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1

Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy consumption throughout the world has increased substantially over the past few years and the trend is projected to continue indefinitely. The primary sources of energy are conventional fuels such as oil, natural gas and coal. The most apparent negative impacts of these conventional fuels are global warming, poor air-quality, and adverse health effects. Considering these negative impacts, it is necessary to develop and use non-conventional sources of energy. Landfill gas (LFG) generated at landfills can serve as a source of cleaner energy. LFG has substantial energy generation potential and, if cleaned of certain impurities, can be used for several applications such as electricity generation and conversion to high Btu gas. This thesis considers another application of LFG, which consists of using it as a vehicular fuel for refuse trucks. Currently, limited research has been performed on the development of such a methodology to evaluate the application of LFG as a vehicular fuel for refuse truck operations. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a methodology that can be used to evaluate the use of LFG generated at landfills as a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel source for refuse trucks in Texas. The methodology simulates the gas generation process at a landfill by using standard models developed by the Environmental Protection Agency. The operations of a refuse truck fleet are replicated by using generic drive cycles developed as part of this research. The economic feasibility is evaluated by estimating the costs required for cleaning the LFG and converting the truck fleet from diesel to LNG as well as quantifying the benefits obtained due to change in fuel consumption and emission generation by the refuse trucks. The methodology was applied to a potential landfill in Texas. The results show that the methodology offers an innovative tool that allows the stakeholders to evaluate the economic feasibility of using LFG for refuse truck operations. The methodology also provides a flexible framework wherein each component can be changed or tailored to meet the specific needs of the stakeholders.

Gokhale, Bhushan

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 136,000 refuse trucks were in operation in the United States in 2007. These trucks burn approximately 1.2 billion gallons of diesel fuel a year, releasing almost 27 billion pounds of greenhouse gases. In addition to contributing to global climate change, diesel-fueled refuse trucks are one of the most concentrated sources of health-threatening air pollution in most cities. The landfills that they ultimately place their waste in are the second largest source of human-related methane emissions in the United States, accounting for approximately 23 percent of these emissions in 2007. At the same time, methane emissions from landfills represent a lost opportunity to capture and use a significant energy resource. Many landfill-gas-to-energy (LFGTE) projects are underway in an attempt to curb emissions and make better use of this energy. The methane that is extracted from these landfills can be converted into a transportation fuel, sold as a pipeline-quality natural gas, operate turbines for electricity, or be flared. The unique relationship that occurs between refuse trucks' constant visits to the landfill and the ability of the landfill itself to produce a transportation fuel creates an ability to accomplish emissions reduction in two sectors with the implementation of using landfill gas to fuel refuse trucks. Landfill owners and operators are very reluctant to invest in large capital LFGTE projects without knowing their long-term feasibility. The costs and benefits associated with each LFGTE project have been presented in such a way that owners/operators can make informed decisions based on economics while also implementing clean energy technology. Owners/operators benefit from larger economic returns, and the citizens of the surrounding cities benefit from better air quality. This research focused on six scenarios: converting landfill gas (LFG) to liquefied natural gas (LNG) for use as a transportation fuel, converting LFG to compressed natural gas (CNG) for use as a transportation fuel, converting LFG to pipeline-quality natural gas, converting LFG to electricity, flaring LFG, and doing nothing. For the test case of a 280-acre landfill, the option of converting LFG to CNG for use as a transportation fuel provided the best benefit-cost ratio at 5.63. Other significant benefit-cost findings involved the LFG-to-LNG option, providing a 5.51 benefit-cost ratio. Currently, the most commonly used LFGTE option of converting LFG to electricity provides only a 1.35 benefit-cost ratio while flaring which is the most common mitigation strategy provides a 1.21, further providing evidence that converting LFG to LNG/CNG for use as a transportation fuel provides greater economic benefits than the most common LFGTE option or mitigation strategy.

Sprague, Stephen M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Manhattan Project truck unearthed at landfill cleanup site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phonebook Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2011 April Manhattan project truck Manhattan Project truck unearthed at landfill cleanup site A LANL...

4

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

5

U. S. landfill gas research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper surveys US landfill gas RandD programs and presents some technical details of work being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois) through the support of the US Department of Energy. The two projects at Argonne include (1) a study of bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials and (2) development of standardized techniques to assay gas production from landfilled refuse (including qualitative microbiology of refuse assays).

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.; Rose, C.; Hsu, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATIONengine that runs on landfill gas. The project team led bygas and simulated landfill gas as a fuel source. This

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,öof Natural gas testing LANDFILL GAS COMPOSITION Tapping into

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulated Landfill Gas Intake Diagram STEADY STATE OPERATIONlandfill gas. Expanding the understanding of HCCI mode of engine operation

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

11

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Facility Winnebago County Landfill Gas Sector Biomass...

12

Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC Place Los Angeles, California Product Owner of landfill gas plant....

13

Landfill Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes annual renewable energy generation and capacity by region (9 regions in England, plus Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). Data available 2003 to 2009. Data is included in the DECC Energy Trends: September 2010 Report (available: http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/trends/558-tr...) Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released September 30th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Energy Generation Hydro Landfill Gas Other Biofuels Renewable Energy Consumption Sewage Gas wind Data application/zip icon 2 Excel files, 1 for generation, 1 for capacity (zip, 24.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

14

Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas What is the potential for additional utilisation of landfill gas in the USA and around the world? By Nickolas Themelis and Priscilla Ulloa, Columbia University. In his 2003 review of energy recovery from landfill gas, Willumsen1 reported that as of 2001, there were

Columbia University

15

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on AddThis.com... June 4, 2011 Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut

16

Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medium Btu methane gas is a naturally occurring byproduct of anaerobic digestion of landfilled municipal solid waste. The energy potential of landfill gas in New York State is estimated to be 61 trillion Btu's per year or the equivalent of 10% of the natural gas used annually in the state. The 18-month Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project conducted at the Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island, New York conclusively demonstrated that landfill gas is an acceptable fuel for producing electricity using an internal combustion engine/generator set. Landfill gas proved to be a reliable and consistent fuel source during a six-month field test program. Engine exhaust emissions were determined to be comparable to that of natural gas and no unusually high corrosion rates on standard pipeline material were found.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 121:569-operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,öUSA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATION

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

19

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Below is the text...

20

Forecast and Control Methods of Landfill Emission Gas to Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main component of landfill gas is CH4, its release is a potential hazard to the environment. To understand the gas law and landfill gas production are the prerequisite for effective control of landfill gas. This paper selects three kinds of typical ... Keywords: Landfill gas, German model, IPCC model, Marticorena dynamic model

Wang Qi; Yang Meihua; Wang Jie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Understanding landfill gas generation and migration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas research in the US Department of Energy (DOE) from Municipal Waste (EMW) Program is focusing on two major areas of investigation: (1) Landfill gas migration processes; and (2) Landfill gas generation. With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that: (1) concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; (2) based on average methane gradients in soil gas and a simple diffusion model, up to 10E5 g methane m/sup /minus /2/ yr/sup /minus/1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and (3) during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel TRANSPORTATION ENERGY alternative fuel, and purified landfill gas could provide a renewable domestic source of it. Landfills from landfills and use it in natural gas applications such as fueling motor vehicles. Project

23

Landfill gas recovery: a technology status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas, which consists mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, can be recovered and used as a fuel. Processing will upgrade it to a high-Btu gas of pipeline quality. There are more than a dozen commercial landfill-gas recovery facilities in the US at present, all at relatively large sites. The amount of gas produced by a given site is a function of size, composition, and age of the landfill. Various techniques can be used to enhance gas production and yield, including controlled addition of moisture and nutrients; bacterial seeding and pH control also appear useful. Several computer models have been developed to examine the effects of various parameters on gas production and yield; these can aid in predicting optimum gas recovery and in maintaining the proper chemical balance within the producing portion of the landfill. Economically, a site's viability depends on its location and potential users, current competing energy costs, and legislation governing the site's operation. Legal problems of site operation can occur because of environmental and safety issues, as well as from questions of gas ownership, liability, and public utility commission considerations. Currently, R and D is under way to improve present recovery techniques and to develop new technologies and concepts. Cost comparisons and potential environmental impacts are being examined. Additional research is needed in the areas of gas enhancement, decompositional analysis, computer modeling, gas characterization, instrumentation, and engineering cost analysis. 77 references, 11 figures, 23 tables.

Zimmermann, R.E.; Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Wilkey, M.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial  

SciTech Connect

In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions.

Dever, S.A. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia) and GHD Pty. Ltd., 10 Bond Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart_dever@ghd.com.au; Swarbrick, G.E. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: g.swarbrick@unsw.edu.au; Stuetz, R.M. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:27am Addthis Photo of a bulldozer on top of a large trash mound in a landfill with a cloudy sky in the backdrop. Methane and other gases produced from landfill decomposition can be leveraged for energy. This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector. Overview Landfill gases are a viable energy resource created during waste decomposition. Landfills are present in most communities. These resources can be tapped to generate heat and electricity. As organic waste decomposes, bio-gas is produced made up of roughly half methane, half carbon dioxide, and small amounts of non-methane organic

26

Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C[sub 1]C[sub 4] hydrocarbons; the C[sub 5]-C[sub 10] normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C{sub 1}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons; the C{sub 5}-C{sub 10} normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY LANDFILL - LANDFILL GAS (LFG) TO LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS (LNG) - PROJECT January/February 2005 Prepared for: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Table of Contents Page BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................1 SUMMARY OF EFFORT PERFORMED ......................................................................................2 Task 2B.1 - Literature Search and Contacts Made...................................................................2 Task 2B.2 - LFG Resource/Resource Collection System - Project Phase One.......................3 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................5

30

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Natural Gas Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on AddThis.com... April 13, 2013

31

Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

Pantelis K. Panteli

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Landfill gas emission prediction using Voronoi diagrams and importance sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are among the nation's largest emitters of methane, a key greenhouse gas, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the surficial methane emissions from landfills. There are limitations in obtaining accurate ... Keywords: Air dispersion modeling, Delaunay tessellation, Kriging, Least squares, MSW landfill, Voronoi diagram

K. R. Mackie; C. D. Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Powers Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana on AddThis.com... Aug. 20, 2011 Natural Gas Powers Milk Delivery Trucks in Indiana

34

Texas Mandate Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Texas Mandate Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Texas Mandate...

35

Case study: City of Industry landfill gas recovery operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of civic, recreation, and conservation facilities throughout a 150-acre site which had been used for waste disposal from 1951 to 1970 is described. The history of the landfill site, the geology of the site, and a test well program to assess the feasibility of recoverying landfill gas economically from the site are discussed. Based on results of the test well program, the City of Industry authorized the design and installation of a full-scale landfill gas recovery system. Design, construction, and operation of the system are described. The landfill gas system provides fuel for use in boilers to meet space heating and hot water demands for site development (MCW)

None

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Six Manufacturers to Offer Natural-Gas-Powered Trucks in 1996  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ix truck manufacturers will offer ix truck manufacturers will offer natural-gas-powered versions of their medium- and heavy-duty trucks in 1996, according to the Gas Research Institute (GRI). The trucks will be the first fully dedicated natural gas vehicles (NGVs) offered in U.S. medium- and heavy-duty markets by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). Four manufacturers will design trucks to operate on liquefied natural gas (LNG), and one manufacturer will design trucks to run on compressed natural gas (CNG). These manufacturers will join Volvo GM Heavy Truck Corporation, which has announced plans to manufacture an NGV refuse hauler, the Xpeditor. The refuse hauler will be available in LNG and CNG versions. "The availability of OEM- produced trucks is a significant development for GRI and the gas

37

Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884┬░, -88.4016041┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Lopez Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821┬░, -118.1122679┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, - Landfill Gas Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: cdm.unfccc.int/public_inputs/meth/acm0001/index.html Cost: Free Language: English References: UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References

40

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Balefill Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Bergen County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.9262762┬░, -74.07701┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9262762,"lon":-74.07701,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708┬░, -117.8311428┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Biomass Facility Facility Spadra Landfill Gas to Energy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821┬░, -118.1122679┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.7924343┬░, -72.8042797┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7924343,"lon":-72.8042797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Understanding natural and induced gas migration through landfill cover materials: the basis for improved landfill gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vertical pressure and concentration gradients in landfill cover materials are being examined at the Mallard North Landfill in Dupage County, IL. The goal of this project is to understand venting of landfill gas and intrusion of atmospheric gases into the landfill in response to changing meteorological conditions (particularly barometric pressure and precipitation) and pumping rates at recovery wells. Nests of probes for directly measuring soil gas pressures have been installed in areas of fractured and unfractured silty clay till cover materials. The probes are at three depths: shallow (0.6 m), intermediate (1.2 m), and deep (in the top of the refuse). Preliminary results from fall 1985 suggest that soil gas pressures respond quickly to changes in barometric pressure but that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen respond more slowly to changing soil moisture conditions. An important near-surface process that limits the total amount of methane available to a gas recovery system is the activity of methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria) in oxygenated cover materials. The results of this project will be used to quantify landfill mass balance relations, improve existing predictive models for landfill gas recovery systems, and improve landfill cover design for sites where gas recovery is anticipated.

Bogner, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site, with vegetated clay cover and a semiarid site with unvegetated sandy silt cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the past year's work at the semiarid site indicates that rates of CH/sub 4/ flux out of the landfill surface may be as high as 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ g cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ (6.3 /times/ 10/sup 2/ Kg m/sup /minus/1/ yr/sup /minus/1/) during dry soil conditions. Such high rates represent both the loss of an energy resource and a significance factor in global warming trends since atmospheric CH/sub 4/ contributes to the greenhouse effect. An independent estimate has suggested that 8--15% of global atmospheric CH/sub 4/ is attributable to landfill sources. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations. Triplicate assays of unamended refuse (controls) are compared to assays with added moisture, nutrients, and bacterial seed. To date, moisture addition is the single most important variable in stimulating gas production, particularly in samples with visible soil content. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797┬░, -73.9359821┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Survey of Landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2-MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten carbonate fuel cells can operate almost as efficiently on landfill gas as on natural gas. This study identified 749 landfills in the United States having the potential to support a total of nearly 3000 2-MW fuel cells.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials, Volume 1: Instrumentation and preliminary site investigations at Mallard North Landfill, Dupage County, Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the first commercial landfill gas recovery system was installed in 1975 at the Palos Verdes Landfill in southern California (Zimmerman et al., 1983), there have been few systematic research efforts aimed at understanding gas dynamics in the landfill and, in particular, gas exchange between the landfill and the atmosphere through the cover materials. To maximize the amount of landfill gas available to a recovery system, the impact of processes by which gas is vented or consumed in near-surface zones must be minimized. This report describes a project undertaken to monitor the flow of gas in a landfill. Data from the observations are presented. 32 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Brubaker, K.; Tome, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

List of Landfill Gas Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 377 Landfill Gas Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 377) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric

53

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites - a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover - have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; up to 10E5 g methane m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. Addressing landfill gas generation, the goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examined the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Triplicate assays of the leachates that produce insignificant quantities of biogas after 90 days incubation are being amended with sucrose, a nutrient broth, or a bacterial seed. Response of gas production to each of the three amendments was similar across all samples, regardless of the leaching method originally employed, with nutrient addition producing the most stable long-term biogas production with the highest methane content. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Landfill Gas Teknologiomr├ąde: Anvendt forskning og udvikling, herunder viden formidling, -udveksling og-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, f├Žlles analyser and landfill gas. I dette tidsinterval er en r├Žkke aktiviteter blevet gennemf├Şrt, herunder deltagelse til task

55

Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Feasibility study for utilization of landfill gas at the Royalton Road Landfill, Broadview Heights, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical viability of landfill gas recovery has been previously demonstrated at numerous sites. However, the economics of a full scale utilization system are dependent on proper market conditions, appropriate technologies, landfill gas quantity and quality, and public/purchaser acceptance. The specific objectives of this feasibility study were to determine: The available markets which might purchase landfill gas or landfill gas derived energy products; An extraction system concept design and to perform an on-site pumping test program; The landfill gas utilization technologies most appropriate for the site; Any adverse environmental, health, safety, or socioeconomic impacts associated with the various proposed technologies; The optimum project economics, based on markets and processes examined. Findings and recommendations were presented which review the feasibility of a landfill gas utilization facility on the Royalton Road Landfill. The three identified utilization alternatives are indeed technically feasible. However, current market considerations indicate that installation of a full scale system is not economically advisable at this time. This final report encompasses work performed by SCS Engineers from late 1980 to the present. Monitoring data from several extraction and monitoring wells is presented, including pumping rates and gas quality and quantity analysis. The Market Analysis Data Form, local climatological data, and barometric pressure data are included in the appendix section. 33 figures, 25 tables.

None

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

VANDOR,D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Feasibility study of landfill gas recovery at seven landfill sites, Adams County/Commerce City, Colorado. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a major landfill gas recovery study conducted in Adams County, Colorado. The study was performed during the period from August 1979 through September 1980. The study was broad in scope, involving a technical, economic, and institutional feasibility analysis of recovering landfill-generated methane gas from seven sanitary landfills in southwestern Adams County. The study included: field extraction testing at the seven sistes; detailed legislative research and activity; a market survey, including preliminary negotiations; and preliminary design and cost estimates for gas recovery systems at all seven sites.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Feasibility of methane-gas recovery at the St. John's Landfill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

All facets reviewed in assessing the feasibility of a commercial landfill gas recovery system at the St. Johns Landfill in Portland, Oregon are discussed. Included are: landfill operational history, step-by-step descriptions of the field testing (and all results therein), landfill gas production/recovery predictions, results of the preliminary market research, cost matrices for primary utilization modes, and conclusions and recommendations based on analysis of the data gathered. Tables and figures are used to illustrate various aspects of the report.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - AEO2010 - Naturall gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks. In 2008, U.S. freight trucks used more than 2 million barrels of petroleum-based diesel fuel per day. In the AEO2010 Reference case, they are projected to use 2.7 million barrels per day in 2035. Petroleum-based diesel use by freight trucks in 2008 accounted for 15 percent of total petroleum consumption (excluding biofuels and other non-petroleum-based products) in the transportation sector (13.2 million barrels per day) and 12 percent of the U.S. total for all sectors (18.7 million barrels per day). In the Reference case, oil use by freight trucks grows to 20 percent of total transportation use (13.7 million barrels per day) and 14 percent of the U.S. total (19.0 million barrels per day) by 2035. The following analysis examines the potential impacts of policies aimed at increasing sales of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles (HDNGVs) and the use of natural gas fuels, and key factors that lead to uncertainty in these estimates.

62

Natural Gas as a Fuel for Heavy Trucks: Issues and Incentives (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Numerical Early Warning Model Research of Landfill Gas Permeation and Diffusion Considering Flow-Temperature Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on seepage mechanics in porous medium gas and heat transfer theory, numerical early warning model is established, which is on quantitative description of migration and release of landfill gas and penetration and diffusion of energy, and dynamic ... Keywords: component, landfill gas, flow-temperature coupling, gas pressure and temperature distribution, numerical early warning model

Xue Qiang; Feng Xia-ting; Ma Shi-jin; Zhou Xiao-jun

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Case Studies from the Climate Technology Partnership: Landfill Gas Projects in South Korea and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines landfill gas projects in South Korea. Two case studies provide concrete examples of lessons learned and offer practical guidance for future projects.

Larney, C.; Heil, M.; Ha, G. A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery in Ghana"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery: PI. 4. "An Improved Model to Predict Gas Generation from Landfills based on Waste Composition-2015, Role: Co-PI. 3. "Field Measurement of Emissions from Natural Gas Drilling, Production, and Distribution

Texas at Arlington, University of

66

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Truck Testing Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adobe Reader. Norcal Waste Systems, Inc. Liquefied Natural Gas Trucks Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report, February 2005 (PDF 806 KB) Norcal Prototype LNG Truck...

67

Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, CA Landfill Gas-Recovery Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

Morris, Jeremy W.F., E-mail: jmorris@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Crest, Marion, E-mail: marion.crest@suez-env.com [Suez Environnement, 38 rue du President Wilson, 78230 Le Pecq (France); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Spokas, Kurt A., E-mail: kurt.spokas@ars.usda.gov [United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, 439 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Akerman, Anna, E-mail: anna.akerman@sita.fr [SITA France, Tour CB 21, 16 Place de l'Iris, 92040 Paris La Defense Cedex (France); Yuan, Lei, E-mail: lyuan@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, V0/. IS, No.4, 2001 Economic evaluation of a landfill system with gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and externalities are examined. A cost-benefit analysis of a landfill system with gas recovery (LFSGR) has been be made as follows: Yedla, S. and Parikh, 1.K. (2001) 'Economic evaluation of a landfill system with gas.K. Parikh Economic evaluation of a landfill system with gas recovery 435 Tonnes per dayMillion tonnes per

Columbia University

70

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Trace-chemical characterization of pollutants occurring in the production of landfill gas from the shoreline regional park sanitary landfill, Mountain View, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the results of sampling and analysis of ambient and process gas streams, and liquid and solid samples taken at different locations from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company Landfill Gas Recovery Plant in Mountain View, California. The purpose of this study is to identify environmental pollutants and characterize the trace chemistry of landfill gas recovered from the Mountain View Sanitary (Class II) Landfill. Gaseous samples, liquid condensate, and other plant products were analyzed for their trace chemical constituents, and the results indicate that certain organic and inorganic pollutants inherent to the landfill are emitted into the ambient environment and also become involved in the methane recovery process. Incorporation of condensate traps, molecular seive and charcoal filtration was found to significantly reduce both the organic and inorganic component burdens in the product gas. The environmental significances of the landfill gas recovery to the surrounding area and to worker safety are presented.

Flynn, N.W.; Guttman, M.; Hahn, J.; Payne, J.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Trace chemical characterization of pollutants occurring in the production of landfill gas from the shoreline regional park sanitary landfill, Mountain View, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of sampling and analysis of ambient and process gas streams, and liquid and solid samples taken at different locations from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company Landfill Gas Recovery Plant in Mountain View, California. The purpose of this study is to identify environmental pollutants and characterize the trace chemistry of landfill gas recovered from the Mountain View Sanitary (Class II) Landfill. Gaseous samples, liquid condensate and other plant products were analyzed for their trace chemical constituents, and the results indicate that certain organic and inorganic pollutants inherent to the landfill are emitted into the ambient environment and also become involved in the methane recovery process. Incorporation of condensate traps, molecular seive and charcoal filtration was found to significantly reduce both the organic and inorganic component burdens in the product gas. The environmental significances of the landfill gas recovery to the surrounding area and to worker safety are presented.

Flynn, N.W.; Guttman, M.; Hahn, J.; Payne, J.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects This webinar, held July 17, 2012, provided information on the challenges and benefits of developing successful community landfill gas-to-energy projects in Will County, Illinois, and Escambia County, Florida. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 112 MB) or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Prairie View RDF Gas to Energy Facility: A Public/Private Partnership Will County partnered with Waste Management, using a portion of the county's DOE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding, to develop the Prairie View Recycling and Disposal Facility. A gas purchase agreement was executed in 2010 and the facility became operational

74

Operability test report for core sample truck {number_sign}1 flammable gas modifications  

SciTech Connect

This report primarily consists of the original test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to Core Sample Truck No. One. Included are exceptions, resolutions, comments, and test results. This report consists of the original, completed, test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to the Push Mode Core Sample Truck No. 1. Prior to the Acceptance/Operability test the truck No. 1 operations procedure (TO-080-503) was revised to be more consistent with the other core sample truck procedures and to include operational steps/instructions for the SR weather cover pressurization system. A draft copy of the operations procedure was used to perform the Operability Test Procedure (OTP). A Document Acceptance Review Form is included with this report (last page) indicating the draft status of the operations procedure during the OTP. During the OTP 11 test exceptions were encountered. Of these exceptions four were determined to affect Acceptance Criteria as listed in the OTP, Section 4.7 ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA.

Akers, J.C.

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Migration and methanogens: A review of current landfill gas field research at ANL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas recovery research at Argonne National Laboratory is focusing on a project studying gas movement through landfill cover materials and a pilot investigation of microbial populations in landfills. Vertical gas pressure and concentration gradients between the top of refuse and the landfill cover are being examined. In particular, changes in the vertical gradients indicative of changes in magnitude and direction of pressure or diffusional flow with time are being monitored. This study emphasizes changes in vertical pressure and concentration gradients related to barometric pressure and other meteorological variables, soil moisture changes, and pumping rates at simulated recovery wells. Preliminary results suggest that changes in soil-gas pressures in the landfill cover and top of refuse closely follow changes in barometric pressure. Measurable concentration gradients exist between the top of refuse and the cover materials indicating that diffusion is a major mechanism for gas movement, particularly during dry weather when pressure gradients are negligible. A pilot investigation has begun on microbial populations in sanitary landfills. First, a series of leachate samples from various depths at the Blackwell Forest Preserve Landfill were evaluated for microbial populations, selected chemical constituents, and methane production. Diverse motile populations of fluorescing organisms were found in selected samples. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Torpy, M.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.; Moore, C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects," originally presented on July 17, 2012. Recorded Voice: The broadcast is now starting. All attendees are in listen-only mode. Sarah Busche: Hello, everyone. Good afternoon and welcome to today's webinar. This is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. My name is Sarah Busche, and I'm here with Devin Egan, and we're broadcasting live from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. We're going to give folks

78

Landfill methane recovery. Part II: gas characterization. Final report, December 1981-December 1982  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses field sampling, analytical testing, and data generation for the characterization of both raw and processed landfill gas. Standardized protocols were developed for the sampling and analysis of the landfill gas for trace constituents and are presented as Appendices A-C. A nationwide survey was conducted in which gas samples were collected at nine landfill sites and tested for trace volatile organic compounds (VOC), trace volatile mercury, and human pathogenic viruses and bacteria. Surface-gas flux measurements at the landfill surface were also made. Repetitive sampling and analysis for each of the nice sites porvided the opportunity to evaluate agreement (or variations) within a laboratory and between two analytical laboratories. Sampling and analytical protocols used by both laboratories were identical, however, the analytical hardware and interpretive computer hardware and software were different.

Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Flynn, N.W.; Wingender, R.; Olivieri, V.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

GAS PRICES UP, BUT TRUCKS STILL ON TOP Highlights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent spikes in gasoline prices have sparked some talk about drivers shifting towards smaller, more fuel efficient vehicles. However, consumer preferences have been quite constant over time. Moreover, the uptake of hybrid and electrical vehicles has been much slower than automakers had anticipated. Although new models continue to be introduced, these advanced technologies still have a number of hurdles to overcome before they will comprise a significant share of the U.S. market. While $4 per gallon gasoline has not triggered much of a change in consumer preferences, fuel efficiency has still improved over the years, thanks to the increased fuel economy of traditional gasoline engines. In America, the Ĺbigger the better ĺ mentality has characterized the auto industry pretty much since the dawn of time. However, with gasoline prices experiencing some major spikes in recent years, there has been much chatter about consumer preferences shifting in favor of smaller, more fuel efficient vehicles. While it appears as though higher gas prices have brought about a change in driving habits ľ as miles travelled in the U.S. are down by 3 % since 2007 and gasoline demand is at a decade low ľ the data show that consumers are not necessarily sacrificing size for better fuel economy. Constant trend over time

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

83

BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRE-TREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set. The production of cleaner renewable energy will help offset the carbon footprint of other energy sources that are currently utilized.

Jon Creighton

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

84

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Emission and Performance Comparison of the Natural Gas C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Trucks: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details results of on-road development and emissions characteristics of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy duty trucks. The objective of this project was to develop, on road and in service, a natural gas truck/bus engine (the C-Gas Plus) with higher horsepower, lower cost, and better performance and diagnostics than the previous C8.3G natural gas engine. The engine was to have an advanced engine management control system to enable implementation of proven technologies that improve engine performance and power density (hp/L). The C-Gas Plus engine was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) Higher engine ratings (280 hp and 850 ft-lb torque for the C-Gas Plus) than the C8.3G natural gas engine; (2) Lower capital cost than the C8.3G engine; and (3) Low emission standards: California Air Resources Board (CARB) low-NO{sub x} (oxides of nitrogen) (2.0 g/bhp-h) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Fuel Fleet Program ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) emission certifications.

Lyford-Pike, E. J.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery. Work was done in the following areas: (1) production of natural gas pipeline methane for liquefaction at an existing LNG facility, (2) production of LNG from sewage digester gas, (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling in the production of LNG, liquid CO{sub 2} and pipeline methane, (4) cost estimates for an LNG production facility at the Arden Landfill in Washington PA.

Brown, W.R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L.A.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Des Plaines Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

89

Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility Facility Rodefeld Landfill Ga Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

90

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

Sutton, W.H.

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

92

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrDigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 +

93

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DigesterLandfillGas DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Digester / landfill gas Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 0.0 +

94

Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

Reichenauer, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.reichenauer@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Gerzabek, Martin H. [Institute of Soil Research, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Greenhouse gas reduction by recovery and utilization of landfill methane and CO{sub 2} technical and market feasibility study, Boului Landfill, Bucharest, Romania. Final report, September 30, 1997--September 19, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The project is a landfill gas to energy project rated at about 4 megawatts (electric) at startup, increasing to 8 megawatts over time. The project site is Boului Landfill, near Bucharest, Romania. The project improves regional air quality, reduces emission of greenhouse gases, controls and utilizes landfill methane, and supplies electric power to the local grid. The technical and economic feasibility of pre-treating Boului landfill gas with Acrion`s new landfill gas cleanup technology prior to combustion for power production us attractive. Acrion`s gas treatment provides several benefits to the currently structured electric generation project: (1) increase energy density of landfill gas from about 500 Btu/ft{sup 3} to about 750 Btu/ft{sup 3}; (2) remove contaminants from landfill gas to prolong engine life and reduce maintenance;; (3) recover carbon dioxide from landfill gas for Romanian markets; and (4) reduce emission of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions reduction attributable to successful implementation of the landfill gas to electric project, with commercial liquid CO{sub 2} recovery, is estimated to be 53 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent of its 15 year life.

Cook, W.J.; Brown, W.R.; Siwajek, L. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanders, W.I. [Power Management Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States); Botgros, I. [Petrodesign, SA, Bucharest (Romania)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Third quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigations are underway concerning the use of liquid natural gas as a fuel for trucks. Progress is reported in the following areas: direct diesel replacement and short and long term storage.

Sutton, W.H.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Independent design review report for truck {number_sign}1 modifications for flammable gas tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The East and West Tank Farm Standing Order 97-01 requires that the PMST be modified to include purging of the enclosed space underneath the shielded receiver weather cover per National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 496, Purged and Pressurized Enclosures for Electrical Equipment. The Standing Order also requires that the PMST be modified by replacing the existing electrical remote latch (RLU) unit with a mechanical remote latch unit. As the mechanical remote latch unit was exactly like the RLU installed on the Rotary Mode Core Sampler Trucks (RMCST) and the design for the RMCST went through formal design review, replacing the RLU was done utilizing informal design verification and was completed per work package ES-97-0028. As the weather cover purge was similar to the design for the RMCSTS, this design was reviewed using the independent review method with multiple independent reviewers. A function design criteria (WHC-SD-WM-FDC-048, Functional Design Criteria for Core Sampling in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks) provided the criteria for the modifications. The review consisted of distributing the design review package to the reviewers and collecting and dispositioning the RCR comments. The review package included the ECNs for review, the Design Compliance Matrix, copies of all drawings affected, and copies of outstanding ECNs against these drawings. A final meeting was held to ensure that all reviewers were aware of the changes to ECNs from incorporation of RCR comments.

Wilson, G.W.

1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests  

SciTech Connect

Methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH{sub 4} to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH{sub 4} with either Ar or CH{sub 4} itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH{sub 4} oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8 {+-} 0.8 h{sup -1} at location 1 and 18.9 {+-} 0.6 h{sup -1} at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH{sub 4} concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH{sub 4} concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH{sub 4} in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH{sub 4} oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH{sub 4} concentrations were low.

Gomez, K.E. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: gomezke@hotmail.com; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Lazzaro, A. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schroth, M.H. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: martin.schroth@env.ethz.ch

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Renewable LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landfill Gas to LNG Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LNG LNG Update on the world's largest landfill gas to LNG plant Mike McGowan Head of Government Affairs Linde NA, Inc. June 12, 2012 $18.3 billion global sales A leading gases and engineering company Linde North America Profile $2.3 billion in gases sales revenue in North America in 2011 5,000 employees throughout the U.S., Canada and the Caribbean Supplier of compressed and cryogenic gases and technology Atmospheric gases - oxygen, nitrogen, argon Helium LNG and LPG Hydrogen Rare gases Plant engineering and supply LNG Petrochemicals Natural gas processing Atmospheric gases 3 Linde's alternative fuels portfolio Green hydrogen production - Magog, Quebec Renewable liquefied natural gas production - Altamont, CA Biogas fueling, LNG import terminal - Sweden

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Environmental Environmental Science Enviro Express Kenworth LNG tractor. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of incinerator waste with two fills per day. This is a workable fit for the limited range LNG trucks. Reduction of fuel costs and harmful emissions relative to the replaced trucks are significant. Introduction The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act legislation

102

Proposal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions via landfill gas management in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of reducing the emission of greenhouse gases by collection, flaring, and possibly beneficially using the gas from landfills in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina (GBA). Another purpose was to prepare a proposal to the US Initiative on Joint Implementation (USIJI) for a project to collect and possibly use the landfill gas (LFG). The project was carried out from September 30, 1997 through September 30, 1998. Collection and flaring of gas is feasible provided private firms have sufficient incentive to obtain greenhouse gas emission reduction benefits. The value of those benefits that would be required to motivate funding of an LFG management project was not explicitly determined. However, one independent power producer has expressed an interest in funding the first phase of the proposed project and paid for a detailed feasibility study which was conducted in August and September of 1998. As a result of this project, a proposal was submitted to the USIJI Evaluation Panel in June, 1998. In August, 1998, an office was established for reviewing and approving joint implementation proposals. The proposal is currently under review by that office.

Jones, D.B.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

SciTech Connect

U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

Not Available

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Design and Testing of a Landfill Gas Cleanup System for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Plants: Volume 1: Field Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an effort to develop a low-cost cleanup system that would enable landfill gas to be used in carbonate fuel cells or other power generation devices. The EPRI-developed system is now available for license to commercial applications.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

www.em.doe.govemrecovery April 20, 2011 Remnants of 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project-era landfill LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)...

107

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup A Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) excavation crew working on an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup project has uncovered the remnants of a 1940s military truck buried in a Manhattan Project landfill. The truck was unearthed inside a sealed building where digging is taking place at Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B), the Lab's first hazardous and radioactive waste landfill. MDA-B was used from 1944 to 1948. Manhattan Project Truck Unearthed in Recovery Act Cleanup More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire

108

Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Phase II Final Report for January 25, 1999 - April 30, 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery.

Brown, W. R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L. A.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Design and Testing of a Landfill Gas Cleanup System for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Plants: Volume II: Full Scale Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Plants (Proprietary)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a proprietary version of section 5 of EPRI technical report TR-108043-V1. The volume contains detailed design information and operating conditions for a full-scale, low-cost cleanup system that would enable landfill gas to be used in carbonate fuel cells or other power generation devices. The EPRI-developed system is now available for license to commercial applications.

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy potential of modern landfills  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methane produced by refuse decomposition in a sanitary landfill can be recovered for commercial use. Landfill methane is currently under-utilized, with commercial recovery at only a small percentage of US landfills. New federal regulations mandating control of landfill gas migration and atmospheric emissions are providing impetus to methane recovery schemes as a means of recovering costs for increased environmental control. The benefits of landfill methane recovery include utilization of an inexpensive renewable energy resource, removal of explosive gas mixtures from the subsurface, and mitigation of observed historic increases in atmospheric methane. Increased commercial interest in landfill methane recovery is dependent on the final form of Clean Air Act amendments pertaining to gaseous emissions from landfills; market shifts in natural gas prices; financial incentives for development of renewable energy resources; and support for applied research and development to develop techniques for increased control of the gas generation process in situ. This paper will discuss the controls on methane generation in landfills. In addition, it will address how landfill regulations affect landfill design and site management practices which, in turn, influence decomposition rates. Finally, future trends in landfilling, and their relationship to gas production, will be examined. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Second quarterly progress report, [October 1, 1994-- December 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis of this project focuses on LNG research issues in use of liquefied natural as a transportation fuel in heavy trucking industry. These issues maybe categorized as: task 1--direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel; and task 2--short and long term storage. Accomplishments for these tasks are discussed. Task 1 consists of atomization, fundamentals of direct replacement, and distribution of emissions. Task 2 includes modified adsorbents, vent gas, and LNG storage at moderate conditions.

Sutton, W.H.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Alternative fuel trucks case studies: Running refuse haulers on compressed natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the experience of New York City`s compressed natural gas refuse haulers. These 35 ton vehicles have engines that displace 10 liters and provide 240 horsepower. Fuel economy, range, cost, maintenance, repair issues, and emissions are discussed. Photographs and figures illustrate the attributes of these alternative fuel vehicles.

Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Truckstop -- and Truck!-- Electrification  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this paper are: 0.5-1.5 G/H and/or BUSG/Y--how much time and money will it take to quantify and WHY BOTHER TO DO SO? No shortage of things to do re truckstop--+ truck!-- electrification; Better that government and industry should put many eggs in lots of baskets vs. all in one or few; Best concepts will surface as most viable; Economic appeal better than regulation or brute force; Launch Ground Freight Partnership and give it a chance to work; Demonstration is an effective means to educate, and learn from, customers--learning is a two way street; Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD 3) are all important but only deployment gets results; TSE can start small in numbers of spaces to accommodate economically inspired growth but upfront plans should be made for expansion if meaningful idle reduction is to follow via TE; 110VAC 15A service/ parking space is minimal--if infrastructure starts like this, upfront plans must be made to increase capacity; Increased electrification of truckstop and truck alike will result in much better life on the road; Improved sleep will improve driver alertness and safety; Reduced idling will significantly reduce fuel use and emissions; Universal appeal for DOD, DOE, DOT, EPA, OEMs, and users alike; Clean coal, gas, hydro, nuclear, or wind energy sources are all distinctly American means by which to generate electricity; Nothing can compete with diesel fuel to serve mobile truck needs; stationary trucks are like power plants--they don't move and should NOT be powered by petroleum products whenever possible; Use American fueled power plants--electricity--to serve truck idling needs wherever practical to do so; encourage economic aspect; Create and reward industry initiatives to reduce fuel use; Eliminate FET on new trucks, provide tax credits (non highway fuel use and investment), provide incentives based on results; Encourage newer/ cleaner truck use; solicit BAAs with mandatory OEM/ fleet participation/ lead; and A gallon saved is a gallon earned-- start NOW, not later.

Skip Yeakel

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

Truckstop -- and Truck!-- Electrification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conclusions of this paper are: 0.5-1.5 G/H and/or BUSG/Y--how much time and money will it take to quantify and WHY BOTHER TO DO SO? No shortage of things to do re truckstop--+ truck!-- electrification; Better that government and industry should put many eggs in lots of baskets vs. all in one or few; Best concepts will surface as most viable; Economic appeal better than regulation or brute force; Launch Ground Freight Partnership and give it a chance to work; Demonstration is an effective means to educate, and learn from, customers--learning is a two way street; Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD 3) are all important but only deployment gets results; TSE can start small in numbers of spaces to accommodate economically inspired growth but upfront plans should be made for expansion if meaningful idle reduction is to follow via TE; 110VAC 15A service/ parking space is minimal--if infrastructure starts like this, upfront plans must be made to increase capacity; Increased electrification of truckstop and truck alike will result in much better life on the road; Improved sleep will improve driver alertness and safety; Reduced idling will significantly reduce fuel use and emissions; Universal appeal for DOD, DOE, DOT, EPA, OEMs, and users alike; Clean coal, gas, hydro, nuclear, or wind energy sources are all distinctly American means by which to generate electricity; Nothing can compete with diesel fuel to serve mobile truck needs; stationary trucks are like power plants--they don't move and should NOT be powered by petroleum products whenever possible; Use American fueled power plants--electricity--to serve truck idling needs wherever practical to do so; encourage economic aspect; Create and reward industry initiatives to reduce fuel use; Eliminate FET on new trucks, provide tax credits (non highway fuel use and investment), provide incentives based on results; Encourage newer/ cleaner truck use; solicit BAAs with mandatory OEM/ fleet participation/ lead; and A gallon saved is a gallon earned-- start NOW, not later.

Skip Yeakel

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

116

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect

Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At least we used to. We are Occult Trucking and Storage andNOTHING. FLASHBACK -- OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT --I saw him. FLASHBACK - OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT -

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report  

SciTech Connect

U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final data.

Chandler, K.; Proc, K.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lift truck safety review  

SciTech Connect

This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ANL/ESD/10-3 Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Landfill Gas-Based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

68.6% Did Not Pass 2 Universal Waste Systems 3CNG Refuse Trucks $380,000 $0 68.6% Did Not Pass 30 $3,000,000 $0 75.6% Finalist 19 Robertson's Ready Mix Company CNG Concrete Mixers $4,000,000 $0 75 Electric CNG Micro-Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Project $2,441,729 $0 57.9% Did Not Pass 13 AHL

Argonne National Laboratory

122

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Landfills Convert Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on AddThis.com... May 25, 2013 Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas

123

UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® Clean Air Natural Gas Vehicle This is a Clean Air Natural Gas Vehicle This is a UPS CNG Truck Fleet UPS CNG Truck Fleet UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final results Final Results Produced for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a DOE national laboratory Alternative Fuel Trucks DOE/NREL Truck Evaluation Project By Kevin Chandler, Battelle Kevin Walkowicz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nigel Clark, West Virginia University Acknowledgments This evaluation would not have been possible without the cooperation, support, and responsiveness of the staff at UPS in Hartford and Atlanta. Thanks are due to the following UPS personnel: On-Site Headquarters Tom Robinson Ken Henrie Bill Jacob Rick Rufolo

124

Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

Wickramarachchi, Praneeth, E-mail: praneeth1977@yahoo.co.uk [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nagamori, Masanao [Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Moldrup, Per [Environmental Engineering Section, Dept. of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Komatsu, Toshiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Neural network prediction model for the methane fraction in biogas from field-scale landfill bioreactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we present a neural network model for predicting the methane fraction in landfill gas originating from field-scale landfill bioreactors. Landfill bioreactors were constructed at the Odayeri Sanitary Landfill, Istanbul, Turkey, and operated ... Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, Landfill gas, Leachate, Methane fraction, Modeling, Neural network

Bestamin Ozkaya; Ahmet Demir; M. Sinan Bilgili

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report, May 10, 1994--December 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report encompasses the first year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on LNG research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (i) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (ii) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. Since this work was for fundamental research in a number of related areas to the use of LNG as a transportation fuel for long haul trucking, many of those results have appeared in numerous refereed journal and conference papers, and significant graduate training experiences (including at least one M.S. thesis and one Ph.D. dissertation) in the first year of this project. In addition, a potential new utilization of LNG fuel has been found, as a part of this work on the fundamental nature of adsorption of LNG vent gases in higher hydrocarbons; follow on research for this and other related applications and transfer of technology are proceeding at this time.

Sutton, W.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by Sandia. The mulch is available to the Air Force and Sandia for landscaping uses. However, grass clippings, leaves, and other green waste were being disposed in the landfill. In an initiative to save time and trips by small trucks with trailers to the landfill carrying organic debris, two 30 cubic yard rolloffs were

128

Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 Abstract Methane gas is a by-product of landfilling municipal solid wastes (MSW). Most tonnes of methane annually, 70% of which is used to generate heat and/or electricity. The landfill gas. All rights reserved. Keywords: Landfill gas; Renewable energy; Municipal solid waste; Biogas; Methane

Columbia University

129

Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Light truck forecasts  

SciTech Connect

The recent dramatic increase in the number of light trucks (109% between 1963 and 1974) has prompted concern about the energy consequences of the growing popularity of the light truck. An estimate of the future number of light trucks is considered to be a reasonable first step in assessing the energy impact of these vehicles. The monograph contains forecasts based on two models and six scenarios. The coefficients for the models have been derived by ordinary least squares regression of national level time series data. The first model is a two stage model. The first stage estimates the number of light trucks and cars (together), and the second stage applies a share's submodel to determine the number of light trucks. The second model is a simultaneous equation model. The two models track one another remarkably well, within about 2%. The scenarios were chosen to be consistent with those used in the Lindsey-Kaufman study Projection of Light Truck Population to Year 2025. Except in the case of the most dismal economic scenario, the number of light trucks is expected to increase from the 1974 level of 0.09 light truck per person to about 0.12 light truck per person in 1995.

Liepins, G.E.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Empty WIPP truck overturns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office reports that a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) truck carrying three empty TRUPACT-II shipping containers overturned on Interstate 15 near Blackfoot, Idaho, at...

132

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Technologies and policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the U. S. automobile and light truck fleet.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The message conveyed by the above discussion is that there are no shortages of technologies available to improve the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet of autos and light trucks. It clearly is technically feasible to improve greatly the fuel economy of the average new light-duty vehicle. Many of these technologies require tradeoffs, however, that manufacturers are unwilling or (as yet) unable to make in today's market and regulatory environment. These tradeoffs involve higher costs (that might be reduced substantially over time with learning and economies of scale), technical risk and added complexity, emissions concerns (especially for direct injection engines, and especially with respect to diesel engine technology), and customer acceptance issues. Even with current low U.S. oil prices, however, many of these technologies may find their way into the U.S. market, or increase their market share, as a consequence of their penetration of European and Japanese markets with their high gasoline prices. Automotive technology is ''fungible'' that is, it can be easily transported from one market to another. Nevertheless, it probably is unrealistic to expect substantial increases in the average fuel economy of the U.S. light-duty fleet without significant changes in the market. Without such changes, the technologies that do penetrate the U.S. market are more likely to be used to increase acceleration performance or vehicle structures or enable four wheel drive to be included in vehicles without a net mpg penalty. In other words, technology by itself is not likely to be enough to raise fleet fuel economy levels - this was the conclusion of the 1995 Ailomar Conference on Energy and Sustainable Transportation, organized by the Transportation Research Board's Committees on Energy and Alternative Fuels, and it is one I share.

Plotkin, S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Raley's LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raley's, a large retail grocery company based in Northern California, began operating heavy-duty trucks powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) in 1997, in cooperation with the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD). The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) sponsored a research project to collect and analyze data on the performance and operation costs of eight of Raley's LNG trucks in the field. Their performance was compared with that of three diesel trucks operating in comparable commercial service. The objective of the DOE research project, which was managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was to provide transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational, and emissions characteristics of LNG as one alternative to conventional diesel fuel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Chandler, K. (Battelle); Norton, P. (NREL); Clark, N. (West Virginia University)

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

135

Trucking | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142235336 Varnish cache server Trucking Home Jessi3bl's picture Submitted by Jessi3bl(15) Member 16 December, 2012 - 19:18 GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway clean energy Clean Energy Fuels energy Environment Fuel GE Innovation Partnerships Technology Innovation & Solutions Transportation Trucking Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

136

International Truck | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truck Truck Jump to: navigation, search Name International Truck Place Atlanta, GA Website http://www.internationaltruck. References International Truck[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2007 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! International Truck is a company located in Atlanta, GA. References ÔćĹ "International Truck" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Truck&oldid=381698" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

137

Turbines produce energy from L. A. landfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes one of the Nation's most sophisticated resource recovery projects which began operating in February at the Puente Hills Landfill Methane Energy Station as part of the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County. The project is currently generating 2.8 megawatts of power which would serve the electrical needs of approximately 5600 homes. Future plans for the landfill energy project include generating enough electricity for more than 50,000 homes. Unlike other methane recovery projects that use diesel or gasoline power reciprocating engines, the Puente Hills Landfill Methane Energy Station drives its electrical generators with gas turbines. This is a first for power generation at a landfill site.

Carry, C.W.; Stahl, J.F.; Maguin, S.R.; Friess, P.L.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Development of a purpose built landfill system for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of landfill gas (LFG). Economic feasibility of the proposed system has been tested by comparing unit cost with gas recovery option. In the present paper, a methodology called purpose build landfill system (PBLF of the proposed system. A purpose built landfill system (PBLS) is a semi-engi- neered landfill with gas recovery

Columbia University

139

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Landfill Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Get Feedback Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/lmop/publications-tools/handbook.html Cost: Free References: Project Development Handbook[1] The handbook describes the process of implementing a waste-to-energy landfill gas project. Overview "Approximately 250 million tons of solid waste was generated in the United States in 2008 with 54 percent deposited in municipal solid waste (MSW)

140

Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landfills, we developed reference projections of waste generation, recycling and landfill-gas captureSardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium 1 Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon UNFCCC-Consolidated baseline and monitoring methodology for landfill gas project activities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

143

Investigations of natural attenuation in groundwater near a landfill and implications for landfill post-closure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-closure phase. During the post-closure phase, landfill operators need to convince environmental authorities treatment of residual greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. Scheutz et al., 2009). From an operator's perspective to be a source of cost. Therefore during the post-closure phase, landfill operators need to convince

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

144

Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Westchester Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587┬░, -87.697554┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Kiefer Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Sacramento County, California Coordinates 38.47467┬░, -121.3541631┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.47467,"lon":-121.3541631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Milliken Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083┬░, -116.419389┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

147

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Colton Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083┬░, -116.419389┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Girvin Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Duval County, Florida Coordinates 30.3500511┬░, -81.6035062┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3500511,"lon":-81.6035062,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

Acme Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Acme Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Acme Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093┬░, -121.9017954┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Facility BKK Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821┬░, -118.1122679┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

151

Dane County Landfill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dane County Landfill Dane County Landfill Jump to: navigation, search Name Dane County Landfill Facility Dane County Landfill #2 Rodefeld Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dane County, Wisconsin Coordinates 43.0186073┬░, -89.5497632┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0186073,"lon":-89.5497632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

CMVRTC: Medium Truck Duty Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

medium truck duty cycle (MTdc) project medium truck duty cycle (MTdc) project OVERVIEW The Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) project involves efforts to collect, analyze and archive data related to medium-truck operations in real-world driving environments. Such data and information will be useful to support technology evaluation efforts and to provide a means of accounting for real-world driving performance within medium-class truck analyses. The project involves private industry partners from various truck vocations. The MTDC project is unique in that there currently does not exist a national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks. This project involves the collection of data from multiple vocations (four vocations) and multiple vehicles within these vocations (three vehicles per

153

UPS CNG Truck Fleet Start Up Experience: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UPS operates 140 Freightliner Custom Chassis compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles with Cummins B5.9G engines. Fifteen are participating in the Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project being funded by DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies and the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies.

Walkowicz, K.

2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

LANDFILL GAS CONVERSION TO LNG AND LCO{sub 2}. PHASE 1, FINAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 1998-FEBRUARY 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Process designs and economics were developed to produce LNG and liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from landfill gas (LFG) using the Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process. The patented Acrion CO{sub 2} wash process uses liquid CO{sub 2} to absorb contaminants from the LFG. The process steps are compression, drying, CO{sub 2} wash contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery, residual CO{sub 2} removal and methane liquefaction. Three flowsheets were developed using different residual CO{sub 2} removal schemes. These included physical solvent absorption (methanol), membranes and molecular sieves. The capital and operating costs of the flowsheets were very similar. The LNG production cost was around ten cents per gallon. In parallel with process flowsheet development, the business aspects of an eventual commercial project have been explored. The process was found to have significant potential commercial application. The business plan effort investigated the economics of LNG transportation, fueling, vehicle conversion, and markets. The commercial value of liquid CO{sub 2} was also investigated. This Phase 1 work, March 1998 through February 1999, was funded under Brookhaven National laboratory contract 725089 under the research program entitled ``Liquefied Natural Gas as a Heavy Vehicle Fuel.'' The Phase 2 effort will develop flowsheets for the following: (1) CO{sub 2} and pipeline gas production, with the pipeline methane being liquefied at a peak shaving site, (2) sewage digester gas as an alternate feedstock to LFG and (3) the use of mixed refrigerants for process cooling. Phase 2 will also study the modification of Acrion's process demonstration unit for the production of LNG and a market site for LNG production.

COOK,W.J.; NEYMAN,M.; SIWAJEK,L.A.; BROWN,W.R.; VAN HAUWAERT,P.M.; CURREN,E.D.

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for 21st Century Truck Partnership. Partial outline of three various size medium to heavy-duty trucks followed by the words, 21st Century Truck Partnership. Medium-duty and...

157

Measurements of particulate matter concentrations at a landfill site (Crete, Greece)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large amounts of solid waste are disposed in landfills and the potential of particulate matter (PM) emissions into the atmosphere is significant. Particulate matter emissions in landfills are the result of resuspension from the disposed waste and other activities such as mechanical recycling and composting, waste unloading and sorting, the process of coating residues and waste transport by trucks. Measurements of ambient levels of inhalable particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) were performed in a landfill site located at Chania (Crete, Greece). Elevated PM{sub 10} concentrations were measured in the landfill site during several landfill operations. It was observed that the meteorological conditions (mainly wind velocity and temperature) influence considerably the PM{sub 10} concentrations. Comparison between the PM{sub 10} concentrations at the landfill and at a PM{sub 10} background site indicates the influence of the landfill activities on local concentrations at the landfill. No correlation was observed between the measurements at the landfill and the background sites. Finally, specific preventing measures are proposed to control the PM concentrations in landfills.

Chalvatzaki, E.; Kopanakis, I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Kontaksakis, M. [Municipal Company of Solid Waste Management, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Glytsos, T.; Kalogerakis, N. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Lazaridis, M., E-mail: lazaridi@mred.tuc.g [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin Governor's Task Force on Waste Materials Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions. I recently saw an exhibit of a landfill gas carbon adsorber designed to remove siloxanes and air toxics from landfill gas prior to engine burning, to reduce wear on the engine. They later stripped this is a common practice. Most landfill gas energy combustion systems are uncontrolled. In 1998, a New York State

Columbia University

159

Investigation of Class 2b Trucks (Vehicles of 8,500 to 10,000...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

weight rating HD heavy-duty lbs pounds LDT light-duty trucks LEV low-emission vehicle LNG liquefied natural gas LPG liquefied petroleum gas MDPV medium-duty passenger vehicle MY...

160

Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash September 28, 2010 - 5:35pm Addthis Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Procedures for Passenger Cars, Light-Duty Trucks and Medium-Duty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001 and subsequent model-year passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty trucks for which non-methane organic gas (NMOG) exhaust emission reduction credit is requested as a result of the use of a DOR technology on a motor vehicle radiator, air conditioning assembly, or other appropriate substrate. REFERENCES:

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Routes Data Acquisition System Setup Routes Data Acquisition System Setup Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) Objective This Department of Energy project focuses on the collection and analysis medium truck (Class-6 and -7) duty cycle data from real-world operations. Analysis of this data will provide information pertaining to the fuel efficiencies and performance of medium trucks in several vocations. Outcomes Rich source of data and information that can contribute to the development of new tools Sound basis upon which DOE can make technology investment decisions A national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data that will support medium-duty vehicle energy efficiency research Collected Data Speed & Acceleration Fuel Consumption GPS Location Road Grade

165

CMVRTC: Heavy Truck Duty Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project was initiated in 2004 and is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies Program. ORNL designed the research program to generate real-world-based duty cycle data from trucks operating in long-haul operations and was designed to be conducted in three phases: identification of parameters to be collected, instrumentation and pilot testing, identification of a real-world fleet, design of the data collection suite and fleet instrumentation, and data collection, analysis, and development of a duty cycle generation tool (DCGT). ANL logo dana logo michelin logo Schrader logo This type of data will be useful for supporting energy efficiency

166

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

167

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.

Alleman, T. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Barton, G.; Rumminger, M.; Duggal, V.; Nelson, C.; Ray, M.; Cherrillo, R. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Process Enhances Use of Landfill...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 11, 2001 DOE-Sponsored Process Enhances Use of Landfill Gas, Improves Air Quality Energy Secretary Abraham Commends Small Business for Innovative Concept Being Showcased...

170

Heavy Truck Engine Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

Nelson, Christopher

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Comparison of models for predicting landfill methane recovery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill methane models are tools used to project methane generation over time from a mass of landfilled waste. These models are used for sizing landfill gas (LFG) collection systems, evaluations and projections of LFG energy uses, and regulatory purposes. The objective of this project was to select various landfill methane models and to provide a comparison of model outputs to actual long-term gas recovery data from a number of well managed and suitable landfills. Another objective was to use these data to develop better estimates of confidence limits that can be assigned to model projections. This project assessed trial model forms against field data from available landfills where methane extraction was maximized, waste filling history was well-documented, and other pertinent site information was of superior quality. Data were obtained from 18 US landfills. Four landfill methane models were compared: a zero-order, a simple first order, a modified first order, and a multi-phase first order model. Models were adjusted for best fit to field data to yield parameter combinations based on the minimized residual errors between predicted and experienced methane recovery. The models were optimized in this way using two data treatments: absolute value of the differences (arithmetic error minimization) and absolute value of the natural log of the ratios (logarithmic error minimization).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Augenstein, D. [Institute for Environmental Management, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Raley's LNG Truck Site Final Data Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raley's is a 120-store grocery chain with headquarters in Sacramento, California, that has been operating eight heavy-duty LNG trucks (Kenworth T800 trucks with Cummins L10-300G engines) and two LNG yard tractors (Ottawa trucks with Cummins B5.9G engines) since April 1997. This report describes the results of data collection and evaluation of the eight heavy-duty LNG trucks compared to similar heavy-duty diesel trucks operating at Raley's. The data collection and evaluation are a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project.

Battelle

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Energy Department, Volvo Partnership Builds More Efficient Trucks...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the United States. Volvo Truck Corporation is one of the leading heavy truck and engine manufacturers in the world. Volvo Trucks manufactures a line of Class 8 trucks, and is...

174

Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Landfill Biomass Facility County Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Ocean County Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Ocean County, New Jersey Coordinates 39.9652553┬░, -74.3118212┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9652553,"lon":-74.3118212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

Cuyahoga Regional Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cuyahoga Regional Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Cuyahoga Regional Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cuyahoga County, Ohio Coordinates 41.7048247┬░, -81.7787021┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7048247,"lon":-81.7787021,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

176

Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Biomass Facility Facility Miramar Landfill Metro Biosolids Center Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Diego County, California Coordinates 33.0933809┬░, -116.6081653┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0933809,"lon":-116.6081653,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

Mid Valley Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mid Valley Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Mid Valley Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083┬░, -116.419389┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

178

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility Facility Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Catawba County, North Carolina Coordinates 35.6840748┬░, -81.2518833┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.6840748,"lon":-81.2518833,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility Facility I 95 Landfill Phase II Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Fairfax County, Virginia Coordinates 38.9085472┬░, -77.2405153┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9085472,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prima Desheha Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Prima Desheha Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708┬░, -117.8311428┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Four Hills Nashua Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Four Hills Nashua Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates 42.8334794┬░, -71.6673352┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8334794,"lon":-71.6673352,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Facility Pearl Hollow Landfil Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hardin County, Kentucky Coordinates 37.6565708┬░, -86.0121573┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6565708,"lon":-86.0121573,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

OpenEI - Landfill Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(2003 - 2009) http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode92

The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes annual renewable energy generation and capacity by region...

184

Truck Thermoacoustic Generator and Chiller  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Report describes the accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement project DE-FC26-04NT42113 - Truck Thermoacoustic Generator and Chiller - whose goal is to design, fabricate and test a thermoacoustic piezoelectric generator and chiller system for use on over-the-road heavy-duty-diesel trucks, driven alternatively by the waste heat of the main diesel engine exhaust or by a burner integrated into the thermoacoustic system. The thermoacoustic system would utilize engine exhaust waste heat to generate electricity and cab air conditioning, and would also function as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for idle reduction. The unit was to be tested in Volvo engine performance and endurance test cells and then integrated onto a Class 8 over-the-road heavy-duty-diesel truck for further testing on the road. The project has been a collaboration of The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Clean Power Resources Inc., and Volvo Powertrain (Mack Trucks Inc.). Cost share funding was provided by Applied Research Laboratory, and by Clean Power Resources Inc via its grant from Innovation Works - funding that was derived from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Los Alamos received its funding separately through DOE Field Work Proposal 04EE09.

Robert Keolian

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Generating CO{sub 2}-credits through landfill in situ aeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfills are some of the major anthropogenic sources of methane emissions worldwide. The installation and operation of gas extraction systems for many landfills in Europe and the US, often including technical installations for energy recovery, significantly reduced these emissions during the last decades. Residual landfill gas, however, is still continuously produced after the energy recovery became economically unattractive, thus resulting in ongoing methane emissions for many years. By landfill in situ aeration these methane emissions can be widely avoided both, during the aeration process as well as in the subsequent aftercare period. Based on model calculations and online monitoring data the amount of avoided CO{sub 2-eq}. can be determined. For an in situ aerated landfill in northern Germany, acting as a case study, 83-95% (depending on the kind and quality of top cover) of the greenhouse gas emission potential could be reduced under strictly controlled conditions. Recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has approved a new methodology on the 'Avoidance of landfill gas emissions by in situ aeration of landfills' (). Based on this methodology landfill aeration projects might be considered for generation of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) in the course of CDM projects. This paper contributes towards an evaluation of the potential of landfill aeration for methane emissions reduction.

Ritzkowski, M., E-mail: m.ritzkowski@tu-harburg.d [Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Hamburg University of Technology, Harburger Schlossstr. 36, D-21079 Hamburg (Germany); Stegmann, R. [Consultants for Waste Management, Prof. R. Stegmann and Partner, Schellerdamm 19-21, D-21079 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wisconsin Reduces Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks on AddThis.com... Oct. 2, 2010 Wisconsin Reduces Emissions With Natural Gas Trucks

187

Heavy Duty Truck Engine Advancement Adoption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum consumption. According to the DOE Energy Information Administration's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009, U.S. heavy truck fuel consumption will increase 23 percent between...

188

DOE SuperTruck Program Benefits Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the project's technical scope development, information collection, and analysis. He also served as the key technical contact point for the SuperTruck development...

189

Reducing Bodybuilder Waste on SCANIA Trucks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In a world of fierce competition that is the reality for heavy truck manufacturers, it is important to optimize every step of production toů (more)

Dahlberg, Carl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of computer simulations for landfill methane recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two- and three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs simulating methane recovery systems in landfills have been developed. These computer programs model multicomponent combined pressure and diffusional flow in porous media. Each program and the processes it models are described in this report. Examples of the capabilities of each program are also presented. The two-dimensional program was used to simulate methane recovery systems in a cylindrically shaped landfill. The effects of various pump locations, geometries, and extraction rates were determined. The three-dimensional program was used to model the Puente Hills landfill, a field test site in southern California. The biochemical and microbiological details of methane generation in landfills are also given. Effects of environmental factors, such as moisture, oxygen, temperature, and nutrients on methane generation are discussed and an analytical representation of the gas generation rate is developed.

Massmann, J.W.; Moore, C.A.; Sykes, R.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Argonne CNM Highlight: Nanofluids Could Make Cool Work of Hot Truck Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofluids Could Make Cool Work of Hot Truck Engines Nanofluids Could Make Cool Work of Hot Truck Engines What the work is about Truck engines are hot places, and new emission reduction technologies such as exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) can make them even hotter. The coolants, lubricants, oils, and other heat transfer fluids used in today's conventional truck thermal systems (including radiators, engines, and HVAC equipment) have inherently poor heat transfer properties. And conventional working fluids that contain millimeter- or micrometer-sized particles do not work with newly emerging "miniaturized" technologies because they can clog in microchannels. Why Nanoparticles Are Better than Microparticles Argonne National Laboratory has developed metal nanofluids that can dramatically enhance the thermal conductivity of conventional heat transfer fluids and flow smoothly in microchannel passages. These "nanocoolants," as they're known, can enhance heat transfer more than several times better than the best competing fluid.

192

Waste Management's LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste Management, Inc., began operating a fleet of heavy-duty LNG refuse trucks at its Washington, Pennsylvania, facility. The objective of the project was to provide transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational, and emissions characteristics of LNG as one alternative to conventional diesel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (US); Clark, N. [West Virginia University (US)

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

193

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Truck Vouchers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Commercial Electric Truck Vouchers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Truck Vouchers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data...

194

Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. BAE Systems plc Caterpillar Inc. Cummins Inc. Daimler Trucks North America LLC Detroit Diesel Corporation Eaton Honeywell International Mack Trucks Meritor, Inc. Navistar,...

195

Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility User Update: SmartTruck...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leadership Computing Facility User Update: SmartTruck Systems Startup zooms to success improving fuel efficiency of long-haul trucks by more than 10 percent Supercomputing...

196

IpNose: Electronic nose for remote bad odour monitoring system in landfill sites Alex Perera*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IpNose: Electronic nose for remote bad odour monitoring system in landfill sites Alex Perera to classify and quantify different gas/odours. Here we suggest the integration of a small form factor computer of bad odours in landfill sites. Preliminary approach to this application using commercial sensors

Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

197

Development of LNG-Powered Heavy-Duty Trucks in Commercial Hauling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's development, deployment, and evaluation of alternative fuels, NREL and the Trucking Research Institute contracted with Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) to develop and operate a liquid natural gas fueled tractor powered by a DDC Series 50 prototype natural gas engine. This is the final report on the project.

Detroit Diesel Corporation; Trucking Research Institute

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Truck Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Efficiency The Fleet Test and Evaluation team is working with industry partners to evaluate truck efficiency technologies in long-haul truck cabs. To keep their cabs at a comfortable temperature, heavy-duty truck drivers idle their engines an average of 1,400 hours annually, using more than 800 million gallons of fuel each year. With diesel prices at an all-time high, carrier companies are looking into ways to incorporate truck efficiency technologies to eliminate engine idling. By doing so, they not only save money on fuel but reduce tailpipe emissions. To find ways trucks can be more efficient without idling, the Fleet Test and Evaluation team is researching: Thermal Load Reduction Idle Reduction Printable Version Fleet Test and Evaluation Home Research & Development

199

POST 10/Truck Inspection Station (Map 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POST 10/Truck Inspection Station (Map 3) POST 10/Truck Inspection Station (Map 3) Changes Effective January 11, 2010 Pajarito Corridor Deliveries: Drivers of commercial delivery trucks headed to the Pajarito Corridor (Pajarito Road bounded by NM Highway 4 and Diamond Drive) must stop at Post 10 for truck inspections. Drivers will then need to present time-stamped inspection passes from Post 10 to protective force officers stationed at the Pajarito Corridor. (Drivers exiting Post 10 should (1) turn right and proceed west on the Truck Route; (2) turn left onto West Jemez Road; (3) proceed to Lane 7; (4) STOP and present the inspection pass to the protective force officer; (5) turn left onto Diamond

200

Research and Development Opportunities for Heavy Trucks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1] 1] Introduction Heavy-duty long-haul trucks are critical to the movement of the Nation's freight. These vehicles, which currently consume about 10 percent of the Nation's oil, are characterized by high fuel consumption, fast market turnover, and rapid uptake of new technologies. Improving the fuel economy of Class 8 trucks will dramatically impact both fuel and cost savings. This paper describes the importance of heavy trucks to the Nation's economy, and its potential for fuel efficiency gains. Why Focus on Heavy Trucks? Large and Immediate Impact Investments in improving the fuel economy of heavy Class 8 trucks will result in large reduction in petroleum consumption within a short timeframe. While heavy-duty vehicles make up only 4% of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Developing and evaluating pit truck safety devices  

SciTech Connect

Describes an electromagnetic system whereby smaller vehicles transmit a signal to haulage truck operators, to alert them to their presence. Driver visibility is restricted in large, rear-dump haulage trucks used in open-pit mining. Analysis shows the need for an alarm in the truck, to warn of vehicles in blind spots. As open-pit haulage truck size has increased, so has the size of the blind areas. Parameters for a prototype system included high- and low-frequency electromagnetic noise rejection, system sensitivity, ease of distance calibration, box size, mounting ease, power needs, and an internal system to continuously self-test all electronic fault-detection circuits. The prototype haulage truck cabmounted receiver had 2 channels. The system has been field-tested at the Twin Buttes open-pit mine near Tucson, AZ.

Yates, W.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A finite element simulation of biological conversion processes in landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfills are the most common way of waste disposal worldwide. Biological processes convert the organic material into an environmentally harmful landfill gas, which has an impact on the greenhouse effect. After the depositing of waste has been stopped, current conversion processes continue and emissions last for several decades and even up to 100 years and longer. A good prediction of these processes is of high importance for landfill operators as well as for authorities, but suitable models for a realistic description of landfill processes are rather poor. In order to take the strong coupled conversion processes into account, a constitutive three-dimensional model based on the multiphase Theory of Porous Media (TPM) has been developed at the University of Duisburg-Essen. The theoretical formulations are implemented in the finite element code FEAP. With the presented calculation concept we are able to simulate the coupled processes that occur in an actual landfill. The model's theoretical background and the results of the simulations as well as the meantime successfully performed simulation of a real landfill body will be shown in the following.

Robeck, M., E-mail: markus.robeck@uni-due.de [Department of Water and Waste Management, Building Sciences, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Ricken, T. [Institute of Mechanics/Computational Mechanics, Building Sciences, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Widmann, R. [Department of Water and Waste Management, Building Sciences, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Brent Bailey; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

204

Real-Time Raman Gas Composition Sensor.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MotivationChallenges Industries that utilize natural gas, gasifier syngas, biogas, landfill gas, or any type of fuel gas can benefit from knowing the composition of...

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Golden Eagle Delivers Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on AddThis.com... Aug. 3, 2013 Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks

206

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Virginia Cleans up Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks on AddThis.com... May 11, 2013 Virginia Cleans up With Natural Gas Refuse Trucks W atch how Richmond, Virginia, powers refuse haulers and other city vehicles

207

Truck Stop Electrification: A Cost-Effective Solution to Reducing Truck Idling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Truck stop electrification (TSE) allows truckers to "plug in" their vehicles while stopped, in order to operate air conditioning, heating, and appliances without any engine idling. Truck stop electrification technologies fall into two major categories: "off-board" and "on-board" systems. Off-board systems are fixed, stand-alone units installed at the truck parking space. These systems provide heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), and may also include AC electrical power and entertainment, co...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO MACK TRUCKS, INC. UNDER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MACK TRUCKS, INC. UNDER MACK TRUCKS, INC. UNDER NREL SUBCONTRACT NO. ZCI-4-32050, UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC36-98GO10337 FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE NEXT GENERATION NATURAL GAS VEHICLE, PHASE II; CH-1182; W(A)-04-012 Mack Trucks, Inc. (Mack) has petitioned for an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice under DOE Contract No. NREL-ZCI-4-32050-01. This advance waiver is intended to apply to all subject inventions of Mack's employees and those of its subcontractors, regardless of tier except subcontractors eligible to obtain title pursuant to P.L. 96-517 as amended, and National Laboratories. As brought out in its waiver petition, the long term objective of this contract is to develop one medium duty compressed natural gas (CGN) prototype engine or one hi:avy duty liquified

209

Alternative fuel trucks case studies: Running line-haul trucks on ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin describes case studies of trucks operating on ethanol fuel. Cost, maintenance and repair, as well as fuel economy are discussed.

Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Marek, N.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

TRUCK ROLL STABILITY DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 TRUCK ROLL STABILITY DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS S. S. Stevens, Principal Investigator S. M. Chin K. A. Hake H. L. Hwang J. P. Rollow L. F. Truett July 2001 Prepared for the...

211

Water by truck in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supply of water to urban households by tanker truck in developing and advanced developing countries is often associated with early stages of urbanization or with the private markets on which water vendors serve households ...

Pike, Jill (Jill Susan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator Location Enter a city, postal code, or address Search Caution: The AFDC recommends that users verify that sites are open prior to making a...

213

Monitoring the Fixed FGD Sludge Landfill--Conesville, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three years of extensive monitoring of the first full-scale application of the fixed flue gas desulfurization sludge process proved it technically sound. This new disposal method offers utilities leachate control in a landfill that allows diverse use of disposal sites in the future.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Card├║s Landfill Li Yu using mechanical models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1 models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1) Analytical solution

Polit├Ęcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

215

Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover...

216

HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility Facility HMDC Kingsland Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type...

217

Diesel Engine Light Truck Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program consists of two major contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). The first one under DE-FC05-97-OR22606, starting from 1997, was completed in 2001, and consequently, a final report was submitted to DOE in 2003. The second part of the contract was under DE-FC05-02OR22909, covering the program progress from 2002 to 2007. This report is the final report of the second part of the program under contract DE-FC05-02OR22909. During the course of this contract, the program work scope and objectives were significantly changed. From 2002 to 2004, the DELTA program continued working on light-duty engine development with the 4.0L V6 DELTA engine, following the accomplishments made from the first part of the program under DE-FC05-97-OR22606. The program work scope in 2005-2007 was changed to the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment. This final report will cover two major technical tasks. (1) Continuation of the DELTA engine development to demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies and to demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages, covering progress made from 2002 to 2004. (2) DPF soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment from 2005-2007.

None

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Alternative Fuels in Trucking Volume 5, Number 3  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

lmost 50% of the petroleum lmost 50% of the petroleum consumed in the United States is imported. By the year 2000, 73% of total petroleum demand will be imported, making America vulnerable to a cutoff in our energy lifeline. Transportation, which is 98% dependent on petroleum, uses two-thirds of the oil consumed in the United States. If we instead used American-produced natural gas to power our vehicles, we could become energy independent. Natural gas could also solve some of our toughest environmental prob- lems. Gasoline- and diesel-fueled cars, trucks, and buses produce half of all air pollution in the United States. Natural gas would cut emis- sions to zero. Congress has recognized the opportunity and enacted legislation to provide incentives for or mandate the production of alternative fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling  

SciTech Connect

Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

Ustohalova, Veronika [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim [Institute of Mechanics, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Widmann, Renatus [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Trucks Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools on AddThis.com... Sept. 17, 2011 Electric Trucks Deliver at Kansas City Schools F ind out how the Lee's Summit R-7 School District in Missouri uses electric

224

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Truck Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on AddThis.com... Dec. 31, 2009 Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree F ollow the Capitol Christmas Tree from Arizona to Washington, D.C., aboard

225

I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Facility I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Fairfax County, Virginia Coordinates 38.9085472┬░, -77.2405153┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9085472,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

OpenEI Community - Trucking  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgcommunitytaxonomyterm2060 en GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogge-clean-energy-fuels-partner-expa...

227

Caterpillar Light Truck Clean Diesel Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, light trucks accounted for over 48% of new vehicle sales in the U.S. and well over half the new Light Duty vehicle fuel consumption. The Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) program seeks to introduce large numbers of advanced technology diesel engines in light-duty trucks that would improve their fuel economy (mpg) by at least 50% and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil. Incorporating diesel engines in this application represents a high-risk technical and economic challenge. To meet the challenge, a government-industry partnership (Department of Energy, diesel engine manufacturers, and the automotive original equipment manufacturers) is applying joint resources to meet specific goals that will provide benefits to the nation. [1] Caterpillar initially teamed with Ford Motor Company on a 5 year program (1997-2002) to develop prototype vehicles that demonstrate a 50% fuel economy improvement over the current 1997 gasoline powered light truck vehicle in this class while complying with EPA's Tier II emissions regulations. The light truck vehicle selected for the demonstration is a 1999 Ford F150 SuperCab. To meet the goals of the program, the 4.6 L V-8 gasoline engine in this vehicle will be replaced by an advanced compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engine. Key elements of the Caterpillar LTCD program plan to develop the advanced CIDI engine are presented in this paper.

Robert L. Miller; Kevin P. Duffy; Michael A. Flinn; Steve A. Faulkner; Mike A. Graham

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report. Advanced Technology Vehicle Evaluation: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Data Report Data Report Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report By Kevin Chandler, Battelle Ken Proc, National Renewable Energy Laboratory February 2005 This report provides detailed data and analyses from the U.S. Department of Energy's evaluation of prototype liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks operated by Norcal Waste Systems, Inc. The final report for this evaluation, published in July 2004, is available from the Alternative Fuels Data Center at www.eere.energy.gov/afdc or by calling the National Alternative Fuels Hotline at 1-800-423-1363. Request Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results, document number DOE/GO-102004-1920. i NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

229

Analytical risk-based model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport in landfills with radium sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport through soils is derived for environmental modeling of landfills containing uranium mill tailings or Ra-226 sources. Processes include radon diffusion in both the gas and liquid phases, ... Keywords: Landfill, Multiphase, Performance assessment, Probabilistic modeling, Radium, Radon, Transport

Clifford K. Ho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Large Scale Truck Duty Cycle.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Truck Duty Cycle Evaluation and Truck Duty Cycle Evaluation and Assessment of Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reduction Technologies Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting research to better understand truck fuel economy and emissions in normal everyday use, as part of a study sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP). By collecting duty cycle data (velocity, acceleration and elevation) during normal operations of literally thousands of vehicles for an

231

Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

I I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our petroleum supply, the price and supply of ethanol is not subject to the whims of potentially unstable foreign governments. And domestic production translates into domestic jobs. In addition, ethanol has the potential to reduce harmful emissions, such as particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen

232

Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

Milam, David

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modified biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays to assess biodegradation potential of landfilled refuse  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modified Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) assays were used to assess biogas production potential of solid landfill samples. In landfill samples with visible soil content, moisture addition alone was generally as effective at stimulating biogas production as the addition of a comprehensive nutrient media. In a variety of samples from humid and semiarid landfills, addition of an aqueous nutrient media was the most effective stimulant for biogas production; however, moisture addition was almost as effective for most samples, suggesting that water addition would be the most cost-effective field approach. Onset of methanogenesis was slower in fresh refuse samples (even when inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge) than in landfill samples, indicating that the soil into which materials are landfilled is a major source of microorganisms. High volatile solids loading in fresh refuse and landfill assays retarded methanogenesis. A comparison of anaerobic and aerobic sample handling techniques showed no significant differences with regard to onset of methanogenesis and total gas production. The technique shows initial promise with regard to replication and reproducibility of results and could be a meaningful addition to landfill site evaluations where commercial gas recovery is anticipated. The BMP technique could also be adapted to assess anaerobic biodegradability of other solid waste materials for conventional anaerobic digestion applications. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Bogner, J.E.; Rose, C.; Piorkowski, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Delaware Reduces Truck Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Reduces Truck Idling With Electrified Parking Areas on AddThis.com...

235

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #372: May 16, 2005 Truck Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2005 Truck Fuel Economy by Size Class to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 372: May 16, 2005 Truck Fuel Economy by Size Class on Facebook Tweet about...

236

Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hanford firefighters stand next to the 31-year-old...

237

Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hanford firefighters stand next to the 31-year-old chemical truck. Pictured, left to right, are Hanford Fire Lt. Robert Smith, Firefighter/Paramedic Kyle Harbert, Firefighter Don Blackburn and Capt. Sean Barajas. Hanford firefighters stand next to the 31-year-old chemical truck. Pictured, left to right, are Hanford Fire Lt. Robert Smith, Firefighter/Paramedic Kyle Harbert, Firefighter Don Blackburn and Capt. Sean Barajas. One of two of the Hanford Fire Department’s new chemical trucks. One of two of the Hanford Fire Department's new chemical trucks. Hanford firefighters stand next to the 31-year-old chemical truck. Pictured, left to right, are Hanford Fire Lt. Robert Smith, Firefighter/Paramedic Kyle Harbert, Firefighter Don Blackburn and Capt. Sean Barajas.

238

Curbside eating : mobilizing food trucks to activate public space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 5 years, cities across the United States have seen the rise of a new form of street vending: the modern food truck. Nearly overnight, food trucks have become an expected and anticipated occurrence in many ...

Sheppard, Alison Marguerite

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Truck Partnership is an industry-government collaboration among heavy-duty engine manufacturers, medium-duty and heavy-duty truck and bus manufacturers, heavy-duty hybrid...

240

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle Fuel Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trucks. This amount of battery capacity can supply a 100 Wshowed that the stock battery capacity of the truck couldCapacity Table 14 - Tank Specifications L psi kg Hawker Genesis Batteries The Genesis battery

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: June 21, 2010 8: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites on AddThis.com... Fact #628: June 21, 2010 Truck Stop Electrification Sites

243

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Maryland Conserves Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks on AddThis.com... March 5, 2011 Maryland Conserves Fuel With Hybrid Trucks L earn how Maryland is reducing fuel consumption, engine noise, and

244

Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

railáandátruckáfreightátransportation. á áTransportationáResearchárail?truckáfreightátransportáliterature. áTransportationáResearchá

Sathaye, Nakul; Horvath, Arpad; Madanat, Samer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Interim Results from Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. Currently, the project has four sites: Raley's in Sacramento, CA (Kenworth, Cummins LlO-300G, liquefied natural gas - LNG); Pima Gro Systems, Inc. in Fontana, CA (White/GMC, Caterpillar 31768 Dual-Fuel, compressed natural gas - CNG); Waste Management in Washington, PA (Mack, Mack E7G, LNG); and United Parcel Service in Hartford, CT (Freightliner Custom Chassis, Cummins B5.9G, CNG). This paper summarizes current data collection and evaluation results from this project.

Kevin L. Chandler; Paul Norton; Nigel Clark

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Evaluations of 1997 Fuel Consumption Patterns of Heavy Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 21st Century Truck program selected three truck classes for focused analysis. On the basis of gross vehicle weight (GVW) classification, these were Class 8 (representing heavy), Class 6 (representing medium), and Class 2b (representing light). To develop and verify these selections, an evaluation of fuel use of commercial trucks was conducted, using data from the 1997 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS). Truck fuel use was analyzed by registered GVW class, and by body type.

Santini, Danilo

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington October 2007 ............................................................................................6 Operational Boundaries.......................................................................................................................21 Montlake Landfill

Kaminsky, Werner

248

Ralphs Grocery EC-Diesel Truck Fleet: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies sponsored a research project with Ralphs Grocery Company to collect and analyze data on the performance and operation of 15 diesel trucks fueled with EC-Diesel in commercial service. These trucks were compared to 5 diesel trucks fueled with CARB diesel and operating on similar routes. This document reports this evaluation.

Not Available

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Results: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational and emissions characteristics of CNG as one alternative to conventional diesel fuel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Not Available

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Truck Stop Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles

251

Light Duty Truck Aftertreatment - Experience and Challenges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel's test experience on light duty truck PM aftertreatment technology development will be presented. The Tier-II extremely low emissions standards combined with the light-duty test cycle impose a significant challenge for the development of production-viable emissions technologies. A robust general path to achieve these emissions targets will be outlined.

Redon, Fabien

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Truck Driver Scheduling in the European Union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since April 2007 working hours of truck drivers in the European Union are controlled by regulation (EC) No. 561/2006. According to the new regulation, road transport undertakings must organise the work of drivers in a way that drivers are able to comply ... Keywords: drivers' working hours, regulation (EC) No. 561/2006, vehicle scheduling

Asvin Goel

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(HTDC) Project (HTDC) Project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies. The project involves efforts to collect, analyze and archive data and information related to class -8 truck operation in real-world environments. Such data and information will be useful for supporting: energy efficiency technology evaluation efforts, the

254

Long Haul Truck Idling at Public Facilities in Key States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Idling the main truck engine to provide for the relatively small power requirements needed during rest stops is inefficient and highly polluting. An alternative is to supply power from the grid or some form of distributed generation, and a national effort is underway to electrify truck stops. Not all idling occurs at truck stops, however. The purpose of this project was to quantify the major truck idling that takes place at public facilities other than truck stops. The study focused on public rest areas,...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

Gharabaghi, B. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: bgharaba@uoguelph.ca; Singh, M.K. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Inkratas, C. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: cinkrata@uoguelph.ca; Fleming, I.R. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ian.fleming@usask.ca; McBean, E. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Economic aspects of the rehabilitation of the Hiriya landfill  

SciTech Connect

The Hiriya landfill, Israel's largest, operated from 1952 to 1998. The landfill, located in the heart of the Dan Region, developed over the years into a major landscape nuisance and environmental hazard. In 1998, the Israeli government decided to close the landfill, and in 2001 rehabilitation activities began at the site, including site investigations, engineering and scientific evaluations, and end-use planning. The purpose of the present research is to perform a cost-benefit analysis of engineering and architectural-landscape rehabilitation projects considered for the site. An engineering rehabilitation project is required for the reduction of environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions, slope instability and leachate formation. An architectural-landscape rehabilitation project would consider improvements to the site to make it suitable for future end uses such as a public park. The findings reveal that reclamation is worthwhile only in the case of architectural-landscape rehabilitation of the landfill, converting it into a public park. Engineering rehabilitation alone was found to be unjustified, but is essential to enable the development of a public park.

Ayalon, O. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: agofira@tx.technion.ac.il; Becker, N. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and NRERC, Haifa University, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Department of Economics and Management, Tel Hai College and NRERC, University of Haifa, Haifa (Israel); Shani, E. [Dan Region Association of Towns, Sanitation and Waste Disposal (Israel)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

2014 Best and Worst MPG Trucks, Vans and SUVs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trucks Trucks 2014 Most Efficient Trucks by EPA Size Class 2014 Least Efficient Trucks by EPA Size Class 2014 Most Fuel Efficient Trucks, Vans and SUVs EPA Class Vehicle Description Fuel Economy Combined Small Pickup Trucks Toyota Tacoma Toyota Tacoma 2WD 4 cyl, 2.7 L, Manual (5), Regular Gasoline 23 Standard Pickup Trucks Ram 1500 HFE 2WD Ram 1500 HFE 2WD 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic (8), Regular Gasoline 21 Small Sport Utility Vehicles Toyota RAV4 EV Toyota RAV4 EV Automatic (variable gear ratios), 115 kW AC Induction, Electricity 76* Subaru XV Crosstrek Hybrid AWD Subaru XV Crosstrek Hybrid AWD 4 cyl, 2.0 L, Automatic (CVT), Regular Gasoline 31 Standard Sport Utility Vehicles Infiniti QX60 Hybrid AWD Infiniti QX60 Hybrid AWD 4 cyl, 2.5 L, AV-S7, Regular Gasoline Infiniti QX60 Hybrid FWD

258

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels & Vehicles ┬╗ Tools Fuels & Vehicles ┬╗ Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification Site Data Collection Methods on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop

259

Fluxes of methane between landfills and the atmosphere: Natural and engineered controls  

SciTech Connect

Field measurement of landfill methane emissions indicates natural variability spanning more than 2 seven orders of magnitude, from approximately 0.0004 to more than 4000 g m{sub -2} day{sup -1}. This wide range reflects net emissions resulting from production (methanogenesis), consumption (methanotrophic oxidation), and gaseous transport processes. The determination of an {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} emission rate for a given field site requires sampling designs and statistical techniques which consider spatial and temporal variability. Moreover, particularly at sites with pumped gas recovery systems, it is possible for methanotrophic microorganisms in aerated cover soils to oxidize all of the methane from landfill sources below and, additionally, to oxidize methane diffusing into cover soils from atmospheric sources above. In such cases, a reversed soil gas concentration gradient is observed in shallow cover soils, indicating bidirectional diffusional transport to the depth of optimum methane oxidation. Rates of landfill methane oxidation from field and laboratory incubation studies range up to 166 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} among the highest for any natural setting, providing an effective natural control on net emissions. Estimates of worldwide landfill methane emissions to the atmosphere have ranged from 9 to 70 Tg yr{sup -1}, differing mainly in assumed methane yields from estimated quantities of landfilled refuse. At highly controlled landfill sites in developed countries, landfill methane is often collected via vertical wells or horizontal collectors. Recovery of landfill methane through engineered systems can provide both environmental and energy benefits by mitigating subsurface migration, reducing surface emissions, and providing an alternative energy resource for industrial boiler use, on-site electrical generation, or upgrading to a substitute natural gas.

Bogner, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Meadows, M. [ETSU, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Czepiel, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of NOx and 30 kW of electrical power. Less than 5.0 ppm ofresource for producing electrical power. For developmentheating is supplied by electrical power during startup and

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Landfill Gas to Energy for Federal Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

micro- turbines, and other technologies can use LFG to produce electricity; and most boilers can be reconfigured to burn LFG to produce hot water or steam. LFG usually consists...

262

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and valves, an air-to-air (ATA) heat exchanger, a liquid-to-air (LTA) heat exchanger, an ICTC manifold and heatis designed with two heat exchanger systems to accommodate

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemical- kinetic model of propane HCCI combustion,ö SAEof a four-cylinder 1.9 l propane- fueled homogeneous chargethe fuel line can use propane from a tank and NG from the

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Prospects for U.S. Oil & Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ľ Proposed light-duty vehicle CAFE standards; advanced battery technology; heavy-duty truck natural gas potential : Independence does not eliminate interdependence ...

265

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

266

Boondocks Truck Stop Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boondocks Truck Stop Wind Farm Boondocks Truck Stop Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Boondocks Truck Stop Wind Farm Facility Boondocks Truck Stop Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Boondocks Truck Stop Energy Purchaser Boondocks Truck Stop Location IA Coordinates 42.4703┬░, -93.5624┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4703,"lon":-93.5624,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

267

Estimation of Fuel Use by Idling Commercial Trucks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimation of Fuel Use Estimation of Fuel Use by Idling Commercial Trucks Estimation of Fuel Use by Idling Commercial Trucks TRB 85 th Annual Meeting Washington, DC January 22-26, 2006 Linda Gaines, Anant Vyas, and John L. Anderson 2 Trucks are classified into 8 classes Based on gross vehicle weight (GVW) - Includes empty vehicle plus cargo - Classes formulated >50 years ago Classes 1 and 2 include commercial and personal vehicles - Our analysis removes personal vehicles - Commercial uses include service and retail, construction, agriculture, manufacturing - Class 2 is divided into 2A and 2B (>8,500 lbs.) Single unit (SU) trucks cover classes 1-8 - Flatbed, pickup, dump, van dominate Combination (C) trucks are in classes 6-8 - About half have sleepers * Travel long distances * Driver often sleeps in truck

268

Truck Stop Electrification: Codes and Standards Ensure Safety for The Trucking Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every day in the United States as many as 677,600 heavy-duty trucks are on the road; and, at some point during that day, they are idling. Over the course of a year, long-duration idling of truck and locomotive engines consumes more than 1 billion gallons of diesel fuel and emits 11 million tons of carbon dioxide. Drivers often idle their main engines during the U.S. Department of Transportation mandated rest time of 10 hours after driving for 11 hours, to power heating, air conditioning, lighting, and ap...

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

269

Health assessment for 19th Avenue Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona, Region 9. CERCLIS No. AZD980496780. Preliminary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19th Avenue Landfill is an National Priorities List site located in Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona. The site was operated as a sanitary landfill between 1957 and 1979. Most of the waste disposed of at the landfill was from municipal sources; however, old gasoline storage tanks, radioactive waste, hospital waste, industrial waste, and old transformers were also landfilled. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ingestion, dermal contact, or inhalation of contaminants in subsurface soil and refuse, soil-gas, and air.

Not Available

1989-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation of three catalysts formulated for methane oxidation on a cng-fueled pickup truck. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes the exhaust emission results obtained from the evaluation of three specialized methane catalytic converters supplied by three different catalysts manufacturers. The catalytic converters were evaluated using a compressed natural gas-fueled Dodge Dakota pickup truck. The report includes a description of the catalytic converters, the test vehicle, test facilities and test procedures.

Piotrowski, G.K.; Schaefer, R.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trench c) Liner Deployment d) Seaming Double Hot wedge Fillet Extrusion Seam properties ┬ş ASTM D6392 e-wise construction of landfill #12;Daily cell, cover, lift & phase of a landfill #12;Operational Points Provisions (contd) Check for compatibilities of different wastes. Divide landfill into cells. Non

Columbia University

272

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 ľ 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Truck Essential Power Systems Efficiency Improvements for Medium-Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With a variety of hybrid vehicles available in the passenger car market, electric technologies and components of that scale are becoming readily available. Commercial vehicle segments have lagged behind passenger car markets, leaving opportunities for component and system development. Escalating fuel prices impact all markets and provide motivation for OEMs, suppliers, customers, and end-users to seek new techniques and technologies to deliver reduced fuel consumption. The research presented here specifically targets the medium-duty (MD), Class 4-7, truck market with technologies aimed at reducing fuel consumption. These technologies could facilitate not only idle, but also parasitic load reductions. The development efforts here build upon the success of the More Electric Truck (MET) demonstration program at Caterpillar Inc. Employing a variety of electric accessories, the MET demonstrated the improvement seen with such technologies on a Class 8 truck. The Truck Essential Power Systems Efficiency Improvements for Medium-Duty Trucks (TEPS) team scaled the concepts and successes of MET to a MD chassis. The team designed an integrated starter/generator (ISG) package and energy storage system (ESS), explored ways to replace belt and gear-driven accessory systems, and developed supervisory control algorithms to direct the usage of the generated electricity and system behavior on the vehicle. All of these systems needed to fit within the footprint of a MD vehicle and be compatible with the existing conventional systems to the largest extent possible. The overall goal of this effort was to demonstrate a reduction in fuel consumption across the drive cycle, including during idle periods, through truck electrification. Furthermore, the team sought to evaluate the benefits of charging the energy storage system during vehicle braking. The vehicle features an array of electric accessories facilitating on-demand, variable actuation. Removal of these accessories from the belt or geartrain of the engine yields efficiency improvements for the engine while freeing those accessories to perform at their individual peak efficiencies to meet instantaneous demand. The net result is a systems approach to fuel usage optimization. Unique control algorithms were specifically developed to capitalize on the flexibility afforded by the TEPS architecture. Moreover, the TEPS truck technology mixture exhibits a means to supplant current accessory power sources such as on-board or trailer-mounted gasoline-powered generators or air compressors. Such functionality further enhances the value of the electric systems beyond the fuel savings alone. To demonstrate the fuel economy improvement wrought via the TEPS components, vehicle fuel economy testing was performed on the nearly stock (baseline) truck and the TEPS truck. Table 1 illustrates the fuel economy gains produced by the TEPS truck electrification. While the fuel economy results shown in Table 1 do reflect specific test conditions, they show that electrification of accessory hardware can yield significant fuel savings. In this case, the savings equated to a 15 percent reduction in fuel consumption during controlled on-road testing. Truck electrification allows engine shutdown during idle conditions as well as independent on-demand actuation of accessory systems. In some cases, independent actuation may even include lack of operation, a feature not always present in mechanically driven components. This combination of attributes allows significant improvements in system efficiency and the fuel economy improvements demonstrated by the TEPS team.

Larry Slone; Jeffery Birkel

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Emission Changes Resulting from the San Pedro Bay, California Ports Truck Retirement Program  

SciTech Connect

Recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions regulations have resulted in lower emissions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen from heavy-duty diesel trucks. To accelerate fleet turnover the State of California in 2008 along with the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (San Pedro Bay Ports) in 2006 passed regulations establishing timelines forcing the retirement of older diesel trucks. On-road emissions measurements of heavy-duty diesel trucks were collected over a three-year period, beginning in 2008, at a Port of Los Angeles location and an inland weigh station on the Riverside freeway (CA SR91). At the Port location the mean fleet age decreased from 12.7 years in April of 2008 to 2.5 years in May of 2010 with significant reductions in carbon monoxide (30%), oxides of nitrogen (48%) and infrared opacity (a measure of particulate matter, 54%). We also observed a 20-fold increase in ammonia emissions as a result of new, stoichiometrically combusted, liquefied natural gas powered trucks. These results compare with changes at our inland site where the average ages were 7.9 years in April of 2008 and 8.3 years in April of 2010, with only small reductions in oxides of nitrogen (10%) being statistically significant. Both locations have experienced significant increases in nitrogen dioxide emissions from new trucks equipped with diesel particle filters; raising the mean nitrogen dioxide to oxides of nitrogen ratios from less than 10% to more than 30% at the Riverside freeway location.

Bishop, G. A.; Schuchmann, B. G.; Stedman, D. H.; Lawson, D. R.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

276

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY MACK TRUCKS, INC. FOR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for all subject inventions made under the above subject cooperative agreement: "Very High Fuel Economy, Heavy Duty, Constant Speed, Truck, Engine Optimized Via Unique Energy...

277

The Role of Batteries in Auxiliary Power for Heavy Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problem that this paper deals with is that Heavy trucks leave their engines on while they are stopped and the driver is sleeping, eating, etc.

D. Crouch

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

Refinery receipts of crude oil by rail, truck, and barge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While refinery receipts of crude by truck, rail, and barge remain a small percentage of total receipts, EIA's recently released Refinery Capacity ...

279

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OSHKOSH TRUCK CORPORATION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of advanced, next generation heavy hybrid truck and bus propulsion technologies and hybrid vehicle systems. This two phase technology development program is intended to...

280

Demonstration Project 111 ITS/CVO Technology Truck Final Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1277 Demonstration Project 111 ITSCVO Technology Truck Final Project Report December 2001 Prepared by G. J. Capps, ORNL Project Manager K. P. Gambrell, Technical Associate K. L....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuel Effects on a Low-Swirl Injector for Lean Premixed Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent to those from landfill gas to liquified petroleumlandfill and biomass fuels, H 2 -enriched CH 4 to simulate refinery gas

Littlejohn, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank Original Landfill January 2011 Monthly Inspection -...

283

Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned By: Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE Where: EM SSAB Teleconference: 1...

284

DOE EM Landfill Workshop and Path Forward - July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teleconference: 2. DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation US Department of Energy July 2009 Slides prepared by CRESP DOE EM Landfill...

285

Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward By: Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Where: SSAB Teleconference 2 Subject: DOE EM...

286

Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies with standard dual tires. The trailers are of various manufacturers and are 53 foot dry-box vans. Five-trailer (Truck#1) had its engine running while the vehicle was not moving. Over a period of one year

287

External costs of intercity truck freight transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From a societal perspective, it is desirable for all transportation users to pay their full social (private and external) costs. We estimate four general types of external costs for intercity freight trucking and compare them with the private costs incurred by carriers. Estimated external costs include: accidents (fatalities, injuries, and property damage); emissions (air pollution and greenhouse gases); noise; and unrecovered costs associated with the provision, operation, and maintenance of public facilities. The analysis reveals that external costs are equal to 13.2 % of private costs and user fees would need to be increased about

David J. Forkenbrock

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

Sizirici, Banu, E-mail: bsy3@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Civil Engineering Department, 2104 Adelbert Road, Bingham Bld. Room: 216, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek [Florida International University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Miami, FL (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

Assamoi, Bernadette [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Lawryshyn, Yuri, E-mail: yuri.lawryshyn@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

CNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S. Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PDF Version of CNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S. Form More Documents & Publications LNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S. Form LNG Imports by Truck into the U.S. Form Complete...

291

Assessing the impact of regulation and deregulation on the rail and trucking industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Many Class I railroads disappeared and severe competition bankrupted many small carriers in the trucking industry. Larger trucking carriers gained market dominance. Real wages in the trucking industry fell. The ...

Lowtan, Donavan M. (Donavan Mahees), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Rail versus truck fuel efficiency: The relative fuel efficiency of truck-competitive rail freight and truck operations compared in a range of corridors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes the findings of a study to evaluate the fuel efficiency of rail freight operations relative to competing truckload service. The objective of the study was to identify the circumstances in which rail freight service offers a fuel efficiency advantage over alternative truckload options, and to estimate the fuel savings associated with using rail service. The findings are based on computer simulations of rail and truck freight movements between the same origins and destinations. The simulation input assumptions and data are based on actual rail and truck operations. Input data was provided by U.S. regional and Class I railroads and by large truck fleet operators.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Anti-Idling Battery for Truck Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance to the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001036, the objective of this project was to develop an advanced high voltage lithium-ion battery for use in an all-electric HVAC system for Class-7-8 heavy duty trucks. This system will help heavy duty truck drivers meet the tough new anti-idling laws being implemented by over 23 states. Quallion will be partnering with a major OEM supplier of HVAC systems to develop this system. The major OEM supplier will provide Quallion the necessary interface requirements and HVAC hardware to ensure successful testing of the all-electric system. At the end of the program, Quallion will deliver test data on three (3) batteries as well as test data for the prototype HVAC system. The objectives of the program are: (1) Battery Development - Objective 1 - Define battery and electronics specifications in preparation for building the prototype module. (Completed - summary included in report) and Objective 2 - Establish a functional prototype battery and characterize three batteries in-house. (Completed - photos and data included in report); (2) HVAC Development - Objective 1 - Collaborate with manufacturers to define HVAC components, layout, and electronics in preparation for establishing the prototype system. (Completed - photos and data included in report) and Objective 2 - Acquire components for three functional prototypes for use by Quallion. (Completed - photos and data included in report).

Keith Kelly

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hybrid Control of a Truck and Trailer Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid control scheme is proposed for the stabilization of backward driving along simple paths for a miniature vehicle composed of a truck and a two-axle trailer. When reversing, the truck and trailer can be modelled as an unstable nonlinear system ...

Claudio Altafini; Alberto Speranzon; Karl Henrik Johansson

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Studies Of The Adoption And Use Of Location And Communication Technologies By The Trucking Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Location and Communication Technologies by the TruckingOF LOCATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES BY THE TRUCKINGpositioning and communication technologies by the trucking

Scapinakis, Dimitris A.; Garrison, William Louis

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Energy Department, Volvo Partnership Builds More Efficient Trucks and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department, Volvo Partnership Builds More Efficient Trucks Department, Volvo Partnership Builds More Efficient Trucks and Manufacturing Plants Energy Department, Volvo Partnership Builds More Efficient Trucks and Manufacturing Plants January 27, 2012 - 3:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -Today, Acting Under Secretary of Energy Arun Majumdar joined with North Carolina Congressman Howard Coble (NC-6) to tour the Volvo Group's truck headquarters in Greensboro, North Carolina, and highlight the blueprint for an America built to last laid out by President Obama in his State of the Union address earlier this week. The Department of Energy is partnering with companies like the Volvo Group to help harness American ingenuity to commercialize and deploy cutting-edge trucking technologies that will help boost the competitiveness of the U.S. auto and

297

Supercomputers, Semi Trucks and America's Clean Energy Future |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supercomputers, Semi Trucks and America's Clean Energy Future Supercomputers, Semi Trucks and America's Clean Energy Future Supercomputers, Semi Trucks and America's Clean Energy Future February 8, 2011 - 5:44pm Addthis BMI corporation, of South Carolina, is using the Jaguar super computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to do complex pre-visualization and develop products to increase fuel efficiency for the trucking industry. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Public Domain BMI corporation, of South Carolina, is using the Jaguar super computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to do complex pre-visualization and develop products to increase fuel efficiency for the trucking industry. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Public Domain

298

DOE/BNL Liquid Natural Gas Heavy Vehicle Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a means of lowering greenhouse gas emissions, increasing economic growth, and reducing the dependency on imported oil, the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory (DOE/ BNL) is promoting the substitution of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in heavy-vehicles that are currently being fueled by diesel. Heavy vehicles are defined as Class 7 and 8 trucks (> 118,000 pounds GVVV), and transit buses that have a fuel usage greater than 10,000 gallons per year and driving range of more than 300 miles. The key in making LNG market-competitive with all types of diesel fuels is in improving energy efficiency and reducing costs of LNG technologies through systems integration. This paper integrates together the three LNG technologies of: (1) production from landfills and remote well sites; (2) cryogenic fuel delivery systems; and (3) state-of-the-art storage tank and refueling facilities, with market end-use strategies. The program's goal is to develop these technologies and strategies under a ''green'' and ''clean'' strategy. This ''green'' approach reduces the net contribution of global warming gases by reducing levels of methane and carbon dioxide released by heavy vehicles usage to below recoverable amounts of natural gas from landfills and other natural resources. Clean technology refers to efficient use of energy with low environmental emissions. The objective of the program is to promote fuel competition by having LNG priced between $0.40 - $0.50 per gallon with a combined production, fuel delivery and engine systems efficiency approaching 45%. This can make LNG a viable alternative to diesel.

James E. Wegrzyn; Wai-Lin Litzke; Michael Gurevich

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model for TOUGH2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models that can be used by operators to predict and design optimal treatment processes. T2LBM is a module for the TOUGH2 simulator that implements a Landfill Bioreactor Model to provide simulation capability for the processes of aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid in the aqueous phase by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. Acetic acid is considered a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. Aerobic and anaerobic microbes are assumed to be immobile and not limited by nutrients in their growth. Methane and carbon dioxide generation due to biodegradation with corresponding thermal effects are modeled. The numerous parameters needed to specify biodegradation are input by the user in the SELEC block of the TOUGH2 input file. Test problems show that good matches to laboratory experiments of biodegradation can be obtained. A landfill test problem demonstrates the capabilities of T2LBM for a hypothetical two-dimensional landfill scenario with permeability heterogeneity and compaction.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Delivery and Storage of Natural Gas - Energy Explained, Your Guide ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

302

Cummins Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins has studied requirements of the Light Truck Automotive market in the United States and believes that the proposed V-family of engines meets those needs. Design and development of the V-family engine system continues and has expanded. The engine system is a difficult one, since the combined requirements of a very fuel-efficient commercial diesel, and the performance and sociability requirements of a gasoline engine are needed. Results of testing show that the engine can meet requirements for fuel economy and emissions in the Tier 2 interim period from 2004 to 2008. Advanced results show that the full Tier 2 results for 2008 and beyond can be achieved on a laboratory basis.

John H. Stang; David E. Koeberlein; Michael J. Ruth

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for renewable energy sources has stimulated technological advances in solar cell development. Initially, development and fabrication were extremely costly and no encouragement for use in industrial applications was made. Today, evidence exists that new technological advances and mass-production techniques have lowered the costs considerably. The U.S. Department of Energy has indicated that by the year 1990 the price per peak watt would be less than fifty U.S. cents. This paper keeps this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial material handling. Two evaluation methods were used; namely, the Payback Method, and the Modified Energy Inflation Rate Method. Neither of the methods proved to be economically favorable, but some interesting results were obtained.

Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Public health assessment for Seattle Municipal Landfill/Kent Highlands, Kent, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD980639462. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle Municipal Landfill, better known as the Kent Highlands Landfill, is located in the City of Kent, approximately 14 miles south of the City of Seattle, Washington, at 23076 Military Road South. Surface water settling ponds, a leachate collection system, and gas collection system have been constructed. Only one completed pathway exists, which is the use of Midway Creek by recreationists. However, worst case scenarios were evaluated and there did not appear to be a human health threat. Two potential pathways were analyzed, for landfill gas and ground water. Again the worst case scenarios did not reveal any imminent human health threat.

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

Barometric pumping of burial trench soil gases into the atmosphere at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

In 1991, a soil gas survey was performed at the Savannah River Site Sanitary Landfill as part of the characterization efforts required under the integrated Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation and Comprehensive Environmental Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) program. This report details the findings of this survey, which identified several areas of the landfill that were releasing volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere at levels exceeding regulatory standards. Knowledge of the rates of VOC outgassing is necessary to protect site workers, provide input into the human health and environmental risk assessment documents and provide input into the remedial design scenario.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Projection of light-truck population to year 2025  

SciTech Connect

The recent growth in the number of light trucks is a matter of considerable interest in that it may have far-reaching implications for gasoline consumption. This paper forecasts the number of light trucks in the years to 2025. The forecast is based on economic scenarios developed by SRI International. Except for the case of the most-dismal economic forecast, the number of light trucks is predicted to increase monotonically and to show the greatest rate of increase between 1973 and 1980.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

LNG Imports by Truck into the U.S. Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Truck into the U.S. Form LNG Imports by Truck into the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Imports by Truck into the U.S. Form.xlsx PDF Version of LNG Imports by Truck into the U.S....

308

LNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S. Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Truck out of the U.S. Form LNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S. Form.xlsx PDF Version of LNG Exports by Truck out of the...

309

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

DOE Seeks Trucking Services for Transuranic Waste Shipments | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trucking Services for Transuranic Waste Shipments Trucking Services for Transuranic Waste Shipments DOE Seeks Trucking Services for Transuranic Waste Shipments March 30, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 william.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov Cincinnati -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today will issue a Request for Proposals for the continuation of carrier services to transport transuranic waste (TRU) between DOE sites and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The transportation of TRU waste is accomplished by contracted trucking carriers that ship the waste via public highways on custom designed trailers. The contract will be an Indefinite Delivery/ Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) contract using firm-fixed- price delivery task orders. The estimated contract cost is $80-$100 million over a five-year contract

311

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Truck Stop Electrification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stop Electrification Stop Electrification NREL's Fleet Test and Evaluation Team is evaluating and documenting the use of 50 truck stop electrification (TSE) sites along the busiest transportation corridors in the United States. Truck drivers typically idle their vehicles during mandated rest periods to maintain access to air conditioning, heat, and electricity. TSE sites allow truckers to enjoy these auxiliary systems by plugging into the electric grid instead of running their engines. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) provided funding for these TSE sites-which feature electric power pedestals at 1,250 truck parking spaces-and for rebates to upgrade 5,000 long-haul trucks for drivers who agreed to use the facilities. Site usage will be monitored for three years to study patterns across the

312

Unemployed Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization Unemployed Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization November 5, 2010 - 2:46pm Addthis Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this mean for me? Workers across the country are being retrained for careers in the new clean energy economy. Tyrone Bailey had been out of work for 14 months when an unemployment office staffer told him about a home-weatherization training program offered by the state of New Jersey. The former truck driver and construction worker jumped at the opportunity to acquire new skills and began training January 19. He graduated April 1 and won a position with GreenLight Solutions, a Montclair, New Jersey-based residential home improvement company just two weeks later.

313

Sysco Deploys Hydrogen Powered Pallet Trucks | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sysco Deploys Hydrogen Powered Pallet Trucks Sysco Deploys Hydrogen Powered Pallet Trucks Sysco Deploys Hydrogen Powered Pallet Trucks July 12, 2010 - 2:50pm Addthis Food service distribution company Sysco celebrated the grand opening of its highly efficient distribution center in June in Houston. As part of Sysco's efforts to reduce its carbon footprint, the company deployed almost 100 pallet trucks powered by fuel cells that create only water and heat as by-products. The hydrogen fuel cell project's cost was partially covered by funding from a $1.2 million grant provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program. The total project cost was $3.3 million. The 98 new Raymond Corporation pallet lifts are powered by Plug Power

314

Unemployed Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unemployed Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization Unemployed Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization Unemployed Truck Driver Trains for New Career in Weatherization November 5, 2010 - 2:46pm Addthis Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this mean for me? Workers across the country are being retrained for careers in the new clean energy economy. Tyrone Bailey had been out of work for 14 months when an unemployment office staffer told him about a home-weatherization training program offered by the state of New Jersey. The former truck driver and construction worker jumped at the opportunity to acquire new skills and began training January 19. He graduated April 1 and won a position with GreenLight Solutions, a Montclair, New Jersey-based residential home improvement company just two weeks later.

315

FedEx Express Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FedEx Express Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 12-Month Report R. Barnitt Technical Report NRELTP-5400-48896 January 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the...

316

Dual-Fuel Truck Fleet: Start-Up Experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although dual-fuel engine technology has been in development and limited use for several years, it has only recently moved toward full-scale operational capability for heavy-duty truck applications. Unlike a bifuel engine, which has two separate fuel systems that are used one at a time, a dual-fuel engine uses two fuel systems simultaneously. One of California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) current programs is a demonstration of dual-fuel engine technology in heavy-duty trucks. These trucks are being studied as part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Alternative Fuel Truck Program. This report describes the start-up experience from the program.

NREL

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a Truck- mounted Fuel Cell APU System. Society ofEngine Idling Versus Fuel Cell APUs. ö Society of AutomotiveJr; 2003. Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

DOE Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks DOE Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks June 30, 2008 - 2:15pm Addthis GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN - U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner and Volvo Group CEO Leif Johansson today agreed to expand cooperation to develop more fuel-efficient trucks. Once contractual negotiations are complete later this year, the cooperative program will be extended for three more years. An additional $9 million over three years in DOE funds will be matched by $9 million in Swedish government funds and $18 million from Volvo Group. When added with the existing $12 million commitment from the United States, Sweden and the Volvo Group the overall value of the cooperation will be $48

319

Outdoor Electric Heavy-Duty Lift Truck Demonstration at Progress Energy Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric lift trucks now represent well over 50% of the U.S. lift truck market, their sales propelled by improved performance, life-cycle cost savings, and operational, health, and environmental benefits. In fact, research shows that electric lift trucks over their lifetime cost approximately $1 per operating hour less per unit than internal combustion trucks due to lower fuel and maintenance costs. Despite these market successes, however, some users perceive that electric lift trucks do not perform ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Long Term Field Emissions Study of Natural Gas Fueled Refuse Haulers in New York City  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New York City Department of Sanitation has operated natural gas fueled refuse haulers in a pilot study: a major goal of this study was to compare the emissions from these natural gas vehicles with their diesel counterparts. The vehicles were tandem axle trucks with GVW (gross vehicle weight) rating of 69,897 pounds. The primary use of these was for street collection and transporting the refuse to a landfill. West Virginia University Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratories have been engaged in monitoring the tailpipe emissions from these trucks for seven-years. In the later years of testing the hydrocarbons were speciated for non-methane and methane components. Six of these vehicles employed the older technology (mechanical mixer) Cummins L-10 lean burn natural gas engines. Five trucks were equipped with electronically controlled Detroit Diesel Series 50 lean burn engines, while another five were powered by Caterpillar stoichiometric burn 3306 natural gas engines, The Ca terpillar engines employed an exhaust oxygen sensor feedback and three way catalysts. Since the refuse haulers had automatic Allison transmissions, and since they were employed in stop-and-go city service, initial emissions measurements were made using the Central Business Cycle (SAE Jl376) for buses at 42,000 pound test weight. Some additional measurements were made using an ad hoc cycle that has been designed to be more representative of the real refuse hauler use that included several compaction cycles. The Cummins powered natural gas vehicles showed oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide emission variations typically associated with variable fuel mixer performance. In the first Year of testing, the stoichiometric Caterpillar engines yielded low emission levels, but in later years two of these refuse haulers had high carbon monoxide attributed to failure of the feedback system. For example, carbon monoxide on these two vehicles rose from 1.4 g/mile and 10 g/mile in 1995 to 144.9 g/mile and 57.8 g/mile in 1996. These stoichiometric engines were also less fuel efficient than their lean burn counterparts. The Detroit Diesel Series 50 powered refuse haulers produced high levels of oxides of nitrogen. However, it was found that changing the shifting patterns of the transmission lowered the oxides of nitrogen. All three engine types showed the potential for low emissions operation and the particulate matter reduction advantage offered by natural gas was evident from the results.

Nigel N. Clark; Byron l. Rapp; Mridul Gautam; Wenguang Wang; Donald W. Lyons

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Industrial Lift Truck Battery Charger Demand Response Impact Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and load shifting are two common energy management strategies used by lift truck fleet operators to mitigate on-peak energy consumption, reduce electricity costs, and react to electric system emergency curtailment requests. When customers elect to participate in demand response programs, they are contacted and asked to reduce load during power shortage situations. Alternatively, customers may implement longer-term economic load shifting strategies by reducing power to their lift truck bat...

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in leachates from selected landfill sites in South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last few decades have seen dramatic growth in the scale of production and the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants. Consequently, PBDEs such as BDE -28, -47, -66, -71, -75, -77, -85, -99, -100, -119, -138, -153, -154, and -183 have been detected in various environmental matrices. Generally, in South Africa, once the products containing these chemicals have outlived their usefulness, they are discarded into landfill sites. Consequently, the levels of PBDEs in leachates from landfill sites may give an indication of the general exposure and use of these compounds. The present study was aimed at determining the occurrence and concentrations of most common PBDEs in leachates from selected landfill sites. The extraction capacities of the solvents were also tested. Spiked landfill leachate samples were used for the recovery tests. Separation and determination of the PBDE congeners were carried out with a gas chromatograph equipped with Ni{sup 63} electron capture detector. The mean percentage recoveries ranged from 63% to 108% (n = 3) for landfill leachate samples with petroleum ether giving the highest percentage extraction. The mean concentrations of PBDEs obtained ranged from ND to 2670 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 6638 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 7230 pg l{sup -1}, 41 to 4009 pg l{sup -1}, 90 to 9793 pg l{sup -1} for the Garankuwa, Hatherly, Kwaggarsrand, Soshanguve and Temba landfill sites, respectively. Also BDE -28, -47, -71 and BDE-77 were detected in the leachate samples from all the landfill sites; and all the congeners were detected in two of the oldest landfill sites. The peak concentrations were recorded for BDE-47 at three sites and BDE-71 and BDE-75 at two sites. The highest concentration, 9793 {+-} 1.5 pg l{sup -1}, was obtained for the Temba landfill site with the highest BOD value. This may suggest some influence of organics on the level of PBDEs. Considering the leaching characteristics of brominated flame retardants, there is a high possibility that with time these compounds may infiltrate into the groundwater around the sites since most of the sites are not adequately lined.

Odusanya, David O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Okonkwo, Jonathan O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: OkonkwoOJ@tut.ac.za; Botha, Ben [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for a feasibility study of m0treAlables on several brownfield sites. The EPA defines a brownfield as 'a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.' All of the brownfields in this study are landfill sites. Citizens of Puerto Rico, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Puerto Rico, which are particularly well suited for solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed-tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed-tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. All of the landfills in Puerto Rico were screened according to these criteria in order to determine the sites with the greatest potential. Eight landfills were chosen for site visits based on the screening criteria and location. Because of time constraints and the fact that Puerto Rico is a relatively large island, the eight landfills for this visit were all located in the eastern half of the island. The findings from this report can be applied to landfills in the western half of the island. The economics of a potential PV system on landfills in Puerto Rico depend greatly on the cost of electricity. Currently, PREPA has an average electric rate of $0.119/kWh. Based on past electric rate increases in Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean, this rate could increase to $0.15/kWh or higher in a relatively short amount of time. In the coming years, increasing electrical rates and increased necessity for clean power will continue to improve the feasibility of implementing solar PV systems at these sites.

Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Frito-Lay Delivers Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet on AddThis.com... Sept. 22, 2012 Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet D iscover how Frito-Lay provides service with electric trucks in Columbus,

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Onboard Equipment Truck Stop Electrification

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements

327

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: April 25, 9: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age on AddThis.com... Fact #369: April 25, 2005 Medium-Truck Miles by Age Medium trucks (class 3-6) were driven an average of 14,439 miles in 2002.

328

Wasting Time : a leisure infrastructure for mega-landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfills are consolidating into fewer, taller, and more massive singular objects in the exurban landscape.This thesis looks at one instance in Virginia, the first regional landfill in the state to accept trash from New ...

Nguyen, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Margaret)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

THERMOELECTRICAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM THE EXHAUST OF A LIGHT TRUCK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A team formed by Clarkson University is engaged in a project to design, build, model, test, and develop a plan to commercialize a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system for recovering energy from the exhaust of light trucks and passenger cars. Clarkson University is responsible for project management, vehicle interface design, system modeling, and commercialization plan. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (sub-contractor to Clarkson) is responsible for TEG design and construction. Delphi Corporation is responsible for testing services and engineering consultation and General Motors Corporation is responsible for providing the test vehicle and information about its systems. Funds were supplied by a grant from the Transportation Research Program of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), through Joseph R. Wagner. Members of the team and John Fairbanks (Project Manager, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology). Currently, the design of TEG has been completed and initial construction of the TEG has been initiated by Hi-Z. The TEG system consists of heat exchangers, thermoelectric modules and a power conditioning unit. The heat source for the TEG is the exhaust gas from the engine and the heat sink is the engine coolant. A model has been developed to simulate the performance of the TEG under varying operating conditions. Preliminary results from the model predict that up to 330 watts can be generated by the TEG which would increase fuel economy by 5 percent. This number could possibly increase to 20 percent with quantum-well technology. To assess the performance of the TEG and improve the accuracy of the modeling, experimental testing will be performed at Delphi Corporation. A preliminary experimental test plan is given. To determine the economic and commercial viability, a business study has been conducted and results from the study showing potential areas for TEG commercialization are discussed.

Karri, M; Thacher, E; Helenbrook, B; Compeau, M; Kushch, A; Elsner, N; Bhatti, M; O' Brien, J; Stabler, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials  

SciTech Connect

The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

Rachor, Ingke, E-mail: i.rachor@ifb.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria [University of Hamburg, Institute of Soil Science, Allende-Platz 2, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

333

US EPA record of decision review for landfills: Sanitary landfill (740-G), Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a review of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Record of Decision System (RODS) database search conducted to identify Superfund landfill sites where a Record of Decision (ROD) has been prepared by EPA, the States or the US Army Corps of Engineers describing the selected remedy at the site. ROD abstracts from the database were reviewed to identify site information including site type, contaminants of concern, components of the selected remedy, and cleanup goals. Only RODs from landfill sites were evaluated so that the results of the analysis can be used to support the remedy selection process for the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Secretary Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Trucks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Trucks, Buses Energy Secretary Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Trucks, Buses May 10, 2005 - 12:45pm Addthis Says Energy Bill Essential to Develop Clean Diesel Technology WASHINGTON, D.C. - Highlighting the promise of alternative fuel trucks and buses, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today opened an exhibition of energy-efficient, clean diesel and advanced hybrid commercial vehicles at a press conference in Washington, D.C. Secretary Bodman also underscored the need to pass an energy bill that encourages the use of renewable fuels and new technologies to provide the United States with greater energy independence. "Industry and government are working hand-in-hand to develop technologies

336

Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called 'biocovers') to enhance biological oxidation of CH{sub 4}. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH{sub 4} oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m{sup 2} were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH{sub 4} load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH{sub 4} was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH{sub 4} emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH{sub 4} emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH{sub 4} mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers.

Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Fredenslund, Anders M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Chanton, Jeffrey, E-mail: jchanton@fsu.edu [Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, 117 N. Woodward Avenue, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fl 32306-4320 (United States); Pedersen, Gitte Bukh, E-mail: gbp@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, Peter, E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

338

Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under Secretary of Energy Majumdar Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under Secretary of Energy Majumdar January 26, 2012 - 2:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Tomorrow, Friday, January 27, Acting Under Secretary of Energy Arun Majumdar and North Carolina Congressman Howard Coble will visit the Volvo Group's truck headquarters in Greensboro, North Carolina. Through the Department of Energy's Super Truck project, the Volvo Group, which includes Mack Trucks and Volvo Trucks, received $19 million in federal funding to improve the freight-moving efficiency of heavy-duty trucks, an example of the Obama Administration's strong commitment to reviving the U.S. auto industry through investments in more efficient

339

Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Truck Truck Technical Goals and Teams to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams on AddThis.com... Key Activities Mission, Vision, & Goals Plans, Implementation, & Results Organization & Contacts National Laboratories Budget

340

Analysis of Major Trends in U.S. Commercial Trucking, 1977-2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Further, since single-unit trucks operate usually at part cargo load, the extra mass of CNG tanks is acceptable. For Class 8 combination trucks, the energy storage limitations of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: April 18, 1: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds on AddThis.com... Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds The Federal Highway Administration studies traffic volume and flow on major

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Conserve Fuel Conserve Fuel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations on AddThis.com... U.S. Truck Stop Electrification Locations

343

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and is scheduled to be complete by the end of August 2003. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and construction of the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell is nearly complete with only the liquid addition system remaining. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5 acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the blower station and biofilter remaining. Waste placement and instrumentation installation is ongoing in the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Full Scale Bioreactor Landfill for Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Emission Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works constructed a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective was to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entailed the construction of a 12-acre module that contained a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells were highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Kathy Sananikone; Don Augenstein

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The remaining task to be completed is to test the biofilter prior to operation, which is currently anticipated to begin in January 2004. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5 acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5 acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the blower station and biofilter remaining. Waste placement and instrumentation installation is ongoing in the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Project Startup: Evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing the project startup for evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 hybrid-electric delivery trucks.

Not Available

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Firm Uses DOE?s Fastest Supercomputer to Streamline Long-Haul Trucks  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Sophisticated simulation on the world?s fastest computer for science makes trucks more aerodynamic, saves fuel, helps environment.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

353

Turning waste into energy beats landfilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turning waste into energy beats landfilling By Christopher Hume The Hamilton Spectator (Nov 16 it in Europe, "waste-to-energy," this is a technology that is needed. Objections to it are based on information lots, perhaps $300 million. But what Miller and others fail to understand is that energy-to-waste

Columbia University

354

Cost Effectiveness of On-Site Chlorine Generation for Chlorine Truck Attack Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chlorine tank truck attack could cause thousands of fatalities. As a means of preventing chlorine truck attacks, I consider the on-site generation of chlorine or hypochlorite at all U.S. facilities currently receiving chlorine by truck. I develop and ... Keywords: applications, cost-effectiveness, public policy, risk analysis, terrorism, uncertainty

Anthony M. Barrett

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

CoolCab: Reducing Thermal Loads in Long-Haul Trucks (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCab project tested and modeled the effects of several thermal-load reduction strategies applied to long-haul truck cabs. NREL partnered with two major truck manufacturers to evaluate three long-haul trucks at NREL's outdoor test facility in Golden, Colorado.

Not Available

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: SUV / Pick-up Truck Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the influence of diesel fuel composition on the ability of NOX adsorber catalyst (NAC) technology, in conjunction with diesel particle filters (DPFs), to achieve stringent emissions levels with a minimal fuel economy impact. The test bed for this project was intended to be a light-duty sport utility vehicle (SUV) with a goal of achieving light-duty Tier 2-Bin 5 tail pipe emission levels (0.07 g/mi. NOX and 0.01 g/mi. PM). However, with the current US market share of light-duty diesel applications being so low, no US 2002 model year (MY) light-duty truck (LDT) or SUV platforms equipped with a diesel engine and having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) less than 8500 lb exist. While the current level of diesel engine use is relatively small in the light-duty class, there exists considerable potential for the diesel engine to gain a much larger market share in the future as manufacturers of heavy light-duty trucks (HLDTs) attempt to offset the negative impact on cooperate average fuel economy (CAFE) that the recent rise in market share of the SUVs and LDTs has caused. The US EPA Tier 2 emission standards also contain regulation to prevent the migration of heavy light-duty trucks and SUV's to the medium duty class. This preventive measure requires that all medium duty trucks, SUV's and vans in the 8,500 to 10,000 lb GVWR range being used as passenger vehicles, meet light-duty Tier 2 standards. In meeting the Tier 2 emission standards, the HLDTs and medium-duty passenger vehicles (MDPVs) will face the greatest technological challenges. Because the MDPV is the closest weight class and application relative to the potential upcoming HLDTs and SUV's, a weight class compromise was made in this program to allow the examination of using a diesel engine with a NAC-DPF system on a 2002 production vehicle. The test bed for this project is a 2500 series Chevrolet Silverado equipped with a 6.6L Duramax diesel engine certified to 2002 MY Federal heavy-duty and 2002 MY California medium-duty emission standards. The stock vehicle included cooled air charge (CAC), turbocharger (TC), direct fuel injection (DFI), oxidation catalyst (OC), and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR)

Webb, C; Weber, P; Thornton,M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

SCR SYSTEMS FOR HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS: PROGRESS TOWARDS MEETING EURO 4 EMISSION STANDARDS IN 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions of diesel engines contain some components, which support the generation of smog and which are classified hazardous. Exhaust gas aftertreatment is a powerful tool to reduce the NOx and Particulate emissions. The NOx-emission can be reduced by the SCR technology. SCR stands for Selective Catalytic Reduction. A reduction agent has to be injected into the exhaust upstream of a catalyst. On the catalyst the NOx is reduced to N2 (Nitrogen) and H2O (Water). This catalytic process was developed in Japan about 30 years ago to reduce the NOx emission of coal-fired power plants. The first reduction agent used was anhydrous ammonia (NH3). SCR technology was used with diesel engines starting mid of the 80s. First applications were stationary operating generator-sets. In 1991 a joint development between DaimlerChrysler, MAN, IVECO and Siemens was started to use SCR technology for the reduction of heavy duty trucks. Several fleet tests demonstrated the durability of the systems. To day, SCR technology is the most promising technology to fulfill the new European Regulations EURO 4 and EURO 5 being effective Oct. 2005 and Oct. 2008. The efficient NOx reduction of the catalyst allows an engine calibration for low fuel consumption. DaimlerChrysler decided to use the SCR technology on every heavy duty truck and bus in Europe and many other truck manufacturers will introduce SCR technology to fulfill the 2005 emission regulation. The truck manufacturers in Europe agreed to use aqueous solution of Urea as reducing agent. The product is called AdBlue. AdBlue is a non toxic, non smelling liquid. The consumption is about 5% of the diesel fuel consumption to reduce the NOx emissions. A small AdBlue tank has to be installed to the vehicle. With an electronically controlled dosing system the AdBlue is injected into the exhaust. The dosing system is simple and durable. It has proven its durability during winter and summer testing as well as in fleet tests. The infrastructure for AdBlue is under evaluation in Europe by Urea Producers and Mineral Oil companies to be readily available in time. Urea is one of the most common chemical products in the world and the production and the distribution very much experienced. However, a pure grade is needed for automotive application and requires special attention.

Frank, W; Huethwohl, G; Maurer, B

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) Program Final Caterpillar Public Report Light Truck Clean Diesel Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy and Caterpillar entered a Cooperative Agreement to develop compression ignition engine technology suitable for the light truck/SUV market. Caterpillar, in collaboration with a suitable commercialization partner, developed a new Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) engine technology to dramatically improve the emissions and performance of light truck engines. The overall program objective was to demonstrate engine prototypes by 2004, with an order of magnitude emission reduction while meeting challenging fuel consumption goals. Program emphasis was placed on developing and incorporating cutting edge technologies that could remove the current impediments to commercialization of CIDI power sources in light truck applications. The major obstacle to commercialization is emissions regulations with secondary concerns of driveability and NVH (noise, vibration and harshness). The target emissions levels were 0.05 g/mile NOx and 0.01 g/mile PM to be compliant with the EPA Tier 2 fleet average requirements of 0.07 g/mile and the CARB LEV 2 of 0.05 g/mile for NOx, both have a PM requirement of 0.01 g/mile. The program team developed a combustion process that fundamentally shifted the classic NOx vs. PM behavior of CIDI engines. The NOx vs. PM shift was accomplished with a form of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). The HCCI concept centers on appropriate mixing of air and fuel in the compression process and controlling the inception and rate of combustion through various means such as variable valve timing, inlet charge temperature and pressure control. Caterpillar has adapted an existing Caterpillar design of a single injector that: (1) creates the appropriate fuel and air mixture for HCCI, (2) is capable of a more conventional injection to overcome the low power density problems of current HCCI implementations, (3) provides a mixed mode where both the HCCI and conventional combustion are functioning in the same combustion cycle. Figure 1 illustrates the mixed mode injection system. Under the LTCD program Caterpillar developed a mixed mode injector for a multi-cylinder engine system. The mixed mode injection system represents a critical enabling technology for the implementation of HCCI. In addition, Caterpillar implemented variable valve system technology and air system technology on the multi-cylinder engine platform. The valve and air system technology were critical to system control. Caterpillar developed the combustion system to achieve a 93% reduction in NOx emissions. The resulting NOx emissions were 0.12 gm/mile NOx. The demonstrated emissions level meets the stringent Tier 2 Bin 8 requirement without NOx aftertreatment! However, combustion development alone was not adequate to meet the program goal of 0.05gm/mile NOx. To meet the program goals, an additional 60% NOx reduction technology will be required. Caterpillar evaluated a number of NOx reduction technologies to quantify and understand the NOx reduction potential and system performance implications. The NOx adsorber was the most attractive NOx aftertreatment option based on fuel consumption and NOx reduction potential. In spite of the breakthrough technology development conducted under the LTCD program there remains many significant challenges associated with the technology configuration. For HCCI, additional effort is needed to develop a robust control strategy, reduce the hydrocarbon emissions at light load condition, and develop a more production viable fuel system. Furthermore, the NOx adsorber suffers from cost, packaging, and durability challenges that must be addressed.

Eric Fluga

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

360

Satellite Detec*on of Truck & Rail NO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite Detec*on of Truck & Rail NO2 Erica Bickford Tracey Holloway Environment (SAGE) University of Wisconsin Madison #12;Freight and Air Quality 2 ┬Ě Transporta*on is the largest source of NOx emissions. ┬Ě Freight accounts for 33

Jacob, Daniel J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO MACK TRUCKS, INC. UNDER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 2006 14:16 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO AGCP-HQ P.02/03 4 2006 14:16 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO AGCP-HQ P.02/03 * 0 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO MACK TRUCKS, INC. UNDER NREL SUBCONTRACT NO. ZCI-4-32049-01, UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC36-98GO10337 FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE NEXT GENERATION NATURAL GAS VEHICLE, PHASE II; CH-1185; W(A)-04-016 Mack Trucks, Inc. (Mack) has petitioned for an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice under DOE Contract No. NREL-ZC:-4-32049-01. This advance waiver is intended to apply to all subject inventions of Mack's employees and those of its subcontractors, regardless of tier except subcontractors eligible to obtain title pursuant to P.L. 96-517 as amended, and National Laboratories.

362

Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to improve the railcar/rail truck interface by developing a low maintenance bearing interface with a favorable friction coefficient. Friction and wear at the center bowl/center plate bearing interface cause high turning moments around curved track, wear of truck components, and increased detrimental dynamic effects. The recommended improvement of the rail truck interface is a set of two steel inserts, one concave and one convex, that can be retrofit to center bowls/center plates. The insert geometry addresses concerns about maintaining favorable pressure distribution on existing components, minimizing overall height increase to accommodate existing infrastructure, and retaining railcar stability. The stability of the railcar upon the design inserts has been ensured when the instantaneous center of rotation of the railcar body is above the railcar center of gravity. The damping ratio provided by the frictional moment within center bowl is 240 and eliminates the possibility of dynamic amplification. Using a 90 inch radius of curvature ensures stability and requires a 0.5 inch diameter reduction of the existing center plate for a gap of 1/16 inch. The increase in railcar height for the specific design is 0.71 inches which can be absorbed by either grinding of the center plate or new manufacturing dimensions. The design is feasible for small travel values corresponding to small vertical gaps at the side bearings. In addition to geometry alterations, the bearing surfaces are coated with a protective metallic layer. The literature suggests that optimum friction coefficients between bearing elements in the center bowl/center plate interface may reduce turning moments of the truck, wear of truck components, and detrimental dynamic effects such as hunting. Axial-torsional tests determined friction coefficient estimates and wear properties for a matrix of various metallic protective coatings and steel. Tungsten carbide-cobalt-chrome has a favorable coefficient of 0.3 under standard center bowl/center plate contact conditions.

Story, Brett Alan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: The semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open dumping is the most common form of waste disposal in neglected small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Semi-mechanized landfills can be a sustainable option for small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the theory of design and operation of semi-mechanized landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Villanueva, Honduras has operated its semi-mechanized landfill for 15 years. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cost of operation is US$4.60/ton with a land requirement of 0.2m{sup 2}/person-year. - Abstract: Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country's total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1-3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in Villanueva has operated for 15 years, using a total land area of approximately 11 ha for a population that grew from 23,000 to 48,000, with a land requirement of 0.2 m{sup 2}/person year, a cover to waste ratio of 0.2, and an estimated soil surplus of 298,000 m{sup 3} that is valorized and used onsite. The landfill has been operated solely by the municipality with an operational cost in 2010 estimated at US$4.60 per ton. A modified water balance analysis at Villanueva shows negligible leachate generation from covered trenches and 700 m{sup 3}/yr (60 m{sup 3}/ha yr) from the two open trenches required for daily operation. If the site were an open dump, however, leachate generation is estimated to be 3900 m{sup 3}/ha yr and contaminated runoff 5000 m{sup 3}/ha yr. A simple model used to estimate dilution of generated leachate based on groundwater flow data and aquifer stratigraphy suggests that the leachate will be diluted by a factor of 0.01 in the aquifer. Leachate contaminants will not accumulate because the aquifer discharges to the Ulua River 2 km south of the landfill. While not suitable for all sites, the Villanueva method nevertheless serves as an excellent example of how a small city landfill with natural compaction of waste and attenuation of leachate can be sustainably operated.

Oakley, Stewart M., E-mail: soakley@csuchico.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Chico State University, California State University, Chico, CA 95929 (United States); Jimenez, Ramon, E-mail: rjimenez1958@yahoo.com [Public Works, Municipality of Villanueva, Cortes (Honduras)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

On-Road Development of the C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet details on-road development of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy-duty trucks, including emissions, fuel costs, and petroleum displacement.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid and Zero Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on AddThis.com...

366

Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility User Update: SmartTruck Systems |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leadership Computing Facility User Update: SmartTruck Systems Leadership Computing Facility User Update: SmartTruck Systems Startup zooms to success improving fuel efficiency of long-haul trucks by more than 10 percent Supercomputing simulations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory enabled SmartTruck Systems engineers to develop the UnderTray System, some components of which are shown here. The system dramatically reduces drag-and increases fuel mileage-in long-haul trucks. Image: Michael Matheson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Supercomputing simulations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory enabled SmartTruck Systems engineers to develop the UnderTray System, some components of which are shown here. The system dramatically reduces drag-and increases fuel mileage-in long-haul trucks. Image: Michael Matheson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (hi-res image)

367

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #571: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: May 18, 2009 1: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE Standards - 2006 Reformation to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #571: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE Standards - 2006 Reformation on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #571: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE Standards - 2006 Reformation on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #571: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE Standards - 2006 Reformation on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #571: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE Standards - 2006 Reformation on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #571: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE Standards - 2006 Reformation on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #571: May 18, 2009 Light Truck CAFE Standards - 2006 Reformation on

368

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: April 2, 2012 1: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently on AddThis.com...

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Saving Fuel in the Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck Stop Electrification to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck Stop Electrification on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck Stop Electrification on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck Stop Electrification on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck Stop Electrification on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck Stop Electrification on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Saving Fuel in the Garden State with Truck Stop Electrification on AddThis.com...

370

cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tanks #12;36 cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Truck Tanks Storage Capacity and Weight Impact LNG Tanks1 cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions for Transportation December 7, 2012 #12;2 cleanenergyfuels.com Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Taxis Airport Vehicles Transit Buses Leading Provider of Natural

Minnesota, University of

371

Microbial oxidation of methane from old landfills in biofilters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfill gas emissions are among the largest sources of the greenhouse gas methane. For this reason, the possibilities of microbial methane degradation in biofilters were investigated. Different filter materials were tested in two experimental plants, a bench-scale plant (total filter volume 51 l) and a pilot plant (total filter volume 4 m{sup 3}). Three months after the beginning of the experiment, very high degradation rates of up to 63 g CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 3}h) were observed in the bench-scale plant at mean methane concentrations of 2.5% v/v and with fine-grained compost as biofilter material. However, the degradation rates of the compost biofilter decreased in the fifth month of the experiment, probably due to the accumulation of exopolymeric substances formed by the microorganisms. A mixture of compost, peat, and wood fibers showed stable and satisfactory degradation rates around 20 g/(m{sup 3}h) at mean concentrations of 3% v/v over a period of one year. In this material, the wood fibers served as a structural material and prevented clogging of the biofilter. Extrapolation of the experimental data indicates that biofilters for methane oxidation have to be at least 100 times the volume of biofilters for odor control to obtain the same cleaning efficiency per unit volume flow of feed gas.

Streese, J.; Stegmann, R

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shpack Landfill - MA 06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shpack Landfill - MA 06 Shpack Landfill - MA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shpack Landfill, NY Alternate Name(s): Attleboro, MA Metals and Controls Site Norton Landfill area MA.06-2 MA.06-3 Location: 68 Union Road, Norton, Massachusetts MA.06-2 Historical Operations: No AEC activities were conducted on site. Contamination was suspected from disposal of materials containing uranium and zirconium ash. MA.06-2 MA.06-3 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MA.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MA.06-4 MA.06-5 MA.06-6 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MA.06-7 MA.06-8 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shpack Landfill, NY MA.06-1 - DOE Memorandum; Meyers to Hart; Subject: Shpack Landfill,

373

Multiphase Modeling of Flow, Transport, and Biodegradation in a Mesoscale Landfill Bioreactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in municipal solid waste landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models to predict and design optimal treatment processes. We have developed a multiphase and multicomponent nonisothermal module called T2LBM for the three-dimensional TOUGH2 flow and transport simulator. T2LBM can be used to simulate aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. Acetic acid is used as a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. We have verified the model against published data, and applied it to our own mesoscale laboratory aerobic landfill bioreactor experiments. We observe spatial variability of flow and biodegradation consistent with permeability heterogeneity and the geometry of the radial grid. The model is capable of matching results of a shut-in test where the respiration of the system is measured over time.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hazen, Terry C.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power (SOFC APU) development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14318. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner development leading to successful demonstration of the SOFC APU objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant SOFC APU Milestones: Demonstrated: Operation meeting SOFC APU requirements on commercial Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel. SOFC systems operating on dry CPOX reformate. Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC APU system without inert gas purge. Developed: Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. Demonstrated efficient SOFC output power conditioning. Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods.

Vesely, Charles John-Paul [Cummins Power Generation; Fuchs, Benjamin S. [Cummins Power Generation; Booten, Chuck W. [Protonex Technology, LLC

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Modeling Analysis of Biosparging at the Sanitary Landfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a groundwater modeling study that evaluates the performance of the biosparging system at the Sanitary Landfill.

Jackson, D.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success...

377

Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Which idling reduction system is Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners? Linda Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Commercial Vehicle Engineering Congress and Exposition Rosemont, Il October 7-9, 2008 The price of diesel is high *Idling a Class 8 truck uses 0.6-1.2 gallons per hour *That can total over $50 a night! *So even without regulations, there's an incentive to reduce idling *Even if the price goes down more, idling reduction makes sense 2 Why do sleepers idle overnight? For services to resting driver and friend y Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) y Power for appliances 8TV, microwave, refrigerator, computer, hair drier To keep fuel and engine warm To mask out noises and smells Because other drivers do it

378

The ethanol heavy-duty truck fleet demonstration project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to test and demonstrate the use of a high- percentage ethanol-blended fuel in a fleet of heavy-duty, over-the- road trucks, paying particular attention to emissions, performance, and repair and maintenance costs. This project also represents the first public demonstration of the use of ethanol fuels as a viable alternative to conventional diesel fuel in heavy-duty engines.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Upgrades for truck transportation of SNM in the Russian Federation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the rapid reduction of risk to truck transportation of SNM in Russia. Enhanced protection is being accomplished by cooperation between the US Department of Energy, MINATOM of Russia, the Russian Ministry of Defense, and various Russian Institutes. This program provides an integrated program of specialized trucks that are equipped with hardened overpack (SNM vault) containers, alarm and communications systems, and armored cabs. Armored escort vehicles are also provided to increase the survivability of the guards escorting convoys. Only indigenous Russian equipment, modified and/or manufactured by Designing Bureau for Motor Vehicle Transport Equipment (KBATO), is provided under this program. The US will not provide assistance in the truck transportation arena without a commitment from the Russian facility to provide heavily armed escorts for SNM movement. Each site conducts a detailed transportation needs assessment study that is used as the basis for prioritizing assistance. The Siberian Chemical Combine (Tomsk-7) was the initial site of cooperation. The designs used at Tomsk-7 are serving as the baseline for all future vehicles modified under this program. In FY98, many vehicles systems have been ordered for various institutes. Many additional systems will be ordered in FY99.

Gardner, B.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kornilovich, E. [Construction Bureau for Motor Vehicle Transport Equipment, Mytischy (Russian Federation)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks  

SciTech Connect

Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated over the 5-day test period, May 17-21, 2004. The runway slopes rather uniformly upward from north-to-south. Over the distance of 2424 meters between our two ''start'' markers at either end of the runway, the net change in elevation is a little over ten meters. Test results clearly show the greater fuel consumption required to lift the truck against gravity in the southbound direction For this reason, it is important that the tests be averaged over a round trip circuit--that is, a run in both directions over the identical portion of the roadway. Northbound-southbound averages require an overlap segment of the runway (near the middle of the runway) where the truck--starting from either end--has achieved its target speed. For the target truck speed of 60 mph, this overlap region is approximately 700 meters in length. Typically a run and the return run are accomplished within a time interval of 6 minutes. Analysis of the data show fuel consumption savings at all flap angle settings tested, when compared to the ''no flaps'' condition. The most beneficial flap angle appears to be 13 degrees, for which the fuel consumption is 0.3778 {+-} 0.0025 liters/km compared to the ''no flaps'' control of 0.3941 {+-} 0.0034 liters/km. The error bounds expressed above mark the 99% confidence interval in the mean values given. That is, additional estimates of the mean fuel consumption would be expected to lie within the bounds given, approximately 99% of the time. The fuel consumption saving is--to reasonable accuracy--about 1.63 liters/100 kilometers. These savings represent the increment associated only with the change in drag due to the presence or absence of flaps. The result will hold for any truck of similar size and shape and engine performance regardless of the loading of the truck or the rolling resistance. The economy achieved by use of base flaps can be compared to the economy resulting from driving two trucks in a tandem configuration. In December 2003, such fuel consumption tests were performe

Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL: News Release - Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test DOE, Delphi, Peterbilt Join to Test Auxiliary Power Unit for Commercial Trucks Washington, DC -In a test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a Delphi auxiliary power unit employing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) successfully operated the electrical system and air conditioning of a Peterbilt Model 386 truck under conditions simulating idling conditions for 10 hours. The device provides an alternative to running a truck's main diesel engine, or using a truck's batteries, to power auxiliary electrical loads during rest periods, thereby lowering emissions, reducing noise, and saving fuel. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test

382

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test March 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --In a test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a Delphi auxiliary power unit employing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) successfully operated the electrical system and air conditioning of a Peterbilt Model 386 truck under conditions simulating idling conditions for 10 hours. The device provides an alternative to running a truck's main diesel engine, or using a truck's batteries, to power auxiliary electrical loads during rest periods, thereby lowering emissions, reducing noise, and saving fuel. In testing at Peterbilt Motors Company Texas head-quarters, a Delphi

383

Company Adds Commercial Trucks to List of Hybrids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Company Adds Commercial Trucks to List of Hybrids Company Adds Commercial Trucks to List of Hybrids Company Adds Commercial Trucks to List of Hybrids August 30, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Allison’s bus hybrid drive unit for transit buses can be found in 164 cities around the world. The company will use similar technology in the commercial truck hybrid system. | Photo courtesy of Allison Transmission Allison's bus hybrid drive unit for transit buses can be found in 164 cities around the world. The company will use similar technology in the commercial truck hybrid system. | Photo courtesy of Allison Transmission Lindsay Gsell Allison Transmission uses $62.8 million in Recovery Act funding for commercial truck hybrid system Project will create or retain close to 100 manufacturing-related jobs in Indiana Hybrid systems could reduce diesel consumption by 35 percent in

384

Fuel Cell Lift Trucks: A Grocer's Best Friend | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Lift Trucks: A Grocer's Best Friend Fuel Cell Lift Trucks: A Grocer's Best Friend Fuel Cell Lift Trucks: A Grocer's Best Friend December 1, 2011 - 3:21pm Addthis Baldor Specialty Foods relies on fuel cell technology from Oorja Protonics to power lift-trucks like the one pictured above, refueling takes less than one minute | Photo Courtesy of Oorja Protonics. Baldor Specialty Foods relies on fuel cell technology from Oorja Protonics to power lift-trucks like the one pictured above, refueling takes less than one minute | Photo Courtesy of Oorja Protonics. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program What are the key facts? Fuel Cell Lift Trucks can operate twice as long as their battery powered counterparts. They also avoid deep discharges, which effectively extends their

385

Ann Arbor's New Recycling Trucks Get an 'Assist' from Clean Cities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ann Arbor's New Recycling Trucks Get an 'Assist' from Clean Cities Ann Arbor's New Recycling Trucks Get an 'Assist' from Clean Cities Ann Arbor's New Recycling Trucks Get an 'Assist' from Clean Cities August 18, 2010 - 2:22pm Addthis Peterbilt Model 320 Hybrid HLAs are being put to use in Ann Arbor, MI, where they will serve as recycling trucks. | Photo Courtesy of Peterbilt Motors Company Peterbilt Model 320 Hybrid HLAs are being put to use in Ann Arbor, MI, where they will serve as recycling trucks. | Photo Courtesy of Peterbilt Motors Company Joshua DeLung Hydraulics in vehicles - best known for bouncing cars and kneeling buses - are getting a serious look in Ann Arbor, Mich. The reasons - saving fuel and increasing the life of heavy-use vehicles. With the support of a $120,000 Recovery Act grant, Ann Arbor, Mich., deployed four recycling trucks with hydraulic hybrid power systems

386

Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

Wang Shuzhong, E-mail: s_z_wang@yahoo.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Guo Yang [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Chen Chongming [Hebei Electric Power Research Institute, Shijizhuang, Hebei 050021 (China); Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy Efficiency and Performance Testing of Non-Road Electric Vehicles: Forklift Truck Evaluation Ś Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forklift trucks play an integral role in the industrial economy, and the majority of those trucks in service in the United States are electric. The benefits of such non-road electric vehicles include lower life cycle costs, improved worker health and safety, and reduced maintenance. However, large numbers of electric lift trucks can become a concern to the electric utility industry if the vehicles are inefficient or cause power quality problems. Southern California Edison (SCE) has evaluated the energy e...

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Business Case for Fast Charging of Industrial Lift Truck Fleets: Life Cycle Cost Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In industrial settings, up to three battery packs are required per electric industrial lift truck: one in use, another being charged, and a third being cooled. Many industry experts see this as a financial barrier in selling electric over internal combustion (IC) industrial lift trucks. EPRI sponsored this study to provide a thorough evaluation of the economics in support of a business case for fast charging lift truck fleets.

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66 Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pfohl Brothers Landfill (NY.66 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Five-Year Review Report Pfohl Brothers Landfill Superfund Site Erie County Town of Cheektowaga, New York EPA REGION 2 Congressional District(s): 30 Erie Cheektowaga NPL LISTING HISTORY Documents Related to Pfohl Brothers Landfill Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to outside sources. LM can not attest to the accuracy of information provided by these links. Please see the Leaving LM Website page for more details.

390

Planning document for the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy and Department of Defense are faced with the closure of thousands of decommissioned radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste landfills as a part of ongoing Environmental Restoration activities. Regulations on the closure of hazardous and radioactive waste landfills require the construction of a ``low-permeability`` cover over the unit to limit the migration of liquids into the underlying waste. These landfills must be maintained and monitored for 30 years to ensure that hazardous materials are not migrating from the landfill. This test plan is intended as an initial road map for planning, designing, constructing, evaluating, and documenting the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD). It describes the goals/ objectives, scope, tasks, responsibilities, technical approach, and deliverables for the demonstration.

Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Center for Ecological Risk Assessment & Management; Bostick, K.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Environmental Science Group

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Organic and nitrogen removal from landfill leachate in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic granular sludge SBR was used to treat real landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different ammonium inputs were explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DO variations were consistent with the GSBR performances at low ammonium inputs. - Abstract: Granule sequencing batch reactors (GSBR) were established for landfill leachate treatment, and the COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Results showed that COD removal rate decreased as influent ammonium concentration increasing. Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different influent ammonium levels were also studied. When the ammonium concentration in the landfill leachate was 366 mg L{sup -1}, the dominant nitrogen removal process in the GSBR was simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Under the ammonium concentration of 788 mg L{sup -1}, nitrite accumulation occurred and the accumulated nitrite was reduced to nitrogen gas by the shortcut denitrification process. When the influent ammonium increased to a higher level of 1105 mg L{sup -1}, accumulation of nitrite and nitrate lasted in the whole cycle, and the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and ammonium decreased to only 35.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Results also showed that DO was a useful process controlling parameter for the organics and nitrogen removal at low ammonium input.

Wei Yanjie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection in Water Transport Engineering Ministry of Communications, Tianjin Research Institute of Water Transport Engineering, Tianjin 300456 (China); Ji Min, E-mail: jmtju@yahoo.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Ruying [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qin Feifei [Tianjin Tanggu Sino French Water Supply Co. Ltd., Tianjin 300450 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7693 May 2010 FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report R. Barnitt National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado...

393

Definition and Evaluation of Bus and Truck Automation Operations Concepts: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trucks Intermodal Rail 2.2 RELATED RESEARCH Research andrail) and the proponents of a more efficient freight system for national defense purposes. Research

Taso, H. S. Jacob; Botha, Jan L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

"Dedicated To The Continued Education, Training and Demonstration of PEM Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks In Real-World Applications."  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective was to further assist in the commercialization of fuel cell and H2 technology by building further upon the successful fuel cell lift truck deployments that were executed by LiftOne in 2007, with longer deployments of this technology in real-world applications. We involved facilities management, operators, maintenance personnel, safety groups, and Authorities Having Jurisdiction. LiftOne strived to educate a broad group from many areas of industry and the community as to the benefits of this technology. Included were First Responders from the local areas. We conducted month long deployments with end-users to validate the value proposition and the market requirements for fuel cell powered lift trucks. Management, lift truck operators, Authorities Having Jurisdiction and the general public experienced 'hands on' fuel cell experience in the material handling applications. We partnered with Hydrogenics in the execution of the deployment segment of the program. Air Products supplied the compressed H2 gas and the mobile fueler. Data from the Fuel Cell Power Packs and the mobile fueler was sent to the DOE and NREL as required. Also, LiftOne conducted the H2 Education Seminars on a rotating basis at their locations for lift trucks users and for other selected segments of the community over the project's 36 month duration. Executive Summary The technology employed during the deployments program was not new, as the equipment had been used in several previous demos and early adoptions within the material handling industry. This was the case with the new HyPx Series PEM - Fuel Cell Power Packs used, which had been demo'd before during the 2007 Greater Columbia Fuel Cell Challenge. The Air Products HF-150 Fueler was used outdoors during the deployments and had similarly been used for many previous demo programs. The methods used centered on providing this technology as the power for electric sit-down lift trucks at high profile companies operating large fleets. As a long-standing lift truck dealership, LiftOne was able to introduce the fuel cells to such companies in the demanding applications. Accomplishments vs Objectives: We were successful in respect to the stated objectives. The Education Segment's H2 Education Sessions were able to introduce fuel cell technology to many companies and reached the intended broad audience. Also, demos of the lift truck at the sessions as well as the conferences; expos and area events provided great additional exposure. The Deployments were successful in allowing the 6 participating companies to test the 2 fuel cell powered lift trucks in their demanding applications. One of the 6 sites (BMW) eventually adopted over 80 fuel cells from Plug Power. LiftOne was one of the 3 fuel cell demonstrators at BMW for this trial and played a major role in helping to prove the viability and efficiency of this alternative form of energy for BMW. The other 5 companies that participated in the project's deployments were encouraged by the trials and while not converting over to fuel cell power at this time, expressed the desire to revisit acquisition scenarios in the near future as the cost of fuel cells and infrastructure continue to improve. The Education sessions began in March of 2009 at the 7 LiftOne Branches and continued throughout the duration of the project. Attendees came from a large base of lift truck users in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. The sessions were free and invitations were sent out to potential users and companies with intrigue. In addition to the Education content at the sessions (which was offered in a 'H2 101' format), LiftOne was able to demonstrate a working fuel cell powered lift truck, which proved to be a big draw with the 'hands on' experience. LiftOne also demo'd the fuel cell lift trucks at many conferences, expos, professional association meetings, trade shows and 'Green' events in major cities region including Charlotte, Greenville, and Columbia. Such events allowed for H2 Education Material to be presented, and recruit attendees for future sessi

Dever, Thomas J.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Microsoft Word - Roosevelt-HW-Hill_Landfill-G0335-I0019-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2009 1, 2009 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Hall Customer Service Engineer - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: H.W. Hill / Roosevelt Landfill Gas Generation Expansion Project (#I0019 and #G0335) Budget Information: Work Order # 244620, Task # 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7: "Acquisition, installation, operation, and removal of communication systems..." B4.6: "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area..." Location: Klickitat County, Washington Proposed by: Klickitat County Public Utility District No.1 (KPUD) and Bonneville Power

396

Landfill gas operation and maintenance manual of practice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual has the following objectives: (1) compile and present key portions of the general body of knowledge about operating and maintaining LFG control systems; (2) present information in an easy to understand format useful for hands-on practical use in the field; (3) present accepted practices and procedures for LFG control practices; (4) highlight key points, common mistakes and lessons learned from more than 20 years of industry experience, point out areas of controversy and indicate alternative practices where applicable; (5) compile key reference information; and (6) provide theory and discussion needed to develop a deeper understanding of LFG control and recovery.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

B B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank Original Landfill January 2012 Monthly Inspection-Attachment 1 The monthly inspection of the OLF was completed on January 30. The Rocky Flats Site only received .15 inches of precipitation during the month of January. The cover was dry at the time of the inspection. The slump in the East Perimeter Channel (EPC) remained unchanged. Berm locations that were re-graded during the OLF Maintenance 2011 Project remained in good condition. Vegetation on the landfill cover including the seep areas remains dormant. OLF Cover Lower OLF Cover Facing East Upper OLF Cover Facing East

399

US EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Outreach Program Landfill Methane Outreach Program Jump to: navigation, search Name US EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program Agency/Company /Organization United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Biomass Topics Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Workshop Website http://www.epa.gov/lmop/intern Country China, Ecuador, Mexico, Philippines, Thailand, Ukraine, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama Eastern Asia, South America, Central America, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America References LMOP[1]

400

Optimal power management for a hydraulic hybrid delivery truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic hybrid propulsion and energy storage components demonstrate characteristics that are very different from their electric counterparts, thus requiring unique control strategies. This paper presents a methodology for developing a power management strategy tailored specifically to a parallel Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle (HHV) configured for a medium-size delivery truck. The Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle is modelled in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment to facilitate system integration and control studies. A Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm is used to obtain optimal control actions for gear shifting and power splitting bet ween the engine and the hydraulic motor over a representative urban driving schedule. Features of optimal trajectories are then studied to derive i mplementable rules. System behaviour demonstrates that the new control strategy takes advantage of high power density and efficiency characteristics of hydraulic components, and minimizes disadvantages of low energy density, to achieve enhanced overall efficiency. Simulation results indicate that the potential for fuel economy improvement of medium trucks with hydraulic hybrid propulsion can be as high as 48 %. 1

Bin Wu; Chan-chiao Lin; Zoran Filipi; Huei Peng

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Forecast of California car and truck fuel demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to forecast likely future car and truck fuel demand in California in light of recent and possible additional improvements in vehicle efficiency. Forecasts of gasoline and diesel fuel demand are made based on projections of primary economic, demographic, and transportation technology variables. Projections of car and light truck stock and new sales are based on regression equations developed from historical data. Feasible future vehicle fuel economies are determined from technical improvements possible with existing technology. Several different cases of market-induced efficiency improvement are presented. Anticipated fuel economy improvements induced by federal mileage standards and rising fuel costs will cause lower future fuel demand, even though vehicle miles traveled will continue to increase both on a per capita and total basis. If only relatively low-cost fuel economy improvements are adopted after about 1985, when federal standards require no further improvements, fuel demand will decrease from the 1982 level of 11.7 billion gallons (gasoline equivalent) to 10.6 billion gallons in 2002, about a 9% reduction. Higher fuel economy levels, based on further refinements in existing technology, can produce an additional 7% reduction in fuel demand by 2002.

Stamets, L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck Emissions in the Austin- San Marcos Area: August Denver, CO 80208 November 1998 UNIVERSITY Of DENVER #12;Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Trucks in Austin be observed by probing the exhaust. In the process of measuring the ratios, the remote sensing unit results

Denver, University of

403

F2001-01-2793 Design of an Advanced Heavy Tactical Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response of both a series hybrid and an electric-driven truck at the top (vehicle) level, and the response is applied to the design of an advanced heavy tactical truck. Novel technologies (e.g., series hybrid for both series hybrid and series electric drive propulsion systems; results are presented for two sets

Michelena, Nestor

404

Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

03TB-45 Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck and vehicle test results for a medium-duty hybrid electric truck are reported in this paper. The design the benchmark vehicle. INTRODUCTION Hybrid powertrain is among the most visible transportation technology

Grizzle, Jessy W.

405

International Truck & Bus Meeting & Exhibition, Fort Worth, TX, November 2003. 2003-01-3369  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck Chan-Chiao Lin, Huei Peng for a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV). The hybrid electric truck that employs this control system features a "Direct Hybrid" powertrain system [1], which integrates an advanced diesel engine, an electric traction

Peng, Huei

406

EM Awards Two Large Contracts to Small Businesses for Trucking Services |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Two Large Contracts to Small Businesses for Trucking Awards Two Large Contracts to Small Businesses for Trucking Services EM Awards Two Large Contracts to Small Businesses for Trucking Services June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) truck approaches the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, N.M. Since opening in 1999, WIPP has established an impressive record. In addition to transporting more than 10,500 shipments safely, WIPP drivers have logged more than 12.6 million safe loaded miles — equivalent to 26 roundtrips to the moon — without a serious accident or injury. Their work has helped DOE clean up 22 transuranic waste sites around the nation. A Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) truck approaches the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, N.M. Since opening in 1999, WIPP has established an

407

VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra August 6, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra Kevin Craft What does this mean for me? Smith Electric Vehicles included in Vice President's report on 100 Recovery Act Projects That Are Changing America. Smith plans to hire at least 50 employees by the end of the year. Through a Recovery Act grant, that company - Smith Electric Vehicles (SEV) - is taking a different tact that could lay the foundation for the industry's future. Not only is the company manufacturing all-electric, zero-emission commercial trucks, it's collecting data on how these commercial EVs are used. In Kansas City, Mo., an 80-year old company is on

408

Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program, a government-industry research partnership  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 21st Century Truck Program has been established as a government-industry research partnership to support the development and implementation of commercially viable technologies that will dramatically cut fuel use and emissions of commercial trucks and buses while enhancing their safety and affordability as well as maintaining or enhancing performance. The innovations resulting from this program will reduce dependence on foreign oil, improve our nation's air quality, provide advanced technology for military vehicles, and enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. truck and bus industry while ensuring safe and affordable freight and bus transportation for the nation's economy. This Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program has been prepared to guide the development of the technical advancements that will enable the needed improvements in commercial truck fuel economy, emissions, and safety.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO INTERNATIONAL TRUCK AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERNATIONAL TRUCK AND INTERNATIONAL TRUCK AND ENGINE CORPORATION (ITEC) UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26- 06NT42791 FOR "NATIONAL HYBRID TRUCK MANUFACTURING PROGRAM"; CH-1412; W(A)-07-024 International Truck and Engine Corporation (ITEC) has petitioned for an advanced waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-06NT42891. ITEC is a subcontractor of WESTSTART- CALSTART. This advanced waiver is intended to apply to all subject inventions of International Truck and Engine's employees and those of its subcontractors, regardless of tier, except subcontractors eligible to obtain title pursuant to P. L. 96-517 as amended, and National Laboratories. As brought out in its waiver petition, ITEC will research and develop electrical subsystems

410

Analysis of major trends in U.S. commercial trucking, 1977-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002) and intermediate-range (1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends. The primary sources of data for this period were the U.S. Bureau of the Census Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey and Truck Inventory and Use Survey. In addition, selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration and from the U.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway Administration's Highway Statistics were used. The report analyzes (1) overall gasoline and diesel fuel consumption patterns by passenger vehicles and trucks and (2) the population changes and fuels used by all commercial truck classes by selected truck type (single unit or combination), during specified time periods, with cargo-hauling commercial trucks given special emphasis. It also assesses trends in selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-mile traveled, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption. In addition, the report examines long-range trends for related factors (e.g., long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes. It identifies the effects of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption. The report also discusses basic engineering design and performance, national legislation on interstate highway construction, national demographic trends (e.g., suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operations requirements, and it highlights their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D .J.; Vyas, A. D.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

An overview of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) focuses on ``in-situ`` characterization, monitoring, remediation, and containment of landfills in and environments that contain hazardous and mixed waste. The MWLID mission is to assess, demonstrate, and transfer technologies and systems that lead to faster, better, cheaper, and safer cleanup. Most important, the demonstrated technologies will be evaluated against the baseline of conventional technologies. Key goals of the MWLID are routine use of these technologies by Environmental Restoration Groups throughout the DOE complex and commercialization of these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID is demonstrating technologies at hazardous waste landfills located at Sandia National Laboratories and on Kirtland Air Force Base. These landfills have been selected because they are representative of many sites throughout the Southwest and in other and climates.

Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D.; Betsill, J.D.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Briefing: Summary and Recommendations of EM Landfill Workshop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the summary and recommendations of the EM Landfill Workshop help in October 2008. By: Craig H. Bendson, PhD, PE; William H. Albright, PhD; David P. Ray, PE; and John Smegal...

413

Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline into the U.S. Form | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

into the U.S. Form More Documents & Publications Natural Gas Exports by Pipeline out of the U.S. Form LNG Imports by Truck into the U.S. Form Complete Set of all Reporting Forms...

414

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect

Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCARÔ??s test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of imported oil, that much less air pollution, and an equivalent reduction in the trade deficit, which is expected to lower the inflation rate.

N.B. Elsner; J.C. Bass; S. Ghamaty; D. Krommenhoek; A. Kushch; D. Snowden; S. Marchetti

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills - An experimental simulation in lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested engineered covers as surrogate to gas extraction during and after in situ aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined how covers influence gas emissions, water balance and leachate generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated effect of top covers on air-distribution in waste mass during aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We suggest criteria and cover design to meet the demands during and after aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such cover systems may offer greenhouse gas emission reduction also after active aeration. - Abstract: Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH{sub 4} loadings up to 300 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability even at 100% water holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, the more cohesive, mineral soil cover was expected to cause a notably uniform distribution of the injected air within the waste layer. Laboratory results also revealed sufficient air permeability of the soil materials (TS-F and SS-Z) placed in lysimeter C. However, at higher compaction density SS-Z became impermeable at 100% WHC. Methane emissions from the reference lysimeter with the smaller substrate cover (12-52 g CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d) were significantly higher than fluxes from the other lysimeters (0-19 g CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d) during in situ aeration. Regarding water balance, lysimeters covered with compost and compost-sand mixture, showed the lowest leachate rate (18-26% of the precipitation) due to the high water holding capacity and more favourable plant growth conditions compared to the lysimeters with mineral, more cohesive, soil covers (27-45% of the precipitation). On the basis of these results, the authors suggest a layered top cover system using both compost material as well as mineral soil in order to support active low-pressure aeration. Conventional soil materials with lower permeability may be used on top of the landfill body for a more uniform aeration of the waste due to an increased resistance to vertical gas flow. A compost cover may be built on top of the soil cover underlain by a gas distribution layer to improve methane oxidation rates and minimise water infiltration. By planting vegetation with a high transpiration rate, the leachate amount emanating from the landfill could be further minimised. The suggested design may be particularly suitable in combination with intermittent in situ aeration, in the later stage of an aeration measure, or at very small sites and shallow deposits. The top cover system could further regulate water infiltration into the landfill and mitigate residual CH{sub 4} emissions, even beyond the time of active aeration.

Hrad, Marlies [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Huber-Humer, Marion, E-mail: marion.huber-humer@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and 07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 26, 2011 EA-1707: Revised Draft Environmental Assessment Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 13, 2010 EA-1707: Draft Environmental Assessment

418

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2005 Success Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader CO2 Wash(tm) Technology Cleans Landfill Gas to Power Heavy Duty Trucks (PDF 249 KB) Composite Materials Production...

419

Natural Gas - CNG & LNG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas pump Natural gas, a fossil fuel comprised mostly of methane, is one of the cleanest burning alternative fuels. It can be used in the form of compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel cars and trucks. Dedicated natural gas vehicles are designed to run on natural gas only, while dual-fuel or bi-fuel vehicles can also run on gasoline or diesel. Dual-fuel vehicles allow users to take advantage of the wide-spread availability of gasoline or diesel but use a cleaner, more economical alternative when natural gas is available. Since natural gas is stored in high-pressure fuel tanks, dual-fuel vehicles require two separate fueling systems, which take up passenger/cargo space. Natural gas vehicles are not available on a large scale in the U.S.-only

420

State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck :  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaii (2007-2009) Hawaii (2007-2009) Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov ┬╗ Communities ┬╗ Research ┬╗ Data State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck : Hawaii (2007-2009) Dataset Summary Description The State Traffic Safety Information (STSI) portal is part of the larger Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Encyclopedia. STSI provides state-by-state traffic safety profiles, including: crash data, lives saved/savable, legislation, economic costs, grant funding, alcohol related crash data, performance measures, and geographic maps of crash data. Tags {geospatial,fatality,crash,data,safety,roadway,vehicle,human,person} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas truck landfills" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck :  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware (2007-2009) Delaware (2007-2009) Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov ┬╗ Communities ┬╗ Research ┬╗ Data State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck : Delaware (2007-2009) Dataset Summary Description The State Traffic Safety Information (STSI) portal is part of the larger Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Encyclopedia. STSI provides state-by-state traffic safety profiles, including: crash data, lives saved/savable, legislation, economic costs, grant funding, alcohol related crash data, performance measures, and geographic maps of crash data. Tags {geospatial,fatality,crash,data,safety,roadway,vehicle,human,person} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness

422

State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck :  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

District of Columbia (2007-2009) District of Columbia (2007-2009) Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov ┬╗ Communities ┬╗ Research ┬╗ Data State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck : District of Columbia (2007-2009) Dataset Summary Description The State Traffic Safety Information (STSI) portal is part of the larger Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Encyclopedia. STSI provides state-by-state traffic safety profiles, including: crash data, lives saved/savable, legislation, economic costs, grant funding, alcohol related crash data, performance measures, and geographic maps of crash data. Tags {geospatial,fatality,crash,data,safety,roadway,vehicle,human,person} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility

423

State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck :  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indiana (2007-2009) Indiana (2007-2009) Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov ┬╗ Communities ┬╗ Research ┬╗ Data State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck : Indiana (2007-2009) Dataset Summary Description The State Traffic Safety Information (STSI) portal is part of the larger Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Encyclopedia. STSI provides state-by-state traffic safety profiles, including: crash data, lives saved/savable, legislation, economic costs, grant funding, alcohol related crash data, performance measures, and geographic maps of crash data. Tags {geospatial,fatality,crash,data,safety,roadway,vehicle,human,person} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness

424

State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck :  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho (2007-2009) Idaho (2007-2009) Research Menu Data/Tools Apps Resources Let's Talk Research Alpha You are here Data.gov ┬╗ Communities ┬╗ Research ┬╗ Data State Traffic Safety Information - Fatal Crashes Involving a Large Truck : Idaho (2007-2009) Dataset Summary Description The State Traffic Safety Information (STSI) portal is part of the larger Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Encyclopedia. STSI provides state-by-state traffic safety profiles, including: crash data, lives saved/savable, legislation, economic costs, grant funding, alcohol related crash data, performance measures, and geographic maps of crash data. Tags {geospatial,fatality,crash,data,safety,roadway,vehicle,human,person} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet

425

Microsoft Word - 2011sr10-fire truck donation.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monday, August 8, 2011 Monday, August 8, 2011 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Rick McLeod, SRSCRO, (803) 593-9954, Ext. 1411 rick.mcleod@srscro.org DOE's Excess Property Donation Protects Lives, Property and the Environment AIKEN, SC - The recent purchase of new fire engines at Savannah River Site resulted in the availability of two excess fire trucks under the SRS Community Reuse Organization's (SRS CRO) Asset Transition Program. The primary goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Asset Transition Program is to utilize excess personal property derived from the Savannah River Site to enhance economic development and job opportunities within a five-county region surrounding the Site. In addition to job creation, assets may also be used to improve the "quality

426

Modeling the interaction between passenger cars and trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The topic of this dissertation was the use of distributed computing to improve the modeling of the interaction between passenger cars and trucks. The two main focus areas were the development of a methodology to combine microscopic traffic simulation programs with driving simulator programs, and the application of a prototype distributed traffic simulation to study the impact of the length of an impeding vehicle on passing behavior. The methodology was motivated by the need to provide an easier way to create calibrated traffic flows in driving simulations and to capture vehicle behavior within microscopic traffic simulations. The original design for the prototype was to establish a two-way, real time exchange of vehicle data, however problems were encountered that imposed limitations on its development and use. The passing study was motivated by the possible changes in federal truck size and weight regulations and the current inconsistency between the passing sight distance criteria for the design of two lane highways and the marking of no-passing zones. Test drivers made passing maneuvers around impeding vehicles that differed in length and speed. The main effects of the impeding vehicle length were found to be significant for the time and distance in the left lane, and the start and end gap distances. Passing equations were formulated based on the mechanics of the passing maneuver and included behavior variables for calibration. Through a sensitivity analysis, it was shown that increases in vehicle speeds, vehicle length, and gap distance increased the distance traveled in the left lane, while increases in the speed difference and speed gain decreased the distance traveled in the left lane. The passing equations were calibrated using the current AASHTO values and used to predict the impact of increased vehicle lengths on the time and distance in the left lane. The passing equations are valuable for evaluating passing sight distance criteria and observed passing behavior.

Jenkins, Jacqueline Marie

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

UPDATING THE FREIGHT TRUCK STOCK ADJUSTMENT MODEL: 1997 VEHICLE INVENTORY AND USE SURVEY DATA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36 36 UPDATING THE FREIGHT TRUCK STOCK ADJUSTMENT MODEL: 1997 VEHICLE INVENTORY AND USE SURVEY DATA Stacy C. Davis November 2000 Prepared for the Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6073 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 Updating the FTSAM: 1997 VIUS Data iii TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 OBJECTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 VIUS DATA PREPARATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Table 1. Share of Trucks by Fuel Type and Truck Size -

428

Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH{sub 4} oxidation in landfill soil covers  

SciTech Connect

Methane (CH{sub 4}), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH{sub 4} is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH{sub 4} oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH{sub 4} (V{sub max}) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O{sub 2} from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH{sub 4} slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O{sub 2} decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is infl