Sample records for gas treatment plan

  1. Planning techniques for avoiding sublease treatment on assigning oil and gas leases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kells, R.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many oil and gas leasebrokers and other industry people who have bought and transferred oil and gas leases may have unintentionally exposed themselves to a large potential tax liability, wholly unrelated to their actual economic gain or loss, by transferring oil and gas leases subject to a continuing nonoperating interest such as an overriding royalty interest. This article is concerned with the various tax consequences which may ensue when a nonproducing oil and gas lease is transferred, and provides suggestions for structuring the purchase and sale of nonproducing oil and gas leases to obtain the most favorable tax treatment. Throughout the article the assignment of leases is assumed to be by a leasebroker.

  2. Planning techniques for avoiding sublease treatment on assigning oil and gas leases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kells, R.B.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The negative tax consequences that may occur upon transfer of a nonproducing oil and gas lease are discussed. It is usually assumed that income taxes are computed on their actual economic gain, however, taxes are computed often on income that is far greater an amount than the economic gain. Suggestionss are made for structuring the sales to obtain the most-favorable tax arrangement. It is also suggested that legislation be enacted to provide for sale treatment in the instance when a lessee assigns a lease but still retains a continuing non-operating interest. Taxing discrepancies that now exist between oil/gas properties and those of other minerals would also be lessened by such legislation. 48 references.

  3. Primer on gas integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

  4. Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules are promulgated under the authority of the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules require that utilities develop and maintain a diversified gas...

  5. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  6. Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

  7. DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Deployment of Advanced Technology DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through...

  8. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (?2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ?2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the original plan fluence map as the starting stage reduced OAR dose at the mid-dose region, but increased the monitor units by 17%. Differences of only 2cc or less in OAR V50%/V70Gy/V76Gy were observed between 100 and 50 iterations.Conclusions: It is feasible to perform automatic online reoptimization in ?2 min using a clinical treatment planning system. Selecting optimal sets of input parameters is the key to achieving high quality reoptimized plans, and should be based on the individual patient's daily anatomy, delivery efficiency, and time allowed for plan adaptation.

  9. Samson Sherman President Obama's Energy Plan & Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Samson Sherman President Obama's Energy Plan & Natural Gas The Plan On March 30, President Obama" but includes wind, solar, nuclear, natural gas, and coal plants that can capture and store CO2 emissions period. Natural Gas Natural gas is considered the cleanest of all fossil fuels. Mostly comprised

  10. Tolerance doses for treatment planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyman, J.T.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to (low-LET) radiation has been compiled from a number of sources which are referenced at the end of this document. This tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD/sub 5/) or 50% (TD/sub 50/) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represents doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same endpoint. The data from some sources shows a tendancy to be quantized in 5 Gy increments. This reflects the size of possible round off errors. It is believed that all these data have been accumulated without the benefit of 3-D dose distributions and therefore the estimates of the size of the volume and/or the uniformity of the irradiation may be less accurate than is now possible. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Process for treatment of residual gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolden, K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

  12. Detailed Execution Planning for Large Oil and Gas Construction Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Detailed Execution Planning for Large Oil and Gas Construction Projects Presented by James Lozon, University of Calgary There is currently 55.8 billion dollars worth of large oil and gas construction projects scheduled or underway in the province of Alberta. Recently, large capital oil and gas projects

  13. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  14. Convex Relaxations for Gas Expansion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    major gas-fired power plants in the northeast of the U.S. were forced to shut .... mission system while minimizing investment, purchase, and transportation costs.

  15. MINERVA - A Multi-Modal Radiation Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Wessol; C. A. Wemple; D. W. Nigg; J. J. Cogliati; M. L. Milvich; C. Frederickson; M. Perkins; G. A. Harkin

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, research efforts have begun to examine the combination of BNCT with external beam photon radiotherapy (Barth et al. 2004). In order to properly prepare treatment plans for patients being treated with combinations of radiation modalities, appropriate planning tools must be available. To facilitiate this, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)and Montana State University (MSU) have undertaken development of a fully multi-modal radiation treatment planning system.

  16. Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). STP reference document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct), to prepare a plan describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste (hazardous/radioactive waste). DOE decided to prepare its site treatment plan in a three phased approach. The first phase, called the Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP), was issued in October 1993. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the CSTP described mixed waste streams generated at SRS and listed treatment scenarios for each waste stream utilizing an onsite, offsite DOE, and offsite or onsite commercial or vendor treatment option. The CSTP is followed by the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), due to be issued in August 1994. The DSTP, the current activity., will narrow the options discussed in the CSTP to a preferred treatment option, if possible, and will include waste streams proposed to be shipped to SRS from other DOE facilities as well as waste streams SRS may send offsite for treatment. The SRS DSTP process has been designed to address treatment options for each of the site`s mixed waste streams. The SRS Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP) is due to be issued in February 1995. The compliance order would be derived from the PSTP.

  17. Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of...

  18. Evolving treatment plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, D.; Shao, W.; DeMarco, J.; Tenn, S.; King, C.; Low, D.; Kupelian, P.; Steinberg, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The dosimetric aspects of radiation therapy treatment plan quality are usually evaluated and reported with dose volume histogram (DVH) endpoints. For clinical practicality, a small number of representative quantities derived from the DVH are often used as dose endpoints to summarize the plan quality. National guidelines on reference values for such quantities for some standard treatment approaches are often used as acceptance criteria to trigger treatment plan review. On the other hand, treatment prescription and planning approaches specific to each institution warrants the need to report plan quality in terms of practice consistency and with respect to institution-specific experience. The purpose of this study is to investigate and develop a systematic approach to record and characterize the institution-specific plan experience and use such information to guide the design of plan quality criteria. In the clinical setting, this approach will assist in (1) improving overall plan quality and consistency and (2) detecting abnormal plan behavior for retrospective analysis. Methods: The authors propose a self-evolving methodology and have developed an in-house prototype software suite that (1) extracts the dose endpoints from a treatment plan and evaluates them against both national standard and institution-specific criteria and (2) evolves the statistics for the dose endpoints and updates institution-specific criteria. Results: The validity of the proposed methodology was demonstrated with a database of prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy cases. As more data sets are accumulated, the evolving institution-specific criteria can serve as a reliable and stable consistency measure for plan quality and reveals the potential use of the ''tighter'' criteria than national standards or projected criteria, leading to practice that may push to shrink the gap between plans deemed acceptable and the underlying unknown optimality. Conclusions: The authors have developed a rationale to improve plan quality and consistency, by evolving the plan quality criteria from institution-specific experience, complementary to national standards. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated with a prototype system on prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases. The current study uses direct and indirect DVH endpoints for plan quality evaluation, but the infrastructure proposed here applies to general outcome data as well. The authors expect forward evaluation together with intelligent update based on evidence-based learning, which will evolve the clinical practice for improved efficiency, consistency, and ultimately better treatment outcome.

  19. Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program Crosscut Plan, FY 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has established a Natural Gas Coordinating Committee to ensure that all natural gas programs are conducted with a single strategic focus and without unnecessary duplication. This group prepared the FY 1993 update of the DOE Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Crosscut Program Plan (FY 1993-1998), which was first produced a year ago as a ``working draft`` for industry comment. This revised version incorporates these external comments and the results and recommendations of such developments as Order No. 636 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the FERC/DOE Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force Report; the National Petroleum Council`s 1992 natural gas study, The Potential for Natural Gas in the United States; relevant provisions of the EPACT, and new policy guidance from the Clinton Administration. The overall goal of the Natural Gas RD&D Program is to improve the Nation`s ability to supply, store, transport, distribute, and utilize gas in an economically efficient and environmentally beneficial manner. In support of DOE`s missions are programs that will: improve the confidence in the continued availability of a long-term gas supply (Resource and Extraction Area); provide more cost-effective and competitive means to use natural gas in both new and existing markets (Utilization Area); develop improved and less costly means of delivering and storing gas (Delivery and Storage Area); and develop and ensure availability of low cost environmental compliance technology, and reduce regulatory barriers to efficient market operations by promoting coordinated, efficient, and innovative Federal and State regulations (Environmental/Regulatory Impact Area). Each program area has its own unique mission that contributes to the goals and mission of the overall Natural Gas Program.

  20. Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  2. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

  3. Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for separating C{sub 3}+ hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane. 6 figs.

  4. Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for separating C.sub.3 + hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane.

  5. Proceedings of the flexible, midsize gas turbine program planning workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission (CEC) held a program planning workshop on March 4--5, 1997 in Sacramento, California on the subject of a flexible, midsize gas turbine (FMGT). The workshop was also co-sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the Gas Turbine Association (GTA), and the Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program (CAGT). The purpose of the workshop was to bring together a broad cross section of knowledgeable people to discuss the potential benefits, markets, technical attributes, development costs, and development funding approaches associated with making this new technology available in the commercial marketplace. The participants in the workshop included representatives from the sponsoring organizations, electric utilities, gas utilities, independent power producers, gas turbine manufacturers, gas turbine packagers, and consultants knowledgeable in the power generation field. Thirteen presentations were given on the technical and commercial aspects of the subject, followed by informal breakout sessions that dealt with sets of questions on markets, technology requirements, funding sources and cost sharing, and links to other programs.

  6. Tax Treatment of Natural Gas The "landowner" referred to in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Tax Treatment of Natural Gas Marcellus Education Fact Sheet The "landowner" referred and tax op- tions available to you as a result T he Marcellus shale geological formation underlies almost in this previously un- tapped formation. The Marcellus shale natural gas boom is creating unprecedented

  7. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  8. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  9. Savannah River Site approved site treatment plan, 2000 annual update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  10. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  11. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  12. A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field, Houston, TX 77098 Abstract The planning of offshore oil or gas field infrastructure under uncertainty is addressed in this paper. The main uncertainties considered are in the initial maximum oil or gas flowrate

  13. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas....................................................................... 1 Analysis of the Direct Use of Natural Gas for the Sixth Power Plan electricity to natural gas for residential space and water heating a lower-cost and lower-risk alternative

  14. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Berry, M.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  15. Approved Site Treatment Plan, Volumes 1 and 2. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmich, E.H.; Molen, G.; Noller, D.

    1996-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume 1. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore, pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021. Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW. The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  16. Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

  17. Adsorption modeling for off-gas treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ladshaw, A.; Sharma, K.; Yiacoumi, S.; Tsouris, C. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0459 (United States); De Paoli, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6181 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Off-gas generated from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel contains a mixture of several radioactive gases including {sup 129}I{sub 2}, {sup 85}Kr, HTO, and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Over the past few decades, various separation and recovery processes have been studied for capturing these gases. Adsorption data for gaseous mixtures of species can be difficult to determine experimentally. Therefore, procedures capable of predicting the adsorption behavior of mixtures need to be developed from the individual isotherms of each of the pure species. A particular isotherm model of interest for the pure species is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption isotherm. This model contains an adjustable number of parameters and will therefore describe a wide range of adsorption isotherms for a variety of components. A code has been developed in C++ to perform the non-linear regression analysis necessary for the determination of the isotherm parameters, as well as the least number of parameters needed to describe an entire set of data. (authors)

  18. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble components are mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, causing uncertainty in its composition, particularly the radionuclide content. This plan will provide an estimate of the likely composition and the basis for it, assess likely treatment technologies, identify potential disposition paths, establish target treatment limits, and recommend the testing needed to show feasibility. Two primary disposition options are proposed for investigation, one is concentration for storage in the tank farms, and the other is treatment prior to disposition in the Effluent Treatment Facility. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Recycle stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of 210,000 years. Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Because {sup 99}Tc has a very long half-life and is highly mobile, it is the largest dose contributor to the Performance Assessment (PA) of the IDF. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Recycle are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. Although the baseline process will recycle this stream to the Pretreatment Facility, if the LAW facility begins operation first, this stream will not have a disposition path internal to WTP. One potential solution is to return the stream to the tank farms where it can be evaporated in the 242-A evaporator, or perhaps deploy an auxiliary evaporator to concentrate it prior to return to the tank farms. In either case, testing is needed to evaluat

  19. B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, T.G.

    1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

  20. Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

  1. Planning and Installation Guide: North Carolina Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Planning and Installation Guide: North Carolina Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations Introduction Are you considering installing a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station for your fleet to provide your fleet with fuel. One resource for locating and identifying public compressed natural gas

  2. Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRIGNANO, A.L.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  3. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  4. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit GFSI Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. A. Owca

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This GFSI Risk Management Plan (RMP) describes the strategy for assessing and managing project risks for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that are specifically within the control and purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and identifies the risks that formed the basis for the DOE contingency included in the performance baseline. DOE-held contingency is required to cover cost and schedule impacts of DOE activities. Prior to approval of the performance baseline (Critical Decision-2) project cost contingency was evaluated during a joint meeting of the Contractor Management Team and the Integrated Project Team for both contractor and DOE risks to schedule and cost. At that time, the contractor cost and schedule risk value was $41.3M and the DOE cost and schedule risk contingency value is $39.0M. The contractor cost and schedule risk value of $41.3M was retained in the performance baseline as the contractor's management reserve for risk contingency. The DOE cost and schedule risk value of $39.0M has been retained in the performance baseline as the DOE Contingency. The performance baseline for the project was approved in December 2006 (Garman 2006). The project will continue to manage to the performance baseline and change control thresholds identified in PLN-1963, ''Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Project Execution Plan'' (PEP).

  5. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zweig, H.R.; Fischler, S.; Wagner, W.R. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International Corporation, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  6. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  7. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  8. Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  10. Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    -492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

  11. Africa planned gas lines will meet future demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The burgeoning European market for natural gas is expected to create major gas line construction. The potential for North Africa looks particularly promising in 1991. Italy's ENI has proposed a 6,000-km (3,728-mi) gas network in North Africa to connect gas-rich Libya and Algeria with Morocco and Mauritania, making large volumes available to the European market. According to the proposal, a gas line would run from the Sirte Basin in Libya west to Mauritania. Extending the line eastward through Egypt and on to the Arabian Peninsula would provide export access. In this paper initial studies are examine reserve projections for the next 20 years, then based on results, a transmission/distribution network will be designed, including an offshore gathering system.

  12. Treatment of nitrous off-gas from dissolution of sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flament, T.A.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several configurations have been reviewed for the NO{sub x} removal of dissolver off-gas. A predesign has been performed and operating conditions have been optimized. Simple absorption columns seems to be sufficient. NHC is in charge of the treatment of sludges containing mainly uranium dioxide and metallic uranium. The process is based on the following processing steps a dissolution step to oxidize the pyrophoric materials and to dissolve radionuclides (uranium, plutonium, americium and fission products), a solid/liquid separation to get rid of the insoluble solids (to be disposed at ERDF), an adjustment of the acid liquor with neutronic poisons, and neutralization of the acid liquor with caustic soda. The dissolution step generates a flow of nitrous fumes which was evaluated in a previous study. This NO{sub x} flow has to be treated. The purpose of this report is to study the treatment process of the nitrous vapors and to 0482 perform a preliminary design. Several treatment configurations are studied and the most effective process option with respect to the authorized level of discharge into atmosphere is discussed. As a conclusion, recommendations concerning the unit preliminary design are given.

  13. Comparison of Prostate IMRT and VMAT Biologically Optimised Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: hardcastle@humonc.wisc.edu [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Department of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Department of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Foo, Kerwyn [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Graduate School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Miller, Andrew [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Graduate School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Carolan, Martin [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Metcalfe, Peter [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new radiotherapy delivery technique has become clinically available-volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). VMAT is the delivery of IMRT while the gantry is in motion using dynamic leaf motion. The perceived benefit of VMAT over IMRT is a reduction in delivery time. In this study, VMAT was compared directly with IMRT for a series of prostate cases. For 10 patients, a biologically optimized seven-field IMRT plan was compared with a biologically optimized VMAT plan using the same planning objectives. The Pinnacle RTPS was used. The resultant target and organ-at-risk dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were compared. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated for 3 model parameter sets. The delivery efficiency and time for the IMRT and VMAT plans was compared. The VMAT plans resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the rectal V25Gy parameter of 8.2% on average over the IMRT plans. For one of the NTCP parameter sets, the VMAT plans had a statistically significant lower rectal NTCP. These reductions in rectal dose were achieved using 18.6% fewer monitor units and a delivery time reduction of up to 69%. VMAT plans resulted in reductions in rectal doses for all 10 patients in the study. This was achieved with significant reductions in delivery time and monitor units. Given the target coverage was equivalent, the VMAT plans were superior.

  14. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  15. OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    , well drilling schedule and production profiles of oil, water and gas in each time period. The model can and how many wells are to be drilled in those fields and in what order, which field to be connected, limitation on the number of wells that can be drilled each year due to availability of the drilling rigs

  16. Mercury Strategic Plan Outfall 200 Mercury Treatment Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Partial LMR * Alpha-5 LMR & Bldg Characterization * S&M mercury removal * Hg waterfishsediment studies * Technology Development Plan * Debris treatability study * Fate and...

  17. Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

  18. Treatment of Uncertainty in Long-Term Planning 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    attribute to lie. For example, we could specify the price of natural gas in one of the following ways: #12 with time. #12;3 Figure 2: Specification of uncertainty in natural gas price Aside: We may also apply (maturation rate) Fuel costs forecast Demand forecast Plant retirement dates and salvage value Policy

  19. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  20. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  1. Analysis of 3D and 4D proton treatment planning for hepatic tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wi?niowska, Agata El?bieta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to assess the difference between 4D liver dose calculations versus standard 3D treatment planning and to investigate the dosimetric gain of gating on radiation dose to normal tissue. 4DCT scans ...

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  3. Computational aspects of treatment planning for neutron capture therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albritton, James Raymond, 1977-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted form of binary radiation therapy that has the potential to deliver radiation to cancers with cellular dose selectivity. Accurate and efficient treatment ...

  4. Forward treatment planning for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) employing Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D., E-mail: henzen@ams.unibe.ch; Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Lössl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K. [Division of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland)] [Division of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Neuenschwander, H. [Clinic for Radiation-Oncology, Lindenhofspital Bern, CH-3012 Berne (Switzerland)] [Clinic for Radiation-Oncology, Lindenhofspital Bern, CH-3012 Berne (Switzerland); Stampanoni, M. F. M. [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zürich and Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland)] [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zürich and Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper describes the development of a forward planning process for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT). The approach is based on a previously developed electron beam model used to calculate dose distributions of electron beams shaped by a photon multi leaf collimator (pMLC). Methods: As the electron beam model has already been implemented into the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan environment, the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) can be included in the planning process for MERT. In a first step, CT data are imported into Eclipse and a pMLC shaped electron beam is set up. This initial electron beam is then divided into segments, with the electron energy in each segment chosen according to the distal depth of the planning target volume (PTV) in beam direction. In order to improve the homogeneity of the dose distribution in the PTV, a feathering process (Gaussian edge feathering) is launched, which results in a number of feathered segments. For each of these segments a dose calculation is performed employing the in-house developed electron beam model along with the macro Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. Finally, an automated weight optimization of all segments is carried out and the total dose distribution is read back into Eclipse for display and evaluation. One academic and two clinical situations are investigated for possible benefits of MERT treatment compared to standard treatments performed in our clinics and treatment with a bolus electron conformal (BolusECT) method. Results: The MERT treatment plan of the academic case was superior to the standard single segment electron treatment plan in terms of organs at risk (OAR) sparing. Further, a comparison between an unfeathered and a feathered MERT plan showed better PTV coverage and homogeneity for the feathered plan, with V{sub 95%} increased from 90% to 96% and V{sub 107%} decreased from 8% to nearly 0%. For a clinical breast boost irradiation, the MERT plan led to a similar homogeneity in the PTV compared to the standard treatment plan while the mean body dose was lower for the MERT plan. Regarding the second clinical case, a whole breast treatment, MERT resulted in a reduction of the lung volume receiving more than 45% of the prescribed dose when compared to the standard plan. On the other hand, the MERT plan leads to a larger low-dose lung volume and a degraded dose homogeneity in the PTV. For the clinical cases evaluated in this work, treatment plans using the BolusECT technique resulted in a more homogenous PTV and CTV coverage but higher doses to the OARs than the MERT plans. Conclusions: MERT treatments were successfully planned for phantom and clinical cases, applying a newly developed intuitive and efficient forward planning strategy that employs a MC based electron beam model for pMLC shaped electron beams. It is shown that MERT can lead to a dose reduction in OARs compared to other methods. The process of feathering MERT segments results in an improvement of the dose homogeneity in the PTV.

  5. Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

  6. A simple DVH generation technique from various radiotherapy treatment planning systems for independent information system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Byung Jun; Jeong, Il Sun; Lee, Hyebin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the use of PACS for radiation therapy has become the norm in hospital environment and has suggested for collecting data and management from different TPSs with DICOM objects. However, some TPS does not provide the DVH exportation with text or other format. In addition, plan review systems for various TPSs often allow DVH recalculation with different algorithms. These algorithms result in the inevitable discrepancy between the values obtained with the recalculation and those obtained with TPS itself. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple method for generating reproducible DVH values obtained from the TPSs. Treatment planning information including structures and delivered dose was exported by the DICOM format from planning systems. The supersampling and trilinear interpolation methods were employed to calculate DVH data from 35 treatment plans. The discrepancies between DVHs extracted from each TPS and the proposed calculation method were evaluated with respect to the supersampling ...

  7. Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

  8. Forward osmosis treatment of drilling mud and fracturing wastewater from oil and gas operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forward osmosis treatment of drilling mud and fracturing wastewater from oil and gas operations) was tested for treatment and reclamation of water from drilling waste to facilitate beneficial water reuse recover more than 80% of the water from the drilling waste. Osmotic backwashing was demonstrated

  9. BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRE-TREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Creighton

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set. The production of cleaner renewable energy will help offset the carbon footprint of other energy sources that are currently utilized.

  10. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the

  11. Development of advanced technology of coke oven gas drainage treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashi, Tadayuki; Yamaguchi, Akikazu; Ikai, Kyozou; Kamiyama, Hisarou; Muto, Hiroshi

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1994, commercial-scale application of ozone oxidation to ammonia liquor (which is primarily the water condensing from coke oven gas) to reduce its chemical oxygen demand (COD) was started at the Nagoya Works of Nippon Steel Corporation. This paper deals with the results of technical studies on the optimization of process operating conditions and the enlargement of equipment size and the operating purification system.

  12. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Markets for renewable energy have historically been motivated primarily by policy efforts, but a less widely recognized driver is poised to also play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Resource planning has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions where retail competition has failed to take root. In the western United States, the most recent resource plans contemplate a significant amount of renewable energy additions. These planned additions--primarily coming from wind power--are motivated by the improved economics of wind power, a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities, and an increasing recognition of the inherent risks (e.g., natural gas price risk, environmental compliance risk) in fossil-based generation portfolios. This report examines how twelve western utilities treat renewable energy in their recent resource plans. In aggregate, these utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. Our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable energy, and (2) to identify methodological/modeling issues, and suggest possible improvements to methods used to evaluate renewable energy as a resource option. Here we summarize the key findings of the report, beginning with a discussion of the planned renewable energy additions called for by the twelve utilities, an overview of how these plans incorporated renewables into candidate portfolios, and a review of the specific technology cost and performance assumptions they made, primarily for wind power. We then turn to the utilities' analysis of natural gas price and environmental compliance risks, and examine how the utilities traded off portfolio cost and risk in selecting a preferred portfolio.

  13. Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

  14. Proposed site treatment plan (PSTP) Volumes I & II & reference document, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S. [and others

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act requires the Department of Energy to undertake a national effort to develop Site Treatment Plans for each of its sites generating or storing mixed waste. Mixed waste contains both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. The Site Treatment Plan for the Savannah River Site proposes how SRS will treat mixed waste that is now stored on the site and mixed waste that Will be generated in the future. Also, the Site Treatment Plan identifies Savannah River Site mixed wastes that other Department of Energy facilities could treat and mixed waste from other facilities that the Savannah River Site could treat. The Site Treatment Plan has been approved by the State of South Carolina. The Department of Energy Will enter into a consent order with the State of South Carolina by October 6, 1995. The consent order will contain enforceable commitments to treat mixed waste.

  15. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  16. Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). Volumes 1 and 2 and Reference Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S.; Bailey, L.L.

    1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compliance Plan Volume provides overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) and contains procedures to establish milestones to be enforced under the Order. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume and is provided for informational purposes only.

  17. 1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenstrom, Michael K.

    1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important = CL (CL + HcVG) (6) where CL = liquid phase concentration, VL = liquid volume, CG = gas phase concentration, VG = gas volume, Hc = dimensionless Henry's law coefficient and M = mass of gas. Now use two

  18. Characterization of oil and gas waste disposal practices and assessment of treatment costs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedient, P.B.

    1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines wastes associated with the onshore exploration and production of crude oil and natural gas in the US. The objective of this study was to update and enhance the current state of knowledge with regard to oil and gas waste quantities, the potential environmental impact of these wastes, potential methods of treatment, and the costs associated with meeting various degrees of treatment. To meet this objective, the study consisted of three tasks: (1) the development of a production Environmental Database (PED) for the purpose of assessing current oil and gas waste volumes by state and for investigating the potential environmental impacts associated with current waste disposal practices on a local scale; (2) the evaluation of available and developing technologies for treating produced water waste streams and the identification of unit process configurations; and (3) the evaluation of the costs associated with various degrees of treatment achievable by different treatment configurations. The evaluation of feasible technologies for the treatment of produced water waste streams was handled in the context of comparing the level of treatment achievable with the associated cost of treatment. Treatment processes were evaluated for the removal of four categories of produced water contaminants: particulate material, volatile organic compounds, adsorbable organic compounds, and dissolved inorganic species. Results showed dissolved inorganic species to be the most costly to remove. The potential cost of treating all 18.3 billion barrels of produced water generated in a year amounts to some 15 billion dollars annually.

  19. Split-Volume Treatment Planning of Multiple Consecutive Vertebral Body Metastases for Cyberknife Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)], E-mail: arjunsahgal@yahoo.com; Chuang, Cynthia; Larson, David; Huang, Kim; Petti, Paula [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Weinstein, Phil [Department of Neurologic Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyberknife treatment planning of multiple consecutive vertebral body metastases is challenging due to large target volumes adjacent to critical normal tissues. A split-volume treatment planning technique was developed to improve the treatment plan quality of such lesions. Treatment plans were generated for 1 to 5 consecutive thoracic vertebral bodies (CVBM) prescribing a total dose of 24 Gy in 3 fractions. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of the entire vertebral body(ies). Treatment plans were generated considering both the de novo clinical scenario (no prior radiation), imposing a dose limit of 8 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord, and the retreatment scenario (prior radiation) with a dose limit of 3 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord. The split-volume planning technique was compared with the standard full-volume technique only for targets ranging from 2 to 5 CVBM in length. The primary endpoint was to obtain best PTV coverage by the 24 Gy prescription isodose line. A total of 18 treatment plans were generated (10 standard and 8 split-volume). PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line worsened consistently as the number of CVBM increased for both the de novo and retreatment scenario. Split-volume planning was achieved by introducing a 0.5-cm gap, splitting the standard full-volume PTV into 2 equal length PTVs. In every case, split-volume planning resulted in improved PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line ranging from 4% to 12% for the de novo scenario and, 8% to 17% for the retreatment scenario. We did not observe a significant trend for increased monitor units required, or higher doses to spinal cord or esophagus, with split-volume planning. Split-volume treatment planning significantly improves Cyberknife treatment plan quality for CVBM, as compared to the standard technique. This technique may be of particular importance in clinical situations where stringent spinal cord dose limits are required.

  20. SU-E-T-148: Efficient Verification Method for Modulated Electron Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D; Chatelain, C; Manser, P; Frei, D; Volken, W; Joosten, A; Loessl, K; Aebersold, D M; Fix, M K [of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Neuenschwander, H [Clinic for Radiation-Oncology, Lindenhofspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: For shallow tumors, modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) promises a reduction of dose to distal organs at risk. At our institution a framework was developed in order to create treatment plans for MERT employing both forward and inverse optimization. In this work, an efficient quality assurance (QA) process is established. Methods: Treatment plans for three different tumor sites were created using an inverse optimization. These plans consist of 6–12 segments and energies between 6 and 18 MeV. An already established QA process for photon IMRT plans is now extended to additionally handle MERT plans. First, the dose distributions are calculated in a homogenous water phantom. For this task a dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) framework for MERT is used. Second, the segments are applied on a stand-alone amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) using a source-to-surface distance of 70 cm. This device was calibrated for electron beams in a previous work. An in-house developed analysis software, is then utilized for comparisons and evaluation of the measured and calculated dose distributions. Results: For all three plans the calculated dose distributions agree well with the measured ones. Using a 2D gamma comparison (2% of dose max/2 mm and 10% dose threshold) passing rates >98% are achieved.The dose calculation for each plan on the water phantom, using voxels of 0.2×0.2×0.2 cm{sup 3}, takes at maximum 30 min on a single core Pentium 2.66 GHz system with 6 GB RAM, to reach a statistical uncertainty of 2% (1 std. dev.). Conclusion: An already established QA procedure for IMRT photon plans was applied for MERT. The dedicated MC framework and the use of EPID measurements allow an efficient QA procedure in a clinical environment. This work was supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  1. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor [Gamma Knife Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosciences Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029 (India)] [Gamma Knife Unit, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosciences Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film.

  2. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate to the insoluble technetium dioxide. The reducing agents were tried with and without sorbents.

  3. Acid diversion is critical in horizontal gas well treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S.A. [Chevron USA Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Bui, H.N. [Chevron USA Production Co., Lafayette, LA (United States); Edwards, M.B. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acid treatment design for a horizontal well in the West Cameron area of the Gulf of Mexico successfully used alternating stages of foamed and nitrified 15% HCl for diversion. The subject well was drilled with a sized-salt fluid system to 3,493-ft MD including a 1,274-ft, 8{1/2}-in. horizontal openhole section. The horizontal openhole section was completed with 1,042 ft of 5-in., 0.008-gauge, 40.60-mesh dual prepack screen. Following placement of the completion assembly, the 10.5-ppg sized salt system used in the horizontal section was dislaced with a 50-bbl, sheared, high-viscosity push pill, followed by 50 bbl of 10.0-ppg filtered, NaCl solution. A 50-bbl, 15% HCl acid breaker solution was then spotted across the formation and allowed to soak on the remaining filter cake for 6 hours. The breaker was then circulated out with 9.5-ppg NaCl brine. Chlorides were monitored to determine the relative amount of filter cake cleanup. This paper reviews the operation and resulting performance of this treatment.

  4. Predicting objective function weights from patient anatomy in prostate IMRT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Taewoo, E-mail: taewoo.lee@utoronto.ca; Hammad, Muhannad [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada)] [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Chan, Timothy C. Y. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)] [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically combines multiple criteria into a single objective function by taking a weighted sum. The authors propose a statistical model that predicts objective function weights from patient anatomy for prostate IMRT treatment planning. This study provides a proof of concept for geometry-driven weight determination. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) was used to generate optimal objective function weights for 24 patients using their historical treatment plans (i.e., dose distributions). These IOM weights were around 1% for each of the femoral heads, while bladder and rectum weights varied greatly between patients. A regression model was developed to predict a patient's rectum weight using the ratio of the overlap volume of the rectum and bladder with the planning target volume at a 1 cm expansion as the independent variable. The femoral head weights were fixed to 1% each and the bladder weight was calculated as one minus the rectum and femoral head weights. The model was validated using leave-one-out cross validation. Objective values and dose distributions generated through inverse planning using the predicted weights were compared to those generated using the original IOM weights, as well as an average of the IOM weights across all patients. Results: The IOM weight vectors were on average six times closer to the predicted weight vectors than to the average weight vector, usingl{sub 2} distance. Likewise, the bladder and rectum objective values achieved by the predicted weights were more similar to the objective values achieved by the IOM weights. The difference in objective value performance between the predicted and average weights was statistically significant according to a one-sided sign test. For all patients, the difference in rectum V54.3 Gy, rectum V70.0 Gy, bladder V54.3 Gy, and bladder V70.0 Gy values between the dose distributions generated by the predicted weights and IOM weights was less than 5 percentage points. Similarly, the difference in femoral head V54.3 Gy values between the two dose distributions was less than 5 percentage points for all but one patient. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a proof of concept that patient anatomy can be used to predict appropriate objective function weights for treatment planning. In the long term, such geometry-driven weights may serve as a starting point for iterative treatment plan design or may provide information about the most clinically relevant region of the Pareto surface to explore.

  5. Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Daniel Arthur

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (â??target areaâ?ť), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

  6. Statistical Assessment of Proton Treatment Plans Under Setup and Range Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Peter C.; Cheung, Joey P.; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dong.lei@scrippshealth.org [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate a method for quantifying the effect of setup errors and range uncertainties on dose distribution and dose–volume histogram using statistical parameters; and to assess existing planning practice in selected treatment sites under setup and range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Twenty passively scattered proton lung cancer plans, 10 prostate, and 1 brain cancer scanning-beam proton plan(s) were analyzed. To account for the dose under uncertainties, we performed a comprehensive simulation in which the dose was recalculated 600 times per given plan under the influence of random and systematic setup errors and proton range errors. On the basis of simulation results, we determined the probability of dose variations and calculated the expected values and standard deviations of dose–volume histograms. The uncertainties in dose were spatially visualized on the planning CT as a probability map of failure to target coverage or overdose of critical structures. Results: The expected value of target coverage under the uncertainties was consistently lower than that of the nominal value determined from the clinical target volume coverage without setup error or range uncertainty, with a mean difference of ?1.1% (?0.9% for breath-hold), ?0.3%, and ?2.2% for lung, prostate, and a brain cases, respectively. The organs with most sensitive dose under uncertainties were esophagus and spinal cord for lung, rectum for prostate, and brain stem for brain cancer. Conclusions: A clinically feasible robustness plan analysis tool based on direct dose calculation and statistical simulation has been developed. Both the expectation value and standard deviation are useful to evaluate the impact of uncertainties. The existing proton beam planning method used in this institution seems to be adequate in terms of target coverage. However, structures that are small in volume or located near the target area showed greater sensitivity to uncertainties.

  7. SU-E-J-70: Feasibility Study of Dynamic Arc and IMRT Treatment Plans Utilizing Vero Treatment Unit and IPlan Planning Computer for SRS/FSRT Brain Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, S; Lee, S; Dagan, R; Malyapa, R; Mendenhall, N; Mendenhall, W; Ho, M; Hough, D; Yam, M; Li, Z [UFPTI, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of utilizing Dynamic Arc (DA) and IMRT with 5mm MLC leaf of VERO treatment unit for SRS/FSRT brain cancer patients with non-invasive stereotactic treatments. The DA and IMRT plans using the VERO unit (BrainLab Inc, USA) are compared with cone-based planning and proton plans to evaluate their dosimetric advantages. Methods: The Vero treatment has unique features like no rotational or translational movements of the table during treatments, Dynamic Arc/IMRT, tracking of IR markers, limitation of Ring rotation. Accuracies of the image fusions using CBCT, orthogonal x-rays, and CT are evaluated less than ? 0.7mm with a custom-made target phantom with 18 hidden targets. 1mm margin is given to GTV to determine PTV for planning constraints considering all the uncertainties of planning computer and mechanical uncertainties of the treatment unit. Also, double-scattering proton plans with 6F to 9F beams and typical clinical parameters, multiple isocenter plans with 6 to 21 isocenters, and DA/IMRT plans are evaluated to investigate the dosimetric advantages of the DA/IMRT for complex shape of targets. Results: 3 Groups of the patients are divided: (1) Group A (complex target shape), CI's are same for IMRT, and DGI of the proton plan are better by 9.5% than that of the IMRT, (2) Group B, CI of the DA plans (1.91+/?0.4) are better than cone-based plan, while DGI of the DA plan is 4.60+/?1.1 is better than cone-based plan (5.32+/?1.4), (3) Group C (small spherical targets), CI of the DA and cone-based plans are almost the same. Conclusion: For small spherical targets, cone-based plans are superior to other 2 plans: DS proton and DA plans. For complex or irregular plans, dynamic and IMRT plans are comparable to cone-based and proton plans for complex targets.

  8. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  9. Pulsed plasma treatment of polluted gas using wet-/low-temperature corona reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro; Yanagihara, Kenya; Rajanikanth, B.S.; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering] [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of pulsed plasma for gas cleaning is gaining prominence in recent years, mainly from the energy consideration point of view. Normally, the gas treatment is carried out at or above room temperature by the conventional dry-type corona reactor. However, this treatment is still inadequate for the removal of certain stable gases present in the exhaust/flue gas mixture. The authors report here some interesting results of treatment of such stable gases like N{sub 2}O with pulsed plasma at subambient temperature. Also reported in this paper are improvements in DeNO/DeNO{sub x} efficiency using unconventional wet-type reactors, designed and fabricated by us, and operating at different subambient temperatures. DeNO/DeNO{sub x} by the pulsed-plasma process is mainly due to oxidation, but reduction takes place at the same time. When the wet-type reactor was used, the NO{sub 2} product was absorbed by water film and higher DeNO{sub x} efficiency could be achieved. Apart from laboratory tests on simulated gas mixtures, field tests were also carried out on the exhaust gas of an 8-kW diesel engine. A comparative analysis of the various tests are presented, together with a note on the energy consideration.

  10. Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

  11. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  12. Transition Plan for the K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmeister J.

    2008-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) was previously used to treat and process all sanitary sewage waste from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The plant was shut down on May 29, 2008 as a result of the transition of sewage treatment for ETTP to the City of Oak Ridge. The City of Oak Ridge expanded the Rarity Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant (RRSTP) to include capacity to treat the waste from the ETTP and the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) constructed a new ETTP lift station and force main to RRSTP. In preparation for the shutdown of K-1203, the US Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with Operation Management International (OMI) developed a shut down plan to outline actions that need to occur prior to the transition of the facility to Bechtel Jacob Company, LLC (BJC) for decontamination and demolition (D and D). This plan outlines the actions, roles, and responsibilities for BJC in order to support the transition of the K-1203 STP from OMI to the BJC Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and D and D programs. The D and D of the K-1203 Facilities is planned under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Remaining Facilities D and D Action Memorandum in the Balance of Site-Utilities D and D Subproject in fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  13. Development and status of the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan or I love that mobile unit of mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bounini, L. [USDOE Grand Junction Project Office, CO (United States); Williams, M. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States); Zygmunt, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine Department of Energy (DOE) sites reporting to the Albuquerque Office (AL) have mixed waste that is chemically hazardous and radioactive. The hazardous waste regulations require the chemical portion of mixed waste to be to be treated to certain standards. The total volume of low-level mixed waste at the nine sites is equivalent to 7,000 drums, with individual site volumes ranging from 1 gallon of waste at the Pinellas Plant to 4,500 drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Nearly all the sites have a diversity of wastes requiring a diversity of treatment processes. Treatment capacity does not exist for much of this waste, and it would be expensive for each site to build the diversity of treatment processes needed to treat its own wastes. DOE-AL assembled a team that developed the AL Mixed Waste Treatment Plan that uses the resources of the nine sites to treat the waste at the sites. Work on the plan started in October 1993, and the plan was finalized in March 1994. The plan uses commercial treatment, treatability studies, and mobile treatment units. The plan specifies treatment technologies that will be built as mobile treatment units to be moved from site to site. Mobile units include bench-top units for very small volumes and treatability studies, drum-size units that treat one drum per day, and skid-size units that handle multiple drum volumes. After the tools needed to treat the wastes were determined, the sites were assigned to provide part of the treatment capacity using their own resources and expertise. The sites are making progress on treatability studies, commercial treatment, and mobile treatment design and fabrication. To date, this is the only plan for treating waste that brings the resources of several DOE sites together to treat mixed waste. It is the only program actively planning to use mobile treatment coordinated between DOE sites.

  14. SU-E-J-36: Combining CBCT Dose Into IMRT Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grelewicz, Z; Wiersma, R [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly used in patient setup for IMRT. Daily CBCT may provide effective localization, however, it introduces concern over excessive imaging dose. Previous studies investigated the calculation of excess CBCT dose, however, no study has yet treated this dose as a source of therapeutic radiation, optimized in consideration of PTV and OARs constrains. Here we present a novel combined MV+kV inverse optimization engine to weave the CBCT and MV dose together such that CBCT dose is used for both imaging and therapeutic purposes. This may mitigate some of the excess imaging dose effects of daily CBCT and allow complete evaluation of the CBCT dose prior to treatment. Methods: The EGSnrc Monte Carlo system was used to model a Varian Trilogy CBCT system and 6 MV treatment beam. Using the model, the dose to patient from treatment beam and imaging beam was calculated for ten patients. The standard IMRT objective function was modified to include CBCT dose. Treatment plan optimization using the MOSEK optimization tool was performed retrospectively with and without assuming kV radiation dose from CBCT, assuming one CBCT per fraction. Results: Across ten patients, the CBCT delivered peaks of between .4% and 3.0% of the prescription dose to the PTV, with average CBCT dose to the PTV between .3% and .8%. By including CBCT dose to skin as a constraint during optimization, peak skin dose is reduced by between 1.9% and 7.4%, and average skin dose is reduced by .2% to 3.3%. Conclusions: Pre-treatment CBCT may deliver a substantial amount of radiation dose to the target volume. By considering CBCT dose to skin at the point of treatment planning, it is possible to reduce patient skin dose from current clinical levels, and to provide patient treatment with the improved accuracy that daily CBCT provides.

  15. Sampling and Analysis Plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105-KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.A.; Green, M.A.; Makenas, B.J.; Trimble, D.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) details the sampling and analyses to be performed on fuel canisters transferred to the Weasel Pit of the 105-KW fuel storage basin. The radionuclide content of the liquid and gas in the canisters must be evaluated to support the shipment of fuel elements to the 300 Area in support of the fuel characterization studies (Abrefah, et al. 1994, Trimble 1995). The following sections provide background information and a description of the facility under investigation, discuss the existing site conditions, present the constituents of concern, outline the purpose and scope of the investigation, outline the data quality objectives (DQO), provide analytical detection limit, precision, and accuracy requirements, and address other quality assurance (QA) issues.

  16. Comparison of Pencil beam, Collapsed cone and Monte-Carlo algorithm in radiotherapy treatment planning for 6 MV photon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment planning system calculations in inhomogeneous regions may present significant inaccuracies due to loss of electronic equilibrium. In this study, three different dose calculation algorithms, pencil beam, collapsed cone, and Monte-Carlo, provided by our planning system were compared to assess their impact on the three-dimensional planning of lung and breast cases. A total of five breast and five lung cases were calculated using the PB, CC, and MC algorithms. Planning treatment volume and organs at risk delineation was performed according to our institutions protocols on the Oncentra MasterPlan image registration module, on 0.3 to 0.5 cm computed tomography slices taken under normal respiration conditions. Four intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were calculated according to each algorithm for each patient. The plans were conducted on the Oncentra MasterPlan and CMS Monaco treatment planning systems, for 6 MV. The plans were compared in terms of the dose distribution in target, OAR volumes, and...

  17. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  18. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

  19. Some Recent Developments in Treatment Planning Software and Methodology for BNCT

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Nigg, D. W.; Wheeler, F. J.; Wessol, D. E.; et al.

    1996-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has led the development of a unique, internationally-recognized set of software modules (BNCT-rtpe) for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The computational capability represented by this software is essential to the proper administration of all forms of radiotherapy for cancer. Such software addresses the need to perform pretreatment computation and optimization of the radiation dose distribution in the target volume. This permits the achievement of the optimal therapeutic ratio (tumor dose relative to critical normal tissue dose) for each individual patient via a systematic procedure for specifying the appropriate irradiation parameters to be employed for a given treatment. These parameters include angle of therapy beam incidence, beam aperture and shape, and beam intensity as a function of position across the beam front. The INEL software is used for treatment planning in the current series of human glioma trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and has also been licensed for research and developmental purposes to several other BNCT research centers in the US and in Europe.

  20. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H [Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  1. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the ? passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were ?4.5 cGy/?0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and ?19.7 cGy/?0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was ?13.3 cGy/?0.32%, to esophagus was ?63.4 cGy/?0.89%, and to spinal cord was ?16.3 cGy/?0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median ? passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by nonperfect image registrations.

  2. Oak Ridge National Lebroatory Liquid&Gaseous Waste Treatment System Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Excellence in Laboratory operations is one of the three key goals of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Agenda. That goal will be met through comprehensive upgrades of facilities and operational approaches over the next few years. Many of ORNL's physical facilities, including the liquid and gaseous waste collection and treatment systems, are quite old, and are reaching the end of their safe operating life. The condition of research facilities and supporting infrastructure, including the waste handling facilities, is a key environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concern. The existing infrastructure will add considerably to the overhead costs of research due to increased maintenance and operating costs as these facilities continue to age. The Liquid Gaseous Waste Treatment System (LGWTS) Reengineering Project is a UT-Battelle, LLC (UT-B) Operations Improvement Program (OIP) project that was undertaken to develop a plan for upgrading the ORNL liquid and gaseous waste systems to support ORNL's research mission.

  3. MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CT generated through atlas registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org; Merchant, Thomas E.; Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning using pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration. Methods: A pseudo CT, providing electron density information for dose calculation, was generated by deforming atlas CT images previously acquired on other patients. The authors tested 4 schemes of synthesizing a pseudo CT from single or multiple deformed atlas images: use of a single arbitrarily selected atlas, arithmetic mean process using 6 atlases, and pattern recognition with Gaussian process (PRGP) using 6 or 12 atlases. The required deformation for atlas CT images was derived from a nonlinear registration of conjugated atlas MR images to that of the patient of interest. The contrasts of atlas MR images were adjusted by histogram matching to reduce the effect of different sets of acquisition parameters. For comparison, the authors also tested a simple scheme assigning the Hounsfield unit of water to the entire patient volume. All pseudo CT generating schemes were applied to 14 patients with common pediatric brain tumors. The image similarity of real patient-specific CT and pseudo CTs constructed by different schemes was compared. Differences in computation times were also calculated. The real CT in the treatment planning system was replaced with the pseudo CT, and the dose distribution was recalculated to determine the difference. Results: The atlas approach generally performed better than assigning a bulk CT number to the entire patient volume. Comparing atlas-based schemes, those using multiple atlases outperformed the single atlas scheme. For multiple atlas schemes, the pseudo CTs were similar to the real CTs (correlation coefficient, 0.787–0.819). The calculated dose distribution was in close agreement with the original dose. Nearly the entire patient volume (98.3%–98.7%) satisfied the criteria of chi-evaluation (<2% maximum dose and 2 mm range). The dose to 95% of the volume and the percentage of volume receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose in the planning target volume differed from the original values by less than 2% of the prescription dose (root-mean-square, RMS < 1%). The PRGP scheme did not perform better than the arithmetic mean process with the same number of atlases. Increasing the number of atlases from 6 to 12 often resulted in improvements, but statistical significance was not always found. Conclusions: MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration is feasible for pediatric brain tumor patients. The doses calculated from pseudo CTs agreed well with those from real CTs, showing dosimetric accuracy within 2% for the PTV when multiple atlases were used. The arithmetic mean process may be a reasonable choice over PRGP for the synthesis scheme considering performance and computational costs.

  4. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal, solar PV, and landfill gas, while PGE initiallywave energy, solar, landfill gas, and MSW, but excluded each

  5. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed.

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  7. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove {sup 90}Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc, and zeolites for {sup 137}Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of {sup 99}Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl{sub 2} as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination Factor (DF) >577 in two hours. It was less effective at alkaline pH. Conversely, removal of the cesium was more effective at alka

  8. Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and fluids from the pure gas (methane) to produce what is known as "pipeline quality" dry natural gas.[2 in wells, providing raw materials for oil refineries or petrochemical plants, and as sources of energy.[3

  9. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricityindirect costs of renewable resources, as well as resourceamount of planned renewable resource additions. In the case

  10. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

  11. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L. Henderson; S. Yoo; M. Kowalok; T.R. Mackie; B.R. Thomadsen

    2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-metere from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum.

  12. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

  13. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

  14. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  15. Scale-Up Information for Gas-Phase Ammonia Treatment of Uranium in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Johnson, Timothy C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium is present in the vadose zone at the Hanford Central Plateau and is of concern for protection of groundwater. The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau identified gas-phase treatment and geochemical manipulation as potentially effective treatment approaches for uranium and technetium in the Hanford Central Plateau vadose zone. Based on laboratory evaluation, use of ammonia vapor was selected as the most promising uranium treatment candidate for further development and field testing. While laboratory tests have shown that ammonia treatment effectively reduces the mobility of uranium, additional information is needed to enable deployment of this technology for remediation. Of importance for field applications are aspects of the technology associated with effective distribution of ammonia to a targeted treatment zone, understanding the fate of injected ammonia and its impact on subsurface conditions, and identifying effective monitoring approaches. In addition, information is needed to select equipment and operational parameters for a field design. As part of development efforts for the ammonia technology for remediation of vadose zone uranium contamination, field scale-up issues were identified and have been addressed through a series of laboratory and modeling efforts. This report presents a conceptual description for field application of the ammonia treatment process, engineering calculations to support treatment design, ammonia transport information, field application monitoring approaches, and a discussion of processes affecting the fate of ammonia in the subsurface. The report compiles this information from previous publications and from recent research and development activities. The intent of this report is to provide technical information about these scale-up elements to support the design and operation of a field test for the ammonia treatment technology.

  16. Gas plasma treatment of cathodes to improve Li/SO{sub 2} cell performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, M.; Mammone, R.J. [Army Electronics and Power Sources Directorate, Fort Monmouth, NJ (United States). Energy Sciences Branch; Thurston, E.P.; Reddy, T.B. [Power Conversion Inc., Elmwood Park, NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One rapid way to alter pendant groups on surfaces and/or to clean surfaces is to expose them briefly to low pressure, room, temperature gas plasmas. In this paper, the authors present results of using this simple vapor process to pretreat fabricated, porous carbon cathodes which were then assembled in spirally wound, hermetically sealed squat ``D`` sized Li/SO{sub 2} cells (PCI Model G-70). Overall cell performance such as start-up times, load voltage, and ampere-hour capacity were monitored before and after 28 days storage at 71 C. Performance during 3 A discharge at {minus}29 C was enhanced in cells containing plasma-treated cathodes. This treatment procedure should be of practical interest because fabricated carbon cathodes of any size can be quickly processed during normal manufacturing.

  17. Gas-Phase Treatment of Technetium in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) is present in the vadose zone of the Hanford Central Plateau and is a concern with respect to the protection of groundwater. The persistence, limited natural attenuation mechanisms, and geochemical behavior of Tc-99 in oxic vadose zone environments must be considered in developing effective alternatives for remediation. This report describes a new in situ geochemical manipulation technique for decreasing Tc-99 mobility using a combination of geochemical Tc-99 reduction with hydrogen sulfide gas and induced sediment mineral dissolution with ammonia vapor, which create conditions for deposition of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of Tc-99. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine changes in Tc-99 mobility in vadose zone sediment samples to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment under a variety of operational and sediment conditions.

  18. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  19. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricity14 4.1 Renewable Resources20 5. Renewable Resource Cost and Performance

  20. NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes.

  1. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT&E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A/O/D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT&E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A/O/D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris.

  2. Effect of availability on multi-period planning of subsea oil and gas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz Vasquez, Karla Liliana

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    subsea equipment downtime of approximately 7%. As a result, new production planning is accomplished in the effective work period, which will be beneficial in financial risk decisions such as a government’s deliverability contracts....

  3. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  4. Optimal fracture treatment design for dry gas wells maximizes well performance in the presence of non-Darcy flow effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Hernandez, Henry De Jesus

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering...) _______________________________ Guy L. Curry (Member) _______________________________ Stephen A. Holditch (Head of Department) August 2004 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering iii ABSTRACT Optimal Fracture Treatment Design for Dry Gas Wells Maximizes...

  5. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokic, Vesna, E-mail: vesna.prokic@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodo (Norway) [Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, Tromso (Norway); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  6. An Efficient Multiperiod MINLP Model for Optimal Planning of Offshore Oil and Gas Field Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    the fields and FPSOs, well drilling schedule and production rates of these three components in each time, and which and how many wells are to be drilled in those fields and in what order, which field instances involving 10 fields, 3 FPSOs, 84 wells and 20 years planning horizon are reported, as well

  7. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for renewable energy, and its risk of permanent expiration,Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in WesternCost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western

  8. Greenhouse Gas Concerns and Power Sector Planning (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about potential climate change driven by rising atmospheric concentrations of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) have grown over the past two decades, both domestically and abroad. In the United States, potential policies to limit or reduce GHG emissions are in various stages of development at the state, regional, and federal levels. In addition to ongoing uncertainty with respect to future growth in energy demand and the costs of fuel, labor, and new plant construction, U.S. electric power companies must consider the effects of potential policy changes to limit or reduce GHG emissions that would significantly alter their planning and operating decisions. The possibility of such changes may already be affecting planning decisions for new generating capacity.

  9. Assessment of natural gas technology opportunities in the treatment of selected metals containing wastes. Topical report, June 1994-August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGervey, J.; Holmes, J.G.; Bluestein, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report analyzes the disposal of certain waste streams that contain heavy metals, as determined by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. Generation of the wastes, the regulatory status of the wastes, and current treatment practices are characterized, and the role of natural gas is determined. The four hazardous metal waste streams addressed in this report are electric arc furnace (EAF) dust, electroplating sludge wastes, used and off-specification circuit boards and cathode ray tubes, and wastes from lead manufacturing. This report assesses research and development opportunities relevant to natural gas technologies that may result from current and future enviromental regulations.

  10. Evaluation of fracture treatment type on the recovery of gas from the cotton valley formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yalavarthi, Ramakrishna

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    gas well completions doubled from 12,600 wells in 1999 to 27,000 wells in 2006. After 2001 substantial increase in low volume unconventional wells were unable to offset declines in offshore Gulf of Mexico and onshore conventional gas production.... Increased drilling boosted unconventional gas production from 4.62 Tcf in 1995 to 11.3 Tcf in 2006 but was not sufficient to offset the declines in conventional gas production (Fig. 1.4). Over this same period conventional offshore gas production declined...

  11. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  12. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

  13. Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

  14. Prostate and Patient Intrafraction Motion: Impact on Treatment Time-Dependent Planning Margins for Patients With Endorectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabeth.steiner@akhwien.at [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria) [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria) [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Goldner, Gregor [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Stock, Markus [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria) [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate intrafraction prostate and patient motion during different radiation therapy treatments as a function of treatment time; included were prostate patients with an endorectal balloon (ERB). Margins accounting for setup uncertainties and intrafraction motion were determined. Methods and Materials: The study included 17 patients undergoing prostate cancer radiation therapy. All patients received 3 fiducial gold markers implanted in the prostate and were then immobilized in the supine position with a knee support and treated with an ERB. Twelve patients with intermediate risk for pelvic lymph node metastases received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 5 patients at low risk received a 4-field box treatment. After setup based on skin marks, patients were imaged with a stereoscopic imaging system. If the marker displacement exceeded a 3-mm tolerance relative to planning computed tomography, patients were shifted and verification images were taken. All patients underwent additional imaging after treatment; IMRT patients also received additional imaging at halftime of treatment. Prostate and bone drifts were evaluated as a function of treatment time for more than 600 fractions, and margins were extracted. Results: Patient motion evaluated by bone match was strongly patient dependent but in general was smallest in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. Prostate drifts were less patient dependent, showing an increase with treatment time in the SI and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. In the lateral (LAT) direction, the prostate stayed rather stable. Mean treatment times were 5.5 minutes for 4-field box, 10 minutes for 5-field boost IMRT, and 15 minutes or more for 9-field boost and 9-field pelvic IMRT treatments. Margins resulted in 2.2 mm, 3.9 mm, and 4.3 mm for 4-field box; 3.7 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.6 mm for 5-field boost IMRT; 2.3 mm, 3.9 mm, and 6.2 mm for 9-field boost IMRT; and 4.2 mm, 5.1 mm, and 6.6 mm for 9-field pelvic IMRT in the LAT, SI, and AP directions, respectively. Conclusion: Intrafraction prostate and patient displacement increased with treatment time, showing different behaviors for the single directions of movement. Repositioning of the patients during long treatments or shorter treatment times will be necessary to further reduce the treatment margin.

  15. Video-rate optical dosimetry and dynamic visualization of IMRT and VMAT treatment plans in water using Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, Adam K., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Davis, Scott C. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Pogue, Brian W., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Fox, Colleen J.; Gladstone, David J. [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)] [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A novel technique for optical dosimetry of dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cherenkov radiation in water. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire a two-dimensional (2D) projection image of the Cherenkov radiation induced by IMRT and VMAT plans, based on the Task Group 119 (TG-119) C-Shape geometry. Plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using 6 MV x-rays from a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator (Linac) incident on a water tank doped with the fluorophore quinine sulfate. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the Linac target trigger pulse to reduce background light artifacts, read out for a single radiation pulse, and binned to a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels. The resulting videos were analyzed temporally for various regions of interest (ROI) covering the planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR), and summed to obtain an overall light intensity distribution, which was compared to the expected dose distribution from the TPS using a gamma-index analysis. Results: The chosen camera settings resulted in 23.5 frames per second dosimetry videos. Temporal intensity plots of the PTV and OAR ROIs confirmed the preferential delivery of dose to the PTV versus the OAR, and the gamma analysis yielded 95.9% and 96.2% agreement between the experimentally captured Cherenkov light distribution and expected TPS dose distribution based upon a 3%/3 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criterion for the IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. Conclusions: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cherenkov radiation for video-rate optical dosimetry of dynamic IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods including the real-time nature of the acquisition, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method with both research and clinical applications.

  16. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR): long term program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 1980 effort was to investigate four technology options identified by program participants as potentially viable candidates for near-term demonstration: the Gas Turbine system (HTGR-GT), reflecting its perceived compatibility with the dry-cooling market, two systems addressing the process heat market, the Reforming (HTGR-R) and Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC) systems, and a more developmental reactor system, The Nuclear Heat Source Demonstration Reactor (NHSDR), which was to serve as a basis for both the HTGR-GT and HTGR-R systems as well as the further potential for developing advanced applications such as steam-coal gasification and water splitting.

  17. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

  18. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  19. Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, May 25, 1992---August 24, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to extend the knowledge base for wetland treatment to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well waste water. Collection of data on the sorption of heavy metals and the degradation of toxic organics is one of the key tasks. The toxic organics phenolics and anthracene, and chromium and copper have been selected as target adsorbates. An information search was performed on oil refinery waste treatment wetland systems.

  20. Treatment/Disposal Plan for Drummed Waste from the 300-FF-1Operable Unit, 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Lerch.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this plan is to support selection of a safe, environmentally responsible, and cost-effective treatment and disposal method for drums containing depleted uranium metal chips submergedin oil that have been and will be excavated from the 618-4 Burial Ground. Remediation of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, 618-4 BurialGround was initiated in fiscal year (FY) 1998 as an excavation andremoval operation. Routine processes were established to excavateand ship contaminated soil and debris to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry of the head and neck: A comparison of treatment plans using linear accelerator-based IMRT and helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)]. E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu; Molloy, Janelle A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To date, most intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery has occurred using linear accelerators (linacs), although helical tomotherapy has become commercially available. To quantify the dosimetric difference, we compared linac-based and helical tomotherapy-based treatment plans for IMRT of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We compared the dosimetry findings of 10 patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma. Five patients each had cancers in the base of the tongue and tonsil. Each plan was independently optimized using either the CORVUS planning system (Nomos Corporation, Sewickly, PA), commissioned for a Varian 2300 CD linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 1-cm multileaf collimator leaves, or helical tomotherapy. The resulting treatment plans were evaluated by comparing the dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), dose uniformity, and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: Helical tomotherapy plans showed improvement of critical structure avoidance and target dose uniformity for all patients. The average equivalent uniform dose reduction for organs at risk (OARs) surrounding the base of tongue and the tonsil were 17.4% and 27.14% respectively. An 80% reduction in normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid glands was observed in the tomotherapy plans relative to the linac-based plans. The standard deviation of the planning target volume dose was reduced by 71%. In our clinic, we use the combined dose-volume histograms for each class of plans as a reference goal for helical tomotherapy treatment planning optimization. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy provides improved dose homogeneity and normal structure dose compared with linac-based IMRT in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma resulting in a reduced risk for complications from focal hotspots within the planning target volume and for the adjacent parotid glands.

  2. TREATMENT TANK OFF-GAS TESTING FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this activity was to provide a bounding estimate of the volume of hydrogen gas generated during Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) of residual sludge remaining in a Type I or Type II treatment tank as well as to provide results independent of the sludge volume in the waste tank to be cleaned. Previous testing to support Chemical Cleaning was based on a 20:1 oxalic acid to sludge ratio. Hydrogen gas evolution is the primary safety concern. Sealed vessel coupon tests were performed to estimate the hydrogen generation rate due to corrosion of carbon steel by 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid. These tests determined the maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate, the rate at which the generation rate decays, and the total hydrogen generated. These values were quantified based on a small scale methodology similar to the one described in WSRC-STI-2007-00209, Rev. 0. The measured rates support identified Safety Class functions. The tests were performed with ASTM A285 Grade C carbon steel coupons. Bounding conditions were determined for the solution environment. The oxalic acid concentration was 2.5 wt.% and the test temperature was 75 C. The test solution was agitated and contained no sludge simulant. Duplicate tests were performed and showed excellent reproducibility for the hydrogen generation rate and total hydrogen generated. The results showed that the hydrogen generation rate was initially high, but decayed rapidly within a couple of days. A statistical model was developed to predict the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate as a function of exposure time by combining both sets of data. An upper bound on the maximum hydrogen generation rate was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound confidence limit for the hydrogen generation rate is represented by the following equation. ln (G{sub v}) = -8.22-0.0584 t + 0.0002 t{sup 2}. This equation should be utilized to estimate the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate per unit surface area, G{sub v}, at a given time, t. The units for G{sub v} and t are ft{sup 3}/ft{sup 2}/min and hours, respectively. The total volume of hydrogen gas generated during the test was calculated from the model equation. An upper bound on the total gas generated was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound limit on the total hydrogen generated during the 163 hour test was 0.332 ft{sup 3}/ft{sup 2}. The maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate for this scenario is greater than that previously measured in the 8 wt.% oxalic acid tests due to both the absence of sludge in the test (i.e., greater than 20:1 ratio of acid to sludge) and the use of polished coupons (vs. mill scale coupons). However, due to passivation of the carbon steel surface, the corrosion rate decays by an order of magnitude within the first three days of exposure such that the instantaneous hydrogen generation rates are less than that previously measure in the 8 wt.% oxalic acid tests. While the results of these tests are bounding, the conditions used in this study may not be representative of the ECC flowsheet, and the applicability of these results to the flowsheet should be evaluated for the following reasons: (1) The absence of sludge results in higher instantaneous hydrogen generation rates than when the sludge is present; and (2) Polished coupons do not represent the condition of the carbon steel interior of the tank, which are covered with mill scale. Based on lower instantaneous corrosion rates measured on mill scale coupons exposed to oxalic acid, lower instantaneous hydrogen generation rates are expected for the tank interior than measured on the polished coupons. Corrosion rates were determined from the coupon tests and also calculated from the measured hydrogen generation rates. Excellent agreement was achieved between the time averaged corrosion rate calculated from the hydrogen generation rates and the corrosion rates determined from the coupon tests. The corrosion rates were on the order of 18 to 28 mpy. Good agreement was also observed between the maximum instantaneo

  3. Influence of mechanical-biological waste pre-treatment methods on the gas formation in landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockreis, A. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute for Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Flows and Environmental Planning (Institute WAR), Chair of Waste Management and Waste Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.bockreis@iwar.tu-darmstadt.de; Steinberg, I. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute for Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Flows and Environmental Planning (Institute WAR), Chair of Waste Management and Waste Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to minimise emissions and environmental impacts, only pre-treated waste should be disposed of. For the last six years, a series of continuous experiments has been conducted at the Institute WAR, TU Darmstadt, in order to determine the emissions from pre-treated waste. Different kinds of pre-treated waste were incubated in several reactors and various data, including production and composition of the gas and the leachate, were collected. In this paper, the interim results of gas production and the gas composition from different types of waste after a running time of six years are presented and discussed.

  4. SU-E-T-03: 3D GPU-Accelerated Secondary Checks of Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemente, F; Perez, C [Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Redundant treatment verifications in conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques are traditionally performed with single point calculations. New solutions can replace these checks with 3D treatment plan verifications. This work describes a software tool (Mobius3D, Mobius Medical Systems) that uses a GPU-accelerated collapsed cone algorithm to perform 3D independent verifications of TPS calculations. Methods: Mobius3D comes with reference beam models for common linear accelerators. The system uses an independently developed collapsed cone algorithm updated with recent enhancements. 144 isotropically-spaced cones are used for each voxel for calculations. These complex calculations can be sped up by using GPUs. Mobius3D calculate dose using DICOM information coming from TPS (CT, RT Struct, RT Plan RT Dose). DVH-metrics and 3D gamma tests can be used to compare both TPS and secondary calculations. 170 patients treated with all common techniques as 3DCFRT (including wedged), static and dynamic IMRT and VMAT have been successfully verified with this solution. Results: Calculation times are between 3–5 minutes for 3DCFRT treatments and 15–20 for most complex dMLC and VMAT plans. For all PTVs mean dose and 90% coverage differences are (1.12±0.97)% and (0.68±1.19)%, respectively. Mean dose discrepancies for all OARs is (0.64±1.00)%. 3D gamma (global, 3%/3 mm) analysis shows a mean passing rate of (97.8 ± 3.0)% for PTVs and (99.0±3.0)% for OARs. 3D gamma pasing rate for all voxels in CT has a mean value of (98.5±1.6)%. Conclusion: Mobius3D is a powerful tool to verify all modalities of radiation therapy treatments. Dose discrepancies calculated by this system are in good agreement with TPS. The use of reference beam data results in time savings and can be used to avoid the propagation of errors in original beam data into our QA system. GPU calculations permit enhanced collapsed cone calculations with reasonable calculation times.

  5. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, M; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for patients with unfavorable anatomy.

  6. Treatment plan comparison of Linac step and shoot,Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton therapy for prostate cancer using dosimetrical and biological index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best IMRT modality technique for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), based tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenc...

  7. Tomotherapy treatment plan quality assurance: The impact of applied criteria on passing rate in gamma index method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresciani, Sara; Di Dia, Amalia; Maggio, Angelo; Cutaia, Claudia; Miranti, Anna; Infusino, Erminia; Stasi, Michele [Medical Physics Division, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCCS), 10060 Candiolo (Italy)] [Medical Physics Division, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCCS), 10060 Candiolo (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Pretreatment patient plan verification with gamma index (GI) metric analysis is standard procedure for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the variability of the local and global gamma index obtained during standard pretreatment quality assurance (QA) measurements for plans performed with Tomotherapy unit. The QA measurements were performed with a 3D diode array, using variable passing criteria: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm, each with both local and global normalization.Methods: The authors analyzed the pretreatment QA results for 73 verifications; 37 were prostate cancer plans, 16 were head and neck plans, and 20 were other clinical sites. All plans were treated using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art System. Pretreatment QA plans were performed with the commercially available 3D diode array ArcCHECK™. This device has 1386 diodes arranged in a helical geometry spaced 1 cm apart. The dose measurements were acquired on the ArcCHECK™ and then compared with the calculated dose using the standard gamma analysis method. The gamma passing rate (%GP), defined as the percentage of points satisfying the condition GI < 1, was calculated for different criteria (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm) and for both global and local normalization. In the case of local normalization method, the authors set three dose difference threshold (DDT) values of 2, 3, and 5 cGy. Dose difference threshold is defined as the minimum absolute dose error considered in the analysis when using local normalization. Low-dose thresholds (TH) of 5% and 10% were also applied and analyzed.Results: Performing a paired-t-test, the authors determined that the gamma passing rate is independent of the threshold values for all of the adopted criteria (5%TH vs 10%TH, p > 0.1). Our findings showed that mean %GPs for local (or global) normalization for the entire study group were 93% (98%), 84% (92%), and 66% (61%) for 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm criteria, respectively. DDT was equal to 2 cGy for the local normalization analysis cases. The authors observed great variability in the resulting %GP. With 3%/3 mm gamma criteria, the overall passing rate with local normalization was 4.6% less on the average than with global one, as expected. The wide difference between %GP calculated with global or local approach is also confirmed by an unpaired t-test statistical analysis.Conclusions: The variability of %GP obtained confirmed the necessity to establish defined agreement criteria that could be universal and comparable between institutions. In particular, while the gamma passing rate does not depend on the choice of threshold, the choice of DDT strongly influences the gamma passing rate for local calculations. The difference between global and local %GP was statistically significant for prostate and other treatment sites when DDT was changed from 2 to 3 cGy.

  8. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reeves

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Prepared various materials to describe the project for promotional purposes and to attract potential industry partners. Materials included slides for DOE's displays at the SPE Eastern Regional and Annual Technical Conference, and a project description prospectus and accompanying presentation. (2) Identified the significant stripper gas plays in the Mid-Continent region. In Texas, where most Mid-Continent stripper gas wells and production exist, we obtained this information from the Railroad Commission. We identified three high-priority plays--the Canyon sands of West Texas, the Bend Conglomerate in North Texas, and the Hugoton field in the Panhandle area (the field also extends into Oklahoma and Kansas). (3) Solicited industry research partners in these areas to provide test sites. We had originally reached an agreement with Union Pacific Resources to utilize their Ozona (Canyon) field in West Texas, but that arrangement eventually fell through in December as a result of their merger with Anadarko. In the meantime, we have contacted the following people or organizations in an attempt to secure test sites: (A) Phillips Petroleum (largest operator in the Texas Hugoton field), never received a call back after two attempts. (B) Made a presentation to Mitchell Energy in Fort Worth (the largest operator in the Bend Conglomerate). They declined to participate--already performing similar studies. (C) Anadarko in the Kansas Hugoton. Similar to the West Texas team, they declined to become involved. (D) St. Mary Operating and Cheasapeake Energy, both of whom showed an interest in such studies at the GTI workshop on restimulation (held on Oct 25 in Houston). Never received call backs. Also contacted Ocean Energy based on a similar lead, but they do not have enough wells for the project. (E) Oneok, who have indicated an interest in participating using the Mocane-Laverne field in Oklahoma. Discussions are ongoing. (F) Harrison Interests, one of the second-tier operators in the Ozona Canyon play, but who have shown some interest in participating. Discussions are ongoing. (4) We have also contacted the Mid-Continent representative of the PTTC, and the Stripper Well Consortium contact at the University of Tulsa, to request their assistance in our partner acquisition process. (5) We have begun developing

  9. An Itegrated Approach to Water Treatment in Oil and Gas Industry via Thermal Membrane Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsayed, Nesreen Ahmed Abdelmoez Mohamed

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and discharge to conserve water resources and reduce the negative environmental impact associated with discharging wastewater into the environment. Wastewater treatment enables providing water with specifications suitable for either recycle in the same... process or reuse in other ways within the process or outside the process. Therefore, water treatment and recycle/reuse contribute to addressing both of the aforementioned water problems: fresh water sacristy and environmental impact of wastewater...

  10. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

  11. A Comparison of Clinical and Dosimetric Outcomes in Patients Receiving Partial Breast Irradiation with Photon-Only versus Mixed Photon/Electron Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Mira M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hubbs, Jessica L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Demirci, Senem [Ege University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Light, Kim L.; Temple, Kathy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Patrone, Michael; Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several series evaluating external-beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) have linked negative cosmetic outcomes to large normal tissue treatment volumes. We compared patients treated with PBI whose treatment plans included only photons to those whose plans incorporated electrons. Twenty-seven patients were identified: median age 67 years, pT1 82%, pN0 56%, margin negative 100%. All received 38.5 Gy using 3-5 noncoplanar photon beams (6-15X). Electrons (9-20 MeV) were included in 59%. Median follow-up was 22 months. Ninety percent experienced good/excellent cosmetic outcomes. Two patients had fair cosmesis, and both were treated with a mixed photon/electron approach. Median conformity index for photon-only treatment plans was 1.7 (range, 0.9-2.0) and for photon/electron plans, 1.0 (0.3-1.4). Median percent ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of prescription dose was 19 and 50 for photon-only plans vs. 10 and 38 for photon/electron plans (p < 0.05). Median percent target volume receiving 100% and 95% of prescription dose was 93 and 98 for photon-only plans vs. 75 and 94 for photon/electron plans (p < 0.05). A mixed photon/electron, noncoplanar technique decreases the volume of treated normal breast tissue at the cost of slightly decreased tumor bed coverage. Further study is needed to determine whether this results in a more favorable therapeutic ratio than photon-only approaches.

  12. An Itegrated Approach to Water Treatment in Oil and Gas Industry via Thermal Membrane Distillation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsayed, Nesreen Ahmed Abdelmoez Mohamed

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    an increasing level of interest in the area of high-purity separation especially in water treatment. It is driven primarily by heat which creates a vapor-pressure difference across a porous hydrophobic membrane. Hot produced water and excess low-level heat from...

  13. Feasibility and Treatment of Oil and Gas Produced Water as a Medium for Nannochloropsis Salina cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laur, Paul A. [Eldorado Biofuels; Visolay, Alfonz [VM Technologies

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of value exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.

  14. Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

  15. Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shibin [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)] [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China); Chang, Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, Shandong (China)] [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, Shandong (China); Li, Zhenjiang, E-mail: zjli126@126.com [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)] [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 {sup o}C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

  16. SU-E-J-04: A Data-Driven, Response-Based, Multi-Criteria Decision Support System for Personalized Lung Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Schipper, M; Matuszak, M; Ten Haken, R [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kong, F [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a decision support tool to predict a patient's potential overall survival (OS) and radiation induced toxicity (RIT) based on clinical factors and responses during the course of radiotherapy, and suggest appropriate radiation dose adjustments to improve therapeutic effect. Methods: Important relationships between a patient's basic information and their clinical features before and during the radiation treatment are identified from historical clinical data by using statistical learning and data mining approaches. During each treatment period, a data analysis (DA) module predicts radiotherapy features such as time to local progression (TTLP), time to distant metastases (TTDM), radiation toxicity to different organs, etc., under possible future treatment plans based on patient specifics or responses. An information fusion (IF) module estimates intervals for a patient's OS and the probabilities of RIT from a treatment plan by integrating the outcomes of module DA. A decision making (DM) module calculates “satisfaction” with the predicted radiation outcome based on trade-offs between OS and RIT, and finds the best treatment plan for the next time period via multi-criteria optimization. Results: Using physical and biological data from 130 lung cancer patients as our test bed, we were able to train and implement the 3 modules of our decision support tool. Examples demonstrate how it can help predict a new patient's potential OS and RIT with different radiation dose plans along with how these combinations change with dose, thus presenting a range of satisfaction/utility for use in individualized decision support. Conclusion: Although the decision support tool is currently developed from a small patient sample size, it shows the potential for the improvement of each patient's satisfaction in personalized radiation therapy. The radiation treatment outcome prediction and decision making model needs to be evaluated with more patients and demonstrated for use in radiation treatments for other cancers. P01-CA59827;R01CA142840.

  17. Abstract --A new solution for VAR planning in distribution systems is proposed. It is based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    problem. In the operation planning problem, the reactive power sources are dispatched and the transformer. In the investment planning problem, the optimal location of new reactive power sources is explored over a long components: Operating Costs (costs for peak power and energy loss; the latter one is only present when

  18. Reinforcing of QA/QC programs in radiotherapy departments in Croatia: Results of treatment planning system verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurkovi?, Slaven; Švabi?, Manda; Dikli?, Ana; Smilovi? Radoj?i?, ?eni; Dundara, Dea [Clinic for Radiotherapy and Oncology, Physics Division, University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Kasabaši?, Mladen; Ivkovi?, Ana [Department for Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Faj, Dario, E-mail: dariofaj@mefos.hr [Department of Physics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of advanced techniques in clinical practice can greatly improve the outcome of radiation therapy, but it also makes the process much more complex with a lot of room for errors. An important part of the quality assurance program is verification of treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric verifications in anthropomorphic phantom were performed in 4 centers where new systems were installed. A total of 14 tests for 2 photon energies and multigrid superposition algorithms were conducted using the CMS XiO TPS. Evaluation criteria as specified in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Reports Series (IAEA TRS) 430 were employed. Results of measurements are grouped according to the placement of the measuring point and the beam energy. The majority of differences between calculated and measured doses in the water-equivalent part of the phantom were in tolerance. Significantly more out-of-tolerance values were observed in “nonwater-equivalent” parts of the phantom, especially for higher-energy photon beams. This survey was done as a part of continuous effort to build up awareness of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) importance in the Croatian radiotherapy community. Understanding the limitations of different parts of the various systems used in radiation therapy can systematically improve quality as well.

  19. Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

  20. Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Treatment Planning Technique and Analysis of Consequences of Rotational and Translational Alignment Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Jeff, E-mail: jmeye3@utsouthwestern.ed [University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques; Amos, Richard [University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conventional proton therapy with passively scattered beams is used to treat a number of tumor sites, including prostate cancer. Spot scanning proton therapy is a treatment delivery means that improves conformal coverage of the clinical target volume (CTV). Placement of individual spots within a target is dependent on traversed tissue density. Errors in patient alignment perturb dose distributions. Moreover, there is a need for a rational planning approach that can mitigate the dosimetric effect of random alignment errors. We propose a treatment planning approach and then analyze the consequences of various simulated alignment errors on prostate treatments. Methods and Materials: Ten control patients with localized prostate cancer underwent treatment planning for spot scanning proton therapy. After delineation of the clinical target volume, a scanning target volume (STV) was created to guide dose coverage. Errors in patient alignment in two axes (rotational and yaw) as well as translational errors in the anteroposterior direction were then simulated, and dose to the CTV and normal tissues were reanalyzed. Results: Coverage of the CTV remained high even in the setting of extreme rotational and yaw misalignments. Changes in the rectum and bladder V45 and V70 were similarly minimal, except in the case of translational errors, where, as a result of opposed lateral beam arrangements, much larger dosimetric perturbations were observed. Conclusions: The concept of the STV as applied to spot scanning radiation therapy and as presented in this report leads to robust coverage of the CTV even in the setting of extreme patient misalignments.

  1. Description of the Science Plan for the April 1995 CoOP Experiment, `Gas Transfer in Coastal Waters',

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    of air-sea gas-transfer rates are essential for understand- ing the global cycles of carbon dioxide that intended to measure both atmospheric and ocean-mixed layer properties. 1 Introduction Accurate estimates

  2. The Importance of the Conformality, Heterogeneity, and Gradient Indices in Evaluating Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Treatment Plans for Intracranial Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balagamwala, Ehsan H. [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Barnett, Gene H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Neyman, Gennady [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cai, Rong S. [Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Vogelbaum, Michael A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Novak, Eric [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rosa Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the conformality index (CIn), heterogeneity index (HIn), and gradient index (GIn) and the development of toxicity in patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Treatment records of patients treated from 1997 to 2009 with at least 6 months of follow-up were reviewed. The following parameters were collected: CIn, HIn, GIn (ratio of the volume receiving half the prescription isodose to the volume receiving the full prescription isodose), brainstem (BS) maximum dose (MD), BS volume receiving {>=}12 Gy (V12), optic apparatus (OA) MD, OA V8 Gy, OA V10, number of isocenters, number of isocenters outside target volume, and the occurrence of six toxicities. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling were used for analysis. Results: This study included 145 patients (148 meningiomas) with a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 6-113.9 months). The majority of meningiomas were located in the skull base (53%). The median prescription dose was 13 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) to the 51.50% (range, 50-92%) isodose. A lower HIn was correlated with a higher GIn (p = 0.007). CIn was not associated with any toxicity. Higher HIn was associated with the development of dizziness (odds ratio [OR] 1.9; p = 0.02), whereas a lower GIn was associated with motor deficits (OR 0.38; p = 0.04) and auditory changes (OR 0.59; p = 0.04). The OA MD, V8, and V12 were not associated with visual changes, but visual changes were associated with a higher number of isocenters outside the target volume (OR 1.93; p = 0.07). BS V12 was correlated with the development of auditory changes (OR 1.05; p = 0.05), whereas patients with higher BS MD tended to have increased toxicity. Conclusions: Close attention must be paid to all three indices (CIn, HIn, GIn) when optimal treatment plans are determined. We recommend that the target CIn should be {<=}2.0, the HIn {<=}2.0, and the GIn {>=}3.0 for intracranial meningiomas.

  3. A comparison of HDR near source dosimetry using a treatment planning system, Monte Carlo simulation, and radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoush, Ahmad, E-mail: amousha@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Luckstead, Marcus; Lamba, Michael; Elson, Howard; Kassing, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aimed to investigate the high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy, including near source dosimetry, of a catheter-based applicator from 0.5 mm to 1 cm along the transverse axis. Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation were used to generate absolute dose for the catheter-based applicator. Results from radiochromic film and MC simulation were compared directly to the treatment planning system (TPS) based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Updated Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) dose calculation formalism. The difference between dose measured using radiochromic film along the transverse plane at 0.5 mm from the surface and the predicted dose by the TPS was 24%±13%. The dose difference between the MC simulation along the transverse plane at 0.5 mm from the surface and the predicted dose by the TPS was 22.1%±3%. For distances from 1.5 mm to 1 cm from the surface, radiochromic film and MC simulation agreed with TPS within an uncertainty of 3%. The TPS under-predicts the dose at the surface of the applicator, i.e., 0.5 mm from the catheter surface, as compared to the measured and MC simulation predicted dose. MC simulation results demonstrated that 15% of this error is due to neglecting the beta particles and discrete electrons emanating from the sources and not considered by the TPS, and 7% of the difference was due to the photon alone, potentially due to the differences in MC dose modeling, photon spectrum, scoring techniques, and effect of the presence of the catheter and the air gap. Beyond 1 mm from the surface, the TPS dose algorithm agrees with the experimental and MC data within 3%.

  4. Mapping of RBE-Weighted Doses Between HIMAC- and LEM-Based Treatment Planning Systems for Carbon Ion Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinstraeter, Olaf, E-mail: o.steinstraeter@gsi.de [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Gruen, Rebecca [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz, TH-Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany); Fachbereich Medizin, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Scholz, Uwe [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Scholz, Michael [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)] [Abteilung Biophysik, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A method was developed to convert clinically prescribed RBE (Relative Biological Effectiveness)-weighted doses from the approach used at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba, Japan, to the LEM (Local Effect Model)-based TReatment planning for Particles (TRiP98) approach used in the pilot project at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt, and the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Methods and Materials: The proposed conversion method is based on a simulation of the fixed spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) depth dose profiles as used for the irradiation at HIMAC by LEM/TRiP98 and a recalculation of the resulting RBE-weighted dose distribution. We present data according to the clinical studies conducted at GSI in the past decade (LEM I), as well as data used in current studies (refined LEM version: LEM IV). Results: We found conversion factors (RBE-weighted dose LEM/RBE-weighted dose HIMAC) reaching from 0.4 to 2.0 for prescribed carbon ion doses from 1 to 60 Gy (RBE) for SOBP extensions ranging from 20 to 120 mm according to the HIMAC approach. A conversion factor of 1.0 was found for approximately 5 Gy (RBE). The conversion factor decreases with increasing prescribed dose. Slightly smaller values for the LEM IV-based data set compared with LEM I were found. A significant dependence of the conversion factor from the SOBP width could be observed in particular for LEM IV, whereas the depth dependence was found to be small. Conclusions: For the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials performed at HIMAC and GSI/HIT, it is of extreme importance to consider these conversion factors because according to the various methods to determine the RBE-weighted dose, similar dose values might not necessarily be related to similar clinical outcomes.

  5. Climate Action Plan (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Governor Timothy M. Kaine established the Governor's Commission on Climate Change in December 2007. The commission prepared a plan for Virginia that identified ways to reduce greenhouse gas...

  6. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SWENSON JA; CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; PLYS MG

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to receive KOP material, enhances heat conduction, and functions as a heat source and sink during drying operations. This use of the copper insert represents a significant change to the thermal model compared to that used for the fuel calculations. A number of cases were run representing a spectrum of normal and upset conditions for the drying process. Dozens of cases have been run on cold vacuum drying of fuel MCOs. Analysis of these previous calculations identified four cases that provide a solid basis for judgments on the behavior of MCO in drying operations. These four cases are: (1) Normal Process; (2) Degraded vacuum pumping; (3) Open MCO with loss of annulus water; and (4) Cool down after vacuum drying. The four cases were run for two sets of input parameters for KOP MCOs: (1) a set of parameters drawn from safety basis values from the technical data book and (2) a sensitivity set using parameters selected to evaluate the impact of lower void volume and smaller particle size on MCO behavior. Results of the calculations for the drying phase cases are shown in Table ES-2. Cases using data book safety basis values showed dry out in 9.7 hours and heat rejection sufficient to hold temperature rise to less than 25 C. Sensitivity cases which included unrealistically small particle sizes and corresponding high reactive surface area showed higher temperature increases that were limited by water consumption. In this document and in the attachment (Apthorpe, R. and M.G. Plys, 2010) cases using Technical Databook safety basis values are referred to as nominal cases. In future calculations such cases will be called safety basis cases. Also in these documents cases using parameters that are less favorable to acceptable performance than databook safety values are referred to as safety cases. In future calculations such cases will be called sensitivity cases or sensitivity evaluations Calculations to be performed in support of the detailed design and formal safety basis documentation will expand the calculations presented in this document to include: additional features of th

  7. State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector under the EPA's Clean Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector goal of comprehensive carbon pricing along with various other policies (LCFS) · Into this setting drops rate" and the role of renewable energy and energy efficiency in the rate targets and in compliance

  8. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

  9. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents &...

  10. Use of 3.0-T MRI for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Planning for Treatment of Brain Metastases: A Single-Institution Retrospective Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saconn, Paul A.; Shaw, Edward G.; Chan, Michael D.; Squire, Sarah E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Johnson, Annette J. [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); McMullen, Kevin P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Tatter, Stephen B.; Ellis, Thomas L. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Lovato, James [Department of Biostatistics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; DeGuzman, Allan F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Munley, Michael T., E-mail: mmunley@wfubmc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting brain metastases for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning. Methods and Materials: All adult patients scheduled for SRS treatment for brain metastases at our institution between October 2005 and January 2008 were eligible for analysis. All patients underwent radiosurgery treatment planning 3.0-T MRI on the day of scheduled radiosurgery and a diagnostic 1.5-T MRI in the days or weeks prior to radiosurgery for comparison. Both scans were interpreted by neuroradiologists who reported their findings in the radiology reports. We performed a retrospective review of the radiology reports to determine the number of brain metastases identified using each MRI system. Results: Of 254 patients scheduled for treatment from October 2005 to January 2008, 138 patients had radiology reports that explicitly described the number of metastases identified on both scans. With a median interval of 17 days (range, 1-82) between scans, the number of metastases detected using 1.5-T MRI system ranged from 1 to 5 and from 1 to 8 using the 3.0 T-MRI system. Twenty-two percent of patients were found to have a greater number of metastases with the 3.0 T-MRI system. The difference in number of metastases detected between the two scans for the entire cohort ranged from 0 to 6. Neither histology (p = 0.52 by chi-sq test) nor time between scans (p = 0.62 by linear regression) were significantly associated with the difference in number of metastases between scans. Conclusions: The 3.0-T MRI system appears to be superior to a 1.5-T MRI system for detecting brain metastases, which may have significant implications in determining the appropriate treatment modality. Our findings suggest the need for a prospectively designed study to further evaluate the use of a 3.0 T-MRI system for stereotactic radiosurgery planning in the treatment of brain metastases.

  11. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Lambert, Jonathan [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Parker, Joel [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum. Conclusions: The electron-density atlas method provides the ability to automatically define organs and map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for radiotherapy dose planning and DRR generation. This method provides the necessary tools for MRI-alone treatment planning and adaptive MRI-based prostate radiation therapy.

  12. EIS-0224: Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This EIS analyzes the Lake County Sanitation District joint venture with the geothermal industry, specifically the Northern California Power Agency, Calpine Corporation (Calpine), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company, to develop a plan for disposal of secondary-treated effluent from the Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant near the City of Clearlake, California, in the Southeast Geysers Geothermal Steam Field."

  13. Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eboagwu, Uche

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water...

  14. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  15. Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eboagwu, Uche

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    than 80 % oil removal efficiency were obtained in all these tests. Process train (pre-treatment and membrane) performance was monitored by chemical analysis of permeate and models fitting experimental data for the process. From the results, hydrocarbon...

  16. Phase I: the pipeline-gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant engineering and design. Volume 18. Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the process and project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. The design has been completed and is being reported in 24 volumes. This is Volume 18 which reports the design of Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment. The objective of the Waste Water Treatment system is to collect and treat all plant liquid effluent streams. The system is designed to permit recycle and reuse of the treated waste water. Plant Section 2700 is composed of primary, secondary, and tertiary waste water treatment methods plus an evaporation system which eliminates liquid discharge from the plant. The Waste Water Treatment Section is designed to produce 130 pounds per hour of sludge that is buried in a landfill on the plant site. The evaporated water is condensed and provides a portion of the make-up water to Plant Section 2400 - Cooling Water.

  17. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Gastric Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Tomotherapy (registered) and Conventional Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Skinner, Matthew; Schultz, Brenda; Cardoso, Marlene; Bell, Chris [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ung, Yee C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: yee.ung@sunnybrook.ca

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some patients with gastric cancer benefit from post-operative chemo-radiotherapy, but adequately irradiating the planning target volume (PTV) whilst avoiding organs at risk (OAR) can be difficult. We evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (TT). TT, 2 and 5-field (F) CRT and IMRT treatment plans with the same PTV coverage were generated for 5 patients and compared. Median values are reported. The volume of left/right kidney receiving at least 20Gy (V20) was 57/51% and 51/60% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 28/14% for TT and 27/19% for IMRT. The volume of liver receiving at least 30Gy (V30) was 45% and 62% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 37% for TT and 35% for IMRT. With TT, 98% of the PTV received 95-105% of the prescribed dose, compared with 45%, 34% and 28% for 2F-CRT, 5F-CRT and IMRT respectively. Using conventional metrics, conventional IMRT can achieve comparable PTV coverage and OAR sparing to TT, but at the expense of PTV dose heterogeneity. Both irradiate large volumes of normal tissue to low doses. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the clinical impact of these technologies.

  18. Characterization of oil and gas waste disposal practices and assessment of treatment costs. Yearly report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedient, P.B.

    1993-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project consists of 3 tasks: (1) Developing a Production Environmental Database (PED) with the purpose of investigating the current industry waste storage and disposal practices by different regions, states and types of waste and investigating the environmental impacts associated with these practices; (2) Evaluating the suitability of available and developing technologies for treating produced water and identifying applicable unit process configurations; and (3) Evaluating the costs associated with various degrees of treatment achievable by different configurations. Records of wells drilled during the years 1986 through 1991 were compiled from industry reports. Overall, drilling has decreased from an average of 60,000 wells/yr for the period 1981 through 1985 to 20,000/yr during 1986 through 1991. A produced water database was developed from data and information provided by the various state and federal agencies. Currently, the database has information on the production of oil, gas and brines from 24 states. The data from the produced water database indicate that for the most part, Class II Injection seemed to be the common disposal method. Other methods included evaporation, surface disposal via NPDES permit, road spreading, hauling out-of-state, and annular disposal. A survey of oil and gas operators has been developed, reviewed and edited. The survey is divided-by topic into three sections. (1) drilling wastes; (2) associated wastes; and (3) produced water. The objective of the survey is to develop more current information on the waste volumes and disposal methods used during 1986 through 1991. The possible treatment scenarios for produced water have been identified. Organic and inorganic contaminant removal, liquid/solid separation and liquid/emulsified oil separation have been identified as the main objectives of the treatment of produced water.

  19. A study on planning organ at risk volume for the rectum using cone beam computed tomography in the treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran, E-mail: Ramachandran.Prabhakar@petermac.org [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Oates, Richard; Jones, Daryl [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Cramb, Jim [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Geso, Moshi [RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Gill, Suki [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we analyzed planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for the rectum using a series of cone beam computed tomographies (CBCTs) acquired during the treatment of prostate cancer and evaluated the dosimetric effect of different PRV definitions. Overall, 21 patients with prostate cancer were treated radically with 78 Gy in 39 fractions had in total 418 CBCTs, each acquired at the end of the first 5 fractions and then every alternate fraction. The PRV was generated from the Boolean sum volume of the rectum obtained from first 5 fractions (PRV-CBCT-5) and from all CBCTs (PRV-CBCT-All). The PRV margin was compared at the superior, middle, and inferior slices of the contoured rectum to compare PRV-CBCT-5 and PRV-CBCT-All. We also compared the dose received by the planned rectum (Rectum-computed tomography [CT]), PRV-CBCT-5, PRV-CBCT-All, and average rectum (CBCT-AV-dose-volume histogram [DVH]) at critical dose levels. The average measured rectal volume for all 21 patients for Rectum-CT, PRV-CBCT-5, and PRV-CBCT-All was 44.3 ± 15.0, 92.8 ± 40.40, and 121.5 ± 36.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For PRV-CBCT-All, the mean ± standard deviation displacement in the anterior, posterior, right, and left lateral directions in centimeters was 2.1 ± 1.1, 0.9 ± 0.5, 0.9 ± 0.8, and 1.1 ± 0.7 for the superior rectum; 0.8 ± 0.5, 1.1 ± 0.5, 1.0 ± 0.5, and 1.0 ± 0.5 for the middle rectum; and 0.3 ± 0.3; 0.9 ± 0.5; 0.4 ± 0.2, and 0.5 ± 0.3 for the inferior rectum, respectively. The first 5 CBCTs did not predict the PRV for individual patients. Our study shows that the PRV margin is different for superior, middle, and the inferior parts of the rectum, it is wider superiorly and narrower inferiorly. A uniform PRV margin does not represent the actual rectal variations during treatment for all treatment fractions. The large variation in interpatient rectal size implies a potential role for adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  20. SU-E-T-300: Spatial Variations of Multiple Off-Axial Targets for a Single Isocenter SRS Treatment Plan in ExacTrac 6D Robotic Couch System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S [Genesis Medical Center, Davenport, IA (United States); Tseng, T [Mount Sinai Hospital, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial variations of multiple off-axial targets for a single isocenter stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment plan in ExacTrac 6D robotic couch system (BrainLab AG). Methods: Five metallic ball bearing (BB) markers were placed sparsely in 3D off-axial locations (non-coplanar) inside a skull phantom as the representatives of multiple targets mimicking multiple brain metastases. The locations of the BB markers were carefully chosen to minimize overlapping of each other in a port imaging detector plane. The skull phantom was immobilized by a frameless mask and CT scanned with a BrainLab Head and Neck Localizer using a GE Optima MDCT scanner. The CT images were exported to iPlan software (BrainLab AG) and a multiple target PTV was drawn by combining all the contours of the BBs. The margin of the MLC opening was selected as 3 mm expansion outward. Two coplanar arc beams were placed to generate a single isocenter SRS plan to treat the PTV. The arc beams were delivered using Novalis Tx system with portal imaging acquisition mode per 10% temporal resolution. The locations of the BBs were visualized and analyzed with respect to the MLC aperture in the treatment plan similar to the Winston-Lutz test. Results: All the BBs were clearly identified inside the MLC openings. The positional errors for the BBs were overall less than 1 mm along the rotational path of the two arcs. Conclusion: This study verified that the spatial deviations of multiple off-axial targets for a single isocenter SRS treatment plan is within sub-millimeter range in ExacTrac 6D robotic couch system. Accompanied with the Winston-Lutz test, this test will quality-assure the spatial accuracies of the isocenter as well as the positions of multiple off-axial targets for the SRS treatment using a single isocenter multiple target treatment plan.

  1. Characterization of oil and gas waste disposal practices and assessment of treatment costs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedient, P.B.

    1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers work completed during the sixth quarter for the project. The project consists of three tasks: the first relates to developing a database of waste volumes and disposal methods used by the industry; the second and third tasks are aimed at investigating technologies that could be used for the treatment of produced waters and developing cost estimates for those technologies. The remainder of this report describes progress related to the three tasks in the project. Overall, construction of the Production Environmental Database (PED) is ongoing. While much of the data has been collected and entered into the database, a few data categories are still missing, for example, soils and geology and geohydrology. Work is currently under way to collect these data. In addition, a detailed data analysis has begun in order to develop relationships between oil and gas activities and environmental characteristics. In terms of the treatment of produced water, much of the work in the past quarter was focused on analyzing the costs associated with the treatment and disposal of waste residuals such as sludges.

  2. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,; Erhart, S C; Spencer, C G

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan addresses: Greenhouse Gas Reduction and Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Inventory; Buildings, ESPC Initiative Schedule, and Regional and Local Planning; Fleet Management; Water Use Efficiency and Management; Pollution Prevention and Waste Reduction; Sustainable Acquisition; Electronic Stewardship and Data Centers; Renewable Energy; Climate Change; and Budget and Funding.

  3. Status of flue-gas treatment technologies for combined SO[sub 2]/NO[sub x] reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.); Markussen, J.M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments and passage of state legislation leading to more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO.) regulations have fueled research and development efforts on the technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and NO[sub x]. The integrated removal of both SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue-gas-cleanup systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

  4. Alternative flue gas treatment technologies for integrated SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markussen, J.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Livengood, D.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enactment of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, as well as passage of legislation at the state level has raised the prospect of more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission regulations and has fueled research and development efforts on a number technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and NO{sub x}. The integrated removal of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue gas cleanup systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

  5. A dual model HU conversion from MRI intensity values within and outside of bone segment for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korhonen, Juha, E-mail: juha.p.korhonen@hus.fi [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland) [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Kapanen, Mika [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland) [Clinical Research Institute Helsinki University Central Hospital Ltd., POB-700, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Department of Medical Physics, Tampere University Hospital, POB-2000, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Keyriläinen, Jani; Seppälä, Tiina; Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland)] [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB-180, 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The lack of electron density information in magnetic resonance images (MRI) poses a major challenge for MRI-based radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). In this study the authors convert MRI intensity values into Hounsfield units (HUs) in the male pelvis and thus enable accurate MRI-based RTP for prostate cancer patients with varying tissue anatomy and body fat contents. Methods: T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}*-weighted MRI intensity values and standard computed tomography (CT) image HUs in the male pelvis were analyzed using image data of 10 prostate cancer patients. The collected data were utilized to generate a dual model HU conversion technique from MRI intensity values of the single image set separately within and outside of contoured pelvic bones. Within the bone segment local MRI intensity values were converted to HUs by applying a second-order polynomial model. This model was tuned for each patient by two patient-specific adjustments: MR signal normalization to correct shifts in absolute intensity level and application of a cutoff value to accurately represent low density bony tissue HUs. For soft tissues, such as fat and muscle, located outside of the bone contours, a threshold-based segmentation method without requirements for any patient-specific adjustments was introduced to convert MRI intensity values into HUs. The dual model HU conversion technique was implemented by constructing pseudo-CT images for 10 other prostate cancer patients. The feasibility of these images for RTP was evaluated by comparing HUs in the generated pseudo-CT images with those in standard CT images, and by determining deviations in MRI-based dose distributions compared to those in CT images with 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the anisotropic analytical algorithm and 360° volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with the Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm. Results: The average HU differences between the constructed pseudo-CT images and standard CT images of each test patient ranged from ?2 to 5 HUs and from 22 to 78 HUs in soft and bony tissues, respectively. The average local absolute value differences were 11 HUs in soft tissues and 99 HUs in bones. The planning target volume doses (volumes 95%, 50%, 5%) in the pseudo-CT images were within 0.8% compared to those in CT images in all of the 20 treatment plans. The average deviation was 0.3%. With all the test patients over 94% (IMRT) and 92% (VMAT) of dose points within body (lower than 10% of maximum dose suppressed) passed the 1 mm and 1% 2D gamma index criterion. The statistical tests (t- and F-tests) showed significantly improved (p ? 0.05) HU and dose calculation accuracies with the soft tissue conversion method instead of homogeneous representation of these tissues in MRI-based RTP images. Conclusions: This study indicates that it is possible to construct high quality pseudo-CT images by converting the intensity values of a single MRI series into HUs in the male pelvis, and to use these images for accurate MRI-based prostate RTP dose calculations.

  6. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrehaug, Sten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Gordon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics Core, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheng, Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  7. An Overview of Project Planning for Hot-Isostatic Pressure Treatment of High-Level Waste Calcine for the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12289

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenni, Joseph A.; Thompson, Theron J. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83403 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Calcine Disposition Project is responsible for retrieval, treatment by hot-isostatic pressure, packaging, and disposal of highly radioactive calcine stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in southeast Idaho. In the 2009 Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement the Department of Energy documented the selection of hot-isostatic pressure as the technology to treat the calcine. The Record of Decision specifies that the treatment results in a volume-reduced, monolithic waste form suitable for transport outside of Idaho by a target date of December 31, 2035. That target date is specified in the 1995 Idaho Settlement Agreement to treat and prepare the calcine for transport out of Idaho in exchange for allowing storage of Navy spent nuclear fuel at the INL Site. The project is completing the design of the calcine-treatment process and facility to comply with Record of Decision, Settlement Agreement, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, and Department of Energy requirements. A systems engineering approach is being used to define the project mission and requirements, manage risks, and establish the safety basis for decision making in compliance with DOE O 413.3B, 'Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets'. The approach draws heavily on 'design-for-quality' tools to systematically add quality, predict design reliability, and manage variation in the earliest possible stages of design when it is most efficient. Use of these tools provides a standardized basis for interfacing systems to interact across system boundaries and promotes system integration on a facility-wide basis. A mass and energy model was developed to assist in the design of process equipment, determine material-flow parameters, and estimate process emissions. Data generated from failure modes and effects analysis and reliability, availability, maintainability, and inspectability analysis were incorporated into a time and motion model to validate and verify the capability to complete treatment of the calcine within the required schedule. The Calcine Disposition Project systems engineering approach, including use of industry-proven design-for-quality tools and quantitative assessment techniques, has strengthened the project's design capability to meet its intended mission in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Use of these tools has been particularly helpful to the project in early design planning to manage variation; improve requirements and high-consequence risk management; and more effectively apply alternative, interface, failure mode, RAMI, and time and motion analyses at the earliest possible stages of design when their application is most efficient and cost effective. The project is using these tools to design and develop HIP treatment of highly radioactive calcine to produce a volume-reduced, monolithic waste form with immobilization of hazardous and radioactive constituents. (authors)

  8. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  9. UMTC Climate Action Plan: Roadmap to Net Zero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    UMTC Climate Action Plan: Roadmap to Net Zero Emissions Co-chairs of UMTC Sustainability Committee changes · Goal: Develop a plan for achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions #12;UMTC Greenhouse Gas

  10. Experiment Hazard Class 5.4 - Compressed Gas Cylinders

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compressed flammable gas and pyrophoric gases. Consultation with EQO Industrial Hygiene when planning experiments that involve toxic gas, oxygen deficiency hazards or other...

  11. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  13. Measurements of lateral penumbra for uniform scanning proton beams under various beam delivery conditions and comparison to the XiO treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Suresh; Zeidan, Omar; Ramirez, Eric; Rains, Michael; Gao, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanshui [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The main purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the dependency of lateral penumbra (80%–20% distance) of uniform scanning proton beams on various factors such as air gap, proton range, modulation width, compensator thickness, and depth, and (2) compare the lateral penumbra calculated by a treatment planning system (TPS) with measurements.Methods: First, lateral penumbra was measured using solid–water phantom and radiographic films for (a) air gap, ranged from 0 to 35 cm, (b) proton range, ranged from 8 to 30 cm, (c) modulation, ranged from 2 to 10 cm, (d) compensator thickness, ranged from 0 to 20 cm, and (e) depth, ranged from 7 to 15 cm. Second, dose calculations were computed in a virtual water phantom using the XiO TPS with pencil beam algorithm for identical beam conditions and geometrical configurations that were used for the measurements. The calculated lateral penumbra was then compared with the measured one for both the horizontal and vertical scanning magnets of our uniform scanning proton beam delivery system.Results: The results in the current study showed that the lateral penumbra of horizontal scanning magnet was larger (up to 1.4 mm for measurement and up to 1.0 mm for TPS) compared to that of vertical scanning magnet. Both the TPS and measurements showed an almost linear increase in lateral penumbra with increasing air gap as it produced the greatest effect on lateral penumbra. Lateral penumbra was dependent on the depth and proton range. Specifically, the width of lateral penumbra was found to be always lower at shallower depth than at deeper depth within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. The lateral penumbra results were less sensitive to the variation in the thickness of compensator, whereas lateral penumbra was independent of modulation. Overall, the comparison between the results of TPS with that of measurements indicates a good agreement for lateral penumbra, with TPS predicting higher values compared to measurements.Conclusions: Lateral penumbra of uniform scanning proton beams depends on air gap, proton range, compensator thickness, and depth, whereas lateral penumbra is not dependent on modulation. The XiO TPS typically overpredicted lateral penumbra compared to measurements, within 1 mm for most cases, but the difference could be up to 2.5 mm at a deep depth and large air gap.

  14. Climate Action Plan (New Orleans)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Orleans' Climate Action Plan will provide a road map to reach the City's greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goal by 2030 while orchestrating its adaptation to climate change. The CAP will outline...

  15. Gonzales Comprehensive Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bright, Elise; Cutaia, Louis; Barrios, Nair; Brinkman, Travis; Caraballo, Stephany; Chen, Long; Coleman, Alex; Crosby, Kevin; Dai, Boya; Espinoza, Carlos; Han, Dondjin; Hansen, Todd; Hyde, Allison; Lazaro, Cristopher; Lin, Rosie; Lopez, Michael; Martin, Michael; Masterson, Jaimie Hicks; Medina, Izel; Peackock, Walter M; Sengupta, Koly; Shelnutt, Andrew; Su, Jin; Tan, Shuman; Tang, Taoi; Tran, Tho

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program’s (NFIP) Community Rat- ing System (CRS) which reduces the premiums for policy holders within the municipality. In terms of improving the human environment, the plan addresses the impacts of the oil and gas industry as well as improving trails...…………………..………………………………………………...…………………...….242 Environment…………………….……………………………………………………………………….……..….245 Future Environment………………...……………………………………………..…………...…..283 Policy Table……………………..……………………………………………………...…...………….288 Appendix………………….…………………………………………………………...…………………292 Urban Design...

  16. Gonzales Comprehensive Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bright, Elise; Cutaia, Louis; Barrios, Nair; Brinkman, Travis; Caraballo, Stephany; Chen, Long; Coleman, Alex; Crosby, Kevin; Dai, Boya; Espinoza, Carlos; Han, Dondjin; Hansen, Todd; Hyde, Allison; Lazaro, Cristopher; Lin, Rosie; Lopez, Michael; Martin, Michael; Masterson, Jaimie Hicks; Medina, Izel; Peackock, Walter M; Sengupta, Koly; Shelnutt, Andrew; Su, Jin; Tan, Shuman; Tang, Taoi; Tran, Tho

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program’s (NFIP) Community Rat- ing System (CRS) which reduces the premiums for policy holders within the municipality. In terms of improving the human environment, the plan addresses the impacts of the oil and gas industry as well as improving trails...…………………..………………………………………………...…………………...….242 Environment…………………….……………………………………………………………………….……..….245 Future Environment………………...……………………………………………..…………...…..283 Policy Table……………………..……………………………………………………...…...………….288 Appendix………………….…………………………………………………………...…………………292 Urban Design...

  17. DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies Power Plan, both natural gas-fired cogeneration and the use of combustion turbines as a means of backing

  18. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  19. Cold Gas at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin A. Norman; Robert Braun

    1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the current observational and theoretical issues concerning cold gas at high redshift and present simulations showing how a number of observational issues can be resolved with planned future instrumentation.

  20. hurricane plan UNO HURRICANE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    hurricane plan #12;UNO HURRICANE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................................... 1 I. HURRICANE EMERGENCY TEAMS Hurricane Emergency Implementation Team (HEIT)......................................... 2 PPoosstt

  1. Microsoft Word - Sec 999 Annual Plan - January 2008 revOMB final...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan focuses on unconventional natural gas rather than "other petroleum resources" (e.g., shale oil, oil sands, deep gas). The Small Producers Program Element targets advancing...

  2. A study of IMRT planning parameters on planning efficiency, delivery efficiency, and plan quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittauer, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32603 and J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Lu Bo; Yan Guanghua; Kahler, Darren; Amdur, Robert; Liu Chihray [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32603 (United States); Gopal, Arun [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve planning and delivery efficiency of head and neck IMRT without compromising planning quality through the evaluation of inverse planning parameters.Methods: Eleven head and neck patients with pre-existing IMRT treatment plans were selected for this retrospective study. The Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) was used to compute new treatment plans for each patient by varying the individual or the combined parameters of dose/fluence grid resolution, minimum MU per segment, and minimum segment area. Forty-five plans per patient were generated with the following variations: 4 dose/fluence grid resolution plans, 12 minimum segment area plans, 9 minimum MU plans, and 20 combined minimum segment area/minimum MU plans. Each plan was evaluated and compared to others based on dose volume histograms (DVHs) (i.e., plan quality), planning time, and delivery time. To evaluate delivery efficiency, a model was developed that estimated the delivery time of a treatment plan, and validated through measurements on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Results: The uncertainty (i.e., variation) of the dose-volume index due to dose calculation grid variation was as high as 8.2% (5.5 Gy in absolute dose) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and 13.3% (2.1 Gy in absolute dose) for planning at risk volumes (PRVs). Comparison results of dose distributions indicated that smaller volumes were more susceptible to uncertainties. The grid resolution of a 4 mm dose grid with a 2 mm fluence grid was recommended, since it can reduce the final dose calculation time by 63% compared to the accepted standard (2 mm dose grid with a 2 mm fluence grid resolution) while maintaining a similar level of dose-volume index variation. Threshold values that maintained adequate plan quality (DVH results of the PTVs and PRVs remained satisfied for their dose objectives) were 5 cm{sup 2} for minimum segment area and 5 MU for minimum MU. As the minimum MU parameter was increased, the number of segments and delivery time were decreased. Increasing the minimum segment area parameter decreased the plan MU, but had less of an effect on the number of segments and delivery time. Our delivery time model predicted delivery time to within 1.8%. Conclusions: Increasing the dose grid while maintaining a small fluence grid allows for improved planning efficiency without compromising plan quality. Delivery efficiency can be improved by increasing the minimum MU, but not the minimum segment area. However, increasing the respective minimum MU and/or the minimum segment area to any value greater than 5 MU and 5 cm{sup 2} is not recommended because it degrades plan quality.

  3. SU-D-BRE-06: Modeling the Dosimetric Effects of Volumetric and Layer-Based Repainting Strategies in Spot Scanning Proton Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J E; Beltran, C; Herman, M G; Kruse, J J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare multiple repainting techniques as strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in free-breathing, spot scanning proton plans. Methods: An analytic routine modeled three-dimensional dose distributions of pencil-beam proton plans delivered to a moving target. The interplay effect was studied in subsequent calculations by modeling proton delivery from a clinical synchrotron based spot scanning system and respiratory target motion, patterned from surrogate breathing traces from clinical 4DCT scans and normalized to nominal 0.5 and 1 cm amplitudes. Two distinct repainting strategies were modeled. In idealized volumetric repainting, the plan is divided up and delivered multiple times successively, with each instance only delivering a fraction of the total MU. Maximum-MU repainting involves delivering a fixed number of MU per spot and repeating a given energy layer until the prescribed MU are reached. For each of 13 patient breathing traces, the dose was computed for up to four volumetric repaints and an array of maximum-MU values. Delivery strategies were inter-compared based on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and delivery time. Results: Increasing levels of repainting generally improved plan quality and reduced dosimetric variability at the expense of longer delivery time. Motion orthogonal to the scan direction yielded substantially greater dose deviations than motion parallel to the scan direction. For a fixed delivery time, maximum-MU repainting was most effective relative to idealized volumetric repainting at small maximum-MU values. For 1 cm amplitude motion orthogonal to the scan direction, the average homogeneity metric (D5 – D95)[%] of 23.4% was reduced to 7.6% with a 168 s delivery using volumetric repainting compared with 8.7% in 157.2 s for maximum-MU repainting. The associated static target homogeneity metric was 2.5%. Conclusion: Maximum-MU repainting can provide a reasonably effective alternative to volumetric repainting for systems without the capability to switch energies rapidly.

  4. Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Model as Applied to Supplementation : Model Description, User Guide, and Theoretical Documentation for the Model Introduced in the Summary Report Series on Supplementation in the Columbia Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lestelle, Lawrence C.; Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the formulation and operation of a model designed to assist in planning supplementation projects. It also has application in examining a broader array of questions related to natural fish production and stock restoration. The model is referred to as the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) Model because of its utility in helping to diagnose and identify possible treatments to be applied to natural production problems for salmonids. It was developed through the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP), which was an initiative to help coordinate supplementation planning in the Columbia Basin. The model is operated within the spreadsheet environment of Quattro Pro using a system of customized menus. No experience with spreadsheet macros is required to operate it. As currently configured, the model should only be applied to spring chinook; modifications are required to apply it to fall chinook and other species. The purpose of the model is to enable managers to consider possible outcomes of supplementation under different sets of assumptions about the natural production system and the integration of supplementation fish into that system. It was designed to help assess uncertainty and the relative risks and benefits of alternative supplementation strategies. The model is a tool to facilitate both planning and learning; it is not a predictive model. This document consists of three principal parts. Part I provides a description of the model. Part II is a guide to running the model. Part III provides theoretical documentation. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of many of the model's parameters is provided in the appendix. This analysis was used to test whether the model produces consistent and reasonable results and to assess the relative effects of specific parameter inputs on outcome.

  5. LHCB RICH gas system proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosteels, Michel; Haider, S

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both LHCb RICH will be operated with fluorocarbon as gas radiator. RICH 1 will be filled with 4m^3 of C4F10 and RICH 2 with 100m^3 of CF4. The gas systems will run as a closed loop circulation and a gas recovery system within the closed loop is planned for RICH 1, where the recovery of the CF4 will only be realised during filling and emptying of the detector. Inline gas purification is foreseen for the gas systems in order to limit water and oxygen impurities.

  6. LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    more on imported supplies, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). Currently, the U.S. has four LNG have proposed to site LNG import facilities in California, in other locations in the U.S, and in Baja California, Mexico. In the early 1970s, California's gas utilities were planning to build an LNG import

  7. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  8. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers` short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners` (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  9. Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komar, C.A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

  10. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lucerna, J. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Plodinec, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development.

  11. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  12. Heat treatment furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  13. Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nova Scotia's Climate Change Action Plan has two main goals: reducing the province's contribution to climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and preparing for changes to the...

  14. Climate Action Plan (New Brunswick, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Brunswick-led initiatives will result in greenhouse gas emission reductions of 5.5 megatonnes (millions of tonnes, Mt) annually in 2012. The plan includes actions in the following areas:...

  15. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence J. Pekot

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  16. Proactive Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 20 Landowners and agricultural producers in the Cedar Creek watershed are working with agency representatives and gov- ernment leaders on a proactive plan to help reduce pollution flowing into Cedar Creek Reservoir. The 34...-county watershed have an opportunity to voice their opinions and help draft the watershed protection plan for the reservoir. The plan, which will outline ways to reduce pollution and improve water quality, is an outgrowth of years of water quality monitoring...

  17. Strategic Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a single BPA data repository * Data quality improvements * Improve model alignment with WECC planning data * Improve WECC base case coordination * Align the BPA data model with...

  18. Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Gas-Transported Reactants: Laboratory Scale Experiments in Support of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Williams, Mark D.; Resch, Charles T.; McKinley, James P.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This laboratory-scale investigation is focused on decreasing mobility of uranium in subsurface contaminated sediments in the vadose zone by in situ geochemical manipulation at low water content. This geochemical manipulation of the sediment surface phases included reduction, pH change (acidic and alkaline), and additions of chemicals (phosphate, ferric iron) to form specific precipitates. Reactants were advected into 1-D columns packed with Hanford 200 area U-contaminated sediment as a reactive gas (for CO2, NH3, H2S, SO2), with a 0.1% water content mist (for NaOH, Fe(III), HCl, PO4) and with a 1% water content foam (for PO4). Uranium is present in the sediment in multiple phases that include (in decreasing mobility): aqueous U(VI) complexes, adsorbed U, reduced U(IV) precipitates, rind-carbonates, total carbonates, oxides, silicates, phosphates, and in vanadate minerals. Geochemical changes were evaluated in the ability to change the mixture of surface U phases to less mobile forms, as defined by a series of liquid extractions that dissolve progressively less soluble phases. Although liquid extractions provide some useful information as to the generalized uranium surface phases (and are considered operational definitions of extracted phases), positive identification (by x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, other techniques) was also used to positively identify U phases and effects of treatment. Some of the changes in U mobility directly involve U phases, whereas other changes result in precipitate coatings on U surface phases. The long-term implication of the U surface phase changes to alter U mass mobility in the vadose zone was then investigated using simulations of 1-D infiltration and downward migration of six U phases to the water table. In terms of the short-term decrease in U mobility (in decreasing order), NH3, NaOH mist, CO2, HCl mist, and Fe(III) mist showed 20% to 35% change in U surface phases. Phosphate addition (mist or foam advected) showed inconsistent change in aqueous and adsorbed U, but significant coating (likely phosphates) on U-carbonates. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U reduction, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals. In addition, simulations showed the greatest decrease in U mass transport time to reach groundwater (and concentration) for these silicate/phosphate minerals. Advection of reactive gasses was the easiest to implement at the laboratory scale (and presumably field scale). Both mist and foam advection show promise and need further development, but current implementation move reactants shorter distances relative to reactive gasses. Overall, the ammonia and carbon dioxide gas had the greatest overall geochemical performance and ability to implement at field scale. Corresponding mist-delivered technologies (NaOH mist for ammonia and HCl mist for carbon dioxide) performed as well or better geochemically, but are not as easily upscaled. Phosphate delivery by mist was rated slightly higher than by foam delivery simply due to the complexity of foam injection and unknown effect of U mobility by the presence of the surfactant.

  19. Multicriteria optimization informed VMAT planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Huixiao; Craft, David L.; Gierga, David P., E-mail: dgierga@partners.org

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a patient-specific volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization procedure using dose-volume histogram (DVH) information from multicriteria optimization (MCO) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The study included 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing standard fractionation treatment, 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing hypofractionation treatment, and 5 patients with head/neck cancer. MCO-IMRT plans using 20 and 7 treatment fields were generated for each patient on the RayStation treatment planning system (clinical version 2.5, RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden). The resulting DVH of the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan for each patient was used as the reference DVH, and the extracted point values of the resulting DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan were used as objectives and constraints for VMAT optimization. Weights of objectives or constraints of VMAT optimization or both were further tuned to generate the best match with the reference DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan. The final optimal VMAT plan quality was evaluated by comparison with MCO-IMRT plans based on homogeneity index, conformity number of planning target volume, and organ at risk sparing. The influence of gantry spacing, arc number, and delivery time on VMAT plan quality for different tumor sites was also evaluated. The resulting VMAT plan quality essentially matched the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan but with a shorter delivery time and less monitor units. VMAT plan quality of head/neck cancer cases improved using dual arcs whereas prostate cases did not. VMAT plan quality was improved by fine gantry spacing of 2 for the head/neck cancer cases and the hypofractionation-treated prostate cancer cases but not for the standard fractionation–treated prostate cancer cases. MCO-informed VMAT optimization is a useful and valuable way to generate patient-specific optimal VMAT plans, though modification of the weights of objectives or constraints extracted from resulting DVH of MCO-IMRT or both is necessary.

  20. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  1. DOE Technical Assistance on Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    state, local, tribal and regional planning efforts related to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the electric power sector. DOE is ready to support state, local, and tribal...

  2. Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission is responsible for regulating gas, electric, and water companies in the state. This legislation contains provisions for such companies, addressing planning and siting...

  3. Short-term supply chain management in upstream natural gas systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selot, Ajay

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas supply chain planning and optimization is important to ensure security and reliability of natural gas supply. However, it is challenging due to the distinctive features of natural gas supply chains. These ...

  4. ARM - Lesson Plans: Measuring Quantities of Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMaking Clouds Outreach

  5. Clean Energy Jobs Plan Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    times as many jobs per dollar as gas, oil or coal. And dollars invested in clean energy tend to stay. Investment in clean technology is also growing. Clean tech investment in California reached $3.3 billionClean Energy Jobs Plan Introduction When I was governor, California was the world leader

  6. Dedicated Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Single-Center Experience in 179 Patients With Varied Dose Prescriptions and Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Zachary A.; Gorgulho, Alessandra A.; Bezrukiy, Nikita; McArthur, David [Department of Neurosurgery, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); De Salles, Antonio A.F., E-mail: adesalles@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); West Los Angeles Veteran's Administration Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dedicated linear accelerator radiosurgery (D-LINAC) has become an important treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although the use of gamma knife continues to be established, few large series exist using D-LINAC. The authors describe their results, comparing the effects of varied target and dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Between August 1995 and January 2008, 179 patients were treated with D-LINAC radiosurgery. Ten patients (5.58%) had no clinical follow-up. The median age was 74.0 years (range, 32-90 years). A total of 39 patients had secondary or atypical pain, and 130 had idiopathic TN. Initially, 28 patients received doses between 70 and 85 Gy, with the 30% isodose line (IDL) touching the brainstem. Then, using 90 Gy, 82 consecutive patients were treated with a 30% IDL and 59 patients with a 50% IDL tangential to the pons. Results: Of 169 patients, 134 (79.3%) experienced significant relief at a mean of 28.8 months (range, 5-142 months). Average time to relief was 1.92 months (range, immediate to 6 months). A total of 31 patients (19.0%) had recurrent pain at 13.5 months. Of 87 patients with idiopathic TN without prior procedures, 79 (90.8%) had initial relief. Among 28 patients treated with 70 Gy and 30% IDL, 18 patients (64.3%) had significant relief, and 10 (35.7%) had numbness. Of the patients with 90 Gy and 30% IDL at the brainstem, 59 (79.0%) had significant relief and 48.9% had numbness. Among 59 consecutive patients with similar dose but the 50% isodoseline at the brainstem, 49 patients (88.0%) had excellent/good relief. Numbness, averaging 2.49 on a subjective scale of 1 to 5, was experienced by 49.7% of the patients, Conclusions: Increased radiation dose and volume of brainstem irradiation may improve clinical outcomes with the trade-off of trigeminal dysfunction. Further study of the implications of dose and target are needed to optimize outcomes and to minimize complications.

  7. Tank 241-S-111: Tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, ORNL, and PNL tank vapor program. Scope of this plan is to provide guidance for sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-S-111 (this tank is on the organic and flammable gas watch list). This tank received Redox plant waste, among other wastes.

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  9. PH/sub 3/ treatment for polymer stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymers are stabilized against oxidative degradation by treatment with phosphine gas. The treatment can be used in situ on polymeric components already in use.

  10. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  11. Saudi Aramco Gas Operations Energy Efficiency Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dossary, F. S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saudi Aramco Gas Operations (GO) created energy efficiency strategies for its 5-year business plan (2011-2015), supported by a unique energy efficiency program, to reduce GO energy intensity by 26% by 2015. The program generated an energy savings...

  12. Saudi Aramco Gas Operations Energy Efficiency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dossary, F. S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saudi Aramco Gas Operations (GO) created energy efficiency strategies for its 5-year business plan (2011-2015), supported by a unique energy efficiency program, to reduce GO energy intensity by 26% by 2015. The program generated an energy savings...

  13. ACQUISITION PLANNING

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7.1 (May 2010) 1 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition...

  14. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  15. Revised GCFR safety program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, A.P.; Boyack, B.E.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary of the recently revised gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) safety program plan. The activities under this plan are organized to support six lines of protection (LOPs) for protection of the public from postulated GCFR accidents. Each LOP provides an independent, sequential, quantifiable risk barrier between the public and the radiological hazards associated with postulated GCFR accidents. To implement a quantitative risk-based approach in identifying the important technology requirements for each LOP, frequency and consequence-limiting goals are allocated to each. To ensure that all necessary tasks are covered to achieve these goals, the program plan is broken into a work breakdown structure (WBS). Finally, the means by which the plan is being implemented are discussed.

  16. Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

  17. How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ken

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

  18. River Protection Project (RPP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POHTO, R.E.

    1999-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document contains the training plan for dangerous waste management at River Protection Project treatment, storage or disposal facility (TSD) Units.

  19. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  20. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  1. Linking Heroin Users in China to Drug Treatment and Other Resources in the Community: Effect of a Recovery Management Intervention Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Fei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substance abuse treatment: Reexamining “Comprehensive” care.abuse include: intake processing/assessment, treatment plan, pharmacotherapy, continuing care,

  2. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO{sub x} and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required.

  3. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization.

  4. Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    of water in a specific location. #12;Water Extraction & Conveyance Water Treatment End-Use AgriculturalIntegrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems Wilkinson, Ph.D. Director, Water Policy Program Bren School of Environmental Science and Management

  5. Energy planning and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

  6. A novel branch and bound algorithm for optimal development of gas fields under uncertainty in reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    in reserves Vikas Goel , Ignacio E. Grossmann Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University and operational planning for development of gas fields under uncertainty in gas reserves. Assuming uncertainties models for planning in the oil and gas exploration and production industry. A major challenge

  7. Plan Your School Visit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Your School Visit For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Plan Your School Visit...

  8. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  9. 2008 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2008 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and...

  10. 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    07 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and...

  11. Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various...

  12. Oil and Gas R&D Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication describes the major components of the research and development programs of the Department of Energy`s Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology. These programs are commonly referred to collectively as the `Oil and Gas Program.` This document provides customers with a single source of information describing the details of the individual technology program components. This document reflects the results of a planning cycle that began in early 1996 with the development of a scenario analysis for the programs, followed by the development of the coordinated strategic plan. The technology program plans, which are the most recent products of the planning cycle, expand on the program descriptions presented in the coordinated strategic plan, and represent an initial effort to coordinate the Oil and Gas Program exploration and production programs and budgets. Each technology program plan includes a `roadmap` that summarizes the progress of the program to the present and indicates its future direction. The roadmaps describe the program drivers, vision, mission, strategies, and measures of success. Both the individual technology program plans and the strategic plan are dynamic and are intended to be updated regularly.

  13. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Charles G

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy effi ciency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifi cally, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan, while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The mission of the Y-12 Energy Management program is to incorporate energy-effi cient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. The plan addresses greenhouse gases, buildings, fleet management, water use, pollution prevention, waste reduction, sustainable acquisition, electronic stewardship and data centers, site innovation and government-wide support.

  14. Democratic Republic of Congo-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ClimateWorks, Project Catalyst, McKinsey and Company Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Forestry, Greenhouse Gas Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS,...

  15. Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Documents Individual Permit: Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents1335769200000Plans...

  16. Annual Training Plan Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

  17. A reservoir management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allis, R.G.

    1989-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There are numerous documented cases of extraction of fluids from the ground causing surface subsidence. The cases include groundwater, oil and gas, as well as geothermal fluid withdrawal. A recent comprehensive review of all types of man-induced land subsidence was published by the Geological Survey of America. At the early stages of a geothermal power development project it is standard practice in most countries for an environmental impact report to be required. The possibility of geothermal subsidence has to be addressed, and usually it falls on the geophysicists and/or geologists to make some predictions. The advice given is vital for planning the power plant location and the borefield pipe and drain layout. It is not so much the vertical settlement that occurs with subsidence but the accompanying horizontal ground strains that can do the most damage to any man-made structure.

  18. Disability Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDieselDirectionsDirectorateDisability Plans

  19. Vision Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 The History of theVision Plan

  20. Plans, Procedures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Oursources |VisitPlans,

  1. Strategic Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSiteSeparationsRelevantStrategic Plan

  2. Medical Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDispositionMechanical R&DMakingMedical Plans

  3. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  4. Cyanide treatment options in coke plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

  5. Pipeline safety. Information on gas distribution system operators reporting unaccounted for gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to Department of Transportation records, 92 of the 1491 gas distribution system operators reported high levels of unaccounted for gas (unaccounted for gas is the difference between the amount of gas purchased and sold) for 1984, the latest year for which data were available. Of the 92 gas system operators, 64 were municipals (gas systems owned by a governmental entity, such as a city or county) and 28 were nonmunicipals. Based on the data we reviewed, these 92 gas systems did not report any accidents during calendar year 1984. Part I provides more details on the unaccounted for gas of municipal gas systems. Federal and industry officials consider that unaccounted for gas in excess of 15% of gas purchases high and worthy of investigation. High levels of unaccounted for gas can occur for a number of reasons, including errors in metering and billing, not accounting for gas used by city or company facilities, and leaking gas pipelines. While it may, a leak does not always indicate a safety problem. For example, a slow leak in an open area may not be a safety hazard. The Secretary has the authority to regulate any liquid deemed hazardous when transported by pipeline, and therefore could regulate hazardous liquids not currently regulated including methanol and carbon dioxide. However, the Department of Transportation has no plans to regulate any additional liquids. Part II provides more details. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

  7. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract # 13460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanochko, Ronald M [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Corcoran, Connie [AEM Consulting, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

  8. Investigation of Created Fracture Geometry through Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ibraheem 1987-

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful development of shale gas reservoirs is highly dependent on hydraulic fracture treatments. Many questions remain in regards to the geometry of the created fractures. Production data analysis from some shale gas wells quantifies a much...

  9. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  10. Annual Report Environmental Management Planning Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..........................................................................................................3 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (EMP) .....................................................4 ENERGY transport, this project will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase efficiency, and is the largest corporate bike fleet in Australia · The ANU Ride2Uni program now has 450 members, up from 270 in 2004

  11. 2030 OCARTS Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Association of Central Oklahoma Governments

    ......................................Director of Planning & Program Development Pearlie Tiggs................................................................... Community Planner 2030 OCARTS Plan Report Table of Contents PART 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................ 1 Federal Legislation.......................................................................... 1 Purpose of the Plan Report and Relationship to other Plan Documents............. 3 Organization of the Transportation Planning Process...

  12. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  13. Nigeria: after crude, the gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Misinterpretation of the laws of the marketplace have already brought Nigeria to the brink of a catastrophe in 1978, when the government had built up heavy stocks expecting a substantial increase in price. When it did not materialize and the production had to be dropped to 50% of the previous rate, in a country where crude constitutes 90% of the export revenues, the system was changed. The new plan is intended to reduce the dependence of Nigeria on oil exports. The production rate is set at between 2.2 and 2.5 million bpd. Due to a significant increase in domestic demand, the 2 existing refineries cannot fill the gap; 2 more refineries are planned. There also are substantial gas reserves; the associated gas, now flared, is to be recovered. A gas liquefaction plant also is in operation, with one-half of the output going to Europe and one-half to the US. Some of the oil and gas is earmarked for local petrochemical plants.

  14. Bibliography of greenhouse-gas reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompkins, M.M.; Mintz, M.M.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bibliography of greenhouse-gas reduction strategies has been compiled to assist the Climate change Action Plan Task Force in their consideration of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from personal motor vehicles. The document contains a summary of the literature, including it major directions and implications; and annotated listing of 32 recent pertinent documents; and a listing of a larger group of related reports.

  15. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix C FUEL PRICE FORECASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Figure C-1 illustrates this for world oil prices, and similar patterns apply to natural gas. The last. Figure C-1 World Oil Prices Have Been Following the 1991 Plan Low Forecast 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25 and earlier Council plans, natural gas prices were dependent on the assumptions about world oil prices

  16. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  17. PLAN100%DIGITAL PLAN100%DIGITAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    en un conjunto d e servicios digitales. RAZONES DEL PLAN: Existe un nú mero importante de institu tos

  18. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  19. High Efficiency Gas Turbines Overcome Cogeneration Project Feasibility Hurdles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cogeneration project feasibility sometimes fails during early planning stages due to an electrical cycle efficiency which could be improved through the use of aeroderivative gas turbine engines. The aeroderivative engine offers greater degrees...

  20. Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan November 26, 2004 Prepared for the Presented's subbasin planning process is iterative and designed within an adaptive management framework. Management is comprised of elected officials from local governments throughout the subbasin, and meets regularly to work

  1. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Officer Biological (Accident Reports) 2204 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) (4/2007) 1

  2. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

  3. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste.

  4. Accidental Death & Dismemberment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Death & Dismemberment Plan A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact...

  5. FY 91 Annual Research Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In line with the Federal Oil Research Program to maximize the economic producibility of the domestic oil resource, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) presents this FY91 Annual Research Plan. NIPER is organized into two research departments -- Energy Production Research (EPR) and Fuels Research (FR). Projects in EPR deal with various aspects of enhanced oil recovery and include reservoir characterization, chemical flooding, gas injection, steam injection, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and the environmental concerns related to these processes. Projects in FR consider the impact of heavy oil and alternative fuels on the processing and end-use of fuels. Projects are briefly described.

  6. Coke oven gas injection to blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, F.L.; Terza, R.R.; Sobek, T.F.; Myklebust, K.L. [U.S. Steel, Clairton, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Steel has three major facilities remaining in Pennsylvania`s Mon Valley near Pittsburgh. The Clairton Coke Works operates 12 batteries which produce 4.7 million tons of coke annually. The Edgar Thomson Works in Braddock is a 2.7 million ton per year steel plant. Irvin Works in Dravosburg has a hot strip mill and a range of finishing facilities. The coke works produces 120 mmscfd of coke oven gas in excess of the battery heating requirements. This surplus gas is used primarily in steel re-heating furnaces and for boiler fuel to produce steam for plant use. In conjunction with blast furnace gas, it is also used for power generation of up to 90 MW. However, matching the consumption with the production of gas has proved to be difficult. Consequently, surplus gas has been flared at rates of up to 50 mmscfd, totaling 400 mmscf in several months. By 1993, several changes in key conditions provided the impetus to install equipment to inject coke oven gas into the blast furnaces. This paper describes the planning and implementation of a project to replace natural gas in the furnaces with coke oven gas. It involved replacement of 7 miles of pipeline between the coking plants and the blast furnaces, equipment capable of compressing coke oven gas from 10 to 50 psig, and installation of electrical and control systems to deliver gas as demanded.

  7. DETERMINATION OF GUIDANCE VALUES FOR CLOSED LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DETERMINATION OF GUIDANCE VALUES FOR CLOSED LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS O. BOUR*, S. BERGER**, C Gambetta, 74 000 Annecy SUMMARY: In order to promote active landfill gas collection and treatment or natural attenuation, it is necessary to identify trigger values concerning landfill gas emissions

  8. Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

  9. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  10. Fire Regimes and Fuel Treatments Project title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management course in April 2001. The fire management professionals completed a survey that allowed us results from this meta-analysis were presented at the June 2001 Musgrove Seminar. We are planning dissemination of ours and other recent research related to fuel treatments and fire regimes. We are planning

  11. Gas sensing with acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spates, J.J. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butler, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey is made of acoustic devices that are suitable as gas and vapor sensors. This survey focuses on attributes such as operating frequency, mass sensitivity, quality factor (Q), and their ability to be fabricated on a semiconductor substrate to allow integration with electronic circuitry. The treatment of the device surface with chemically-sensitive films to detect species of interest is discussed. Strategies for improving discrimination are described, including sensor arrays and species concentration and separation schemes. The advantages and disadvantages of integrating sensors with microelectronics are considered, along with the effect on sensitivity of scaling acoustic gas sensors to smaller size.

  12. TWRS privatization phase 1 master site plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE-RL is pursuing a new business strategy of hiring private contractors for treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes. This strategy is called `privatization` and includes design, permitting, construction, operation and deactivation of facilities for tank waste treatment. The TWRS Privatization Infrastructure Project consists of several sub-projects which will provide key services needed to support the privatization mission. This master site plan presently describes all pertinent aspects of the site and identifies all planned provisions for site development, utilities and other site services. It is a baseline document which will be revised as privatization proceeds through design, construction and start-up.

  13. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (WIPO) including information on plans, implementations, and results.

  14. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  15. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  16. Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Gas Engine Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    to carry out preventive maintenance at regular intervals19 . The maintenance schedule affects many short1 Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Gas Engine Power Plant using Generalized Disjunctive with parallel units. Gas engines are shutdown according to a regular maintenance plan that limits the number

  17. Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; adjusted to 2012$, state construction cost index, vintage of cost estimate, scope of estimate to extent's Discussion Aeroderivative Gas Turbine Technology Proposed reference plant and assumptions Preliminary cost Robbins 2 #12;Peaking Power Plant Characteristics 6th Power Plan ($2006) Unit Size (MW) Capital Cost ($/k

  18. Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

  19. Portable treatment systems study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherick, M.J.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.; Bechtold, T.E.; Cole, L.T.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In developing their Site Treatment Plans (STPs), many of the Department of Energy installations identified some form of portable treatment, to facilitate compliant disposition of select mixed low-level wastestreams. The Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology requested that a systems study be performed to better define the potential role of portable treatment with respect to mixed low-level waste, highlight obstacles to implementation, and identify opportunities for future research and development emphasis. The study was performed by first establishing a representative set of mixed waste, then formulating portable treatment system concepts to meet the required processing needs for these wastes. The portable systems that were conceptualized were evaluated and compared to a fixed centralized treatment alternative. The system evaluations include a life-cycle cost analysis and an assessment of regulatory, institutional, and technical issues associated with the potential use of portable systems. The results of this study show that when all costs are included, there are no significant cost differences between portable systems and fixed systems. However, it is also emphasized that many uncertainties exist that could impact the cost of implementing portable treatment systems. Portable treatment could be made more attractive through private sector implementation, although there is little economic incentive for a commercial vendor to develop small, specialized treatment capabilities with limited applicability. Alternatively, there may also be valid reasons why fixed units cannot be used for some problematic wastestreams. In any event, there are some site-specific problems that still need to be addressed, and there may be some opportunity for research and development to make a positive impact in these areas.

  20. High Efficiency Gas Turbines Overcome Cogeneration Project Feasibility Hurdles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, J.

    HIGH EFFICIENCY GAS TlJR1HNES OVERCOME COGENFRATION PROJECT FEASIBILITY HURDLES JIM KING Gas Turbine Perfonumce Engineer STEVART &: STEVENSON SERVICES. INC. Houston. TelUlS ABSTRACT Cogeneration project feasibility sometimes fails... during early planning stages due to an electrical cycle efficiency which could be improved through the use of aeroderivative gas turbine engines. The aeroderivative engine offers greater degrees of freedom in terms of power augmentation through...

  1. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  2. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions was conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute partially supported the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. During the course of this project, MTR has sold thirteen commercial units related to the field test technology. Revenue generated from new business is already more than four times the research dollars invested in this process by DOE. The process is ready for broader commercialization and the expectation is to pursue the commercialization plans developed during this project, including collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  3. Kern River natural gas pipeline commissioned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Kern River Gas Transmission Co., the biggest gas pipeline built in the U.S. in the last decade, has been commissioned. The system was dedicated Mar. 6 at a meter station in an oil field near Bakersfield, Calif. The $984 million, 904 mile pipeline is a 50-50 venture of Tenneco Inc. and Williams Cos. Planning for the project began about 7 years ago. Current operating capacity of the line is 700 MMcfd. Plans call for boosting capacity by 452 MMcfd with added compression. Most of the gas will go to thermal enhanced oil recovery projects in heavy oil fields in California. This paper reports that other customers include utilities, independent electrical power producers, and cogeneration projects.

  4. Studies, Transport and Treatment Concept for Boilers from Berkeley NPP, England - 13599

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirendal, Bo [Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden); Saul, David; Robinson, Joe; Davidson, Gavin [Studsvik UK Ltd (United Kingdom)] [Studsvik UK Ltd (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. Four boilers have been processed and the fifth is planned for completion by end of December 2012.The project had many challenges including a very tight timescale and has been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the first four boilers. It is the first UK project to send large components overseas for recycling and provides new insight into the processing of Magnox gas-circuit components. (authors)

  5. azithromycin treatment reduces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used for gas turbine cooling water system. At the moment we are planning to install Hydrogen Plant, it turns out this equipment takes raw water with a maximum conductivity of 5...

  6. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  7. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ

    2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

  8. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

  9. 65 Contingency Planning Issues CONTINGENCY PLANNING ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The plan relies on a mixed strategy response to an energy shortage. The plan uses a free market approach to local jurisdic- tions, economic considerations, revisions to the California Energy Shortage Contingency multiple jurisdictions or agencies. LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM The purpose of the Energy

  10. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Clinical Engineering 2964 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE

  11. Multiperiod Planning of Water Networks in Industrial Cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishnu, Sumit Kumar

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches would be required to determine the optimal utilization of water over the planning horizon and beyond. Burgara-Montero et al [61] developed an optimization approach that incorporates seasonal variations in the optimal treatment of industrial...

  12. Rev mlh052912 Dartmouth Student Group Health Plan Name: ______________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    /substance abuse treatment and the benefits include at least twenty (20) outpatient mental health and this requirement.) 2. My plan provides coverage for inpatient and outpatient mental health care and chemical

  13. U. S. gas pipelines move to comply with Order 636

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that more US interstate gas pipelines have unveiled plans to comply with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636 megarestructuring rule. In the latest developments: Texas Eastern Transmission Corp. (Tetco) filed the first Order 636 compliance proposal with FERC outlining new transportation rates, operational issues, and services the company plans to offer. Tenneco Gas will eliminate a layer of managers and split marketing and transportation functions into four divisions to deal with Order 646. ANR Pipeline Co. made organizational changes expected to help it participate faster and more effectively under Order 636. The company in mid-May made gas sales a stand alone activity, reorganized system sales by region, and consolidated transportation and storage functions. FERC's long awaited megarestructuring rule, issued early in April, aims to assure the open access, interstate pipelines provide equal services for all gas supplies. Companies are to submit transition plans to FERC by Nov. 2.

  14. ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, P. L.

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

  15. CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CLEMSON UNIVERSITY 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    . The planned Agricultural Science expansion dictates the use of a 10" main in this area. Should the 12" main be installed prior to the Agricultural Science campus expansion in 2010, the water main costs. The campus is now served by a 2.4-mgd (million gallons per day) wastewater treatment plant located north

  16. Natural Gas and Other Petroleum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports3 Annual Plan

  17. benefit description Mit student/Affiliate Medical plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    that includes a variety of health care benefits. The MIT Student Health Plan is designed to fulfill the state is the Mit student Medical plan. It provides you with primary care, outpatient mental health care, and a wide hospitalization, inpatient mental health and substance abuse treatment, surgical procedures, and prescription

  18. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  19. Virginia Energy Plan (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2010 Virginia Energy Plan affirms the state's support for the development of renewable energy. The Plan assesses the state’s energy picture through an examination of the state’s primary energy...

  20. Sustainabiliity Sustainability Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Sustainabiliity IIT Campus Sustainability Plan 2010­2020 Published Fall Semester 2010 www.iit.edu/campus_sustainability #12;IIT Campus Sustainability Plan 2010-2020 Fall Semester 2010 1 Section I: Background Sustainability ...................................................................................................................................................................8 IIT Academic Entities on Sustainability

  1. Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory May 16, 2005 SSRL-HRLP-000-R0 Page 3 of 3 Guidelines for Generating a Rigging Sketch The lift plan required a rigging sketch or...

  2. Strategic Plan Environmental Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan Environmental Assessment 2009 Clinical Center National Institutes of Health U Institutes of Health Strategic Plan ­ Environmental Assessment 2009 Contents Executive Summary environmental assessment to determine Clinical Center strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats

  3. Effective tax planning for Mexican operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.J.A.; Rodriguez, E.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in Mexico's economic and tax systems make it important for foreign investors in oil and gas development to understand these protective policies and investment barriers. American investors, for example, should plan for technology-based opportunities. Among the tax opportunities described are those dealing with site selection, type of ownership, foreign tax credits, income sourcing, and the use of a Domestic International Sales Corporation (DISC). (DCK)

  4. Greensburg Sustainable Comprehensive Plan

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Greensburg, KS In October 2007, the architectural and planning firm, BNIM, was selected formally by the City of Greensburg, with support from the USDA, to prepare the first phase of a comprehensive master plan to rebuild the city, which provides a framework for the rebuilding of Greensburg based around the principles of economic, social and environmental sustainability. The BNIM Planning team presented the final draft of Greensburg's Comprehensive Plan to the City Council and to a public hearing on January 16, 2008.

  5. Environmental Management System Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and locations chemicals are used as well as information about emergency plans and procedures. The current Hazardous

  6. Business Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business Planning Resources, a presentation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  7. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 6 Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan Waste6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan LBNL/4 Management Quality Assurance

  8. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  9. Gas Companies Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Companies program is a set of rules that encourage the development of the natural gas industry in Tennessee. They empower gas companies to lay piped and extend conductors through the...

  10. Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one...

  11. Gas Utilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

  12. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts *...

  13. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  14. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  15. Corporate and Business Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corporate and Business Plan 2010-2011 #12;Main addresses Forest Research Alice Holt Lodge Farnham Research's Business Plan 2010-2011 ..........................12 Table Contents Table 1 - Income This Corporate and Business Plan sets out FR's aims and strategic objectives. It describes the Key Performance

  16. Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization with Nonlinear CDU Models Abdulrahman Alattas, Advisor #12;Refinery Planning Model Development 2 Extension to Multiperiod Planning #12;3 Multiperiod Refinery: refinery configuration Determine · What crude oil to process and in which time period? · The quantities

  17. University of Operations Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Management Plan Office of Campus and Public Safety University of Delaware Critical Incident Management Plan Management Plan Office of Campus and Public Safety - 4 - University of Delaware Critical Incident Management and Public Safety - 5 - County of New Castle CD-30 911 Center/Communications CD-31 Department of Police CD-32

  18. University Libraries Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Libraries Bowling Green State University #12;Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................19 Page 2 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University Libraries Bowling Green State University #12University Libraries Technology Plan 2003-2005 Page 1 of 19 Technology Plan, 2003-2005 University

  19. Tax credit for tight-sands gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schugart, G.L.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a $3 per barrel tax credit, which is tied to crude oil prices, in the Windfall Profits Tax (WPT) for producing fuels from certain unconventional sources. Concentrating on the tight gas formations section of qualifying fuels, the author examines the tax credit and certain factors natural gas producers may want to consider in deciding on whether to choose the tax credit or the incentive prices of the Natural Gas Policy Act. The decline in oil prices is significant enough to provide some producers an opportunity to take advantage of the tax credit. They should do some tax planning by calculating the estimated break-even point for NGPA incentive prices and the nonconventional gas production tax credit.

  20. Toward Fully Automated Multicriterial Plan Generation: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voet, Peter W.J., E-mail: p.voet@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands); Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Fransen, Dennie; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To prospectively compare plans generated with iCycle, an in-house-developed algorithm for fully automated multicriterial intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beam profile and beam orientation optimization, with plans manually generated by dosimetrists using the clinical treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: For 20 randomly selected head-and-neck cancer patients with various tumor locations (of whom 13 received sequential boost treatments), we offered the treating physician the choice between an automatically generated iCycle plan and a manually optimized plan using standard clinical procedures. Although iCycle used a fixed “wish list” with hard constraints and prioritized objectives, the dosimetrists manually selected the beam configuration and fine tuned the constraints and objectives for each IMRT plan. Dosimetrists were not informed in advance whether a competing iCycle plan was made. The 2 plans were simultaneously presented to the physician, who then selected the plan to be used for treatment. For the patient group, differences in planning target volume coverage and sparing of critical tissues were quantified. Results: In 32 of 33 plan comparisons, the physician selected the iCycle plan for treatment. This highly consistent preference for the automatically generated plans was mainly caused by the improved sparing for the large majority of critical structures. With iCycle, the normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid and submandibular glands were reduced by 2.4% ± 4.9% (maximum, 18.5%, P=.001) and 6.5% ± 8.3% (maximum, 27%, P=.005), respectively. The reduction in the mean oral cavity dose was 2.8 ± 2.8 Gy (maximum, 8.1 Gy, P=.005). For the swallowing muscles, the esophagus and larynx, the mean dose reduction was 3.3 ± 1.1 Gy (maximum, 9.2 Gy, P<.001). For 15 of the 20 patients, target coverage was also improved. Conclusions: In 97% of cases, automatically generated plans were selected for treatment because of the superior quality. Apart from the improved plan quality, automatic plan generation is economically attractive because of the reduced workload.

  1. Natural Gas Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue...

  2. Gas Production Tax (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tax of 7.5 percent of the market value of natural gas produced in the state of Texas is imposed on every producer of gas.

  3. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  4. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  5. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  6. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  7. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    ? 7 #12;Domestic Natural Gas Consumption Sectoral Trends and Projections: 2010 Total Consumption = 23 Timothy J. Skone, P.E. Office of Strategic Energy Analysis and Planning May 12 2011May 12, 2011 Presented for reducing 2 GHG emissions? #12;Question #1: Who is NETL? 3 #12;National Energy Technology Laboratory MISSION

  8. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  9. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, L.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard associated with compressed gas cylinders and methods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  10. Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert B. (Allentown, PA); Hegarty, William P. (State College, PA); Studer, David W. (Wescosville, PA); Tirados, Edward J. (Easton, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

  11. Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization 2030 Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of Carencro Byron Breaux City-Parish Council Designee John Broussard City-Parish President Designee Vernal Comeaux City-Parish Council Designee Bill Fontenot La Dept of Transportation and Development Lucien Gastineau City-Parish Planning Commission...

  12. Retirement Planning TimeLine MPSERS Retirement Plan Participant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    early in your career! Your MPSERS retirement pension is based on your best 3 years (MIP plan) or 5 years- it is never too early to plan for your retirement! · Know what plan you are in - MIP or Basic. · Review your1 Retirement Planning TimeLine MPSERS Retirement Plan Participant Retirement planning is essential

  13. Business Plans for Agricultural Producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Dean; Bevers, Stan

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural resources Z Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities ? and threats (SWOT) Mission statement ? Objectives and goals ? Production plan ? Financial plan ? Market plan ? Legal and liability issues ? Insurance ? Succession and estate planning...

  14. Compact Fuzzy Rules Induction and Feature Extraction Using SVM with Particle Swarms for Breast Cancer Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Cancer Treatments Shang-Ming Zhou, Robert I. John, Xiao-Ying Wang, Jonathan M. Garibaldi, and Ian O. Ellis Abstract-- Developing a treatment plan for breast cancer patient is a very complex process. It is widely accepted that developing a treatment plan for a breast cancer patient is a very complex process

  15. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF POROUS MEDIA TO GAS-WETTING FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND INJECTIVITY IN GAS-LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wettability alteration to intermediate gas-wetting in porous media by treatment with FC-759, a fluoropolymer polymer, has been studied experimentally. Berea sandstone was used as the main rock sample in our work and its wettability before and after chemical treatment was studied at various temperatures from 25 to 93 C. We also studied recovery performance for both gas/oil and oil/water systems for Berea sandstone before and after wettability alteration by chemical treatment. Our experimental study shows that chemical treatment with FC-759 can result in: (1) wettability alteration from strong liquid-wetting to stable intermediate gas-wetting at room temperature and at elevated temperatures; (2) neutral wetting for gas, oil, and water phases in two-phase flow; (3) significant increase in oil mobility for gas/oil system; and (4) improved recovery behavior for both gas/oil and oil/water systems. This work reveals a potential for field application for improved gas-well deliverability and well injectivity by altering the rock wettability around wellbore in gas condensate reservoirs from strong liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting.

  16. Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program. Emissions measurements were obtained over a variety of operating conditions. A kinetics model is formulated to describe the emissions performance. The model is a tool for determining the conditions for low emission performance. The flow field was also modeled using CFD. A first prototype was developed for low emission performance on natural gas. The design utilized the tools anchored to the atmospheric prototype performance. The 1/6 scale combustor was designed for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. A second prototype was developed to evaluate changes in the design approach. The prototype was developed at a 1/10 scale for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. The performance of the first two prototypes gave a strong indication of the best design approach. Review of the emission results led to the development of a 3rd prototype to further reduce the combustor emissions. The original plan to produce a scaled-up prototype was pushed out beyond the scope of the current program. The 3rd prototype was designed at 1/10 scale and targeted further reductions in the full-speed full-load emissions.

  17. EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has postponed preparation of this EIS to better align the completion of the EIS with planned future operations of facilities on Hanford’s Central Plateau (such as Hanford’s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant).

  18. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

  19. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD); Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  20. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  1. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  2. NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES FOR PURDUE UNIVERSITY HEALTH PLANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    court order. Alcohol and drug abuse treatment information is also subject to special protections under purposes: For treatment. The Purdue Health Plans may assist your health care providers to deter it carefully. If you have any questions about this Notice, please contact: Privacy Officer Purdue University

  3. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  4. An Implementation Plan for Integrated Control and Asset Management of Petroleum Production Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, James H.

    An Implementation Plan for Integrated Control and Asset Management of Petroleum Production management for the petroleum industry, which is very crucial for profitable oil and gas facilities operations, enhance safety, and improve product quality. Many research studies proposed different combinations

  5. City in Colorado Fueling Vehicles with Gas Produced from Wastewater...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the key facts? Grand Junction built a five mile pipeline to transport compressed natural gas (CNG) from its local wastewater treatment facility to its CNG station to fuel the city...

  6. Plan averaging for multicriteria navigation of sliding window IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craft, David, E-mail: dcraft@partners.org; Papp, Dávid; Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe a method for combining sliding window plans [intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] for use in treatment plan averaging, which is needed for Pareto surface navigation based multicriteria treatment planning. Methods: The authors show that by taking an appropriately defined average of leaf trajectories of sliding window plans, the authors obtain a sliding window plan whose fluence map is the exact average of the fluence maps corresponding to the initial plans. In the case of static-beam IMRT, this also implies that the dose distribution of the averaged plan is the exact dosimetric average of the initial plans. In VMAT delivery, the dose distribution of the averaged plan is a close approximation of the dosimetric average of the initial plans. Results: The authors demonstrate the method on three Pareto optimal VMAT plans created for a demanding paraspinal case, where the tumor surrounds the spinal cord. The results show that the leaf averaged plans yield dose distributions that approximate the dosimetric averages of the precomputed Pareto optimal plans well. Conclusions: The proposed method enables the navigation of deliverable Pareto optimal plans directly, i.e., interactive multicriteria exploration of deliverable sliding window IMRT and VMAT plans, eliminating the need for a sequencing step after navigation and hence the dose degradation that is caused by such a sequencing step.

  7. Options for Bulgaria power system extension planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vassilev, C.; Christov, C.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the existing transition to market economy in Bulgaria, the planning of development of electricity generation is among the priorities of the national policy of restructuring and renovation of electricity system in the country. Optimal plans for development of the generation capacity are worked out by means of optimization procedure part of ENPEP package (ELECTRIC module) based on the dynamic programming technique. The optimal plans study three main strategies for development of energy capacities, which have to do with the priority of some type of natural resources--Coal, Natural Gas and Nuclear Energy. The Hydro Power Plant construction and loading schedule for each scenario is different and it harmonized with the maneuverability of other capacities. Coal scenario emphasizes the opportunities for the maximizing of local coal mining, substitution of black coal (energy and coke) import by mining of local coal fields and implementation of efficient and environmentally sound technologies when constructing new thermal power plants. Gas scenario envisages natural gas consumption within the limit of existing capacities of the national and transit pipelines. In this connection, the share of the new generating capacities using combined cycle increases their share. Nuclear scenario assumes increased share of the nuclear units at the expense of local coal mining and natural gas. This is due to the rehabilitation of 1,000 MW units in NPP Kozloduy, completion of a 1,000 MW unit in new NPP and construction of 1--2 new units 600 MW after 2010. The data obtained outlines the perspectives for development of energy generation capacities in Bulgaria for the period 2000--2020, tendencies in the generation structure and the share of each different type of generation units in the structure of electricity generation system. Output information serves as a sound base for conclusions on the advantages and disadvantages of the three strategies.

  8. IDC Integrated Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, David J.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project Integrated Master Plan (IMP). The IMP presents the major accomplishments planned over time to re-engineer the IDC system. The IMP and the associate Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) are used for planning, scheduling, executing, and tracking the project technical work efforts. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  9. SYSTEM PLANNING WITH THE HANFORD WASTE OPERATIONS SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD TW; CERTA PJ; WELLS MN

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, 216 million liters (57 million gallons) of nuclear waste is currently stored in aging underground tanks, threatening the Columbia River. The River Protection Project (RPP), a fully integrated system of waste storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal facilities, is in varying stages of design, construction, operation, and future planning. These facilities face many overlapping technical, regulatory, and financial hurdles to achieve site cleanup and closure. Program execution is ongoing, but completion is currently expected to take approximately 40 more years. Strategic planning for the treatment of Hanford tank waste is by nature a multi-faceted, complex and iterative process. To help manage the planning, a report referred to as the RPP System Plan is prepared to provide a basis for aligning the program scope with the cost and schedule, from upper-tier contracts to individual facility operating plans. The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulation and mass balance computer model, is used to simulate the current planned RPP mission, evaluate the impacts of changes to the mission, and assist in planning near-term facility operations. Development of additional modeling tools, including an operations research model and a cost model, will further improve long-term planning confidence. The most recent RPP System Plan, Revision 4, was published in September 2009.

  10. Computing the Resilience of a Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor Nabil Mabrouk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    guillaume.deffuant@cemagref.fr Abstract--Biological wastewater treatment reactor are de- signed to reduce and industrial activities. In biological wastewater treatment processes, a community of microorganisms, a gas that can be used in energy production. Biological wastewater treatment reactors are often de

  11. Community Relations Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Permittees and the public are documented during the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Community Relations Plan development. Contact Environmental Communication & Public...

  12. MITG Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plan presented is for the testing of a prototypical slice of the Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG). Cross Reference T48-1.

  13. Planning and Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates Planning Ten-Year Capital Program Projects Lovell-Yellowtail Transmission Line Rebuild project Studies WACM Wind production summary overview (Oct. 2006)...

  14. State Energy Strategic Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) presentation at a TAP webinar held on April 3, 2013 and dealing with state energy strategic planning.

  15. Navajo Marketing Plan Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Basin Project Act General Power Contract Provisions (GCPC) - 090107 Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984 Navajo Marketing Plan Area Map Navajo Sales Enabling Agreement FINAL -...

  16. Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brekke, D.D.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

  17. Strategic Health Workforce Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    May 11, 2013 ... linked to long-term workforce management plans of doctors, nurses and .... survey [53] particularly highlight the need to research long-term ...

  18. Individual Development Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To be effective, training decisions made at the organizational and departmental levels must be informed by the needs of the individual. An individual development plan (IDP) is cooperatively...

  19. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  20. DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOEDepartment|Amchitka, Alaska,through

  1. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D I S P U TPurpose

  2. Gas reburn and cofiring technologies entering the market place

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratapas, J.M. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Research Institute, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, is delivering information products and evaluation tools for applying gas reburn, gas cofiring and seasonal gas switching at utility boilers originally designed for coal or oil firing. Version 1.2 of the Coal Quality Impact Model (CQIM) was released in February 1995 with the inclusion of gas cofiring and seasonal gas conversion. A technology module for the State of the Art Power Plant (SOAAP) Workstation developed by EPRI that will include gas cofiring, gas reburn and seasonal gas switching is under development. A beta release is targeted for fall 1995. An EPRI/GRI guidelines report for gas conversions is being issued this summer. The paper describes how these guidelines and software products are being developed and validated from ongoing and completed full-scale field experiments and tests conducted at units totaling over 4,950 MW of capacity. Future plans for deployment and possible enhancement of information products dealing with gas reburn and cofiring technologies are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated Arc treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Young Kyu; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Jin Young; Kang, Young-Nam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were performed in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre study was conducted to find the most competent plan condition of mARC treatment and the usefulness of mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with the other Arc treatment plans such as Tomotherapy and RapidArc. In the case of mARC, the optimal condition for the mARC plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the mARC plans with the use of various parameters. The various parameters includes the photon energies (6 MV, 10 MV), optimization point angle (6{\\deg}-10{\\deg} intervals), and total segment number (36-59 segment). The best dosimetric performance of mARC was observed at 10 MV photon energy and the point angle 6 degree, and 59 segments. The each treatment plans of three different techniques were compared with the followin...

  4. Implementing Motor Decision Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.

    The first step to reducing energy costs and increasing reliability in motors is to establish a motor plan. A motor plan allows decisions to be made in advance of motor failure, and increases the options available. By contrast, most motor decisions...

  5. Environmental protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. Holland

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

  6. Supporting Document Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auckland, University of

    1 Supporting Document Strategic Plan 2013­2020 #12;2 Supporting Document Strategic Plan 2013 more critical to the University's future than was the case in 2005. The purpose of this document are summarised via a SWOT analysis in Appendix 1. This document should therefore be read in conjunction

  7. Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports...

  8. Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

  9. Revamping AK-Ashland gas cleaning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, H.; Koerbel, R. [Mannesmann Demag Corp., Coraopolis, PA (United States); Haberkamp, K. [Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Keeton, S. [AK Steel Corp., Ashland, KY (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AK Steel`s (formerly Armco) BOF shop was using a static precipitator for the primary collection. The system was designed for full combustion in the gas collecting hoods. No secondary dust collection was in place. A detailed study on alternative solutions led to a completely different system in 1990, and an order was awarded to Mannesmann Demag Corp. (MDC) in Dec. 1990. The new gas collection system is using suppressed combustion with the capability to collect Co at a later stage. The gas cleaning uses the Mannesmann Demag Baumco scrubber with a venturi throat for gas flow control. All auxiliary components, water treatment plant, electric substations and sludge handling were designed and supplied by MDC. The secondary dust collection covers the hot metal and scrap charging into the BOF`s, reladling, desulfurization and deslagging by a pulse jet baghouse. All emission limits set by the EPA and guaranteed by MDC have been met by the systems installed.

  10. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  11. The Sellafield Plan - 12458

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, Iain [Stakeholder Relations Director, Sellafield Ltd, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sellafield Performance Plan represents the start of a new era for the Sellafield site. It is a key driver in the Nuclear Management Partners mission to make Sellafield safer, cleaner, more productive, more cost effective and a better neighbour. When published in summer 2011, the Sellafield Performance Plan set out exactly what work would be completed at Sellafield between 2010/11 and 2025/26, how all of the facilities on the site interact, and what new facilities would be needed in order to deliver the risk and hazard reduction mission. The plan is the first credible and underpinned lifetime plan for the Sellafield site - the most complex part of the UK's civil nuclear estate. Under the Sellafield Performance Plan there are projected to be more jobs longer creating opportunities for the site, its workforce and the economic stability of West Cumbria. The Sellafield Ltd performance plan sets out how NMP will apply their global experience to improve operations, generate efficiencies and deliver detailed programmes of work with the aim of accelerating decommissioning and providing value for money. Successful delivery of the plan will also ensure the site continues to effectively operate critical national infrastructure that supports the UK's energy programme, and maintains the safe and secure management and storage of nuclear materials. The NDA and UK Government have demonstrated their confidence in NMP and Sellafield Ltd's capability to deliver this plan by providing the highest-ever Annual Site Funding Limit for the site in 2011/12. The Sellafield Performance Plan also creates both the foundation and the environment for a vibrant West Cumbrian economy through significant opportunities for the local supply chain and real prospects for further inward investment. By working flexibly and accelerating the decommissioning programme, the plan provides the opportunity for significant retraining to adapt to future challenges on the site and for other potential new nuclear missions in West Cumbria. (authors)

  12. Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, October 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwasnoski, D.

    1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on this coke oven gas cleaning demonstration project (CCT-II) this quarter has been focused on Phase IIB tasks, and include engineering, procurement, construction, and training. Additionally, plans for changes in the operating schedule of the coke plant that affect the demonstration project are described. Engineering efforts are nearly complete. Remaining to be finalized is an assessment of electrical heat tracing/insulation needs for pipe lines, assessment of fire protection requirements, and instrument modifications. Procurement of all major equipment items is complete, except for possible additions to fire fighting capabilities. Major focus is on expediting pipe and structural steel to the project site. Civil construction is complete except for minor pads and bases as required for pipe supports, etc. Erection of the hydrogen sulfide and ammonia scrubber vessels is complete. Installation of scrubber vessel internals is underway. A subcontractor has been retained to develop a computerized program for operations and maintenance training for the coke oven gas treatment plant. Recent developments in the coke plant operating plans will result in reductions in the rate of production of coke oven gas to be processed in the demonstration project.

  13. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?˘ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?˘ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?˘ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?˘ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

  14. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  15. Gas Turbine Cogeneration Plant for the Dade County Government Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, R. W.; Malloy, M. K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GAS TURBINE COGENERATION PLANT FOR THE DADE COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER Roger W. Michalowski Michael K. Malloy Thermo Electron Corporation GEC Rolls-Royce Waltham, Massachusetts ABSTRACT A government complex consisting of a number of State... expansion plans, the system will efficiently produce additional electricity when chilled water demands are low. Houston, Texas The cogeneration plant consists of a Rolls-Royce gas turbine-generator set and a waste-heat recovery system which recovers...

  16. Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering June 2014 #12;Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 POLICY.......................................................................................... 2 2.1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE OFFICER

  17. DRAFT Fifteenmile Management Plan 5. Fifteenmile Subbasin Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT Fifteenmile Management Plan 5. Fifteenmile Subbasin Management Plan DRAFT May 25 2004 Group 5. FIFTEENMILE SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN............................................... 38 5.5.2. Consistency with the Clean Water Act, Total Maximum Daily Loads and Existing Water Quality

  18. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Interim Report on Electric Price Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    because natural gas fired electric generating plants are on the margin much of the time in Western marketsBiennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Interim Report on Electric Price Forecasts Electricity prices in the Council's Power Plan are forecast using the AURORATM Electricity Market Model of the entire

  19. COMPUTATIONAL OPTIMIZATION OF GAS COMPRESSOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2015 ... When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport net- works ..... The four most frequently used drive types are gas turbines, gas driven.

  20. Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas...

  1. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  2. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Interim Report on Fuel Price Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In addition, the delivered price of coal to power plants located in the region will be affected by diesel fuel The Fifth Power Plan includes price forecasts for natural gas, oil, and coal. Natural gas prices have by far costs for trains that deliver coal to the plants. Recent higher prices for coal are partially related

  3. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  4. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  5. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  6. Gas and Oil (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

  7. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  8. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  9. BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PL LDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A R RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDIN T PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN BUILDING A RISK MANAGEM

  10. Regulations for Gas Transmission Lines Less than Ten Miles Long (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any person who wishes to construct a gas transmission line that is less than ten miles long must file documents describing the construction plans and potential land use and environmental impacts of...

  11. Regulations for Electric Transmission and Fuel Gas Transmission Lines Ten or More Miles Long (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any person who wishes to construct an electric or gas transmission line that is more than ten miles long must file documents describing the construction plans and potential land use and...

  12. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  13. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  14. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  15. The treatment of wood preserving wastes with activated carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pence, Robert Fuller

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requirement and treatment schemes should be based on these combined requirements. Current treatment schemes employed in the wood preserving industry combine physical, chemical, and biological processes and operations in treating wastewaters. Jones, et al...-five of the plants performed secondary treatment on-site of which 32 used biological methods. Only 6 per- cent discharged their wastewaters directly to the environment without any form of treatment and approximately 40 percent of the plants planned to change...

  16. Public affairs plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Public Affairs Plan is to establish goals for the Fiscal Year 1995 UMTRA public affairs program and identify specific activities to be conducted during the year. It also describes the roles of various agencies involved in the conduct of the public affairs program and defines the functions of the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Public Affairs Department. It integrates and replaces the Public Participation Plan (DOE/AL/62350-47D) and Public Information Plan (DOE/AL/623590-71). The plan describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans to keep stakeholders and other members of the public informed about project policies, plans, and activities, and provide opportunities for stakeholders and interested segments of the public to participate in project decision-making processes. The plan applies to the UMTRA Project Office; the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs (OIEA); the UMTRA TAC; the UMTRA Remedial Action Contractor (RAC); and other cooperating agencies.

  17. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  18. Gas Cylinders: Proper Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

  19. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  20. Natural Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    . Exploration and extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus shale is a potentially valuable economic stimulus for landowners. You might be wondering how the nation's economic situation is affecting the market for naturalNatural Gas Exploration: A Landowners Guide to Financial Management Natural Gas Exploration

  1. Texas Tech University Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Texas Tech University Chemical Hygiene Plan (Laboratory Safety Manual) January 2013 #12;TABLE C ­ Chemical Hygiene Checklist #12;TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN January 2013 1 PURPOSE OF THIS PLAN It is the desire

  2. Gas futures can help independents manage their risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treat, J.E.; Rogers, M.C. (Booz-Allen and Hamilton Inc., San Francisco, CA (US))

    1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of natural gas futures trading presents the natural gas industry with a powerful tool and a formidable challenge. On the one hand, producers, pipelines, local distribution companies (LDCs), end-users, and marketers can use gas futures to hedge against price risk, protecting companies against abnormal price spikes, stabilizing cash flows, enabling companies to write long-term contracts, and facilitating planning. Gas futures can also be used in combination with oil futures to hedge against fuel switching. On the other hand, the introduction of natural gas futures trading will dramatically reshape the natural gas business. Natural gas companies from smaller independent producers to large end-users will be forced to adapt. Short-term price volatility will tend to increase. At the same time, long-term price volatility should decline. Information flows will increase. Oil and gas prices may become more closely linked. Futures prices will become benchmarks for formula-priced contracts. Increased longer-term and mid-month contracting will reduce the current reliance on month-end spot market contracts. And new players will enter the natural gas business. As a result of these trends, natural gas companies will need to adopt new strategies, systems, and organizational structures in order to remain competitive.

  3. PREVIOUS GEOSCIENCES INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCES CITY PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    PREVIOUS GEOSCIENCES INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCES CITY PLANNING TRANSPORTATION PLANNING LAND USE (HIGHER EDUCATION) LAND USE PLANNING INTERNSHIPS CH2M-HILL PLANNING AND ENGINEERING CITY OF ANAHEIM

  4. Analysis of Desalination Processes for Treatment of Produced Water for Re-use as Irrigation Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradt, Laura

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major side product of onshore oil and gas production. This water contains a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds and requires treatment for beneficial reuse. One option for the reuse of this water is irrigation. Treatment...

  5. Community Energy Stategic Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Community Energy Strategic Planning Resources Technical Assistance Program January 24 th , 2013 2 Agenda 1. Welcome & overview 2. What is a community energy strategic plan and why...

  6. B Plant Complex preclosure work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADLER, J.G.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This preclosure work plan describes the condition of the dangerous waste treatment storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit after completion of the B Plant Complex decommissioning Transition Phase preclosure activities. This description includes waste characteristics, waste types, locations, and associated hazards. The goal to be met by the Transition Phase preclosure activities is to place the TSD unit into a safe and environmentally secure condition for the long-term Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Phase of the facility decommissioning process. This preclosure work plan has been prepared in accordance with Section 8.0 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1996). The preclosure work plan is one of three critical Transition Phase documents, the other two being: B Plant End Points Document (WHC-SD-WM-TPP-054) and B Plant S&M plan. These documents are prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its contractors with the involvement of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). The tanks and vessels addressed by this preclosure work plan are limited to those tanks end vessels included on the B Plant Complex Part A, Form 3, Permit Application (DOE/RL-88-21). The criteria for determining which tanks or vessels are in the Part A, Form 3, are discussed in the following. The closure plan for the TSD unit will not be prepared until the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process is initiated, which follows the long-term S&M Phase. Final closure will occur during the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process. The Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) is excluded from the scope of this preclosure work plan.

  7. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.D. Wheelock

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of a gas agglomeration method for cleaning coal was demonstrated by means of bench-scale tests conducted with a mixing system which enabled the treatment of ultra-fine coal particles with a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water. A suitable suspension of microbubbles was prepared by first saturating water with air or carbon dioxide under pressure then reducing the pressure to release the dissolved gas. The formation of microbubbles was facilitated by agitation and a small amount of i-octane. When the suspension of microbubbles and coal particles was mixed, agglomeration was rapid and small spherical agglomerates were produced. Since the agglomerates floated, they were separated from the nonfloating tailings in a settling chamber. By employing this process in numerous agglomeration tests of moderately hydrophobic coals with 26 wt.% ash, it was shown that the ash content would be reduced to 6--7 wt.% while achieving a coal recovery of 75 to 85% on a dry, ash-free basis. This was accomplished by employing a solids concentration of 3 to 5 w/w%, an air saturation pressure of 136 to 205 kPa (5 to 15 psig), and an i-octane concentration of 1.0 v/w% based on the weight of coal.

  8. Welcome FUPWG- Natural Gas Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides an overview of natural gas, including emissions, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, and landfill gas supplement for natural gas system.

  9. CarbonPlan Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermitsGreen BioEnergy LLC Jump to:MicroTrustCarbonPlan

  10. Involuntary Separation Plan Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas » Methane HydrateEnergy Investments inEnergyPlan

  11. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  12. Constraints and AI Planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nareyek, A; Freuder, E C; Fourer, R; Giunchiglia, R P; Kautz, H; Rintanen, J; Tate, Austin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tackling real-world problems often requires to take various types of constraints into account. Such constraint types range from simple numerical comparators to complex resources. This article describes how planning techniques ...

  13. Conservation Plan Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Capacity Base Plan - Least Cost January Sustained Peak Reserve 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 2010 2011 2012 Sustained Peak Reserve 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

  14. Planning a Prescribed Burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This leaflet explains how to plan for adequate fuel for a prescribed burn, control the fire, notify the proper authority, manage the burn itself, and conduct follow-up management. A ranch checklist for prescribed burning is included....

  15. Environmental Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site`s environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy`s Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  16. Environmental Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site's environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  17. Technical Planning Basis

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide assists DOE/NNSA field elements and operating contractors in identifying and analyzing hazards at facilities and sites to provide the technical planning basis for emergency management programs. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 2.

  18. Developing a Marketing Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

  19. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R. C.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan documents the quality assurance activities for the Wastewater/Stormwater/Groundwater and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This QAPP was prepared in accordance with DOE guidance on compliance with 10CFR830.120.

  20. Hygiene Plan ENVIRONMENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Chemical Hygiene Plan ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY #12;University Of Delaware Chemical Hygiene/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10106 · National Research Council Recommendations Concerning Chemical Hygiene in Laboratories (Non

  1. Developing a Marketing Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

  2. AWARD FEE PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AWARD FEE PLAN FOR LAT A Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC Paducah Remediation Contract DE-AC30-10CC40020 CONCUR: Rob Seifert, Paducah Re e iation Engineer and Deputy...

  3. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  4. Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2035

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN 2035 Revised April 22, 2010 Adopted by the Tyler Area MPO Policy Committee December 4, 2009 Amended/Revised April 22, 2010 Prepared by: Bucher..., Willis, and Ratliff Corporation 1828 East Southeast Loop 323, Suite 202 Tyler, Texas 75701 903.581.7844 This Document Serves as an Update to the Tyler Area Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2030. Portions of that Document were Unchanged and Appear...

  5. LCLS Undulator Fiducialization Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This note presents the LCLS undulator fiducialization plan. The undulators will be fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage format are presented.

  6. Environmental implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, G.L.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, the Savannah River site environmental programs and plans from DOE contractors and Westinghouse Savannah River Company divisions/departments are presented along with the environmental coordinator for each program. The objectives are to enhase communication of existing or planned programs to do the following: identify activities required for meeting environmental needs; identify needing resources and a schedule to accomplish those activities; promote share-savings and consistency in those activities.

  7. MINERALIZING, STEAM REFORMING TREATMENT OF HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE (a.k.a. INEEL/EXT-05-02526)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. L. Olson; N. R. Soelberg; D. W. Marshall; G. L. Anderson

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.4 hours of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process achieved essentially complete bed turnover within approximately 40 hours. Samples of mineralized solid product materials were analyzed for chemical/physical properties. SRNL will report separately the results of product performance testing that were accomplished.

  8. SU-E-I-97: Smart Auto-Planning Framework in An EMR Environment (SAFEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B; Chen, S; Mutaf, Y; Prado, K; D'Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Our Radiation Oncology Department uses clinical practice guidelines for patient treatment, including normal tissue sparing and other dosimetric constraints. These practice guidelines were adapted from national guidelines, clinical trials, literature reviews, and practitioner's own experience. Modern treatment planning systems (TPS) have the capability of incorporating these practice guidelines to automatically create radiation therapy treatment plans with little human intervention. We are developing a software infrastructure to integrate clinical practice guidelines and radiation oncology electronic medical record (EMR) system into radiation therapy treatment planning system (TPS) for auto planning. Methods: Our Smart Auto-Planning Framework in an EMR environment (SAFEE) uses a software pipeline framework to integrate practice guidelines,EMR, and TPS together. The SAFEE system starts with retrieving diagnosis information and physician's prescription from the EMR system. After approval of contouring, SAFEE will automatically create plans according to our guidelines. Based on clinical objectives, SAFEE will automatically select treatment delivery techniques (such as, 3DRT/IMRT/VMAT) and optimize plans. When necessary, SAFEE will create multiple treatment plans with different combinations of parameters. SAFEE's pipeline structure makes it very flexible to integrate various techniques, such as, Model-Base Segmentation (MBS) and plan optimization algorithms, e.g., Multi-Criteria Optimization (MCO). In addition, SAFEE uses machine learning, data mining techniques, and an integrated database to create clinical knowledgebase and then answer clinical questions, such as, how to score plan quality or how volume overlap affects physicians' decision in beam and treatment technique selection. Results: In our institution, we use Varian Aria EMR system and RayStation TPS from RaySearch, whose ScriptService API allows control by external programs. These applications are the building blocks of our SAFEE system. Conclusion: SAFEE is a feasible method of integrating clinical information to develop an auto-planning paradigm to improve clinical workflow in cancer patient care.

  9. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  10. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cycle units include a heat recovery steam generator on the exhaust to recover otherwise wasted energy. Steam from the heat recovery steam generator powers an additional steam turbine, providing extra electric to about 50 percent. In addition, the steam generator of combined-cycle units can be fitted with fuel

  11. Public affairs plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Public Affairs Plan is to establish goals for the fiscal year (FY) 1996 UMTRA Project public affairs program and to identify specific activities to be conducted during the year. It describes the roles of various agencies involved in the public affairs program and defines the functions of the UMTRA Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Public Affairs Department. It replaces the FY 1995 Public Affairs Plan (DOE/AL/62350-154). The plan also describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans to keep stakeholders and other members of the public informed about UMTRA Project policies, plans, and activities, and provide opportunities for stakeholders and interested segments of the public to participate in UMTRA Project decision-making processes. The plan applies to the UMTRA Project Team; the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO); the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Office of Public Affairs (OPA); the TAC; the UMTRA Project Remedial Action Contractor (RAC); and other cooperating agencies.

  12. Green Power Purchase Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Class I renewable energy resources include solar, wind, new sustainable biomass, landfill gas, fuel cells (using renewable or non-renewable fuels), ocean thermal power, wave or tidal power, low...

  13. CALIFORNIA INVESTMENT PLAN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) .................................................................... 25 Natural Gas TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE James D. Boyd Presiding Member Karen Douglas Associate Member Primary Author was prepared by the California Energy Commission's Transportation Committee as part of the Alternative

  14. Part I: Overall Plan 2008 Cornell Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Plan 79 Primary Open Space Network Plan 83 Movement Plan 149 Development Opportunity Sites and Areas master plan 176 5 ImplementationLand Use 4.11 Concentrate academic buildings in Core Campus 59 4.12 Create a second academic hub in the core 62 4.13 Protect outdoor teaching and research facilities 64 4

  15. B Plant complex treatment, storage, and disposal units inspection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, T.G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Owners or operators of facilities that treat, store, and/or dispose of dangerous waste and/or mixed waste as defined by WAC 173-303, {open_quotes}Dangerous Waste Regulations,{close_quotes} must inspect their facilities to prevent malfunctions and deteriorations, operator errors, and discharges that may cause or lead to the release of hazardous waste constituents to the environment and/or cause a threat to human health. The WAC regulations require a written inspection schedule be developed, implemented, and kept at the facility.

  16. Incorporating range uncertainty into proton therapy treatment planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGowan, Stacey Elizabeth

    2015-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica CNS Central Nervous System CPAC Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation CRUK Cancer Research UK CT Computed Tomography CTV Clinical Target Volume DDA Dose Difference Analysis DECT Dual Energy Computed Tomography DET... of MVCT HU to proton stopping power relative to water . 47 3.7 Image of truncated patient on TomoTherapy showing the the scanning circle (white circle). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 4.1 Heat plots of %volume range...

  17. automated improvement of radiation therapy treatment plans by ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    ... Department of Mathematics, KTH Royal Institute of Tech- nology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; and RaySearch Laboratories, Sveavägen 25, SE-111 34.

  18. Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plan Project PIA, Richland

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing the Office of River

  19. Portsmouth Site Treatment Plan Director's Final Findings and Orders |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmount forDecontamination andBoard -Site

  20. Mercury Strategic Plan Outfall 200 Mercury Treatment Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember 5-6, 2001 Meeting DepartmentMentor

  1. Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dever, S.A. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia) and GHD Pty. Ltd., 10 Bond Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart_dever@ghd.com.au; Swarbrick, G.E. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: g.swarbrick@unsw.edu.au; Stuetz, R.M. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions.

  2. Implications of Disruption to Natural Gas Deliverability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Science Applications International

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was sponsored by Department of Energy/Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. The primary purpose of the project was to analyze the capability of the natural gas production, transmission and supply systems to continue to provide service in the event of a major disruption in capacity of one or more natural gas transmission pipelines. The project was specifically designed to detail the ability of natural gas market to absorb facility losses and efficiently reallocate gas supplies during a significant pipeline capacity disruption in terms that allowed federal and state agencies and interests to develop effective policies and action plans to prioritize natural gas deliveries from a regional and national perspective. The analyses for each regional study were based on four primary considerations: (1) operating conditions (pipeline capacity, storage capacity, local production, power dispatch decision making and end user options); (2) weather; (3) magnitude and location of the disruption; and, (4) normal versus emergency situation. The detailed information contained in the region reports as generated from this project are Unclassified Controlled Information; and as such are subject to disclosure in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act. Therefore, this report defines the regions that were analyzed and the basic methodologies and assumptions used to completing the analysis.

  3. Gas storage plays critical role in deregulated U. S. marketplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Gas Journal for the first time has compiled a county-by-county list of underground natural-gas storage operating in the US on Sept. 1. Nearly 3.1 tcf of working gas in storage is currently operated. As will be discussed, several projects to add capacity are under way or planned before 2000. To collect the data, OGJ contacted every company reported by the American Gas Association, U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or the US Department of Energy to have operated storage in the past 2 years. The results were combined with other published information to form Table 1 which provides base, working, and total gas capacities for storage fields, types of reservoirs used, and daily design injection and withdrawal rates. The paper also discusses deregulation, what's ahead, and salt cavern storage.

  4. NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilis Papavassiliou; Leo Bonnell; Dion Vlachos

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Praxair investigated an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from natural gas and oxygen This production process combined the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The program achieved all of the milestones contained in the development plan for Phase I. We were able to develop a reactor configuration that was able to operate at high pressures (up to 19atm). This new reactor technology was used as the basis for a new process for the conversion of natural gas to liquid products (Gas to Liquids or GTL). Economic analysis indicated that the new process could provide a 8-10% cost advantage over conventional technology. The economic prediction although favorable was not encouraging enough for a high risk program like this. Praxair decided to terminate development.

  5. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherry, T. D.; Kohlhorst, D. P.; Little, S. K.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to resources, including energy/fuel, water, waste, pesticides, and pollution generation; (8) Incorporate sustainable design principles into the design and construction of facility upgrades, new facilities, and infrastructure; and (9) Comply with federal and state regulations, executive orders, and DOE requirements. Y-12 is working to communicate its sustainment vision through procedural, engineering, operational, and management practices. The site will make informed decisions based on the application of the five Guiding Principles for HPSBs to the maximum extent possible.

  6. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  7. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  8. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, M.; Haas, M.; Pepper, W.; Rose, J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent dramatic changes in natural gas markets have significant implications for the scope and direction of DOE`s upstream as well as downstream natural gas R&D. Open access transportation changes the way gas is bought and sold. The end of the gas deliverability surplus requires increased reserve development above recent levels. Increased gas demand for power generation and other new uses changes the overall demand picture in terms of volumes, locations and seasonality. DOE`s Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that its R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced gas. Potential R&D projects are to be evaluated using a full fuel cycle, benefit-cost approach to estimate likely market impact as well as technical success. To assure R&D projects are evaluated on a comparable basis, METC has undertaken the development of a comprehensive natural gas technology evaluation framework. Existing energy systems models lack the level of detail required to estimate the impact of specific upstream natural gas technologies across the known range of geological settings and likely market conditions. Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM) research during FY 1993 developed and implemented this comprehensive, consistent natural gas system evaluation framework. Rather than a isolated research activity, however, GSAM represents the integration of many prior and ongoing natural gas research efforts. When complete, it will incorporate the most current resource base description, reservoir modeling, technology characterization and other geologic and engineering aspects developed through recent METC and industry gas R&D programs.

  9. Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NNSA deliver President Obama's nuclear security agenda and continues to ensure the safety, security. The NNSA also plans to use this capability to improve trending data for aging affects by gas sampling. Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the Department of Energy's NNSA #12;

  10. Forestry Commission England Corporate Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Commission England Corporate Plan 2011-15 This is the Corporate Plan for the Forestry Commission in England. It is one of a suite of plans including those for Forestry Commission (GB) and Forest Research. Page 1Forestry Commission England Corporate Plan 2011-15 #12;Page 2Forestry Commission England

  11. Future natural gas supply and demand balance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the future price and availability of natural gas as a boiler fuel in the United States. Analysis focuses on various forecasts for natural gas production and consumption through the year 2000. The forecasts reviewed predict that conventional lower-48 production will decline through the year 2000, but there is a wide divergence of opinion on the future availability of gas from unconventional sources of supply. Future gas prices are also uncertain, but as deregulation proceeds, the rolling-in of high cost sources of supply will diminish and gas will be priced more competitively with oil. Analysis presented in the report implies that it will be prudent to maintain the planning assumption that gas will be phased out as a boiler fuel. Gas should, however, remain attractive to utilities for a variety of specific uses. Fluctuating fuel prices may make it advantageous to use gas for short periods of time, and gas may also prove to be attractive in less price sensitive applications.

  12. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  13. Environmental Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is a dynamic long-range environmental-protection plan for SRS. The EIP communicates the current and future (five year) environmental plans from individual organizations and divisions as well as site environmental initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed compliance with changing environmental/ regulatory requirements. Communication with all site organizations is essential for making the site environmental planning process work. Demonstrating environmental excellence is a high priority embodied in DOE and WSRC policy. Because of your support and participation in the three EIP initiatives; Reflections, Sectional Revision, and Integrated Planning, improvements are being made to the EIP and SRS environmental protection programs. I appreciate the ``Partnership in Environmental Excellence`` formed by the environmental coordinators and professionals who work daily toward our goal of compliance and environmental excellence. I look forward to seeing continued success and improvement in our environmental protection programs through combined efforts of all site organizations to protect our employees, the public health, and the environment. Together, we will achieve our site vision for SRS to be the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  14. Integrated Planning: Consolidating Annual Facility Planning - More Time for Execution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J. G.; R., L. Morton; Ramirez, C.; Morris, P. S.; McSwain, J. T.

    2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously, annual planning for Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was fragmented, disconnected, circular, and occurred constantly throughout the fiscal year (FY) comprising 9 of the 12 months, reducing the focus on implementation and execution. This required constant “looking back” instead of “looking forward.” In FY 2009, annual planning was consolidated into one comprehensive integrated plan (IP) for each facility/project, which comprised annual task planning/outyear budgeting, AMPs, and investment planning (i.e., TYIP). In FY 2010, the Risk Management Plans were added to the IPs. The integrated planning process achieved the following: 1) Eliminated fragmented, circular, planning and moved the plan to be more forward-looking; 2) Achieved a 90% reduction in schedule planning timeframe from 40 weeks (9 months) to 6 weeks; 3) Achieved an 80% reduction in cost from just under $1.0M to just over $200K, for a cost savings of nearly $800K (reduced combined effort from over 200 person-weeks to less than 40); 4) Reduced the number of plans generated from 21 plans (1 per facility per plan) per year to 8 plans per year (1 per facility plus 1 program-level IP); 5) Eliminated redundancy in common content between plans and improved consistency and overall quality; 6) Reduced the preparation time and cost of the FY 2010 SEP by 50% due to information provided in the IP; 7) Met the requirements for annual task planning, annual maintenance planning, ten-year investment planning, and risk management plans.

  15. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  16. Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

  17. Electric Reliability & Hurricane Preparedness Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Clean coal technology · On line ­ May 2014 · Generation mix: Natural gas, coal and lignite · Base load

  18. Home Safety: Radon Gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

  19. String Gas Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Alberghi

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

  20. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  1. Home Safety: Radon Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

  2. Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document adopts the standards promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association as rules for the transportation, storage, handling, and use of liquefied natural gas. The NFPA standards...

  3. Oil and Gas Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Outlook For Independent Petroleum Association of America November 13, 2014 | Palm Beach, FL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Recent...

  4. Oil and Gas (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

  5. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that address the unique nature and challenging locations of many of our remaining oil and natural gas accumulations. The National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL)...

  6. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  7. Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

  8. Gas venting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Amjad; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; White, Erik James

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to vent a moist gas stream is disclosed. The system includes an enclosure and an electrochemical cell disposed within the enclosure, the electrochemical cell productive of the moist gas stream. A first vent is in fluid communication with the electrochemical cell for venting the moist gas stream to an exterior of the enclosure, and a second vent is in fluid communication with an interior of the enclosure and in thermal communication with the first vent for discharging heated air to the exterior of the enclosure. At least a portion of the discharging heated air is for preventing freezing of the moist gas stream within the first vent.

  9. Optimal Model-Based Production Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimal Model-Based Production Planning for Refinery Operation Abdulrahman Alattas Advisor;2 Outline Introduction Problem Statement Refinery Planning Model Development LP Planning Models NLP Planning Models Conclusion #12;3 Introduction Refinery production planning models Optimizing refinery

  10. Methods and computer readable medium for improved radiotherapy dosimetry planning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Frandsen, Michael W.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Nigg, David W.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and computer readable media are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume irradiated during radiation therapy with a radiation source concentrated internally within a patient or incident from an external beam. The dosimetry plan is available in near "real-time" because of the novel geometric model construction of the treatment volume which in turn allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks therethrough. The particles are exemplary representations of alpha, beta or gamma emissions emanating from an internal radiation source during various radiotherapies, such as brachytherapy or targeted radionuclide therapy, or they are exemplary representations of high-energy photons, electrons, protons or other ionizing particles incident on the treatment volume from an external source. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image of a treatment volume irradiated during radiotherapy having a plurality of pixels of information is obtained.

  11. Energy Organizational Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gina C. Paradis; James Yockey; Tracey LeBeau

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) continues to refine and finalize its Strategic Energy Plan, it became necessary to insure that a sustainable organization structure was developed through which the energy program and its initiatives could be nurtured and managed. To that end, SNI undertook a study to thoroughly evaluate the existing organizational structures and assess the requisite changes and/or additions to that framework that would complement the mission of the Strategic Plan. The goal of this study was to analyze, work with staff and leadership and recommend the most effective plan for the development of an organizational framework within which the Seneca could more effectively exercise energy sovereignty – control and manage their natural resource assets – i.e. develop its own energy resources, meet the current and projected energy needs of their community, and “sit at the table” with other regional energy providers to deal with issues on a peer-to-peer basis.

  12. Ablation Plume Dynamics in a Background Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoruso, Salvatore [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Schou, Joergen [Deparment of Photonics Engineering, Risoe Campus, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Lunney, James G. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of a plume in a background gas of pressure comparable to that used in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been analyzed in terms of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM). This approach gives a relatively clear and simple description of the essential hydrodynamics during the expansion. The model also leads to an insightful treatment of the stopping behavior in dimensionless units for plumes and background gases of different atomic/molecular masses. The energetics of the plume dynamics can also be treated with this model. Experimental time-of-flight data of silver ions in a neon background gas show a fair agreement with predictions from the PM-model. Finally we discuss the validity of the model, if the work done by the pressure of the background gas is neglected.

  13. Guam Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes various energy strategies available to Guam to meet the territory's goal of diversifying fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020.The information presented in this strategic energy plan will be used by the Guam Energy Task Force to develop an energy action plan. Available energy strategies include policy changes, education and outreach, reducing energy consumption at federal facilities, and expanding the use of a range of energy technologies, including buildings energy efficiency and conservation, renewable electricity production, and alternative transportation. The strategies are categorized based on the time required to implement them.

  14. Performance expectation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, P.E.

    1998-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the significant accomplishments of fiscal year 1998 for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team. Opportunities for improvement to better meet some performance expectations have been identified. The PHMC has performed at an excellent level in administration of leadership, planning, and technical direction. The contractor has met and made notable improvement of attaining customer satisfaction in mission execution. This document includes the team`s recommendation that the PHMC TWRS Performance Expectation Plan evaluation rating for fiscal year 1998 be an Excellent.

  15. Strategic Planning for Landowners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason; Polk, Wade

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic Planning for Landowners Risk Management E-146 RM3-12.0 09-08 *Assistant Professor and Extension Economist?Management, and Extension Specialist?Risk Management, The Texas A&M System Strategic planning is a process that provides direction... the bottom up. Managers are also responsible for Jason L. Johnson and Wade Polk* 2 carrying out those required daily tasks. Land- owners are often both manager and employee, which demands a combination of vision and technical aptitude. Steps for Setting...

  16. Environmental protection implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

  17. Enhanced radiological work planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DECKER, W.A.

    1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System.

  18. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy`s response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department`s Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B.

  19. 47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

  20. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/UnionGlossary Shale GasShale gas