bullock, R. Morris (Wading River, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Impingement starting and power boosting of small gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The technology of high-pressure air or hot-gas impingement from stationary shroud supplementary nozzles onto radial outflow compressors and radial inflow turbines to permit rapid gas turbine starting or power boosting is discussed. Data are presented on the equivalent turbine component performance for convergent/divergent shroud impingement nozzles, which reveal the sensitivity of nozzle velocity coefficient with Mach number and turbine efficiency with impingement nozzle admission arc. Compressor and turbine matching is addressed in the transient turbine start mode with the possibility of operating these components in braking or reverse flow regimes when impingement flow rates exceed design.

Rodgers, C.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Activities of 238U decay series radioisotopes have been determined for both postcaldera basalts erupted between 1849 and 1974 and genetically related young precaldera dacites from Batur volcano, Bali, Sunda arc. All rocks possess (230Th/238U) = 1 within 2 sigma error indicating that little, if any, fractionation between Th and U occurred during their genesis, or in their source regions, within approximately the last 350 ka. Both the basaltic and the dacitic rocks possess (230Th/232U) ~

297

An Archean Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine Group, Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Archean Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine Group, Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canada Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 2730-Ma-old Hunter Mine Group (HMG), a dominantly felsic subaqueous volcanic sequence, was formed during early arc construction in the Abitibi greenstone belt (Quebec, Canada). The western part of the HMG contains a felsic dyke swarm up to 1.5 km wide and traceable up-section for 2.5 km. Five distinct generations were identified: (1) aphanitic to feldspar-phyric dykes; (2) quartz-feldspar-phyric dykes with < 5% quartz

298

Computational study of flow dynamics from a dc arc plasma jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma jets produced by direct-current (DC) non-transferred arc plasma torches, at the core of technologies ranging from spray coating to pyrolysis, present intricate dynamics due to the coupled interaction of fluid flow, thermal, and electromagnetic phenomena. The flow dynamics from an arc discharge plasma jet are investigated using time-dependent three-dimensional simulations encompassing the dynamics of the arc inside the torch, the evolution of the jet through the discharge environment, and the subsequent impingement of the jet over a flat substrate. The plasma is described by a chemical equilibrium and thermodynamic nonequilibrium (two-temperature) model. The numerical formulation of the physical model is based on a monolithic and fully-coupled treatment of the fluid and electromagnetic equations using a Variational Multiscale Finite Element Method. Simulation results uncover distinct aspects of the flow dynamics, including the jet forcing due to the movement of the electric arc, the prevalence of deviat...

Trelles, Juan Pablo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodic vacuum arc plasmas are known to contain multiply charged ions. 20 years after “Pressure Ionization: its role in metal vapour vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources” appeared in vol. 1 of Plasma Sources Science and Technology, it is a great opportunity to re-visit the issue of pressure ionization, a non-ideal plasma effect, and put it in perspective to the many other factors that influence observable charge state distributions, such as the role of the cathode material, the path in the density-temperature phase diagram, the “noise” in vacuum arc plasma as described by a fractal model approach, the effects of external magnetic fields and charge exchange collisions with neutrals. A much more complex image of the vacuum arc plasma emerges putting decades of experimentation and modeling in perspective.

Anders, Andre

2011-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbon nanostructures production by AC arc discharge plasma process at atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon nanostructures have received much attention for a wide range of applications. In this paper, we produced carbon nanostructures by decomposition of benzene using AC arc discharge plasma process at atmospheric pressure. Discharge was carried out ...

Shenqiang Zhao; Ruoyu Hong; Zhi Luo; Haifeng Lu; Biao Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

302

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Solidification Modeling of Vacuum Arc Remelted Superalloy 718 Ingot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

liquid pool depth for a helium gas injection pressure of 20 mm Hg for a 500 ... This flow is caused because of the density differences in solid/liquid phases and.

304

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

305

Development of an ArcGIS-pollutant load application (PLOAD) tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many of the findings of previous studies have indicated that there is a direct correlation between water quality and urbanization. Increasing impervious coverage typically results in a decrease in water quality. The purpose of this study was to adapt an automated tool for assessing the Pollutant Load Application (PLOAD). Created by CH2M HILL, a fullservice engineering and construction enterprise, PLOAD is a simplified GIS-based model used to calculate pollutants within a watershed. The so-called “simple method” implemented by PLOAD and discussed in this thesis has been endorsed by the EPA as a viable screening tool for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) stormwater projects. This model was designed to be used with ArcView 3.3. ArcView 3.3 is a depreciated product, the capabilities of which have been replaced by ArcGIS 9.1. Using the same GIS data and tabular data required by PLOAD and custom ArcObjects scripting, a replacement, ArcGIS-PLOAD, was created. The current version of ArcGISPLOAD implements the “simple method” to calculate total pollutant load in pounds per year based on basin boundaries, precipitation in inches per year, ratio of storms producing runoff, parcel land use and parcel area, runoff coefficient for each land use, event mean pollutant concentrations for each land use. Time comparisons between the original PLOAD and the new ArcGIS-PLOAD revealed significant improvements. Both versions of PLOAD produce an intersection between the basin boundary and the land use layer. Calculations are actually done to the intersect layer. It was also found that the original PLOAD disregarded an albeit small portion of the intersection polygons. The new version does not. With the creation of ArcGIS-PLOAD, it is anticipated that it will become a small step in assist the State of Texas in improving water quality.

Young, De'Etra Jenra

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Low pressure arc discharge lamp apparatus with magnetic field generating means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-pressure arc discharge apparatus having a magnetic field generating means for increasing the output of a discharge lamp is disclosed. The magnetic field generating means, which in one embodiment includes a plurality of permanent magnets, is disposed along the lamp for applying a constant transverse magnetic field over at least a portion of the positive discharge column produced in the arc discharge lamp operating at an ambient temperature greater than about 25 C. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Maya, J.

1987-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

DC Arc Fault Detection and Circuit Interruption Technologies for Photovoltaic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, much like the rest of the world, rapid growth in photovoltaic (PV) systems is currently taking place. These systems are being installed in open fields, on parking structures, and on residential or commercial rooftops. Unfortunately, electrical arcing within a PV system’s DC circuits has caused some fires. DC-sourced electrical fires are difficult to extinguish if arcing originates from unprotected source circuits within a PV array. Several high-visibility structural fires ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electrical and thermal finite element modeling of arc faults in photovoltaic bypass diodes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arc faults in photovoltaic (PV) modules have caused multiple rooftop fires. The arc generates a high-temperature plasma that ignites surrounding materials and subsequently spreads the fire to the building structure. While there are many possible locations in PV systems and PV modules where arcs could initiate, bypass diodes have been suspected of triggering arc faults in some modules. In order to understand the electrical and thermal phenomena associated with these events, a finite element model of a busbar and diode was created. Thermoelectrical simulations found Joule and internal diode heating from normal operation would not normally cause bypass diode or solder failures. However, if corrosion increased the contact resistance in the solder connection between the busbar and the diode leads, enough voltage potentially would be established to arc across micron-scale electrode gaps. Lastly, an analytical arc radiation model based on observed data was employed to predicted polymer ignition times. The model predicted polymer materials in the adjacent area of the diode and junction box ignite in less than 0.1 seconds.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Quintana, Michael A.; Johnson, Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Formation of Self-Organized Anode Patterns in Arc Discharge Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pattern formation and self-organization are phenomena commonly observed experimentally in diverse types of plasma systems, including atmospheric-pressure electric arc discharges. However, numerical simulations reproducing anode pattern formation in arc discharges have proven exceedingly elusive. Time-dependent three-dimensional thermodynamic nonequilibrium simulations reveal the spontaneous formation of self-organized patterns of anode attachment spots in the free-burning arc, a canonical thermal plasma flow established by a constant DC current between an axi-symmetric electrodes configuration in the absence of external forcing. The number of spots, their size, and distribution within the pattern depend on the applied total current and on the resolution of the spatial discretization, whereas the main properties of the plasma flow, such as maximum temperatures, velocity, and voltage drop, depend only on the former. The sensibility of the solution to the spatial discretization stresses the computational requirements for comprehensive arc discharge simulations. The obtained anode patterns qualitatively agree with experimental observations and confirm that the spots originate at the fringes of the arc - anode attachment. The results imply that heavy-species - electron energy equilibration, in addition to thermal instability, has a dominant role in the formation of anode spots in arc discharges.

Juan Pablo Trelles

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Manual Plasma Welding (PTAW) Evaluation with Powder Hardfacing Alloys: Revision 1 to 1003164  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repair practices for hardfacing alloys using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) have been evaluated in the past on hardfacing applied with various automated welding processes. Accessibility often limits the use of these welding processes in typical manual repair applications. Recent developments in PTAW powder welding systems by Deloro-Stellite have prompted evaluations of an alternative repair technique for hardfacing materials. This document reports on the tests and f...

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

311

Alloy 600 Repairs with PTAW Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities have Alloy 600 reactor vessel heads (RVHs) that are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), but have not cracked to date. This has prompted an exploration of repair and mitigation options to prevent future degradation of the RVH. Inconel 52 and Inconel 152, which are resistant to PWSCC, have been identified as potential repair alloys for Alloy 600 type repairs, and have been evaluated with the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) pro...

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness  

SciTech Connect

This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

314

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

315

Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations of the n=3-3 transition energies in highly charged tungsten ions  

SciTech Connect

A large-scale relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of the n=3-3 transition energies for Ne- to Ar-like tungsten is carried out. The calculation is based on the relativistic no-pair Hamiltonian and uses finite B-spline orbitals in a cavity as basis functions. Quantum electrodynamic and mass polarization corrections are also included. Results are compared with other theories and with experiment, and are generally found to be more reliable than previous theoretical predictions.

Chen, M. H.; Cheng, K. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Multiphysics Design and Simulation of a Tungsten-Cermet Nuclear Thermal Rocket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to apply modern methods of analysis to the design of a tungsten-cermet Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) core. An NTR is one of the most viable propulsion options for enabling piloted deep-space exploration. Concerns over fuel safety have sparked interest in an NTR core based on tungsten-cermet fuel. This work investigates the capability of modern CFD and neutronics codes to design a cermet NTR, and makes specific recommendations for the configuration of channels in the core. First, the best CFD practices available from the commercial package Star-CCM+ are determined by comparing different modeling options with a hot-hydrogen flow experiment. Next, through grid convergence and sensitivity studies, numerical uncertainty is shown to be a small contributor to overall uncertainty; while fuel thermal conductivity, hydrogen specific heat, and fission energy deposition are found to have a large impact on simulation uncertainty. The model-form error is then estimated by simulation of a NERVA fuel element from an NRX-A6 engine test, where the peak temperature matches measured data to within 2.2%. Using a combination of Star-CCM+ and MCNP for neutronics, typical uncertainties are estimated at 3% for predicting fuel temperature, 2% for hydrogen temperature, and 5% for pressure. The second part uses the aforementioned analysis methods in a parametric study to determine what coolant channel size and distribution is optimum for a 10 klbf-thrust cermet NTR core. By varying the channel diameter and pitch-to-diameter ratio (p/d), it is found that a diameter of 0.12 cm with a p/d of 1.8 results in the lightest core with a peak temperature of 2850 K. The study also shows that element-by-element mass flow rate zoning is the best method for handling radial power peaking. In addition, a detailed simulation of a cermet design developed at the Argonne National Laboratory shows that modifications to the historical fuel element design are required to avoid overheating. The final part investigates the ability of Star-CCM+ to model fuel element failure modes. Through a combination of uncertainty quantification and a parametric analysis, this thesis ultimately lays a groundwork for future detailed design of cermet NTR fuel elements.

Appel, Bradley

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

318

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

319

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

320

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

322

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

323

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

324

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

326

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

327

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

328

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

329

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

330

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

331

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

332

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

333

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

334

1. Introduction The Electric Arc Furnace (EAF), designed for steelmak-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dust to be stored in specific landfills. Therefore, the management of dust accounts for a signifi- cant to the recovery of the zinc it contains. In order to define the best operating conditions to achieve this strategy of these particles by the gas flow in the fume extraction system, the in-flight physico-chemical transformations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

335

Development of a Coating Formulation Procedure for Ni-base Shielded Metal Arc Electrodes with Varying Core Wire Composition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In order for manufacturers of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) electrodes to stay competitive, they must be able to have flexibility in the performance of… (more)

Gaal, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was found that the electrical resistivity decreases with ancathodic vacuum arc; electrical resistivity; profilometry;elastic modulus, high electrical resistivity, low friction

Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Intasiri, Sawate; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Anders, Andre

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Plasma-sprayed semiconductor electrodes: Photoelectrochemical characterization and NH sub 3 photoproduction by substoichiometric tungsten oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two substoichiometric tungsten oxide coatings have been obtained by plasma spray of WO{sub 3} powder on Ti substrates. The films are 40 {plus minus} 20 {mu}m thick and are yellow (WO{sub 2.99}) or dark blue (WO{sub 2.97}). WO{sub 2.99} coatings show a highly textured surface with a specific area 27.9 times the geometrical one. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that their structure is a mixture of monoclinic and triclinic phases. The yellow films have been characterized photoelectrochemically in regenerative cells by using O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O redox at pH 2.0. Under anodic polarization of 1.5 V (SCE) their quantum yield is between 10% and 20% in the wavelength range comprised between 270 and 430 nm with an indirect bandgap of 2.55 eV and a flatband potential of {minus}0.1 V. WO{sub 2.99} films have been tested for NH{sub 3} photoproduction.

Ladouceur, M.; Dodelet, J.P. (INRS-Energie, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)); Tourillon, G. (Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Parent, L.; Dallaire, S. (IGM, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada))

1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

ELECTRON MODEL OF A DOGBONE RLA WITH MULTI-PASS ARCS  

SciTech Connect

The design of a dogbone Recirculated Linear Accelerator, RLA, with linear-field multi-pass arcs was earlier developed [1] for accelerating muons in a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration. This paper describes a possible straightforward test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected at the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to the frequency readily available at CEBAF: 1.5 GHz. The footprint of a complete RLA fits in an area of 25 by 7 m. The scheme utilizes only fixed magnetic fields including injection and extraction. The hardware requirements are not very demanding, making it straightforward to implement

Beard, Kevin B. [JLAB, MUONS Inc.; Roblin, Yves R. [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Bogacz, Slawomir Alex [JLAB; Krafft, Geoffrey A. [JLAB

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Linear Fixed-Field Multi-Pass Arcs for Recirculating Linear Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA's) provide a compact and efficient way of accelerating particle beams to medium and high energies by reusing the same linac for multiple passes. In the conventional scheme, after each pass, the different energy beams coming out of the linac are separated and directed into appropriate arcs for recirculation, with each pass requiring a separate fixed-energy arc. In this paper we present a concept of an RLA return arc based on linear combined-function magnets, in which two and potentially more consecutive passes with very different energies are transported through the same string of magnets. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the constituting linear combined-function magnets, the arc is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final reference orbit offsets for all transported beam energies. We demonstrate the concept by developing a design for a droplet-shaped return arc for a dog-bone RLA capable of transporting two beam passes with momenta different by a factor of two. We present the results of tracking simulations of the two passes and lay out the path to end-to-end design and simulation of a complete dog-bone RLA.

V.S. Morozov, S.A. Bogacz, Y.R. Roblin, K.B. Beard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Catalyst Wire-feed Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Catalyst Wire-feed Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and A Catalyst Wire-feed Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Particles This invention pertains to a highly effective arc-based synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene particles using catalysts in the form of wires made from ion group alloys instead of commonly used catalyst powders. The catalyst wire can be introduced into the discharge either from the anode or cathode regions or into the inter-electrode gap. The catalyst introduction can be done automatically and controlled using feedback based on the ablation of the graphite electrode. To maintain simplicity and attractiveness for industrial applications, it is desirable that the catalyst composition be contained in a single wire alloy. No.: M-808 Inventor(s): Yevgeny Raitses

343

Test plan for BWID Phase 2 electric arc melter vitrification tests  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), Phase 2, electric arc melter, waste treatment evaluation tests to be performed at the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Albany Research Center. The BWID Arc Melter Vitrification Project is being conducted to evaluate and demonstrate existing industrial arc melter technology for thermally treating mixed transuranic-contaminated wastes and soils. Phase 1 baseline tests, performed during fiscal year 1993 at the USBM, were conducted on waste feeds representing incinerated buried mixed wastes and soils. In Phase 2, surrogate feeds will be processed that represent actual as-retrieved buried wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

Soelberg, N.R.; Turner, P.C.; Oden, L.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An improved algorithm for maintaining arc consistency in dynamic constraint satisfaction problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real world is dynamic in its nature, so techniques attempting to model the real world should take this dynamicity in consideration. A well known Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) can be extended this way to a so called Dynamic Constraint Satisfaction Problem (DynCSP) that supports adding and removing constraints in runtime. As Arc Consistency is one of the major techniques in solving CSPs, its dynamic version is of a particular interest for DynCSPs. This paper presents an improved version of AC|DC-2 algorithm for maintaining maximal arc consistency after constraint retraction. This improvement leads to runtimes better than the so far fastest dynamic arc consistency algorithm DnAC-6 while keeping low memory consumption. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is open in the sense of using either non-optimal AC-3 algorithm keeping a minimal memory consumption or optimal AC-3.1 algorithm improving runtime for constraint addition but increasing a memory consumption.

Roman Barták; Pavel Surynek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Dynamics of vaporization and dissociation during transient surface heating, with application to vacuum arcs  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a model of vaporization and dissociation occurring as a result of intense heating over a localized area of a material surface. The balance of heat between the input power and losses due to vaporization, as well as radiation and conduction in the material, are considered. The model includes the effect of binary mass diffusion and changes of surface stoichiometry for multiple component materials. Effects of vapor recondensation are included. The model is then applied to the description of spot heating on a vacuum arc anode through the use of a simple power feedback model. Comparison of surface temperature measurements to model predictions are used to parametrically describe the arc behavior. Finally, extensive parametric analyses showing the effect of material property variations on the arc behavior are described.

Benson, D.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Numerical predictions of railgun performance including the effects of ablation and arc drag  

SciTech Connect

Thermal radiation from plasma armatures in railguns may cause vaporization and partial ionization of the rail and insulator materials. This causes an increase in mass of the arc, which has an adverse effect on projectile velocity. Viscous drag on the arc also has a deleterious effect, particularly at high velocities. These loss mechanisms are modeled in the Los Alamos Railgun Estimator code. Simulations were performed and numerical results were compared with experimental data for a wide range of tests performed at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the Ling Temco Vought Aerospace and Defense Company, and the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas at Austin. The effects of ablation and arc drag on railgun performance are discussed. Parametric studies illustrate the effects of some design parameters on projectile velocity and launcher efficiency. Some strategies for reducing the effects of ablation are proposed.

Schnurr, N.M.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Parker, J.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

348

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Optical Analysis Of The Vacuum Arc Plasma Generated In Cup-Shape Contacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper are presented the results of the optical analysis on the rotating arc plasma, generated in the vacuum low voltage circuit breaker with cup-shaped contacts. An adequate experimental setup was used for single shot time and spatial resolved spectroscopy in order to analyze the evolution of the vacuum arc plasma. Different current interruption situations are correlated with plasma spectral diagnosis. The study is aimed to contribute to a better understanding of the complex phenomena that take place in the interruption process of high currents that appears in the short-circuit regime of electrical networks.

Pavelescu, G.; Gherendi, F. [National Institute for Optoelectronics, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Pavelescu, D. ['Politehnica' University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Dumitrescu, G.; Anghelita, P. [Electrotechnical Institute, ICPE, Bucharest (Romania)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

351

Super-radiance in the sodium resonance lines from sodium iodide arc lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Super-radiance observed within the centers of the sodium resonance D lines emitted by arc lamps containing sodium iodide as additive in a high-pressure mercury plasma environment was studied by high-resolution emission spectroscopy. The spectral radiance of these self-reversed lines including super-radiance was simulated by considering a local enhancement of the source function due to the presence of an additional source of radiation near the arc wall. Causes of this hitherto unrecognized source of radiation are given.

Karabourniotis, D. [Department of Physics, Institute of Plasma Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Drakakis, E. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc  

SciTech Connect

The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the trench east of the Amlia Fracture Zone, which is being subducting beneath the arc at Seguam Island. Mixing trends between mantle wedge and sediment end members become flatter in Hf-Nd isotope space at locations further west along the arc, indicating that the sediment end member in the west has either higher Nd/Hf or is more radiogenic in Hf compared to Nd. This pattern is interpreted to reflect an increase in pelagic clay relative to the terrigenous subducted sedimentary component westward along the arc. Results of this study imply that Hf does not behave as a conservative element in the Aleutian subduction system, as has been proposed for some other arcs.

Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate.

Rosa, R.J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Pollina, R.J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering]|[Avco-Everett Research Lab., Everett, MA (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

355

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

356

Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Pleistocene hinterland evolution of the active Banda Arc: Surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia AND Hinterland emergence of the active Banda arc-continent collision: Metamorphism, geochronology, and structure of the uplifted Kisar Atoll, Indonesia and related Banda Arc: surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

Seamons, Kent E.

358

Book Review: Arc Marine -GIS For A Blue Planet on 22-09-2007 10:44  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review: Arc Marine - GIS For A Blue Planet on 22-09-2007 10:44 A few year's ago I 47.95 USD / 34.00 Euro Review by Jeff Thurston I was subsequently surprised when the new book Arc Marine: GIS for a Blue Planet arrived at my doorstep. The book includes a foreword by Jane Lubchenco

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

359

Development of Monte Carlo Simulation Code to Model Behavior of Hydrogen Isotopes Loaded into Tungsten Containing Vacancies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of hydrogen isotopes implanted into tungsten containing vacancies was simulated using a Monte Carlo technique. The correlations between the distribution of implanted deuterium and fluence, trap density and trap distribution were evaluated. Throughout the present study, qualitatively understandable results were obtained. In order to improve the precision of the model and obtain quantitatively reliable results, it is necessary to deal with the following subjects: (1) how to balance long-time irradiation processes with a rapid diffusion process, (2) how to prevent unrealistic accumulation of hydrogen, and (3) how to model the release of hydrogen forcibly loaded into a region where hydrogen densely exist already.

T. Oda; M. Shimada; K. Zhang; P. Calderoni; Y. Oya; M. Sokolov; R. Kolasinski

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

362

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

363

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

364

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

365

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

366

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

367

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

368

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

369

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

370

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

371

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

372

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

373

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

374

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

375

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

376

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

377

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

378

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

379

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

380

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gaseous divertor simulation in an arc-jet device  

SciTech Connect

The first experimental simulation of the gaseous tokamak divertor is presented. Significant results are: (1) neutral gas at a pressure of a few mTorr is sufficient to absorb the entire localized flux of plasma thermal energy and reidstribute it over a wide area; (2) elastic ion-neutral collisions constitute the main energy absorbing process (at T/sub e,i/ less than or equal to 5 eV), and (3) a large pressure difference between divertor and main plasma chamber is maintained by plasma pumping in the connecting channel.

Hsu, W.L.; Yamada, M.; Barrett, P.J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance of Nanoscale Tantalum Oxide-Based Electrocatalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the properties of a series of non-platinum based nanoscale tantalum oxide/tungsten oxide-carbon composite catalysts was investigated for potential use in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the cathode side of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly. Electrochemical performance was measured using a half-cell test set up with a rotating disc electrode and compared with a commercial platinum-on-carbon (Pt/C) catalyst. Overall, all of the oxide-based composite catalysts exhibit high ORR on-set potentials, comparable to that of the baseline Pt/C catalyst. The addition of tungsten oxide as a dopant to tantalum oxide greatly improved mass specific current density. Maximum performance was achieved with a catalyst containing 32 mol% of tungsten oxide, which exhibited a mass specific current density ~8% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.6 V vs. the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) and ~35% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.2 V vs. NHE. Results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the tungsten cations in the composite catalysts exist in the +6 oxidation state, while the tantalum displays an average valence of +5, suggesting that the addition of tungsten likely creates an oxygen excess in the tantalum oxide structure that influences its oxygen absorption kinetics. When the 32mol% tungsten doped catalyst loading on the working electrode was increased to five times that of the original loading (which was equivalent to that of the baseline Pt/C catalyst), the area specific current density improved four fold, achieving an area specific current density ~35% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.6 V vs. NHE.

Oh, Tak Keun; Kim, Jin Yong; Shin, Yongsoon; Engelhard, Mark H.; Weil, K. Scott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Permian evolution of sandstone composition in a complex back-arc extensional to foreland basin: The Bowen Basin, eastern Australia  

SciTech Connect

The Bowen Basin is a Permo-Triassic, back-arc extensional to foreland basin that developed landward of an intermittently active continental volcanic arc associated with the eastern Australian convergent plate margin. The basin has a complex, polyphase tectonic history that began with limited back-arc crustal extension during the Early Permian. This created a series of north-trending grabens and half grabens which, in the west, accommodated quartz-rich sediment derived locally from surrounding, uplifted continental basement. In the east, coeval calc-alkaline, volcanolithic-rich, and volcaniclastic sediment was derived from the active volcanic arc. This early extensional episode was followed by a phase of passive thermal subsidence accompanied by episodic compression during the late Early Permian to early Late Permian, with little contemporaneous volcanism. In the west, quartzose sediment was shed from stable, polymictic, continental basement immediately to the west and south of the basin, whereas volcanolithic-rich sediment that entered the eastern side of the basin during this time was presumably derived from the inactive, and possibly partly submerged volcanic arc. During the late Late Permian, flexural loading and increased compression occurred along the eastern margin of the Bowen Basin, and renewed volcanism took place in the arc system to the east. Reactivation of this arc led to westward and southward spread of volcanolithic-rich sediment over the entire basin. Accordingly, areas in the west that were earlier receiving quartzose, craton-derived sediment from the west and south were overwhelmed by volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediment from the east and north. This transition from quartz-rich, craton-derived sediments to volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediments is consistent with the interpreted back-arc extensional to foreland basin origin for the Bowen Basin.

Baker, J.C. (Univ. of Queensland, (Australia). Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis); Fielding, C.R. (Univ. of Queensland, (Australia). Dept. of Earth Sciences); Caritat, P de (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Dept. of Geology); Wilkinson, M.M. (Santos Petroleum, Queensland (Australia))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development and evaluation of GIS-based ArcPRZM-3 system for spatial modeling of groundwater vulnerability to pesticide contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate a GIS-based modeling system called ArcPRZM-3 for spatial modeling of pesticide leaching potential from soil surface towards groundwater. The ArcPRZM-3 was developed by coupling a commonly used ... Keywords: ArcPRZM-3, GIS, Groundwater, Groundwater spatial modeling, PRZM-3, Pesticide, Vulnerability assessment

Tahir Ali Akbar; Henry Lin; John DeGroote

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

SciTech Connect

Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

388

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

389

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

390

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

391

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

392

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

393

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

394

(Smart) Look-Ahead Arc Consistency and the Pursuit of CSP Tractability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Smart) Look-Ahead Arc Consistency and the Pursuit of CSP Tractability Hubie Chen 1 and V#19. The constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) can be formu- lated as the problem of deciding, given a pair (A; B) of relational struc- tures, whether or not there is a homomorphism from A to B. Although the CSP is in general

Dalmau, Victor

395

How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software?  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? Home > Groups > Geospatial I downloaded the Map of Wind Farms data as a .csv from http://en.openei.org/wiki/Map_of_Wind_Farms/Data. The downloaded data contains the latitude and longitude values in a single column. ArcMap requires separate fields for lat/long. Also, there is a strange character at the end of the coordinate values, °. It looks like this might be due to using the degree symbol? Will this cause an issue when attempting to import the downloaded data into ESRI ArcMap software? Thanks for any guidance you can provide! Submitted by Scourer on 10 September, 2013 - 09:40 1 answer Points: 1 Hi- Yes, you are correct with determining why the ° characters appear in the

396

How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software?  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? Home > Groups > Geospatial I downloaded the Map of Wind Farms data as a .csv from http://en.openei.org/wiki/Map_of_Wind_Farms/Data. The downloaded data contains the latitude and longitude values in a single column. ArcMap requires separate fields for lat/long. Also, there is a strange character at the end of the coordinate values, °. It looks like this might be due to using the degree symbol? Will this cause an issue when attempting to import the downloaded data into ESRI ArcMap software? Thanks for any guidance you can provide! Submitted by Scourer on 10 September, 2013 - 09:40 1 answer Points: 1 Hi- Yes, you are correct with determining why the ° characters appear in the CSV. This is an artifact of transforming the coordinates to values for the

397

A model of plasma discharges in pre-arcing regime for water treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is presented a simulation study of a water treatment system based upon 1 kHz frequency plasma discharges in the pre-arcing regime produced within a coaxial cylinder reactor. The proposed computational model takes into consideration the three main ... Keywords: modelling, pulsed corona discharges, simulation, streamers

B. G. Rodríguez-Méndez; R. López-Callejas; R. Peña-Eguiluz; A. Mercado-Cabrera; R. Valencia-Alvarado; S. R. Barocio; A. de la Piedad-Beneitez; J. S. Benítez-Read; J. O. Pacheco-Sotelo

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Optimization of bead geometry of submerged arc weld using fuzzy based desirability function approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study highlights application of Taguchi's robust design coupled with fuzzy based desirability function approach for optimizing multiple bead geometry parameters of submerged arc weldment. Fuzzy inference system has been adapted to avoid uncertainly, ... Keywords: Desirability function, Fuzzy logic, SAW, Taguchi's robust design

Ankita Singh; Saurav Datta; Siba Sankar Mahapatra; Tapan Singha; Gautam Majumdar

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

File-Based storage of digital objects and constituent datastreams: XMLtapes and internet archive ARC files  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces the write-once/read-many XMLtape/ARC storage approach for Digital Objects and their constituent datastreams. The approach combines two interconnected file-based storage mechanisms that are made accessible in a protocol-based manner. ...

Xiaoming Liu; Lyudmila Balakireva; Patrick Hochstenbach; Herbert Van de Sompel

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fast Arc Delivery for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Vertebral and Lung Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams with higher dose rates and faster delivery are now clinically available. The purpose of this planning study was to compare optimized non-FFF and FFF RapidArc plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and to validate the accuracy of fast arc delivery. Methods and Material: Ten patients with peripheral lung tumors and 10 with vertebral metastases were planned using RapidArc with a flattened 6-MV photon beam and a 10-MV FFF beam for fraction doses of 7.5-18 Gy. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OAR), number of monitor units (MU), and beam delivery times were assessed. GafChromic EBT2 film measurements of FFF plans were performed to compare calculated and delivered dose distributions. Results: No major dosimetric differences were seen between the two delivery techniques. For lung SBRT plans, conformity indices and OAR doses were similar, although the average MU required were higher with FFF plans. For vertebral SBRT, FFF plans provided comparable PTV coverage, with no significant differences in OAR doses. Average beam delivery times were reduced by a factor of up to 2.5, with all FFF fractions deliverable within 4 min. Measured FFF plans showed high agreement with calculated plans, with more than 99% of the area within the region of interest fulfilling the acceptance criterion. Conclusion: The higher dose rate of FFF RapidArc reduces delivery times significantly, without compromising plan quality or accuracy of dose delivery.

Ong, Chin Loon, E-mail: c.ong@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Arc-melting preparation of single crystal LaB.sub.6 cathodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing single crystals of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB.sub.6) by arc melting a rod of compacted LaB.sub.6 powder. The method is especially suitable for preparing single crystal LaB.sub.6 cathodes for use in scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM).

Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA)

1977-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

A model for temperature prediction of melted steel in the electric arc furnace (EAF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constant aspiration to optimize electric arc steelmaking process causes an increase of the use of advanced analytical methods for the process support. The goal of the paper is to present the way to predict temperature of melted steel in the electric ...

Marcin Blachnik; Krystian M?czka; Tadeusz Wieczorek

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Dynamic analysis of electric arcs based on energetic and Clarke approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper an innovative approach to the transient study of interrupted single- and three-phase networks is proposed. It is based on state-equations and it is independent on the mathematical model adopted to represent the electric arc. In the ... Keywords: circuit breakers, switching transients, transient analysis

Francesco Della Torre; Sonia Leva; Adriano Paolo Morando

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

405

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

406

Influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of magnetron sputtered tungsten thin films  

SciTech Connect

The influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of tungsten thin films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering was studied using 310 steel (AISI), Fecralloy registered and Invar registered substrates. Besides elemental tungsten, only residual amounts of contamination elements (O, C, Ar, etc.) were detected by electron probe microanalysis. Only the {alpha}-W crystalline structure, with a preferential <110> orientation, was detected in all the films by x-ray diffraction. The highest lattice parameters were measured for the films deposited on 310 steel substrates, while the smallest values were obtained for the films deposited on Invar registered substrates. These results are closely related to the thermal expansion coefficients of the substrates. All the as-deposited films were in a compressive stress state independent of the substrate type (-3 GPa for 310 steel and Fecralloy registered substrates and -2 GPa for Invar registered substrates). The residual compressive stresses of the films deposited on Fecralloy registered substrates strongly decrease with annealing temperatures up to {approx_equal}-8 GPa at 1175 K. This result shows that the measured compressive stresses are not real, and they are a direct consequence of plastic deformation of the substrate. On the contrary, the compressive stresses measured in the films deposited on Invar registered and 310 steel substrates are real as plastic deformation of the substrates is not observed.

Oliveira, J. C.; Cavaleiro, A. [Grupo de Materiais e Engenharia de Superficies, ICEMS, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030 Coimbra (Portugal)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Localization of deformable tumors from short-arc projections using Bayesian estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The authors present a stochastic framework for radiotherapy patient positioning directly utilizing radiographic projections. This framework is developed to be robust against anatomical nonrigid deformations and to cope with challenging imaging scenarios, involving only a few cone beam CT projections from short arcs. Methods: Specifically, a Bayesian estimator (BE) is explicitly derived for the given scanning geometry. This estimator is compared to reference methods such as chamfer matching (CM) and the minimization of the median absolute error adapted as tools of robust image processing and statistics. In order to show the performance of the stochastic short-arc patient positioning method, a CIRS IMRT thorax phantom study is presented with movable markers and the utilization of an Elekta Synergy{sup Registered-Sign} XVI system. Furthermore, a clinical prostate CBCT scan of a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} On-Board Imager{sup Registered-Sign} system is utilized to investigate the robustness of the method for large variations of image quality (anterior-posterior vs lateral views). Results: The results show that the BE shifts reduce the initial setup error of up to 3 cm down to 3 mm at maximum for an imaging arc as short as 10 Degree-Sign while CM achieves residual errors of 7 mm at maximum only for arcs longer than 40 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, the BE can compensate robustly for low image qualities using several low quality projections simultaneously. Conclusions: In conclusion, an estimation method for marker-based patient positioning for short imaging arcs is presented and shown to be robust and accurate for deformable anatomies.

Hoegele, W.; Zygmanski, P.; Dobler, B.; Kroiss, M.; Koelbl, O.; Loeschel, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg University Medical Center, 93053 Regensburg (Germany) and Department of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Applied Sciences, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg University Medical Center, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the Sisters of Mercy, 4010 Linz (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg University Medical Center, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Applied Sciences, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Verification of dose distribution for volumetric modulated arc therapy total marrow irradiation in a humanlike phantom  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning studies have been reported to provide good target coverage and organs at risk (OARs) sparing in total marrow irradiation (TMI). A comprehensive dosimetric study simulating the clinical situation as close as possible is a norm in radiotherapy before a technique can be used to treat a patient. Without such a study, it would be difficult to make a reliable and safe clinical transition especially with a technique as complicated as VMAT-TMI. To this end, the dosimetric feasibility of VMAT-TMI technique in terms of treatment planning, delivery efficiency, and the most importantly three dimensional dose distribution accuracy was investigated in this study. The VMAT-TMI dose distribution inside a humanlike Rando phantom was measured and compared to the dose calculated using RapidArc especially in the field junctions and the inhomogeneous tissues including the lungs, which is the dose-limiting organ in TMI. Methods: Three subplans with a total of nine arcs were used to treat the planning target volume (PTV), which was determined as all the bones plus the 3 mm margin. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at 39 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated plan doses. Planar dose for each arc was verified using mapcheck. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of 0.5% (range: -4.3% and 6.6%) from the calculated dose in the junctions and in the inhomogeneous medium including the lungs. Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that RapidArc VMAT technique is dosimetrically accurate, safe, and efficient in delivering TMI within clinically acceptable time frame.

Surucu, Murat; Yeginer, Mete; Kavak, Gulbin O.; Fan, John; Radosevich, James A.; Aydogan, Bulent [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology University of Chicago, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC 9006, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Center for Molecular Biology of Oral Diseases, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Edwards Hospital, 801 South Washington Street, Naperville, Illinois 60540 (United States); Center for Molecular Biology of Oral Diseases, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States); Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology University of Chicago, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC 9006, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago Medical Center, 1801 West Taylor Street, C400, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

410

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

411

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

412

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

413

Development of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet fuel Specimens for Thermionic Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration initiated a project at Battelle Memorial Institute for the purpose of fabricating clad fuel pellet containment vessel assemblies. These assemblies house clad fuel pellets containing enriched fuel. Irradiation studies of these assemblies in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor will provide data required for the desigi of thermionic converter reactors being considered by NASA. Three major objectives were defined at the initiation of this project at Battelle. These were (1) to provide containment vessel assemblies for irradiation studies, (2) to identify the best fuel dispersion/cladding combination for the fueled pellets, and (3) to identify and optimize the most promising fabrication technique to the extent necessary to provide reproducible specimens. In addition to these major objectives, other goals were defined in relation to supporting studies required for the successful conclusion of this program. The approach for accomplishing these objectives involved the cooperation of various research and research support groups at Battelle. These groups contributed to the overall program by involvement in the following areas: (1) Preparation or procurement of various types of UO{sub 2} fuel particles; (2) Application of tungsten coating to the fuel particles; (3) Development of various powder-consolidation techniques for the fuel form including use of explosive methods and hot isostatic pressing; (4) Selection and evaluation of high-temperature claddings for the fuel form; (5) Development of techniques for cladding application to the fuel form; (6) Evaluation of candidate systems by thermal cycling; (7) Fabrication of irradiation containment vessels and the associated components; and (8) Conduction of appropriate supporting studies associated with welding and brazing of the containment vessel components. The objectives of this program were accomplished to the extent that two clad fuel pellet containment vessel assemblies were completed and forwarded to NASA for irradiation testing. In conjunction with this effort, a compatible fuel-cladding system was developed for the clad fuel pellet as well as a fabrication process. In addition'to the accomplishment of these major goals, other valuable information relating to the fabrication and assembly of the containment vessel components was developed.

Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

1968-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

415

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

416

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent … more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Application of a nonisothermal thermogravimetric method to the kinetic study of the reduction of metallic oxides: Part 2. A theoretical treatment of powder bed reduction and its application to the reduction of tungsten oxide by hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical treatment of nonisothermal kinetic studies has been extended in the present work to gas-solid reactions in powder beds. An expression for the activation energies for the reaction has been derived on the basis that the reaction proceeds by the movement of the reaction front, the velocity of the movement being kept constant. The reliability of the method has been tested by applying the same to the reduction of tungsten oxide by hydrogen. The experiments were carried out using thermogravimetric technique under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The reaction front is considered to consist of a thin layer of small particles. The rate of the reduction seems to be controlled by the chemical reaction between the product and the unreacted core existing in each of the small particles. Using the expression derived in the present work, the activation energy of the reaction was calculated from the results of the nonisothermal experiments to be 83.62 kJ/mol. This value is in good agreement with the value of 83.17 kJ/mol evaluated from isothermal experiments.

Bustnes, J.A.; Sichen, D.; Seetharaman, S. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Theoretical Metallurgy)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

GTAW Flux-Cored Wires for Open Root SS Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) procedures for stainless steel open root welding applications typically require purging or shielding with an inert gas (i.e. argon), during the root and subsequent hot passes, to assist with wetting and to prevent atmospheric contamination of the exposed surface. Lack of adequate purging, or welding without a purge, typically results in weld defects both on the surface and within the weld deposit, such as porosity and poor bead profile. Poor root weld profile such as lack-...

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas to the AvalonThe Merits of Piping Jeanne D'arc Gas to the Avalon Dr. Stephen Bruneau, P.EngDr. Stephen Bruneau, P.Eng  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diffusion layer properties. HVDC Syringe Pump High-Voltage DC Supply Syringe Needle Rotating and Translating Grounded Target HVDC . . . . . ... .. . . . . . . . . ..... . Particles Porous Films Dense Films

Bruneau, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

Craddock, Paul R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Improved structural and electrical properties of thin ZnO:Al films by dc filtered cathodic arc deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that nearly the entire solar spectrum can be transmitted,and nearly the entire solar spectrum is transmitted. Thisspectrum. Therefore, arc-grown AZO is potentially suitable for high efficiency, multijunction solar

Zhu, Yuankun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch  

SciTech Connect

Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. [Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Las Heras 644, Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe 2600 (Argentina); Artana, G. [Departamento Ing. Mecanica, Laboratorio de Fluidodinamica, Facultad de Ingenieria (UBA), Paseo Colon 850 (C1063ACV), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA), Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Bounds for the moduli of continuity for conformal mappings of domains near their accessible boundary arcs  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents bounds for the moduli of continuity {omega}(f, G-bar ,{delta}) of conformal mappings w=f(z) of a bounded simply connected domain G with an arbitrary Jordan boundary onto a bounded simply connected domain with an arbitrary Jordan boundary, the 'quality' of boundaries being taken into account. For a Jordan curve (simple arc or a closed contour), its quality is characterized in general by its modulus of oscillation, and if it has finite length, by a more sensitive modulus of rectifiability-these purely metric concepts were introduced by the author in 1996. Theorems on the behaviour of conformal mappings of simply connected domains of arbitrary nature near open accessible boundary arcs are established. Bibliography: 18 titles.

Dolzhenko, Evgenii P [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mechanism of surface modification in the plasma-surface interaction in electrical arcs  

SciTech Connect

Electrical sparks and arcs are plasma discharges that carry large currents and can strongly modify surfaces. This damage usually comes in the form of micrometer-sized craters and frozen-in liquid on the surface. Using a combination of experiments, plasma and atomistic simulation tools, we now show that the observed formation of deep craters and liquidlike features during sparking in vacuum is explained by the impacts of energetic ions, accelerated under the given conditions in the plasma sheath to kiloelectron volt energies, on surfaces. The flux in arcs is so high that in combination with kiloelectron volt energies it produces multiple overlapping heat spikes, which can lead to cratering even in materials such as Cu, where a single heat spike normally does not.

Timko, H.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K.; Costelle, L.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.; Toerklep, A.; Arnau-Izquierdo, G.; Descoeudres, A.; Calatroni, S.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); and Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Graphene layer growth on silicon substrates with nickel film by pulse arc plasma deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon layer has been grown on a Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si(111) substrate under high vacuum pressure by pulse arc plasma deposition. From the results of Raman spectroscopy for the sample, it is found that graphene was formed by ex-situ annealing of sample grown at room temperature. Furthermore, for the sample grown at high temperature, graphene formation was shown and optimum temperature was around 1000 Degree-Sign C. Transmission electron microscopy observation of the sample suggests that the graphene was grown from step site caused by grain of Ni film. The results show that the pulse arc plasma technique has the possibility for acquiring homogenous graphene layer with controlled layer thickness.

Fujita, K.; Banno, K.; Aryal, H. R.; Egawa, T. [Research Center for Nano-Device and System, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-Ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Joint TVA EPRI Evaluation of Steel Arc Furnace Regulation Impacts and Potential Innovative Mitigation Solutions: Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is considering the costs and benefits of serving arc furnace loads. One potential adverse power system impact of arc furnaces is that their electric power consumption is extremely volatile and can significantly impact the short-term frequency regulation requirements of the TVA power system, increasing the regulating reserve requirements needed to meet North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) reliability criteria. A one-month analysis of TVA regulation ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants Background The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) University Coal Research (UCR) Program seeks to further develop the understanding of coal utilization. Since the program's inception in 1979, its primary objectives have been to improve our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner; maintain and upgrade the coal research capabilities and facilities of U.S. colleges and

430

X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum z-pinch plasma with tungsten backlighter planar wire array source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption features from K-shell aluminum z-pinch plasmas have recently been studied on Zebra, the 1.7 MA pulse power generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. In particular, tungsten plasma has been used as a semi-backlighter source in the generation of aluminum K-shell absorption spectra by placing a single Al wire at or near the end of a single planar W array. All spectroscopic experimental results were recorded using a time-integrated, spatially resolved convex potassium hydrogen phthalate (KAP) crystal spectrometer. Other diagnostics used to study these plasmas included x-ray detectors, optical imaging, laser shadowgraphy, and time-gated and time-integrated x-ray pinhole imagers. Through comparisons with previous publications, Al K-shell absorption lines are shown to be from much lower electron temperature ({approx}10-40 eV) plasmas than emission spectra ({approx}350-500 eV).

Osborne, G. C.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Ouart, N. D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants  

SciTech Connect

Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

The effects of 800 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion of tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel, and gold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real time electrochemical data were acquired for tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel 304L, and gold targets during proton irradiation at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The goal of this research was to establish a better understanding of the corrosion properties of materials as a function of proton irradiation and gain insight into the mechanism of the observed phenomena. The following electrochemical observations were made during proton irradiation of W, Ta, SS304, and Au: (1) the open circuit potential of all materials increased with increasing proton fluence; (2) the corrosion rate (at the OCP) of W and SS304 increased with increasing proton fluence; (3) the passive dissolution rate for SS304 and Ta decreased with increasing proton fluence; (4) the anodic dissolution rate for W increased with increasing proton fluence; (5) the pitting potential for SS304 increased with proton fluence, which is an indication that the material is less susceptible to pitting attack during irradiation.

Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Kanner, G.; Daemen, L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Synthesis and reactivity of molybdenum and tungsten bis(dinitrogen) complexes supported by diphosphine chelates containing pendant amines  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we report the synthesis and characterization of molybdenum bis(dinitrogen) complexes supported by two PNP diphosphine ligands, Mo(N{sub 2}){sub 2}(PNP){sub 2}; PNP = [(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}){sub 2}N(R'), R = Et (ethyl), Ph (phenyl); R'= Me (methyl), Bn (benzyl)], and a series of tungsten bis(dinitrogen) complexes containing one or two PNP ligands, W(N{sub 2}){sub 2}(dppe)(PNP) and W(N{sub 2}){sub 2}(PNP){sub 2}, respectively, and the analogues complexes without pendant amines for comparison. These Mo- and W-N{sub 2} complexes were characterized by NMR, IR, spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. In addition, reactivity of the complexes with CO is described.

Weiss, Charles J.; Groves, Amy N.; Mock, Michael T.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Helm, Monte L.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

Calculation of pressure waves in substation buildings due to arcing faults  

SciTech Connect

Pressure stress from internal arcing includes static and dynamic phenomena. These phenomena can be distinguished with the help of the pulsation factor. The ray tracing technique presented allows the three-dimensional calculation of pressure stresses including transient effects. Two examples demonstrating the importance of pressure waves on the stress of rooms are presented. A calculation procedure is given which enables an improvement of the design of substation buildings.

Dasbach, A.; Pietsch, G.J. (Grundegebiete der Elektrotechnik und Gasentladungstechnik, Aachen Univ. of Technology, Aachen (DE))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage mediate the cytotoxicity of tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloys in vitro  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten alloys (WA) have been introduced in an attempt to find safer alternatives to depleted uranium and lead munitions. However, it is known that at least one alloy, 91% tungsten-6% nickel-3% cobalt (WNC-91-6-3), causes rhabdomyosarcomas when fragments are implanted in rat muscle. This raises concerns that shrapnel, if not surgically removable, may result in similar tumours in humans. There is therefore a clear need to develop rapid and robust in vitro methods to characterise the toxicity of different WAs in order to identify those that are most likely to be harmful to human health and to guide development of new materials in the future. In the current study we have developed a rapid visual in vitro assay to detect toxicity mediated by individual WA particles in cultured L6-C11 rat muscle cells. Using a variety of techniques (histology, comet assay, caspase-3 activity, oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin to measure the production of reactive oxygen species and whole-genome microarrays) we show that, in agreement with the in vivo rat carcinogenicity studies, WNC-91-6-3 was the most toxic of the alloys tested. On dissolution, it produces large amounts of reactive oxygen species, causes significant amounts of DNA damage, inhibits caspase-3, triggers a severe hypoxic response and kills the cells in the immediate vicinity of the alloy particles within 24 h. By combining these in vitro data we offer a mechanistic explanation of the effect of this alloy in vivo and show that in vitro tests are a viable alternative for assessing new alloys in the future.

Harris, R.M.; Williams, T.D.; Hodges, N.J.; Waring, R.H., E-mail: R.H.Waring@bham.ac.uk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Mechanism of Synthesis of Ultra-Long Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge Plasma  

SciTech Connect

In this project fundamental issues related to synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which is relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics were investigated. Given that among plasma-based techniques arc discharge stands out as very advantageous in several ways (fewer defects, high flexibility, longer lifetime) this techniques warrants attention from the plasma physics and plasma technology standpoint. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of the plasma and SWNTs synthesis were conducted. Experimental efforts focused on plasma diagnostics, measurements of nanostructures parameters, and nanoparticle characterization. Theoretical efforts focused to focus on multi-dimensional modeling of the arc discharge and single wall nanotube synthesis in arc plasmas. It was demonstrated in experiment and theoretically that controlling plasma parameters can affect nanostucture synthesis altering SWNT properties (length and diameter) and leading to synthesis of new structures such as a few-layer graphene. Among clearly identified parameters affecting synthesis are magnetic and electric fields. Knowledge of the plasma parameters and discharge characteristics is crucial for ability to control synthesis process by virtue of both magnetic and electric fields. New graduate course on plasma engineering was introduced into curriculum. 3 undergraduate students were attracted to the project and 3 graduate students (two are female) were involved in the project. Undergraduate student from Historically Black University was attracted and participated in the project during Summer 2010.

Keidar, Michael [George Washington University] [George Washington University

2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

Spontaneous combustion prediction of coal by C80 and ARC techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many coal fires were caused by spontaneous combustion in coal mines or coal storehouses, which resulted in a great loss and energy wastage. To identify and evaluate the hazardous degree of coal stockpile, a C80 microcalorimeter and accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) were employed in this work. The coal samples undergo an exothermal process start at 80 {sup o}C with heat generation of -75.1 J g{sup -1} (mean value) detected by C80 experiment. The activation energies of the first exothermal process were calculated for the three experiments, and the mean value is 80.76 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is lower than that of obtained from the ARC result, 127.0 kJ mol{sup -1}. For a 300 tons coal stockpile, the self-heating oxidation temperatures (SHOT) were calculated as 164, 60, 90, and 68{sup o}C based on the ARC experiment and three C80 experiments, respectively. Further research on the mass effect on SHOT shows that if the coal mass is less than 12 tons, the danger of thermal spontaneous combustion is less. However, if the mass amount is more than 12000 tons, the danger of thermal spontaneous combustion is difficult to avoid even at ambient temperature if no special measures are taken. 38 refs., 9 figs.

Qingsong Wang; Song Guo; Jinhua Sun [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China). State Key Laboratory of Fire Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Consumable arc-melting, extruding, and rolling process for iridium sheet  

SciTech Connect

An iridium alloy has been used as cladding for the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) for recent interplanetary spacecraft such as Voyagers 1 and 2 and will be used for the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft. The iridium alloy sheet for the fuel cladding used on these missions was fabricated by hot and cold rolling of arc-melted and drop-cast 0.5-kg ingots. Upon completion of production for these spacecraft, an opportunity was taken to conduct process improvement studies that would increase processing batch sizes, develop a more uniform product, decrease rejections due to internal delaminations and surface defects, and reduce costs. The studies to scale up and improve the fabrication process are described. In the new process, iridium is electron beam melted, alloyed by arc melting, and then consumable arc melted to form a cylindrical ingot of approximately 7 kg for extrusion. The ingot is extruded to sheet bar and hot and cold rooled into sheet. Sheet evaluated from the first two ingots showed 100% acceptance with no defects on inspection. An improved uniformity of microstructure was obtained, and chemistry was controlled within specification limits.

Heestand, R.L.; Copeland, G.L.; Martin, M.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

440

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

442

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

443

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

444

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

445

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

446

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

447

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

448

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

449

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

450

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

451

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

452

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

453

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

454

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

455

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

456

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

457

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

458

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

459

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

460

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas tungsten arc" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

462

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

463

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

464

Modular ultrahigh vacuum-compatible gas-injection system with an adjustable gas flow for focused particle beam-induced deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas-injection system (GIS) heats up a powdery substance and transports the resulting gas through a capillary into a vacuum chamber. Such a system can be used to guide a (metal)organic precursor gas very close to the focal area of an electron or ion beam, where a permanent deposit is created and adheres to the substrate. This process is known as focused particle beam-induced deposition. The authors present design principles and give construction details of a GIS suitable for ultrahigh vacuum usage. The GIS is composed of several self-contained components which can be customized rather independently. It allows for a continuously adjustable gas-flow rate. The GIS was attached to a standard scanning electron microscope (JEOL 6100) and tested with the tungsten precursor W(CO){sub 6}. The analysis of the deposits by means of atomic force microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy provides clear evidence that excellent gas-flow-rate stability and ensuing growth rate and metal-content reproducibility are experienced.

Klingenberger, D.; Huth, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Comparison of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy resulting from the use of a tungsten alloy MLC or a brass collimator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To apply the dual ionization chamber method for mixed radiation fields to an accurate comparison of the secondary neutron dose arising from the use of a tungsten alloy multileaf collimator (MLC) as opposed to a brass collimator system for defining the shape of a therapeutic proton field. Methods: Hydrogenous and nonhydrogenous ionization chambers were constructed with large volumes to enable measurements of absorbed doses below 10{sup -4} Gy in mixed radiation fields using the dual ionization chamber method for mixed-field dosimetry. Neutron dose measurements were made with a nominal 230 MeV proton beam incident on a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a solid brass block. The chambers were cross-calibrated against a {sup 60}Co-calibrated Farmer chamber in water using a 6 MV x-ray beam and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to account for variations in ionization chamber response due to differences in secondary neutron energy spectra. Results: The neutron and combined proton plus {gamma}-ray absorbed doses are shown to be nearly equivalent downstream from either a closed tungsten alloy MLC or a solid brass block. At 10 cm downstream from the distal edge of the collimating material the neutron dose from the closed MLC was (5.3 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. The neutron dose with brass was (6.4 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -5} Gy/Gy. Further from the secondary neutron source, at 50 cm, the neutron doses remain close for both the MLC and brass block at (6.9 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy and (6.3 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -6} Gy/Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The dual ionization chamber method is suitable for measuring secondary neutron doses resulting from proton irradiation. The results of measurements downstream from a closed tungsten alloy MLC and a brass block indicate that, even in an overly pessimistic worst-case scenario, secondary neutron production in a tungsten alloy MLC leads to absorbed doses that are nearly equivalent to those seen from brass collimators. Therefore, the choice of tungsten alloy in constructing the leaves of a proton MLC is appropriate, and does not lead to a substantial increase in the secondary neutron dose to the patient compared to that generated in a brass collimator.

Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Ainsley, Christopher G.; Kirk, Maura L.; McDonough, James E.; Maughan, Richard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

467

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

468

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

469

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

470

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

471

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

472

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

473

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

474

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

475

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

476

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

477

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

478

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

479

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...