Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Thermal Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment Processes for Zero Liquid Discharge Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a worldwide inventory of power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) blowdown treatment systems using thermal technologies to achieve zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management. The number of thermal treatment systems presently operating is very few, with the majority using chemical pretreatment followed by evaporation in a brine concentrator and crystallizer and finally dewatering of the residual salts. Of the operating thermal ZLD systems identified, six are located in Italy and o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration… (more)

Flesland, Synnøve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Liens for Oil and Gas Operations (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section contains regulations concerning lien allowances made to operators of oil and gas operations.

4

Gas treatment by adsorption  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and a process for treatment of gaseous hydrocarbons to recover condensable materials consist of 3 beds of adsorbent materials which are alternately subjected to adsorbing, regeneration, and cooling phases. The regeneration is accomplished by means of hot gas passing through the bed. When regeneration of a bed is substantially complete, a portion of the hot gas from that bed is fed into the bed, which is in the adsorption phase of the cycle. At the same time, cool lean gas is directed into the bed, which is on the regeneration phase. (6 claims)

Russell, G.F.

1969-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thailand gas project now operational  

SciTech Connect

Now operational, Phase 1 of Thailand's first major natural gas system comprises one of the world's longest (264 miles) offshore gas lines. Built for the Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT), this system delivers gas from the Erawan field in the Gulf of Thailand to two electrical power plants near Bangkok, operated by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The project required laying about 360 miles of pipeline, 34-in., 0.625 in.-thick API-5LX-60 pipe offshore and 28-in., 0.406 in.-thick API-5LX-60 onshore. The offshore pipe received a coal-tar coating, a 3.5-5.0 in. concrete coating, and zinc sacrificial-anode bracelets. The onshore line was coated with the same coal-tar enamel and, where necessary, with concrete up to 4.5 in. thick. Because EGAT's two power plants are the system's only customers, no more pipeline will be constructed until deliveries, currently averaging about 100 million CF/day, reach the 250 million CF/day level. The project's second phase will include additional pipelines as well as an onshore distribution network to industrial customers.

Horner, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Control of waste gas from a thermal EOR operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes a waste-gas treatment system designed to control emissions from thermal EOR wells. This case study discusses the need, design, installation, and operation of the system.

Peavy, M.A.; Braun, J.E. (Oryx Energy Co. (US))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

SciTech Connect

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

9

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301967"...

10

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release...

11

New Jersey Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators New Jersey Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage...

12

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply &...

13

Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

Jeffrey Savidge

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gas Turbine Upgrades for Enhancing Operational Flexibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last several years, gas turbines owners have had to adapt their operating profiles to adjust to an ever changing environment that has included a dramatic run-up in gas prices, the halt (or collapse) of deregulation efforts in regions of the United States, the bankruptcy or near bankruptcy of industry giants, and an overall squeeze in profitability. In recent years, these externalities have been further exacerbated by the push for renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which mandate how much energy...

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Gas Companies Operating Within the State of Connecticut (Connecticut...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Companies Operating Within the State of Connecticut (Connecticut) Gas Companies Operating Within the State of Connecticut (Connecticut) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

16

Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

17

Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

18

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

19

Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

20

Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

22

Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

23

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

24

Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

25

Saudi Aramco Gas Operations Energy Efficiency Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saudi Aramco Gas Operations (GO) created energy efficiency strategies for its 5-year business plan (2011-2015), supported by a unique energy efficiency program, to reduce GO energy intensity by 26% by 2015. The program generated an energy savings of $ 8.8 MM, equivalent to 5% energy intensity reduction in 2011 as compared to 2010 level. The program works through a structured process, pre-set energy targets, installations of online energy management tools, and implementation of key high impact energy efficiency initiatives and completion of energy conservation projects. The long-term fruit of the program was recognized as a best practice to be adapted by most of Saudi Aramco facilities. The generation of innovative energy saving ideas under implementation resulted in potential energy savings of $23 MM. This paper confirms what many others in the industry have found, the opportunity is significant. The author illustrates GO organization crafted a structured energy efficiency program and innovative approaches to unlock the full potential of higher standards of energy efficiency performance. Gas Operation energy efficiency program will ideally translates energy intensity strategies into realities and transforms the missed opportunities into practical tactics for capturing the millions of dollars of savings potential that exist across GO facilities.

Al-Dossary, F. S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fission product iodine during early Hanford-Site operations: Its production and behavior during fuel processing, off-gas treatment and release to the atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate the radiological dose impact that Hanford Site operations may have made on the local and regional population. This impact is estimated by examining operations involving radioactive materials that were conducted at the Hanford Site from the startup of the first reactor in 1944 to the present. HEDR Project work is divided among several technical tasks. One of these tasks, Source Terms, is designed to develop quantitative estimates of all significant emissions of radionuclides by Hanford Site operations since 1944. Radiation doses can be estimated from these emissions by accounting for specific radionuclide transport conditions and population demography. This document provides technical information to assist in the evaluation of iodine releases. 115 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Burger, L.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Process for treatment of residual gas  

SciTech Connect

A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

Nolden, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

/Gas Plant Operators Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report. As  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

sales to refiners and gas plant operators represented on the list. When using this list, ... (CNG Transmission) Dominion Transmission . DCP Midstream Partners.

29

EIA-782A EXCLUSIONARY LIST INSTRUCTIONS /Gas Plant Operators ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

sales to refiners and gas plant operators represented on the list. When using this list, ... CNG Transmission (Dominion Field Serv.) Coastal Markets Limited .

30

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301935" ,"Release Date:","9302013" ,"Next Release Date:","10312013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngstorsumd...

31

,"New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release...

32

Gas characterization system operation, maintenance, and calibration plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document details the responsibilities and requirements for operation, maintenance, and calibration of the Gas Characterization Systems (GCS) analytical instrumentation. It further, defines the division of responsibility between the Characterization Monitoring Development organization and Tank Farms Operations.

Tate, D.D.

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this Act is to promote safety, the protection of the environment, the conservation of oil and gas resources, joint production arrangements, and economically efficient infrastructures.

34

Flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment primer  

SciTech Connect

Purge water from a typical wet flue gas desulfurization system contains myriad chemical constituents and heavy metals whose mixture is determined by the fuel source and combustion products as well as the stack gas treatment process. A well-designed water treatment system can tolerate upstream fuel and sorbent arranged in just the right order to produce wastewater acceptable for discharge. This article presents state-of-the-art technologies for treating the waste water that is generated by wet FGD systems. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Higgins, T.E.; Sandy, A.T.; Givens, S.W.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado requires a life cycle perspective. This paper compares greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from three renewable, and natural gas power plants is estimated for four time periods after construction. The assessment

Kammen, Daniel M.

36

Circuit arrangement for starting and operating a gas discharge laser  

SciTech Connect

A circuit arrangement is described for starting and operating a gas discharge laser having a starting phase and an operating phase. It consists of two supply lines for supplying a direct current to the gas discharge laser, a ballast resistor connected in at least one of the supply lines, and circuit means in shunt with the ballast resistor through which a starting current flows during the starting phase of the gas discharge laser.

Bolhuis, P.J.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6,104 53,825 53,540 55,026 57,959 59,418 1990-2013 Base Gas 45,677 45,677 45,677 45,677 45,677 45,677 1990-2013 Working Gas 10,427 8,147 7,862 9,349 12,281 13,740 1990-2013 Net...

38

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

94,235 91,816 90,464 90,588 89,999 89,825 1990-2013 Base Gas 74,349 74,318 74,296 74,321 73,267 72,140 1990-2013 Working Gas 19,886 17,498 16,168 16,267 16,732 17,685 1990-2013 Net...

39

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,348 26,574 28,455 28,958 28,160 28,582 1995-2013 Base Gas 8,050 8,050 8,050 8,050 8,050 8,050 1995-2013 Working Gas 19,298 18,524 20,405 20,908 20,110 20,532 1995-2013 Net...

40

Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

26,333 25,408 25,055 25,858 26,866 27,234 1990-2013 Base Gas 20,031 20,031 20,031 20,031 20,031 20,031 1990-2013 Working Gas 6,302 5,377 5,024 5,827 6,835 7,203 1990-2013 Net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies October 7, 2013 - 1:17pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 4 To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy. Table 1. Types and Ranges of Initial Investment Requirements and Annual Operating Costs and Savings. Strategies Initial Investment Operating Costs Operating Savings Consolidate trips Time to research & coordinate routes None Eliminate fleet vehicle trips; reduce cost & time (fuel, maintenance, etc) associated with fleet vehicle use. Could result in decreasing inventory & need for vehicles leading to long-term savings

42

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield… (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment...

44

Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info Start Date 1985 Program Type Environmental Regulations Equipment Certification Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Generation Disclosure Industry Recruitment/Support Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Canada National Energy Board The purpose of this Act is to promote safety, the protection of the environment, the conservation of oil and gas resources, joint production arrangements, and economically efficient infrastructures.

45

Improved Gas Turbines for LBTU Syngas Fuel Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines running on syngas can take advantage of that fuel's high mass flow per BTU. Optimizing performance while keeping all operating parameters within acceptable limits was the result of a G.E. project.

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

Summary of Gas Turbine Operation on Liquid Biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel, an alternative liquid biofuel option for stationary gas turbines, has gained much interest in the past decade. This report documents recent biodiesel field tests on aeroderivative and frame class gas turbines. Pollutant emissions and engine performance for these gas turbineswhich include models from General Electric, Siemens, Pratt Whitney, and Alstomwere plotted, compared, and analyzed to determine trends, similarities, and noticeable differences. In addition, the report documents engine oper...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

47

Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility.

WESTRA, A.G.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 340 340 340 340 340 340 1997-2013

49

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 5,563 5,789 6,051 6,354 6,516 6,874 1990-2013

50

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 21,071 24,355 26,317 27,099 27,826 28,494 1990-2013

51

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 7,917 7,809 8,111 7,771 8,769 9,216 1997-2013

52

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 10,867 11,358 11,873 12,197 12,433 12,660 1990-2013

53

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 53,540 55,026 57,959 59,418 61,671 62,862 1990-2013

54

Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 30,412 33,787 37,711 40,833 43,621 45,359 1990-2013

55

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 390,648 417,691 447,275 468,055 493,454 516,625 1990-2013

56

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 567,796 613,368 634,789 656,308 693,662 712,848 1990-2013

57

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 5,535 5,563 5,789 6,051 6,354 6,516 1990-2013

58

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 481,448 506,368 537,381 569,532 588,760 616,097 1990-2013

59

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 7,627 7,917 7,809 8,111 7,771 8,769 1997-2013

60

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 18,802 21,071 24,355 26,317 27,099 27,826 1990-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 494,687 526,990 548,682 551,855 553,972 563,219 1990-2013

62

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 93,084 97,539 101,216 104,637 109,135 112,135 1990-2013

63

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 28,455 28,958 28,160 28,582 28,018 29,312 1995-2013

64

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 87,254 89,244 91,822 94,240 97,911 101,106 1990-2013

65

Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 30,412 33,787 37,711 40,833 43,621 45,359 1990-2013

66

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 638,154 659,387 666,457 668,068 696,056 730,492 1990-2013

67

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 390,648 417,691 447,275 468,055 493,454 516,625 1990-2013

68

California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 494,687 526,990 548,682 551,855 553,972 563,219 1990-2013

69

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 270,117 293,368 310,075 317,797 325,829 340,801 1990-2013

70

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 188,580 205,724 214,887 222,273 217,684 229,843 1990-2013

71

Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 200,725 214,725 228,046 244,878 256,709 266,439 1990-2013

72

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 165,997 174,089 181,856 187,293 192,663 201,374 1990-2013

73

Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 28,203 29,473 30,384 31,284 32,766 34,652 2013-2013

74

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 207,626 210,385 214,435 219,447 224,995 224,335 1990-2013

75

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 90,464 90,588 89,999 89,825 91,028 93,007 1990-2013

76

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 746,993 774,182 809,958 842,081 876,844 917,781 1990-2013

77

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 209,512 215,593 221,664 230,749 245,317 261,998 1990-2013

78

Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 28,203 29,473 30,384 31,284 32,766 34,652 2013-2013

79

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 11,133 11,575 11,977 12,383 12,816 13,020 1990-2013

80

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 215,593 221,664 230,749 245,317 261,998 273,823 1990-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 97,539 101,216 104,637 109,135 112,135 113,539 1990-2013

82

Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 70,182 74,046 80,390 87,199 94,797 100,693 1990-2013

83

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 746,993 774,182 809,958 842,081 876,844 917,781 1990-2013

84

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 293,368 310,075 317,797 325,829 340,801 351,660 1990-2013

85

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 205,724 214,887 222,273 217,684 229,843 244,371 1990-2013

86

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 506,368 537,381 569,532 588,760 616,097 641,658 1990-2013

87

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 89,244 91,822 94,240 97,911 101,106 102,341 1990-2013

88

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 520,387 567,796 613,368 634,789 656,308 693,662 1990-2013

89

Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 25,055 25,858 26,866 27,234 29,408 31,383 1990-2013

90

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 10,867 11,358 11,873 12,197 12,433 12,660 1990-2013

91

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 582,834 638,154 659,387 666,457 668,068 696,056 1990-2013

92

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 11,133 11,575 11,977 12,383 12,816 13,020 1990-2013

93

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 205,601 207,626 210,385 214,435 219,447 224,995 1990-2013

94

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 643,563 706,443 777,107 839,963 906,927 972,307 1990-2013

95

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 643,563 706,443 777,107 839,963 906,927 972,307 1990-2013

96

Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 200,725 214,725 228,046 244,878 256,709 266,439 1990-2013

97

Gas turbine operating and maintenance experience in Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect

Operation and maintenance of the gas turbines in Saudi Arabia, utilized to drive crude oil shipping pumps and process gas compressors, are discussed. Operation on wet, sour gas is taken into account, emphasizing the hot corrosion problem and the approaches taken to solve it. Intake air filtration is examined, indicating that as a result of an in depth study it was decided to retrofit the turbines with a three stage air filtration system. The methods for applying corrosion resistant coatings to the blades are considered, as are the overhaul logistics and the repair procedures.

Anderson, A.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Automated gas transfer systems for low pressure operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of new components and the modification of commercially available hardware have been instrumental in the automation of low pressure gas transfer systems. The benefits from the automation have been faster sample operation, increased precision and a safer environment for the operator.

Baker, R.W.; Hoseus, N.L.

1988-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

100

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fall closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves  

SciTech Connect

1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

Gas Turbine Technology, Part B: Components, Operations and Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper builds on Part A and discusses the hardware involved in gas turbines as well as operations and maintenance aspects pertinent to cogeneration plants. Different categories of gas turbines are reviewed such as heavy duty aeroderivative, single and split shaft. The pros and cons of different types are reviewed. Gas turbine component types - axial and centrifugal compressors and different turbine types, along with combustor types will be discussed. Important considerations during machine specifications are also reviewed. Practical aspects such as coatings, materials, fuel handling and auxiliary systems will also be highlighted. Operations and maintenance aspects including Preventative Maintenance, Repairs, Fuel and Air Filtration, Compressor Washing and Reliability is discussed. Typical operating and maintenance costs are provided. This paper presents an extensive bibliography to enable readers to follow up any topic in detail.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Case study: City of Industry landfill gas recovery operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of civic, recreation, and conservation facilities throughout a 150-acre site which had been used for waste disposal from 1951 to 1970 is described. The history of the landfill site, the geology of the site, and a test well program to assess the feasibility of recoverying landfill gas economically from the site are discussed. Based on results of the test well program, the City of Industry authorized the design and installation of a full-scale landfill gas recovery system. Design, construction, and operation of the system are described. The landfill gas system provides fuel for use in boilers to meet space heating and hot water demands for site development (MCW)

None

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Operational Flexibility Guidelines for Gas Turbine Low NOx Combustion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine low-NOx combustion systems can differ in hardware from manufacturer to manufacturer, but the principle is the same. Low-NOx combustors reduce peak flame temperatures by mixing fuel and air before combustion and by keeping the fuel-to-air ratio as low (lean) as possible, while still maintaining combustion stability over the broadest possible operating range. Low-NOx combustion systems are inherently more complex than diffusion combustion systems, a fact that impacts operational flexibility, re...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Operational characteristics of anaerobic digesters at selected municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale and pilot plant studies at PNL have shown that powdered activated carbon is effective in improving volatile solids destruction and gas production in anaerobic digesters that are operating at less than normally expected levels of efficiency. To evaluate the applicability of this technology to digesters in the United States, digester operating characteristics at 60 facilities were surveyed and the number of stressed digesters estimated. The results show that although median values of the operating parameters conformed with those of a well-operated digester, 30% of the digesters surveyed were stressed with regard to at least one important parameter. Of the 30 largest treatment plants in the U.S., 7 fell into this category. Digester gas production and usage were then examined to determine the importance of methane off-gas as an energy source. A conservative estimate is that the gas produced nationally represents a heating value of about 2.36 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year with a present value of $40 million. Of this amount, an estimated 75% is used either onsite or sold. Onsite uses include heating digesters and buildings, incinerating sludge, operating equipment, and generating electricity. The other 25% is flared and the energy value lost. The present value of the flared gas is about $10 million/year. Natural gas prices are projected to increase 150% over the next 7 years. If the present utilization ratio continues, the flared gas will be worth approximately $27 million in 1985. Presently, digester gas is mainly used for process heating and operating equipment. The technical and economic feasibility of recovering digester gas for electrical power generation, onsite equipment operation, and sales to other consumers (utilities, private companies) should be thoroughly investigated. If fuel gas recovery and utilization are found to be desirable, consideration should be given to expanding and upgrading anaerobic digester facilities in the U.S.

Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Coates, J.A.; Ahlstrom, S.B.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Water treatment program raises boiler operating efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the boiler water treatment program which played a vital role in changing an aging steam plant into a profitable plant in just three years. Boiler efficiency increased from approximately 70 percent initially to 86 percent today. The first step in this water treatment program involves use of a sodium zeolite water softener that works to remove scale-forming ions from municipal water used in the system. A resin cleaner is also added to prolong the life of resins in the softener. The water is then passed through a new blow-down heat exchanger, which allows preheating from the continuous blow-down from the boiler system. The water gets pumped into a deaerator tank where sulfite treatment is added. The water then passes from feedpumps into the boiler system.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Innovative Distributed Multi-Pollutant Pot Gas Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arranging the gas treatment in decentralized installations as Distributed Decentralised ... Development of NEUI500kA Family High Energy Efficiency Aluminum ...

109

Evaluation of fracture treatment type on the recovery of gas from the cotton valley formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every tight gas well needs to be stimulated with a hydraulic fracture treatment to produce natural gas at economic flow rates and recover a volume of gas that provides an acceptable return on investment. Over the past few decades, many different types of fracture fluids, propping agents and treatment sizes have been tried in the Cotton Valley formation. The treatment design engineer has to choose the optimum fluid, optimum proppant, optimum treatment size and make sure the optimum treatment is mixed and pumped in the field. These optimum values also depend on drilling costs, fracturing costs and other economic parameters; such as gas prices, operating costs and taxes. Using information from the petroleum literature, numerical and analytical simulators, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides a detailed economic evaluation of the Cotton Valley wells drilled in the Elm Grove field operated by Matador Resources to determine not only the optimum treatment type, but also the optimum treatment volume as a function of drilling costs, completion costs, operating costs and gas prices. This work also provides an evaluation of well performance as a function of the fracture treatment type by reviewing production data from the Carthage and Oak Hill Cotton Valley fields in Texas and the Elm Grove field in Louisiana.

Yalavarthi, Ramakrishna

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Treatment of oily wastewaters from onshore operations  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of samples of process water from the Alyeska ballast treatment plant, Port Valdez, Alaska, disclosed that organic matter present in the process stream included volatile organic matter (lower molecular weight hydrocarbons), dissolved nonvolatile organic matter (including phenolic and naphthalenic compounds), and suspended oil. To develop informaton on the effectiveness of oil removal and to characterize the chemical redistribution taking place in the process, concentrations of each organic fraction were measured and the principal compounds were characterized chemically. Results show that the treatment plant was effective in reducing free oil content of the ballast water. A reduction of 99.8% in the organic load was realized, producing effluent generally within federal regulations regarding discharge of oil. The bulk of organic content reduction took place in the gravity separator. (JMT)

Lysyj, I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Gas Fired Power Plants: Investment Timing, Operating Flexibility and Abandonment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many firms are considering investment in gas fired power plants. We consider a firm holding a license, i.e. an option, to build a gas fired power plant. The operating cash flows from the plant depend on the spark spread, defined as the difference between the unit price of electricity and cost of gas. The plant produces electricity when the spark spread exceeds emission costs, otherwise the plant is ramped down and held idle. The owner has also an option to abandon the plant and realize the salvage value of the equipment. We compute optimal entry and exit threshold values for the spark spread. Also the effects of emission costs on the value of installing CO2 capture technology are analyzed.

Stein-erik Fleten; Erkka Näsäkkälä

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding January 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL (509)376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is boosting its capacity for treating groundwater to remove chromium near the Columbia River by 40 percent with the recent completion of a new treatment facility. Contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) finished building and started operating the new 100-DX groundwater treatment facility in December. The facility is located near the D and DR Reactors on

113

Optimization for Design and Operation of Natural Gas Transmission Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses the problem of designing a new natural gas transmission network or expanding an existing network while minimizing the total investment and operating costs. A substantial reduction in costs can be obtained by effectively designing and operating the network. A well-designed network helps natural gas companies minimize the costs while increasing the customer service level. The aim of the study is to determine the optimum installation scheduling and locations of new pipelines and compressor stations. On an existing network, the model also optimizes the total flow through pipelines that satisfy demand to determine the best purchase amount of gas. A mixed integer nonlinear programming model for steady-state natural gas transmission problem on tree-structured network is introduced. The problem is a multi-period model, so changes in the network over a planning horizon can be observed and decisions can be made accordingly in advance. The problem is modeled and solved with easily accessible modeling and solving tools in order to help decision makers to make appropriate decisions in a short time. Various test instances are generated, including problems with different sizes, period lengths and cost parameters, to evaluate the performance and reliability of the model. Test results revealed that the proposed model helps to determine the optimum number of periods in a planning horizon and the crucial cost parameters that affect the network structure the most.

Dilaveroglu, Sebnem 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

SciTech Connect

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as Integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CWF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air In-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

116

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

SciTech Connect

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

NPDES permit compliance and enforcement: A resource guide for oil and gas operators  

SciTech Connect

During the fall of 1996, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission sponsored sessions for government and industry representatives to discuss concerns about the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program under the Clean Water Act. In January 1997, the NPDES Education/Communication/Training Workgroup (ECT Workgroup) was established with co-leaders from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and industry. The ECT Workgroup`s purpose was to develop ideas that would improve communication between NPDES regulators and the oil and gas industry regarding NPDES compliance issues. The Workgroup focused on several areas, including permit compliance monitoring and reporting, enforcement activity and options, and treatment technology. The ECT Workgroup also discussed the need for materials and information to help NPDES regulatory agency personnel understand more about oil and gas industry exploration and extraction operations and treatment processes. This report represents a compendium of the ECT Workgroup`s efforts.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating C{sub 3}+ hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane. 6 figs.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating C.sub.3 + hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Field testing the Raman gas composition sensor for gas turbine operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas composition sensor based on Raman spectroscopy using reflective metal lined capillary waveguides is tested under field conditions for feed-forward applications in gas turbine control. The capillary waveguide enables effective use of low powered lasers and rapid composition determination, for computation of required parameters to pre-adjust burner control based on incoming fuel. Tests on high pressure fuel streams show sub-second time response and better than one percent accuracy on natural gas fuel mixtures. Fuel composition and Wobbe constant values are provided at one second intervals or faster. The sensor, designed and constructed at NETL, is packaged for Class I Division 2 operations typical of gas turbine environments, and samples gas at up to 800 psig. Simultaneous determination of the hydrocarbons methane, ethane, and propane plus CO, CO2, H2O, H2, N2, and O2 are realized. The capillary waveguide permits use of miniature spectrometers and laser power of less than 100 mW. The capillary dimensions of 1 m length and 300 ?m ID also enable a full sample exchange in 0.4 s or less at 5 psig pressure differential, which allows a fast response to changes in sample composition. Sensor operation under field operation conditions will be reported.

Buric, M.; Chorpening, B.; Mullem, J.; Ranalli, J.; Woodruff, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NETL: News Release - DOE's Strategic Gas Center Now Operational  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Strategic Center for Natural Gas will oversee federal research efforts in gas exploration, production and storage, infrastructure reliability, and advanced gas use...

125

Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

Nick Soelberg

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gas Release During Saltwell Pumping: Interpretation of Operational Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive waste that is a complex mix of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid into the surrounding soil, while 82 are considered sound (Hanlon 1999). To minimize the amount of material that potentially could leak into the surrounding soil, all of the SSTs are scheduled to have drainable liquid removed and to be designated as interim stabilized. Of the SSTs, 119 have been declared stabilized, and only 30 require further processing (Hanlon 1999). Many of the tanks have been declared stabilized administratively, with only 45 tanks having had drainable liquid removed. The pending consent decree between the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Office of River Protection. (U.S. District Court Eastern District of Washington, 1999) sets a milestone to complete interim stabilization by September 2004. While process equipment exists for removing drainable liquid, and its operation is well known from previous pumping campaigns, a number of safety issues associated with the release and potential ignition of flammable gases within the tanks needs to be addressed. The safety concerns associated with flammable gases stem from the observation that some of the waste in the SSTs generates and retains hazardous quantities of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Of the 30 SSTs remaining to be declared interim stabilized, 29 need to have drainable liquid removed by saltwell pumping (waste in tank 241-C-106 will be removed by sluicing), and 16 of these are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) (Hopkins 1995; Hanlon 1999). Most of these tanks are in Facility Group 2 (Noorani 1997); that is, it is believed that tank operations may induce the release of significant quantities of flammable gas, but gas release does not occur spontaneously. In particular, saltwell pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, both insoluble (principally hydrogen) and soluble (principally ammonia), posing a number of safety concerns (Peurrung et al. 1997; Meader 1996).

J.L. Huckaby; L.M. Peurrung; P.A. Gauglitz

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines Summary of Overall Operating History and Experience from GE 7F in Peaking Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline report describes the operating history, performance, and maintenance protocol for advanced gas turbine units. It details the effects of peaking service on the integrity and life of hot-gas-path parts such as buckets and combustors and the frequency of hot gas path inspections. The results have serious implications for the reliability, availability, and maintainability of these units when subjected to peaking operation.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both

Forsyth, Peter A.

129

Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

Schulz, Rebecca L. (Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Gas-liquid separator and method of operation - Energy ...  

A system for gas-liquid separation in electrolysis processes is provided. The system includes a first compartment having a liquid carrier including a ...

131

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment… (more)

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EIA-782A REFINERS’/GAS PLANT OPERATORS’ MONTHLY ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

interested in receiving this free software, contact the Electronic Data Collection Support Staff at (202) 586-9659. Mail forms to: Oil & Gas ...

133

Natural Gas Transportation - Infrastructure Issues and Operational Trends  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines how well the current national natural gas pipeline network has been able to handle today's market demand for natural gas. In addition, it identifies those areas of the country where pipeline utilization is continuing to grow rapidly and where new pipeline capacity is needed or is planned over the next several years.

Information Center

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimization system for operation of gas cogeneration power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a distributed control system for the realization of cogenerative supply of electricity and heat and, in given case, for their combination with waste heat recovery, particularly in combined (gas-steam) cycle industrial power plants. ... Keywords: cogenerative gas power plant, control of distributed parameter systems, optimization, process control

Ion Miciu

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base...

136

West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

33,359 313,029 340,652 379,915 406,533 425,046 1990-2013 Base Gas 267,676 267,676 267,680 267,684 267,688 266,927 1990-2013 Working Gas 65,683 45,353 72,972 112,231 138,845 158,119...

137

AGA Producing Region Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,894,503 1,780,012 1,829,817 1,964,003 2,054,202 2,124,803 1994-2013 Base Gas 1,076,234 1,074,821 1,075,297 1,077,568 1,080,613 1,080,790 1994-2013 Working Gas 818,269 705,191...

138

New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

174,104 163,250 166,528 177,048 190,166 195,803 1990-2013 Base Gas 113,110 112,769 112,678 112,806 112,927 112,547 1990-2013 Working Gas 60,994 50,480 53,849 64,243 77,239 83,256...

139

The integrated melter off-gas treatment systems at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration project was established by an act of Congress in 1980 to solidify the high level radioactive liquid wastes produced from operation of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center from 1966 to 1972. The waste will be solidified as borosilicate glass. This report describes the functions, the controlling design criteria, and the resulting design of the melter off-gas treatment systems.

Vance, R.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Design and Operating Guidelines Manual for Cooling-Water Treatment - Treatment of Recirculated Cooling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary manual was developed to provide a systematic procedure for evaluating candidate strategies for the treatment of recirculated cooling water. It presents (1) a means of selecting optimal treatment methods and facilities on the basis of technical and economic considerations, and (2) guidelines for proper cooling-water system operation. Descriptions of, and user's manuals for, the cooling-system process and chemical equilibrium computer simulation models are included.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nano Sensor Networks for Tailored Operation of Highly Efficient Gas-To-Liquid Fuels Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano Sensor Networks for Tailored Operation of Highly Efficient Gas-To-Liquid Fuels Catalysts Eisa Engineering at University of New South Wales. #12;1 Introduction Gas-to-liquid (GTL) compounds are clean fuels for converting natural gas to the liquid hydrocarbons [1]. However, the reaction is a complex network of many

New South Wales, University of

142

Investigating the efficiency of gas turbines in off-design operation  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data on the performance of gas turbines for eight gas turbine power plants are presented and compared for the purpose of determining the efficiency of gas turbines in off-design operation such as during start-up or at less than rated speeds. (LCL)

Ol' Khovskii, G.G.; Ol' Khovskaya, N.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation Zhuliang Chen such as fuel and electricity, natural gas prices exhibit seasonality dynamics due to fluctuations in demand [28]. As such, natural gas storage facilities are constructed to provide a cushion for such fluctuations

Forsyth, Peter A.

144

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation Zhuliang Chen]. As such, natural gas storage facilities are constructed to provide a cushion for such fluctuations by releasing natural gas in storage in seasons with high demand. Recently, several authors [1, 32, 35, 36, 25

Forsyth, Peter A.

145

Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lower 48 States Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,454,493 6,074,123 6,207,548 6,623,711 6,997,324 7,271,272 2012-2013 Base Gas 4,365,297 4,363,812 4,363,259 4,367,088 4,370,387 4,351,118 2012-2013 Working Gas 2,089,196 1,710,311...

147

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in the fourth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: second field test; test data analysis for the first field test; operational optimization plans.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Plub Borough, PA); Antenucci, Annette B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Help Operators See Oil, Gas Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Six Research Teams to Develop Advanced Diagnostics And Imaging Technologies for Oil, Gas Fields TULSA, OK - If oil and gas producers could "see" hydrocarbon-bearing formations more accurately from the surface or from nearby wellbores, they can position new wells more precisely to produce more oil or gas with less risk and ultimately, at lower costs. For many producers in the United States, especially smaller producers operating on razor-thin margins, advanced diagnostics and imaging systems can help them in business. By visualizing the barriers and pathways for the flow of oil and gas through underground rock formations, producers can avoid dry holes and increase ultimate recovery.

151

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Hot Gas Path Parts Condition and Remaining Life Assessment for GE 7FA in Baseload Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on two years experience operating four advanced gas turbines (AGT) General Electric MS 7221 FA at Martin CC of Florida Power & Light (FP&L), this guideline describes the operating and maintenance philosophy used for baseload AGT units and the integrity of the hot path components and their remaining life. The guideline will assist utilities operating the GE MS 7221FA class AGT plan inspections and comparisons with other units in this class.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Released: September 28, 2010 Next Release: Discontinued Excel Spreadsheet Model - 1994-2009 XLS (1,178 KB) Overview Oil and gas well equipment and operating costs, including coal bed methane costs, stopped their upward trend from the 1990s and fell sharply in 2009. The extremely high oil and gas prices during the first half of 2008 followed by an unprecedented drop to very low prices by the end of the year had a major impact on equipment demand. Operating costs tumbled also because fuel costs were reduced and well servicing rates fell in most areas. The exceptions were in California where electric rates continued to increase, causing a one (1) percent increase in annual operating costs for leases producing from 12,000 feet. Operating cost for coal bed methane wells in the Appalachian and Powder River areas increased because electric rates continued to climb. Due to the timing of the data collection, the cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other well completion costs, so the effect of the oil and gas prices on collected data may be lessened. Annual average electric rates and natural gas prices are used, which also helps to dampen cost variances.

153

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infracture''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and tested on four different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and qualitatively demonstrated in tests on three different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In addition, it was speculated prior to testing that the use of HCNG fuel could extend oil change intervals, thus reducing operating costs and waste products such as used engine...

156

A Guidance Document for Kentucky's Oil and Gas Operators  

SciTech Connect

The accompanying report, manual and assimilated data represent the initial preparation for submission of an Application for Primacy under the Class II Underground Injection Control (UIC) program on behalf of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The purpose of this study was to identify deficiencies in Kentucky law and regulation that would prevent the Kentucky Division of Oil and Gas from receiving approval of primacy of the UIC program, currently under control of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Atlanta, Georgia.

Bender, Rick

2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

FY-2001 Accomplishments in Off-gas Treatment Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the efforts funded by the Tank Focus Area to investigate nitrogen oxide (NOx) destruction (a.k.a. deNOx) technologies and off-gas scrubber system designs. The primary deNOx technologies that were considered are staged combustion (a.k.a. NOx reburning), selective catalytic reduction, selective non-catalytic reduction, and steam reformation. After engineering studies and a team evaluation were completed, selective catalytic reduction and staged combustion were considered the most likely candidate technologies to be deployed in a sodium-bearing waste vitrification facility. The outcome of the team evaluation factored heavily in the establishing a baseline configuration for off-gas and secondary waste treatment systems.

Marshall, Douglas William

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 99: 89: 90: 79: 72 ...

159

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

160

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 1,219: 1,126: 1,049: 993 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Case history of industrial plant steam system layup for direct-fired gas operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the facts of an industrial plant steam system layup for direct fired gas operations. Fuel price savings indicated that gas firing a paper dryer, the largest steam user in the plant, would pay for itself in one year. Conversion work is detailed. Primary gas distribution was achieved by using one line of the steam loop. Machine water heating, power venting, space heating, and air makeup heating, among other conversions, are also specified.

Stacy, G.N.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1168-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD CONFINEMENT VENTILATION AND PROCESS GAS TREATMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1168-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-1168-2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK iv DOE-STD-1168-2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT...................................................................................................................vii

163

Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Proceedings of symposium on operation and maintenance of synthetic gas plants  

SciTech Connect

The Symposium on Operation and Maintenance of Synthetic Gas Plants sponsored by the Gas Processors Association and the American Petroleum Institute (Division of Refining) was held at the Statler Hilton Hotel, Dallas, Texas, October 10, 1973. Four papers have been entered individually into EDB. (LTN)

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in the third quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: first field test; test data analysis.

Anthony J. Smalle; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in the fifth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: completion of analysis of data from first visit to second site; preparation for follow-up testing.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this contract continues to be the demonstration of high fuel gas desulfurization of high temperature fuel gas desulfurization and particulate removal using a moving bed process with regenerable metal oxide sorbent. The fuel gas source for test operation is a fixed bed, air blown gasifier located at GE Corporate Research and Development in Schenectady, New York. The demonstration project also includes the design, construction, installation and test operation of a gas turbine simulator which includes a modified GE MS6000 type gas turbine combustor and a film cooled, first stage LM 6000 nozzle assembly. The hot gas cleanup (HGCU) system and the gas turbine simulator have been designed to operate with the full 8000 lb/hr fuel gas flow from the gasification of 1800 lb/hr of coal at 280 psig and 1000 to 1150 F. An advanced formulation of zinc ferrite as well as zinc titanate have been used as the regenerable metal oxide sorbents in testing to date. Demonstration of halogen removal as well as characterization of alkali and heavy metal concentrations in the fuel gas remain objectives, as well. Results are discussed.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this contract continues to be the demonstration of high fuel gas desulfurization of high temperature fuel gas desulfurization and particulate removal using a moving bed process with regenerable metal oxide sorbent. The fuel gas source for test operation is a fixed bed, air blown gasifier located at GE Corporate Research and Development in Schenectady, New York. The demonstration project also includes the design, construction, installation and test operation of a gas turbine simulator which includes a modified GE MS6000 type gas turbine combustor and a film cooled, first stage LM 6000 nozzle assembly. The hot gas cleanup (HGCU) system and the gas turbine simulator have been designed to operate with the full 8000 lb/hr fuel gas flow from the gasification of 1800 lb/hr of coal at 280 psig and 1000 to 1150 F. An advanced formulation of zinc ferrite as well as zinc titanate have been used as the regenerable metal oxide sorbents in testing to date. Demonstration of halogen removal as well as characterization of alkali and heavy metal concentrations in the fuel gas remain objectives, as well. Results are discussed.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Operation of a 200-kW PAFC Unit on Anaerobic Digestor Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anaerobic digestor process used by over 90% of wastewater treatment plants generates methane-rich gas as a byproduct. This report describes the initial phases of a twelve-month demonstration project in which a fuel cell power plant in Yonkers, New York, is being successfully run on anaerobic digestor gas (ADG).

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evaluation of cooling tower and wastewater treatment operations at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a technical assessment of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Wastewater Treatment System. This Scope of Work consisted of five primary tasks described as follows: Task 1 - Determine the quantity of hydantoins in the stripped gas liquor (SGL), their precursors, and the kinetics of their formation in condensed liquor for the Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA) gasification facility. The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) has measured a high concentration of hydantoins in the gas liquor from their slagging gasifier. UNDERC has tested the use of SGL in a pilot cooling tower and they witnessed some adverse effects in the cooling tower and heat exchanger systems. Task 2 - Investigate the adverse Department of Energy (DOE) findings at UNDERC with regard to corrosion, foaming, biological and organic fouling, chemical attack on concrete and organic emissions resulting from the use of SGL in a pilot plant cooling tower. Task 3 - Validate the heat load on the cooling tower for both summer and winter operation and determine the adequacy of the surge pond to store the maximum predicted amount of excess water accumulated during winter operation. Task 4 - Assess potential fouling, foaming and organic carry-over problems associated with operability of the multiple-effect evaporator and develop recommendations on possible alternate use of evaporator condensate to alleviate possible problems in disposing of excess wastewater. Task 5 - Provide DOE with recommendations on the wastewater treatment backup design and test program already committed to by GPGA. This paper presents Fluor's findings regarding the five primary tasks. 12 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 6,235,025 6,652,218 7,026,645 7,302,127 7,572,885 7,928,016

172

New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 165,802 176,083 189,103 195,374 204,838 215,729 1990-2013

173

New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 65,129 64,289 62,901 61,506 61,449 63,300 1990-2013

174

New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 66,524 65,129 64,289 62,901 61,506 61,449 1990-2013

175

Landfill gas operation and maintenance manual of practice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual has the following objectives: (1) compile and present key portions of the general body of knowledge about operating and maintaining LFG control systems; (2) present information in an easy to understand format useful for hands-on practical use in the field; (3) present accepted practices and procedures for LFG control practices; (4) highlight key points, common mistakes and lessons learned from more than 20 years of industry experience, point out areas of controversy and indicate alternative practices where applicable; (5) compile key reference information; and (6) provide theory and discussion needed to develop a deeper understanding of LFG control and recovery.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Foreign operators' oil and gas E and D action in Thailand gathering speed  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the pace of foreign operators' exploration and development campaigns in Thailand. A rapidly growing economy is spurring sharp growth in oil and gas demand in Thailand. Correspondingly the Thai government recently embarked on an ambitious energy program that focuses on increasing oil and gas production, expanding gas utilization, and building gas supply ties with neighboring countries. Key to the success of the domestic E D push has been the government's ability to attract foreign investment in Thai E D. although progress is sometimes slow in coming amid tough negotiations, efforts to improve contract terms are yielding green lights for key projects.

1991-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a one-factor regime-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both market futures and options on futures. Calibration results indicate that the regime-switching model is a better fit to market data compared to a one-factor mean-reverting model similar to those used by other authors to value gas storage. We extend a semi-Lagrangian timestepping scheme from Chen and Forsyth (2007) to solve the gas storage pricing problem, essentially a stochastic control problem, and conduct a convergence analysis of the scheme. Numerical results also indicate that the regime-switching model can generate operational strategies for gas storage facilities that reflect the existence of multiple regimes in the market as well as the regime shifts due to various exogenous events.

Zhuliang Chen; Peter A. Forsyth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

179

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 11172010 - 04072011 Report Preparer: Jake...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Decoupling treatment of electric and gas utilities can differ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Many States institute decoupled rates for both electric and gas utilities ... Virginia and North Carolina have both decoupled gas rates but not electric rates.

182

Apparatus and method for partial-load operation of a combined gas and steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method are disclosed for the partial load operation of a combined gas turbine and steam turbine plant, including a shaft being connected to the gas turbine and drivable at a given nominal speed of rotation, a first generator being connected to the shaft and electrically connectible to an electric network, a compressor being connected to the shaft and connected upstream of the gas turbine in gas flow direction, a heat exchanger having an output and a variable heat supply and being connected upstream of the gas turbine in gas flow direction, a steam generator for the steam turbine being connected downstream of the gas turbine in gas flow direction for receiving exhaust gases therefrom, a second generator being connected to the steam turbine and electrically connectible to the electric network for supplying given nominal power thereto along with the first generator, means for giving to the electric network and taking away from the network at least part of the nominal power if the shaft rotates at less than the nominal speed of rotation, and means for reducing the speed of rotation of the gas turbine for preventing a substantial drop in temperature at the output of the heat exchanger if the heat supply of the heat exchanger is reduced.

Becker, B.; Finckh, H.; Meyer-pittroff, R.

1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1935" U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1935" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_sum_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_sum_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:04:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" "Sourcekey","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

184

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Influence of electrolytes and membranes on cell operation for syn-gas production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of membrane type and electrolyte composition for the electrochemical generation of synthesis gas (CO + H2) using a Ag gas diffusion electrode are presented. Changing from a cation exchange membrane to an anion exchange membrane (AEM) extended the cell operational time at low Ecell values (up to 4x) without impacting product composition. The use of KOH as the catholyte decreased the Ecell and resulted in a minimum electrolyte cost reduction of 39%. The prime factor in determining operational time at low Ecell values was the ability to maintain a sufficiently high anolyte pH.

Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas  

SciTech Connect

The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

191

Operability test report for core sample truck {number_sign}1 flammable gas modifications  

SciTech Connect

This report primarily consists of the original test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to Core Sample Truck No. One. Included are exceptions, resolutions, comments, and test results. This report consists of the original, completed, test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to the Push Mode Core Sample Truck No. 1. Prior to the Acceptance/Operability test the truck No. 1 operations procedure (TO-080-503) was revised to be more consistent with the other core sample truck procedures and to include operational steps/instructions for the SR weather cover pressurization system. A draft copy of the operations procedure was used to perform the Operability Test Procedure (OTP). A Document Acceptance Review Form is included with this report (last page) indicating the draft status of the operations procedure during the OTP. During the OTP 11 test exceptions were encountered. Of these exceptions four were determined to affect Acceptance Criteria as listed in the OTP, Section 4.7 ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA.

Akers, J.C.

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks.

Waldo, E.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

193

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated VPS System Ball Valve  

SciTech Connect

1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valve incorporates a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. The valve is normally open and fails safe to the closed position. The associated valve position switch is class GS.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

194

Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated VPS System Ball Valve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1 inch Gas-operated full-pod ball valve incorporates a solenoid and limit switches as integral park of the actuator. The valve is normally open and fails safe to the closed position. The associated valve position switch is class GS.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effect of operating parameters and anode gas impurities upon polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are actively under development for transportation and other applications. Integration of a PEM fuel cell stack with a methanol reformer requires an understanding of single cell performance under a range of operating conditions using anode gas contaminated with impurities. The effect of temperature, pressure, and anode gas impurities on single cell PEM performance was investigated with platinum black electrodes. Single cell performance remained unchanged as temperature was varied between 80 and 100 at 3 atm pressure. High water partial pressures at 120C produced a mass transfer limiting current. While operation at 120C did not reverse CO{sub 2} poisoning, anode air addition proved effective. Air injection also decreased CO poisoning at injected concentrations up to 200 ppm CO. Higher single cell tolerance was observed for CH{sub 3}OH than CO. Up to 1 mole % CH{sub 3}OH in the gas phase reduced the current density by less than 10%.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 14 years, the Gas Technology Institute and jointly with Uhde since 1997 developing Morphysorb{reg_sign} a new physical solvent-based acid gas removal process. Based on extensive laboratory, bench, pilot-plant scale experiments and computer simulations, DEGT Gas Transmission Company, Canada (DEGT) has chosen the process for use at its Kwoen processing facility near Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada as the first commercial application for the Morphysorb process. DOE co-funded the development of the Morphysorb process in various stages of development. DOE funded the production of this report to ensure that the results of the work would be readily available to potential users of the process in the United States. The Kwoen Plant is designed to process 300 MMscfd of raw natural gas at 1,080-psia pressure. The sour natural gas contains 20 to 25 percent H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. The plant reduces the acid gas content by about 50% and injects the removed H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} into an injection well. The Kwoen plant has been operating since August 2002. Morphysorb{reg_sign} is a physical solvent-based process used for the bulk removal of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S from natural gas and other gaseous streams. The solvent consists of N-Formyl morpholine and other morpholine derivatives. This process is particularly effective for high-pressure and high acid-gas applications and offers substantial savings in investment and operating cost compared to competitive physical solvent-based processes. GTI and DEGT first entered into an agreement in 2002 to test the Morphysorb process at their Kwoen Gas Treating Plant in northern BC. The process is operating successfully without any solvent related problems and has between DEGTC and GTI. As of December 2003, about 90 Bcf of sour gas was processed. Of this about 8 Bcf of acid gas containing mainly H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was injected back into the depleted reservoir and 82 Bcf sent for further processing at DEGTC's Pine River Plant. This report discusses the operational performance at Kwoen plant during the performance test as well as the solvent performance since the plant started up. The Morphysorb performance is assessed by Duke Energy according to five metrics: acid gas pickup, recycle gas flow, total hydrocarbon loss in acid gas stream, Morphysorb solvent losses and foaming related problems. Plant data over a period of one year show that the Morphysorb solvent has performed extremely well in four out of five of these categories. The fifth metric, Morphysorb solvent loss, is being evaluated over a longer-term period in order to accurately assess it. However, the preliminary indications based on makeup solvent used to date are that solvent losses will also be within expectations. The analysis of the solvent samples indicates that the solvent is very stable and did not show any sign of degradation. The operability of the solvent is good and no foaming related problems have been encountered. According to plant operators the Morphysorb unit runs smoothly and requires no special attention.

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1973 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050wi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050wi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:12 PM"

199

,"Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:50 PM"

200

,"Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050id2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050id2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:51 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Operators (MMcf)" All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5070ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5070ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:42 PM"

202

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050sc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050sc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:07 PM"

203

,"Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:46 PM"

204

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:50 PM"

205

,"Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Injections All Operators (MMcf)" Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:28:50 PM"

206

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at 1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to use an existing glass melter thermal treatment unit (also known as a Penberthy Pyro-Converter joule-heated glass furnace) for the treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes (waste containing both hazardous and radioactive material at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 26, 1995 EA-0821: Finding of No Significant Impact Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department

207

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Developing a water treatment system for Subsea Gas processing plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The petroleum industry is currently moving to meet the ever-rising demand for oil and gas production. As onshore fields become depleted and decline in production,… (more)

Honer Badi M Nazhat, Dana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Compact Filter Design for Gas Treatment Centers - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Innovative Compact Heat Exchanger Solution for Aluminium Off-Gas Cooling and Heat Recovery · Autonomous Vehicle and Smelter Technologies · Compact ...

210

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey site test performed on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. This test completes planned screening efforts designed to guide selection of one or more units for design analysis and testing with emphasis on identification and reduction of compressor losses. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report presents results of design analysis performed on the TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey test performed on an HBA-6 engine/compressor installed at Duke Energy's Bedford Compressor Station. This is one of several tests planned, which will emphasize identification and reduction of compressor losses. Additionally, this report presents a methodology for distinguishing losses in compressor attributable to valves, irreversibility in the compression process, and the attached piping (installation losses); it illustrates the methodology with data from the survey test. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Models, Calculation and Optimization of Gas Networks, Equipment and Contracts for Design, Operation, Booking and Accounting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are proposed models of contracts, technological equipment and gas networks and methods of their optimization. The flow in network undergoes restrictions of contracts and equipment to be operated. The values of sources and sinks are provided by contracts. The contract models represent (sub-) networks. The simplest contracts represent either nodes or edges. Equipment is modeled by edges. More sophisticated equipment is represented by sub-networks. Examples of such equipment are multi-poles and compressor stations with many entries and exits. The edges can be of different types corresponding to equipment and contracts. On such edges, there are given systems of equation and inequalities simulating the contracts and equipment. On this base, the methods proposed that allow: calculation and control of contract values for booking on future days and for accounting of sales and purchases; simulation and optimization of design and of operation of gas networks. These models and methods are realized in software syst...

Ostromuhov, Leonid A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first summarizes key results from survey site tests performed on an HBA-6 installed at Duke Energy's Bedford compressor station, and on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. The report then presents results of design analysis performed on the Bedford HBA-6 to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

Clean air program: Liquefied natural gas safety in transit operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report examines the safety issues relating to the use of Liquefied natural Gas (LNG) in transit service. The surveys consisted of: (1) extensive interviews; (2) review of recrods, procedures, and plans relating to safety; (3) examination of facilities and equipment; (4) observations of operations including fueling, maintenance, morning start-up, and revenue service; (5) measurement of methane concentrations in the air where the buses are being fueled or stored. Interviews included all job categories associated with management, operations, safety, maintenance, acquisition, and support. The surveys also included an examination of the occupational hygiene aspects of LNG use.

Friedman, D.M.; Malcosky, N.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Investigation of a Multiphase Twin-screw Pump Operating at High Gas Volume Fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of twin-screw pumps for moving fluids is not new technology but its application to wet gas compression (high gas volume fraction [GVF]) is still considered relatively new. There are many advantages for using twin-screw pumps for oil field applications; three of the immediate improvements include reducing hardware costs, reducing well bore pressure, and producing a pressure boost to move the product to a central collection facility. While there are many advantages to using twin-screw pumps in wet gas applications, there are some problems that have been encountered while operating at high GVFs. When operating at high GVF, over 95 percent twin-screw pumps experience a severe loss of efficiency and an increase of operating temperature. A common way to increase the efficiency while operating in the high GVF range includes adding a liquid recirculation system where a portion of liquid is stored downstream of the pump and is injected into the pump inlet. These systems lower the effective GVF of the multiphase fluid below 95 percent in order to increase the pump efficiency. The first objective is to characterize the performance of a twin-screw pump fitted with a liquid recirculation system while operating under high GVF conditions. The second objective is to investigate the transient heat rise associated with high GVF operation. While traditional twin-screw pumps can be fitted with a liquid recirculation system to allow them to operate under high GVF conditions the pumps themselves are not optimized for wet gas compression and still suffer performance penalties. The results of this investigation show that the liquid recirculation system can allow the pump to operate under high GVF but the heat added to the system reduces the systems efficiency. Without a method of removing the heat generated in the pumping process the pump will not run at its optimal efficiency. The following investigation provides recommendations for further research in area of multiphase pumping using twin-screw pumps based on the characterization and transient studies provided in this thesis.

Kroupa, Ryan Daniel

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Fire protection considerations for the design and operation of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) storage facilities  

SciTech Connect

This standard addresses the design, operation, and maintenance of LPG storage facilities from the standpoint of prevention and control of releases, fire-protection design, and fire-control measures, as well as the history of LPG storage facility failure, facility design philosophy, operating and maintenance procedures, and various fire-protection and firefighting approaches and presentations. The storage facilities covered are LPG installations (storage vessels and associated loading/unloading/transfer systems) at marine and pipeline terminals, natural gas processing plants, refineries, petrochemical plants, and tank farms.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Identifying emerging smart grid impacts to upstream and midstream natural gas operations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Smart Grid has come to describe a next-generation electrical power system that is typified by the increased use of communications and information technology in the generation, delivery and consumption of electrical energy. Much of the present Smart Grid analysis focuses on utility and consumer interaction. i.e. smart appliances, home automation systems, rate structures, consumer demand response, etc. An identified need is to assess the upstream and midstream operations of natural gas as a result of the smart grid. The nature of Smart Grid, including the demand response and role of information, may require changes in upstream and midstream natural gas operations to ensure availability and efficiency. Utility reliance on natural gas will continue and likely increase, given the backup requirements for intermittent renewable energy sources. Efficient generation and delivery of electricity on Smart Grid could affect how natural gas is utilized. Things that we already know about Smart Grid are: (1) The role of information and data integrity is increasingly important. (2) Smart Grid includes a fully distributed system with two-way communication. (3) Smart Grid, a complex network, may change the way energy is supplied, stored, and in demand. (4) Smart Grid has evolved through consumer driven decisions. (5) Smart Grid and the US critical infrastructure will include many intermittent renewables.

McIntyre, Annie

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

BC Technologies

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed-bed gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system, and turbine simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. The HGCU Program is based on the design and demonstration of the HGCU system in a test facility made up of a pilot-scale fixed bed gasifier, a HGCU system, and a turbine simulator in Schenectady, NY, at the General Electric Research and Development Center. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at 2,350 F rotor inlet temperature and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions on low-Btu fuel gas. The turbine simulator program also includes the development and operation of experimental combustors based on the rich-quench-lean concept (RQL) to minimize the conversion of ammonia and other fuel-bound nitrogen species to NO{sub x} during combustion. The HGCU system and turbine simulator have been designed to process approximately 8,000 lb/hr of low heating value fuel gas produced by the GE fixed bed gasifier. The HGCU system has utilized several mixed metal oxide sorbents, including zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, and Z-Sorb, with the objective of demonstrating good sulfur removal and mechanical attrition resistance as well as economic cost characteristics. Demonstration of halogen removal and the characterization of alkali and trace metal concentrations in the fuel gas are subordinate objectives of the overall program. This report describes the results of several long-duration pilot tests.

Bevan, S.; Ayala, R.E.; Feitelberg, A.; Furman, A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

,"Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5070id2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5070id2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:46 PM"

224

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5070sc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5070sc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:30:00 PM"

225

,"Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5070ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5070ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:45 PM"

226

,"Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1975 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5070de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5070de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:45 PM"

227

Laboratory investigation of the performance of a Holden engine operating on liquified petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation into the relative performances of an engine when operated on both liquified petroleum gas (LPG) and petrol showed that the engine operated at higher termal efficiency on LPG and also that it would operate satisfactorily at leaner air-fuel mixtures on this fuel. Engine performance was less affected by retarded ignition for LPG than for petrol. Furthermore a large increase in dwell angle from the recommended setting had no significant effect on LPG performance. The LPG carburettor when installed in its normal configuration maintained an essentially constant mixture strength with no part throttle leaning of mixtures to give better efficiency nor corresponding full throttle enrichment to give best engine torque.

Webb, N.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5070ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5070ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:45 PM"

229

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other acid gases from coke-oven gas. The final step in sulfur removal uses a Lo-Cat II. The Lo-Cat process absorbs and subsequently oxidizes H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. These two processes have been effective in reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coke-oven gas by 95%. Since the end of the start-up and optimization phase, emission rate has stayed below the 104.5 lb/hr limit of equivalent SO{sub 2} (based on a 24-hr average). In Jan. 1995, the emission rate from the sulfur removal facility averaged 86.7 lb/hr with less than 20 lb/hr from the Econobator exhaust. The challenges yet to be met are decreasing the operating expenses of the sulfur removal facility, notably chemical costs, and minimizing the impact of the heating system on unit reliability.

Havili, M.U.; Fraser-Smyth, L.L.; Wood, B.W. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Operational Readiness Review June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

232

BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRE-TREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set. The production of cleaner renewable energy will help offset the carbon footprint of other energy sources that are currently utilized.

Jon Creighton

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends have been assessed under warmed-up and cold idle conditions. The speciated emissions show that the ...

Kar, Kenneth

236

Ten Years of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Operations at SunLine Transit Agency: April 2003--December 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on the lesson learned at the SunLine Transit Agency after it converted in 1994 its entire operating transit bus fleet to compressed natural gas (CNG).

Chandler, K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Case Studies to Evaluate Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Physical/Chemical Treatment Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on physical/chemical wastewater treatment technologies used to remove trace metals from flue gas desulphurization (FGD) wastewater. The scope of this study includes FGD wastewater treatment for trace metals.BackgroundThe United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently revising the Effluent Limitations Guidelines (ELGs) for the steam electric power generating industry. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Operation Synopsis of Gas-Fired Double-Effect Absorption Chillers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorption refrigeration systems are one of the oldest systems available. The fundamentals of absorption refrigeration were formulated about 1777, and the first successful absorption machine was developed in 1850. The first U.S. patent for an absorption refrigeration system was issued in 1860. Absorption systems can use many different heat sources to produce the refrigeration effect: natural gas, steam, solar, and oil. While absorption systems were popular in the U.S. in the early part of the 20th century, their use declined in the mid twentieth century for several reasons: (1) increased reliability of vapor compression systems, (2) dropping electric prices (in real dollars), and (3) rapidly increasing gas prices. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in absorption refrigeration and cooling. Natural gas prices have moderated while electric prices continue to rise. The reliability and performance of absorption systems have been substantially improved with new technology from Japan. This paper summarizes the results of the operation of three absorption systems located in the greater Dallas/Ft. Worth area.

Phillips, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Issues Involving The OSI Concept of Operation For Noble Gas Radionuclide Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a technically sound protocol for detecting the subsurface release of noble gas radionuclides is critical to the successful operation of an on site inspection (OSI) under the CTBT and has broad ramifications for all aspects of the OSI regime including the setting of specifications for both sampling and analysis equipment used during an OSI. With NA-24 support, we are investigating a variety of issues and concerns that have significant bearing on policy development and technical guidance regarding the detection of noble gases and the creation of a technically justifiable OSI concept of operation. The work at LLNL focuses on optimizing the ability to capture radioactive noble gases subject to the constraints of possible OSI scenarios. This focus results from recognizing the difficulty of detecting gas releases in geologic environments - a lesson we learned previously from the LLNL Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE). Evaluation of a number of important noble gas detection issues, potentially affecting OSI policy, has awaited the US re-engagement with the OSI technical community. Thus, there have been numerous issues to address during the past 18 months. Most of our evaluations of a sampling or transport issue necessarily involve computer simulations. This is partly due to the lack of OSI-relevant field data, such as that provided by the NPE, and partly a result of the ability of LLNL computer-based models to test a range of geologic and atmospheric scenarios far beyond what could ever be studied in the field making this approach very highly cost effective. We review some highlights of the transport and sampling issues we have investigated during the past year. We complete the discussion of these issues with a description of a preliminary design for subsurface sampling that is intended to be a practical solution to most if not all the challenges addressed here.

Carrigan, C R; Sun, Y

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Dissolver Off-gas Hot Operations Authorization (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)  

SciTech Connect

The head-end processing of the Coupled-End-to-End (CETE) Demonstration includes fuel receipt, fuel disassembly, exposure of fuel (e.g., by segmenting the fuel pins), voloxidation of the fuel to separate tritium, and fuel dissolution. All of these processing steps with the exception of the dissolution step will be accomplished in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) (Building 3525). The final headend step will be performed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (Building 7920). The primary purpose of the fuel dissolution step is to prepare the solid fuel for subsequent liquid separations steps. This is accomplished by dissolving the fuel solids using nitric acid. During the dissolution process gases are evolved. Oxides of nitrogen are the primary off-gas components generated by the reactions of nitric acid and the fuel oxides however, during the dissolution and sparging of the resulting solution, iodine, C-14 as carbon dioxide, xenon, and krypton gasses are also released to the off-gas stream. The Dissolver Off-gas treatment rack provides a means of trapping these volatile fission products and other gases via various trapping media. Specifically the rack will recover iodine on a solid sorbent bed, scrub NOx in a water/acid column, scrub CO{sub 2} in a caustic scrubber column, remove moisture with solid sorbent drier beds and recover Xe and Kr using solid absorbent beds. The primary purpose of this experimental rack and the off-gas rack associated with the voloxidation equipment located at IFEL is to close the material balances around the volatile gases and to provide an understanding of the impacts of specific processing conditions on the fractions of the volatile components released from the various head-end processing steps.

Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, April 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 11/17/2010 - 04/07/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: On November 17, 2010, a HSS representative participated in a tour of the STP test facility. The HSS representative was also briefed by the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Project Engineer, the CHPRC STP Design

243

An investigation of gas separation membranes for reduction of thermal treatment emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas permeable membranes were evaluated for possible use as air pollution control devices on a fluidized bed catalytic incineration unit. The unit is a candidate technology for treatment of certain mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant. Cellulose acetate and polyimide membranes were tested to determine the permeance of typical off-gas components such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen. Multi-component permeation studies included gas mixtures containing light hydrocarbons. Experiments were also conducted to discover information about potential membrane degradation in the presence of organic compounds.

Stull, D.M.; Logsdon, B.W. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Pellegrino, J.J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)  

SciTech Connect

Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

Chad Smutzer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

An Experimental Examination of a Progressing Cavity Pump Operating at Very High Gas Volume Fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The progressing cavity pump is a type of positive displacement pump that is capable of moving nearly any fluid. This type of pump transports fluids in a series of discrete cavities formed by the helical geometries of its rigid rotor and elastomeric stator. With appropriate materials for the rotor and stator, this pump can move combinations of liquids, suspended solids, and gasses equally well. Because of its versatility, the progressing cavity pump is widely used in the oil industry to transport mixtures of oil, water, and sediment; this investigation was prompted by a desire to extend the use of progressing cavity pumps to wet gas pumping applications. One of the progressing cavity pump's limitations is that the friction between the rotor and stator can generate enough heat to damage the rotor if the pump is not lubricated and cooled by the process fluid. Conventional wisdom dictates that this type of pump will overheat if it pumps only gas, with no liquid in the process fluid. If a progressing cavity pump is used to boost the output from a wet gas well, it could potentially be damaged if the well's output is too dry for an extended period of time. This project seeks to determine how a progressing cavity pump behaves when operating at gas volume fractions between 0.90 and 0.98. A progressing cavity pump manufactured by seepex, model no. BN 130-12, is tested at half and full speed using air-water mixtures with gas volume fractions of 0.90, 0.92, 0.94, 0.96, and 0.98. The pump's inlet and outlet conditions are controlled to produce suction pressures of 15, 30, and 45 psi and outlet pressures 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 psi higher than the inlet pressure. A series of thermocouples, pressure transducers, and turbine flow meters measures the pump's inlet and outlet conditions, the flow rates of water and air entering the pump, and pressures and temperatures at four positions within the pump's stator. Over all test conditions, the maximum recorded temperature of the pump stator did not exceed the maximum safe rubber temperature specified by the manufacturer. The pump’s flow rate is independent of both the fluid's gas volume fraction and the pressure difference across the pump, but it increases slightly with the pump's suction pressure. The pump's mechanical load, however, is dependent only on the pressure difference across the pump and increases linearly with that parameter. Pressure measurements within the stator demonstrated that the leakage between the pump's cavities increases with the fluids gas volume fraction, indicating that liquid inside the pump improves its sealing capability. However, those same measurements failed to detect any appreciable leakage between the two pressure taps nearest the pump's inlet. This last observation suggests that the pump could be shortened by as much as 25 percent without losing any performance in the range of tested conditions; shortening the pump should increase its efficiency by decreasing its frictional mechanical load.

Glier, Michael W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluation of Thermal Zero Liquid Discharge Treatment Technologies for Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to identify and update key details of zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management systems currently operating at U.S. gas-fired combined cycle generating stations (CC). The study focused on not only the technologies applied, but also on the advantages and shortcomings of the various processes and summarized the lessons learned from the operating systems. Most ZLD's were found to employ one of four different types of water pretreatment process assemblies consisting of the following:...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

SciTech Connect

This project has documented and demonstrated the feasibility of technologies and operational choices for companies who operate the large installed fleet of integral engine compressors in pipeline service. Continued operations of this fleet is required to meet the projected growth of the U.S. gas market. Applying project results will meet the goals of the DOE-NETL Natural Gas Infrastructure program to enhance integrity, extend life, improve efficiency, and increase capacity, while managing NOx emissions. These benefits will translate into lower cost, more reliable gas transmission, and options for increasing deliverability from the existing infrastructure on high demand days. The power cylinders on large bore slow-speed integral engine/compressors do not in general combust equally. Variations in cylinder pressure between power cylinders occur cycle-to-cycle. These variations affect both individual cylinder performance and unit average performance. The magnitude of the variations in power cylinder combustion is dependent on a variety of parameters, including air/fuel ratio. Large variations in cylinder performance and peak firing pressure can lead to detonation and misfires, both of which can be damaging to the unit. Reducing the variation in combustion pressure, and moving the high and low performing cylinders closer to the mean is the goal of engine balancing. The benefit of improving the state of the engine ''balance'' is a small reduction in heat rate and a significant reduction in both crankshaft strain and emissions. A new method invented during the course of this project is combustion pressure ratio (CPR) balancing. This method is more effective than current methods because it naturally accounts for differences in compression pressure, which results from cylinder-to-cylinder differences in the amount of air flowing through the inlet ports and trapped at port closure. It also helps avoid compensation for low compression pressure by the addition of excess fuel to achieve equalizing peak firing pressure, even if some of the compression pressure differences are attributed to differences in cylinder and piston geometry, clearance, and kinematics. The combination of high-pressure fuel injection and turbocharging should produce better mixing of fuel and air in lean mixtures. Test results documented modest improvements in heat rate and efficiency and significant improvements in emissions. The feasibility of a closed-loop control of waste-gate setting, which will maintain an equivalence ratio set point, has been demonstrated. This capability allows more direct tuning to enhance combustion stability, heat rate, or emissions. The project has documented the strong dependence of heat rate on load. The feasibility of directly measuring power and torque using the GMRC Rod Load Monitor (RLM) has been demonstrated. This capability helps to optimize heat rate while avoiding overload. The crankshaft Strain Data Capture Module (SDCM) has shown the sensitivity to changes in operating conditions and how they influence crankshaft bending strain. The results indicate that: balancing reduces the frequency of high-strain excursions, advanced timing directly increases crankshaft dynamic strain, reduced speed directly reduces strain, and high-pressure fuel injection reduces crankshaft strain slightly. The project demonstrated that when the timing is advanced, the heat rate is reduced, and when the timing is retarded, the heat rate is increased. One reason why timing is not advanced as much as it might be is the potential for detonation on hot days. A low-cost knock detector was demonstrated that allowed active control to use timing to allow the heat rate benefit to be realized safely. High flow resistance losses in the pulsation control systems installed on some compressors have been shown to hurt efficiency of both compressor and engine/compressor system. Improved pulsation control systems have the potential to recover almost 10% of available engine power. Integrity enhancements and reduced component failure probability will enhance aggregate

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing is essential for producing gas and oil at an economic rate from low permeability sands. Most fracturing treatments use water and polymers with a gelling agent as a fracturing fluid. The water is held in the small pore spaces by capillary pressure and is not recovered when drawdown pressures are low. The un-recovered water leaves a water saturated zone around the fracture face that stops the flow of gas into the fracture. This is a particularly acute problem in low permeability formations where capillary pressures are high. Depletion (lower reservoir pressures) causes a limitation on the drawdown pressure that can be applied. A hydraulic fracturing process can be energized by the addition of a compressible, sometimes soluble, gas phase into the treatment fluid. When the well is produced, the energized fluid expands and gas comes out of solution. Energizing the fluid creates high gas saturation in the invaded zone, thereby facilitating gas flowback. A new compositional hydraulic fracturing model has been created (EFRAC). This is the first model to include changes in composition, temperature, and phase behavior of the fluid inside the fracture. An equation of state is used to evaluate the phase behavior of the fluid. These compositional effects are coupled with the fluid rheology, proppant transport, and mechanics of fracture growth to create a general model for fracture creation when energized fluids are used. In addition to the fracture propagation model, we have also introduced another new model for hydraulically fractured well productivity. This is the first and only model that takes into account both finite fracture conductivity and damage in the invaded zone in a simple analytical way. EFRAC was successfully used to simulate several fracture treatments in a gas field in South Texas. Based on production estimates, energized fluids may be required when drawdown pressures are smaller than the capillary forces in the formation. For this field, the minimum CO{sub 2} gas quality (volume % of gas) recommended is 30% for moderate differences between fracture and reservoir pressures (2900 psi reservoir, 5300 psi fracture). The minimum quality is reduced to 20% when the difference between pressures is larger, resulting in additional gas expansion in the invaded zone. Inlet fluid temperature, flow rate, and base viscosity did not have a large impact on fracture production. Finally, every stage of the fracturing treatment should be energized with a gas component to ensure high gas saturation in the invaded zone. A second, more general, sensitivity study was conducted. Simulations show that CO{sub 2} outperforms N{sub 2} as a fluid component because it has higher solubility in water at fracturing temperatures and pressures. In fact, all gas components with higher solubility in water will increase the fluid's ability to reduce damage in the invaded zone. Adding methanol to the fracturing solution can increase the solubility of CO{sub 2}. N{sub 2} should only be used if the gas leaks-off either during the creation of the fracture or during closure, resulting in gas going into the invaded zone. Experimental data is needed to determine if the gas phase leaks-off during the creation of the fracture. Simulations show that the bubbles in a fluid traveling across the face of a porous medium are not likely to attach to the surface of the rock, the filter cake, or penetrate far into the porous medium. In summary, this research has created the first compositional fracturing simulator, a useful tool to aid in energized fracture design. We have made several important and original conclusions about the best practices when using energized fluids in tight gas sands. The models and tools presented here may be used in the future to predict behavior of any multi-phase or multi-component fracturing fluid system.

Mukul Sharma; Kyle Friehauf

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on these systems. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for these areas of their scrubber system.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Experimental Evaluation of SI Engine Operation Supplemented by Hydrogen Rich Gas from a Compact Plasma Boosted Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency. Micro plasmatron fuel converters can be used for onboard generation of hydrogen-rich gas by partial oxidation of a wide range of fuels. These plasma-boosted microreformers are compact, rugged, and provide rapid response. With hydrogen supplement to the main fuel, SI engines can run very lean resulting in a large reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions relative to stoichiometric combustion without a catalytic converter. This paper presents experimental results from a microplasmatron fuel converter operating under variable oxygen to carbon ratios. Tests have also been carried out to evaluate the effect of the addition of a microplasmatron fuel converter generated gas in a 1995 2.3-L four-cylinder SI production engine. The tests were performed with and without hydrogen-rich gas produced by the plasma boosted fuel converter with gasoline. A one hundred fold reduction in NO x due to very lean operation was obtained under certain conditions. An advantage of onboard plasma-boosted generation of hydrogen-rich gas is that it is used only when required and can be readily turned on and off. Substantial NO x reduction should also be obtainable by heavy exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) facilitated by use of hydrogen-rich gas with stoichiometric operation.

J. B. Green, Jr.; N. Domingo; J. M. E. Storey; R.M. Wagner; J.S. Armfield; L. Bromberg; D. R. Cohn; A. Rabinovich; N. Alexeev

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Commercialization of waste gob gas and methane produced in conjunction with coal mining operations. Final report, August 1992--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objectives of the project were to identify and evaluate existing processes for (1) using gas as a feedstock for production of marketable, value-added commodities, and (2) enriching contaminated gas to pipeline quality. The following gas conversion technologies were evaluated: (1) transformation to liquid fuels, (2) manufacture of methanol, (3) synthesis of mixed alcohols, and (4) conversion to ammonia and urea. All of these involved synthesis gas production prior to conversion to the desired end products. Most of the conversion technologies evaluated were found to be mature processes operating at a large scale. A drawback in all of the processes was the need to have a relatively pure feedstock, thereby requiring gas clean-up prior to conversion. Despite this requirement, the conversion technologies were preliminarily found to be marginally economic. However, the prohibitively high investment for a combined gas clean-up/conversion facility required that REI refocus the project to investigation of gas enrichment alternatives. Enrichment of a gas stream with only one contaminant is a relatively straightforward process (depending on the contaminant) using available technology. However, gob gas has a unique nature, being typically composed of from constituents. These components are: methane, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor. Each of the four contaminants may be separated from the methane using existing technologies that have varying degrees of complexity and compatibility. However, the operating and cost effectiveness of the combined system is dependent on careful integration of the clean-up processes. REI is pursuing Phase 2 of this project for demonstration of a waste gas enrichment facility using the approach described above. This is expected to result in the validation of the commercial and technical viability of the facility, and the refinement of design parameters.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Combined cycle electric power plant having a control system which enables dry steam generator operation during gas turbine operation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for a combined cycle electric power plant is described. It contains: at least one gas turbine including an exit through which heated exhaust gases pass; means for generating steam coupled to said gas turbine exit for transferring heat from the exhaust gases to a fluid passing through the steam generator; a steam turbine coupled to the steam generator and driven by the steam supplied thereby; means for generating electric power by the driving power of the turbines; condenser means for receiving and converting the spent steam from the steam turbine into condensate; and steam generating means comprising a low pressure storage tank, a first heat exchange tube, a boiler feedwater pump for directing fluid from a low pressure storage tank through the first heat exchange tube, a main storage drum, a second heat exchange tube, and a high pressure recirculation pump for directing fluid from the main storage pump through the second heat exchange tube. The control system monitors the temperature of the exhaust gas turbine gases as directed to the steam generator and deactuates the steam turbine when a predetermined temperature is exceeded.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1974-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas Supply  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Oil and Natural Gas Supply Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Additional Information Onsite operations and water quality testing of the...

255

Improving Model-Based Gas Turbine Fault Diagnosis Using Multi-Operating Point Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive gas turbine fault diagnosis system has been designed using a full nonlinear simulator developed in Turbotec company for the V94.2 industrial gas turbine manufactured by Siemens AG. The methods used for detection and isolation of faulty ... Keywords: monitoring, fault diagnosis, extended Kalman filter, gas turbine, simulator

Amin Salar; Seyed Mehrdad Hosseini; Behnam Rezaei Zangmolk; Ali Khaki Sedigh

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of a gas storage facility is characterized as a stochastic control problem, resulting in a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. In this paper, we present a semi-Lagrangian method for solving the HJB equation for a typical gas storage ... Keywords: HJB equation, gas storage, semi-Lagrangian, stochastic control, viscosity solution

Zhuliang Chen; Peter A. Forsyth

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Interdependencies of Electricity Markets with Gas Markets A Case Study of Transmission System Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amount of LNG imported will depend crucially on the development of the natural gas reserves in the region distribution companies, transmission companies, liquefied natural gas importers, and associate member companies and the Natural Gas markets and the conditions and influences on both markets. Load-growth influences the need

Rudnick, Hugh

258

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone Sediments for Uranium Remediation  

SciTech Connect

NH3 gas treatment of low water content sediments resulted in a significant decrease in aqueous and adsorbed uranium, which is attributed to incorporation into precipitates. Uranium associated with carbonates showed little change. Uranium associated with hydrous silicates such as Na-boltwoodite showed a significant decrease in mobility but no change in Na-boltwoodite concentration (by EXAFS/XANES), so is most likely caused by non-U precipitate coatings. Complex resistivity changes occurred in the sediment during NH3 and subsequent N2 gas injection, indicating ERT/IP could be used at field scale for injection monitoring.

Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Johnson, Timothy C.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Mark D.; Greenwood, William J.; Wallin, Erin L.; Bargar, John R.; Faurie, Danielle K.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE  

SciTech Connect

This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effects of operating damage of labyrinth seal on seal leakage and wheelspace hot gas ingress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The labyrinth seal is widely used in turbomachinery to minimize or control leakage between areas of different pressure. The present investigation numerically explored the effect of damage and wear of the labyrinth seal on the turbomachinery flow and temperature fields. Specifically, this work investigated: (1) the effect of rubgroove downstream wall angle on seal leakage, (2) the effect of tooth bending damage on the leakage, (3) the effect of tooth "����mushrooming"��� damage on seal leakage, and (4) the effect of rub-groove axial position and wall angle on gas turbine ingress heating. To facilitate grid generation, an unstructured grid generator named OpenCFD was also developed. The grid generator is written in C++ and generates hybrid grids consisting primarily of Cartesian cells. This investigation of labyrinth seal damage and wear was conducted using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) to simulate the flows. The high- Reynolds k - Model and the standard wall function were used to model the turbulence. STAR-CD was used to solve the equations, and the grids were generated using the new code OpenCFD. It was found that the damage and wear of the labyrinth seal have a significant effect on the leakage and temperature field, as well as on the flow pattern. The leakage increases significantly faster than the operating clearance increase from the wear. Further, the specific seal configuration resulting from the damage and wear was found to be important. For example, for pure-bending cases, it was found that the bending curvature and the percentage of tooth length that is bent are important, and that the mushroom radius and tooth bending are important for the mushrooming damage cases. When an abradable labyrinth seal was applied to a very large gas turbine wheelspace cavity, it was found that the rub-groove axial position, and to a smaller degree, rub-groove wall angle, alter the magnitude and distribution of the fluid temperature.

Xu, Jinming

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

An Integrated Framework for Gas Turbine Based Power Plant Operational Modeling and Optimization .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The deregulation of the electric power market introduced a strong element of competition. Power plant operators strive to develop advanced operational strategies to maximize the… (more)

Zhao, Yongjun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1986 Through 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water handling costs are a major factor in coal bed methane operating costs and partially account for the difference in operating costs. Items tracked

264

Expanding the operational envelope of compact cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid separators using a variable inlet-slot configuration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the numerous advantages associated with using compact cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid separators, particularly for upstream production operations, the lack of a full understanding of the complex hydrodynamic process taking place in it and its Â?unfamiliarityÂ? to oil field personnel has hindered its widespread use. The complexity associated with this technology is attributed to two limiting physical phenomena, liquid carry-over and gas carryunder. While a lot of work has been done to better understand and predict the liquid carry-over operational envelope, little or no information about methods capable of adequately predicting or characterizing the gas carry-under performance of such separators is available. Traditionally, to mitigate the gas carry-under phenomena, the use of complex control algorithms and systems has been employed. These systems make the technology expensive (as opposed to the potential cost reduction it promises) and impractical for realistic use in the oil field where reliability is of critical importance. A simpler solution, the use of changeable or adjustable inlet-slots that regulate the artificial gravity environment created in the separator, could significantly improve the gas carry-under performance of cylindrical cyclone separators. This research has focused primarily on the use of adjustable inlet-slots. Theoretical analysis and experimental data investigating the benefits of variable inlet geometry have been provided. This work lays the foundation or validation required to perform more tests on a field-scale version to verify the results presented here. A modular design of such a variable inlet-slot inletsection has the potential of simplifying the design and specifications of cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid separators. From the results of this investigation, it was found that the gas carry-under performance of a cylindrical cyclone gas/liquid separator could be improved considerably over a wider range of operating conditions by adjusting the size of the inlet-slots. This contradicts earlier reports of liquid carry-over improvement in separator performance. Also, for the first time, a simple method for theoretically analyzing the percent improvement in separator gas carry-under performance using the optimum g-force concept is presented. This method could be incorporated into design software for determining the slot-size configuration required for varying separator-operating conditions.

Uvwo, Ighofasan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Task 23 - background report on subsurface environmental issues relating to natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes information pertaining to environmental issues, toxicity, environmental transport, and fate of alkanolamines and glycols associated with natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Waste management associated with the operations is also discussed.

Sorensen, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Reducing Energy Consumption through Optimization of the Operating Conditions of the Gas Trunk Pipeline.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Gas supplying process for consumers needs sufficient share of energy for upstream, midstream and downstream purposes. In spite of a huge amount of great… (more)

Albutov, Alexey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

"1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "1. Rhode Island State Energy Partners","Gas","FPL Energy Operating Serv Inc",528 "2. Manchester Street","Gas","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",447 "3. Tiverton Power Plant","Gas","Tiverton Power Inc",250 "4. Ocean State Power II","Gas","Ocean State Power II",219 "4. Ocean State Power","Gas","Ocean State Power Co",219 "6. Pawtucket Power Associates","Gas","Pawtucket Power Associates LP",63 "7. Ridgewood Providence Power","Other Renewables","Ridgewood Power Management LLC",24 "8. Central Power Plant","Gas","State of Rhode Island",10

268

Gas turbine effects on integrated-gasification-combined-cycle power plant operations  

SciTech Connect

This study used detailed thermodynamic modeling procedures to assess the influence of different gas turbine characteristics and steam cycle conditions on the design and off-design performance of integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. IGCC plant simulation models for a base case plant with Texaco gasifiers and both radiant and convective syngas coolers were developed, and three different types of gas turbines were evaluated as well as non-reheat and reheat steam systems. Results indicated that improving the gas turbine heat rate significantly improves the heat rate of the IGCC power plant. In addition results indicated that using a reheat steam system with current gas turbines improves IGCC performance, though as gas turbine efficiency increases, the impact of using a reheat steam system decreases. Increasing gas turbine temperatures from 1985{degree}F to 2500{degree}F was also found to have the potential to reduce overall IGCC system heat rates by approximately 700 BTU/kWh. The methodologies and models developed for this work are extremely useful tools for investigating the impact of specific gas turbine and steam cycle conditions on the overall performance of IGCC power plants. Moreover, they can assist utilities during the preliminary engineering phase of an IGCC project in evaluating the cost effectiveness of using specific gas turbines and steam cycles in the overall plant design. 45 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Eustis, F.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). High Temperature Gasdynamics Lab.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximate the seasonality trend in the futures price data. Meanwhile, the table reveals a strong annual-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model) to solve the gas storage pricing problem, essentially a stochastic control problem, and conduct

Forsyth, Peter A.

270

Operating experience with gas-bearing circulators in a high-pressure helium loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure engineering test loop has been designed and constructed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for circulating helium through a test chamber at temperatures to 1000/sup 0/C. The purpose of this loop is to determine the thermal and structural performance of proposed components for the primary loops of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Five MW of power is available to provide the required gas temperature at the test chamber, and an air-cooled heat exchanger, rated at 4.4 MW, serves as a heat sink. This report contains results of tests performed on gas-bearing circulators.

Sanders, J.P.; Gat, Uri; Young, H.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

272

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water in well sites. This research has helped to develop a membrane process train for a mobile produced water treatment unit for treating oilfield produced brine for reuse. To design the process train, over 30 sets of combination tests at pilot laboratory scale were performed using pretreatment, microfiltration and nanofiltration processes. Membrane performance was selected based on high flux separation efficiency, high tolerance for solids and fluid treatments. Over 95 % solids rejection and greater than 80 % oil removal efficiency were obtained in all these tests. Process train (pre-treatment and membrane) performance was monitored by chemical analysis of permeate and models fitting experimental data for the process. From the results, hydrocarbon rejection was analyzed; total organic carbon rejection was 47.9 %, total carbon content averaged 37.3 % rejection and total inorganic carbon rejection was at 3.66 %. BTEX removal efficiency ranged from 0.98 % to 52.7 % with the progressive pretreatment methods of using cartridge filters. The nanofiltration membrane showed significant reduction in total dissolved solids and in both anionic and cationic species. The process train is seen to follow a sequence of treatment from cartridge and oil removal filter treatment to microfiltration treatment to ultrafiltration, followed by nanofiltration for the purpose of this research. Further research still needs to be done on to determine the kind of analytical test which will give real time feedback on effectiveness of filters. In summary, the process train developed by TAMU-GPRI possesses distinct advantages in treating oilfield produced brine using membrane technology. These advantages include high quality of permeate, reduced sludge and the possibility of total recycle water systems. The small space requirement, moderate capital costs and ease of operation associated with the use of the mobile unit membrane technology also makes it a very competitive alternative to conventional technologies.

Eboagwu, Uche

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

150 kW PEM Stationary Power Plant Operating on Natural Gas -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reformate. Insights gained from these studies will be applied towards designing a power plant, such as described above, that meets the following 2015 DOE targets: Operating...

276

Performance Analysis of a Natural Gas Gathering and Production System and Diagnosis of Operational Bottlenecks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maximum energy preservation of the transported fluid is a fundamental design criterion in pipeline networks, in order to curtail the maintenance and operating costs such… (more)

Krishnamurthy, Jayanth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Gri testing of SulFerox (trade name) for the direct treatment of high-pressure natural gas at NGPL`s Kermit, Texas site. Final report, April 1995  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour gas is vital to the natural gas industry. About 14% of gas reserves are sour, and 15% of gas produced requires sulfur removal. Direct treatment of high-pressure sour gas with liquid redox processes has potential to reduce sulfur emissions and costs compared to conventional amine/Claus/SCOT technologies. However, these potential benefits and operability have not been commercially proven. For these reasons, GRI funded a pilot unit project with Radian Corporation and with the assistance of Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America. SulFerox was the first of a series of technologies to be evaluated. ARI-LO-CAT II will be evaluated next.

McIntush, K.E.; Petrinec, B.J.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Integrated operation of a pressurized gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system and turbine simulator  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. This technology will ultimately be incorporated into advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at F conditions (2,350 F rotor inlet temperature) and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions of such a combustor. Testing of the GE HGCU system has been underway since December 1990. The two most recent tests, Test 5 and Test 6, represent the latest advancements in regenerator configuration, type of sorbent, and chloride control systems. Test 5 was based on the use of zinc titanate sorbent and included a revised regenerator configuration and a sodium bicarbonate injection system for chloride control. Test 6 incorporated the use of Z-Sorb, a chloride guard in the regenerator recycle loop, and further modifications to the regenerator internal configuration. This report describes the test conditions in detail and discusses the test results.

Bevan, S.; Najewicz, D.; Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.; Feitelberg, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Forward osmosis treatment of drilling mud and fracturing wastewater from oil and gas operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with different objectives (Plan-Neofluar 10�/0.30, Plan-Neofluar 40�/ 1.30 Oil, and Plan-Apochromat 63�/1.40 Oil-W, Burgath K-P, Oberthu¨r T, Tarkian M, Pfeiffer T. 2000. Unconventional PGE occurrences and PGE

280

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Smelting Exhaust Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a cost efficient capture of more valuable heat (higher exergy), heat exchangers should operate on the exhaust gases upstream of the gas treatment plants.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A semi-Lagrangian approach for natural gas storage valuation and optimal operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The valuation of a gas storage facility is characterized as a stochastic control problem, resulting in a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. In this paper, we present a semi-Lagrangian method for solving the HJB equation for a typical gas storage valuation problem. The method is able to handle a wide class of spot price models that exhibit mean-reverting, seasonality dynamics and price jumps. We develop fully implicit and Crank-Nicolson timestepping schemes based on a semi-Lagrangian approach and prove the convergence of fully implicit timestepping to the viscosity solution of the HJB equation. We show that fully implicit timestepping is equivalent to a discrete control strategy, which allows for a convenient interpretation of the optimal controls. The semi-Lagrangian approach avoids the nonlinear iterations required by an implicit finite difference method without requiring additional cost. Numerical experiments are presented for several variants of the basic scheme.

Zhuliang Chen; Peter A. Forsyth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Guidance Document for Kentucky's Oil and Gas Operators  

SciTech Connect

The accompanying report, manual and assimilated data represent the initial preparation for submission of an Application for Primacy under the Class II Underground Injection Control (UIC) program on behalf of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The purpose of this study was to identify deficiencies in Kentucky law and regulation that would prevent the Kentucky Division of Oil and Gas from receiving approval of primacy of the UIC program, currently under control of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Atlanta, Georgia.

Bender, Rick

2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

284

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cook Cook 1 , Gilles Guerin 1 , Stefan Mrozewski 1 , Timothy Collett 2 , & Ray Boswell 3 Walker Ridge 313 LWD Operations and Results Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II: 1 Borehole Research Group Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Palisades, NY 10964 E-mail: Cook: acook@ldeo.columbia.edu Guerin: guerin@ldeo.columbia.edu Mrozewski: stefan@ldeo.columbia.edu 3 National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 E-mail: ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov 2 US Geological Survey Denver Federal Center, MS-939 Box 25046 Denver, CO 80225 E-mail:

286

Improved safety through training for gas-handling operations at the ship-jetty interface  

SciTech Connect

Leith Nautical College has found that integrated training of both ship and dock personnel in LNG-cargo handling is beneficial to both groups of workers. Overlapping coursework alleviate much of the difficulties which emerge in implementing this approach. The use of computers and models to simulate loading and off-loading operation has been a valuable aid in training workers for maximum safety.

Mcquire, G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB) to cool process syngas. The gas enters satisfies all 3 design criteria. · Correlations relating our experimental results to a waste heat boiler

Demirel, Melik C.

288

Feasibility and Treatment of Oil and Gas Produced Water as a Medium for Nannochloropsis Salina cultivation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of value exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laur, Paul A. [Eldorado Biofuels; Visolay, Alfonz [VM Technologies

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

289

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

CARRO CA

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

,"U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Underground Storage",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" Total Underground Storage",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 2","Change in Working Gas from Same Period Previous Year",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_stor_sum_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_stor_sum_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 7:04:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Underground Storage"

291

Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of three terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. The products of the effort will be a series of technical reports detailing the study procedures, results, and conclusions which contribute to the transfer of technology to the scientific community, petroleum industry, and state and federal agencies.

Gettleson, David A

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Uinit Contractor Operational Readiness Review, June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Contractor Operational Readiness Review June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

293

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Uinit Contractor Operational Readiness Review, June 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contractor Contractor Operational Readiness Review June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

294

Plasma-chemical treatment of hydrogen sulfide in natural gas processing. Final report, May 1991--December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new process for the treatment of hydrogen sulfide waste that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology has been under development in Russia and the United States. Whereas the present waste-treatment technology, at best, only recovers sulfur, this novel process recovers both hydrogen and sulfur by dissociating hydrogen sulfide in a plasma by means of a microwave or radio-frequency reactor. A research project has been undertaken to determine the suitability of the plasma process in natural gas processing applications. The experiments tested acid-gas compositions with 30--65% carbon dioxide, 0--7% water, and 0--0.2% of a standard mixture of pipeline gas. The balance gas in all cases was hydrogen sulfide. The reactor pressure for the experiments was 50 torr, and the microwave power was 1.0 kW. Conversions of hydrogen sulfide ranged from 80 to 100%, while 35--50% of the carbon dioxide was converted to carbon monoxide. This conversion of carbon dioxide resulted in a loss of hydrogen production and an energy loss from a hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment perspective. Tests of a direct natural gas treatment concept showed that hydrocarbon losses were unacceptably high; consequently, the concept would not be economically viable.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Bioelectrochemical Treatment of Gaseous By-products - Energy ...  

Electricity or hydrogen can be reused for hydrotreatment processes; Operates by renewable means; Applications and Industries. Treatment of sulfide-containing gas streams;

296

Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IWTU Integrated Waste Treatment Unit LCO Limiting Condition for Operation LSS Life Safety Systems MSA Management Self-Assessment OFI Opportunity for Improvement OGC Off-Gas...

297

Post-test analysis of 20kW molten carbonate fuel cell stack operated on coal gas. Final report, August 1993--February 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 20kW carbonate fuel cell stack was operated with coal gas for the first time in the world. The stack was tested for a total of 4,000 hours, of which 3,900 hours of testing was conducted at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Incorporated, Plaquemine, Louisiana outdoor site. The operation was on either natural gas or coal gas and switched several times without any effects, demonstrating duel fuel capabilities. This test was conducted with 9142 kJ/m{sup 3} (245 Btu/cft) coal gas provided by a slipstream from Destec`s entrained flow, slagging, slurry-fed gasifier equipped with a cold gas cleanup subsystem. The stack generated up to 21 kW with this coal gas. Following completion of this test, the stack was brought to Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and a detailed post-test analysis was conducted to identify any effects of coal gas on cell components. This investigation has shown that the direct fuel cell (DFC) can be operated with properly cleaned and humidified coal-as, providing stable performance. The basic C direct fuel cell component materials are stable and display normal stability in presence of the coal gas. No effects of the coal-borne contaminants are apparent. Further cell testing at ERC 1 17, confirmed these findings.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved continued data analysis and report writing. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) was issued as a final report during the previous reporting period. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities included the preparation of the final report. There were no Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities to report. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.

300

Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office evaluation of feasibility studies for private sector treatment of alpha and TRU mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is currently storing a large quantity of alpha contaminated mixed low level waste which will require treatment prior to disposal. The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) recognized that current knowledge and funding were insufficient to directly pursue services for the requisite treatment. Therefore, it was decided that private sector studies would be funded to clarify cost, regulatory, technology, and contractual issues associated with procuring treatment services. This report analyzes the three private sector studies procured and recommends a path forward for DOE in procuring retrieval, assay, characterization, and treatment services for INEL transuranic and alpha contaminated mixed low level waste. This report was prepared by a team of subject matter experts from the INEL referred to as the DOE-ID Evaluation Team.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Design and operation of an inert gas facility for thermoelectric generator storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While the flight hardware is protected by design from the harsh environments of space, its in-air storage often requires special protection from contaminants such as dust, moisture and other gases. One of these components, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) which powers the missions, was deemed particularly vulnerable to pre-launch aging because the generators remain operational at core temperatures in excess of 1000 degrees centigrade throughout the storage period. Any oxygen permitted to enter the devices will react with thermally hot components, preferentially with molybdenum in the insulating foils, and with graphites to form CO/CO{sub 2} gases which are corrosive to the thermopile. It was important therefore to minimize the amount of oxygen which could enter, by either limiting the effective in-leakage areas on the generators themselves, or by reducing the relative amount of oxygen within the environment around the generators, or both. With the generators already assembled and procedures in place to assure minimal in-leakage in handling, the approach of choice was to provide a storage environment which contains significantly less oxygen than normal air. 2 refs.

Goebel, C.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Injection with seawater: problems in the operation of a seawater treatment plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir pressure elevation by means of water injection in the production formation is a technique that improves production efficiency. In offshore activities, seawater is available for injection, but it has a high level of solids in suspension and also ions and dissolved gases that may cause problems in the water injection system. Therefore, a seawater treatment plant is necessary for preparation of the injection water. The treatment system has the following components for physical treatment: colander, which prevents the intake of large objects to the system; filters, which include flocculation for coagulation means for the removal of microscopic particles that can pass through the colander; deaerator; and system controls.

Garbis, S.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Demonstration of the enrichment of medium quality gas from gob wells through interactive well operating practices. Final report, June--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane released to the atmosphere during coal mining operations is believed to contribute to global warming and represents a waste of a valuable energy resource. Commercial production of pipeline-quality gob well methane through wells drilled from the surface into the area above the gob can, if properly implemented, be the most effective means of reducing mine methane emissions. However, much of the gas produced from gob wells is vented because the quality of the gas is highly variable and is often below current natural gas pipeline specifications. Prior to the initiation of field-testing required to further understand the operational criteria for upgrading gob well gas, a preliminary evaluation and assessment was performed. An assessment of the methane gas in-place and producible methane resource at the Jim Walter Resources, Inc. No. 4 and No. 5 Mines established a potential 15-year supply of 60 billion cubic feet of mien methane from gob wells, satisfying the resource criteria for the test site. To understand the effect of operating conditions on gob gas quality, gob wells producing pipeline quality (i.e., < 96% hydrocarbons) gas at this site will be operated over a wide range of suction pressures. Parameters to be determined will include absolute methane quantity and methane concentration produced through the gob wells; working face, tailgate and bleeder entry methane levels in the mine; and the effect on the economics of production of gob wells at various levels of methane quality. Following this, a field demonstration will be initiated at a mine where commercial gob gas production has not been attempted. The guidelines established during the first phase of the project will be used to design the production program. The economic feasibility of various utilization options will also be tested based upon the information gathered during the first phase. 41 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

Blackburn, S.T.; Sanders, R.G.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.; Stevenson, J.W.; Mills, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 2. Alternatives for waste treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II of the five-volume report is devoted to the description of alternatives for waste treatment. The discussion is presented under the following section titles: fuel reprocessing modifications; high-level liquid waste solidification; treatment and immobilization of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; treatment of noncombustible solid wastes; treatment of combustible wastes; treatment of non-high-level liquid wastes; recovery of transuranics from non-high-level wastes; immobilization of miscellaneous non-high-level wastes; volatile radioisotope recovery and off-gas treatment; immobilization of volatile radioisotopes; retired facilities (decontamination and decommissioning); and, modification and use of selected fuel reprocessing wastes. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7F Unit in Peaking Operation: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Elect ric Power Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures to reduce power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. To assure the staying power of these turbines, EPRI launched a multi-year durability surveillance program. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis of a General Electric 7F unit in peaking operation.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

State of the art and emerging trends in operations and maintenance of offshore oil and gas production facilities: Some experiences and observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plant maintenance has been a discipline that has gradually evolved with the industrial revolution. For quite some time, it has been a "necessary evil" in production, manufacturing, and process settings. The changing business needs and industrial conditions ... Keywords: Maintenance, asset management, oil and gas operations, risk, technical integrity

Jayantha P. Liyanage

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Extreme wave events during hurricanes can seriously jeopardize the integrity and safety of offshore oil and gas operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Validation of wave forecast for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil and gas operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Validation of wave forecast for significant wave heights over the warm Gulf of Mexico water between 26 and 28 August, and became a category 5 hurricane by 1200 OF WAVES AND CURRENTS IN HURRICANE KATRINA BY DONG-PING WANG AND LIE-YAUW OEY FIG. 1. The Gulf of Mexico

310

TREATMENT TANK OFF-GAS TESTING FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this activity was to provide a bounding estimate of the volume of hydrogen gas generated during Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) of residual sludge remaining in a Type I or Type II treatment tank as well as to provide results independent of the sludge volume in the waste tank to be cleaned. Previous testing to support Chemical Cleaning was based on a 20:1 oxalic acid to sludge ratio. Hydrogen gas evolution is the primary safety concern. Sealed vessel coupon tests were performed to estimate the hydrogen generation rate due to corrosion of carbon steel by 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid. These tests determined the maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate, the rate at which the generation rate decays, and the total hydrogen generated. These values were quantified based on a small scale methodology similar to the one described in WSRC-STI-2007-00209, Rev. 0. The measured rates support identified Safety Class functions. The tests were performed with ASTM A285 Grade C carbon steel coupons. Bounding conditions were determined for the solution environment. The oxalic acid concentration was 2.5 wt.% and the test temperature was 75 C. The test solution was agitated and contained no sludge simulant. Duplicate tests were performed and showed excellent reproducibility for the hydrogen generation rate and total hydrogen generated. The results showed that the hydrogen generation rate was initially high, but decayed rapidly within a couple of days. A statistical model was developed to predict the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate as a function of exposure time by combining both sets of data. An upper bound on the maximum hydrogen generation rate was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound confidence limit for the hydrogen generation rate is represented by the following equation. ln (G{sub v}) = -8.22-0.0584 t + 0.0002 t{sup 2}. This equation should be utilized to estimate the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate per unit surface area, G{sub v}, at a given time, t. The units for G{sub v} and t are ft{sup 3}/ft{sup 2}/min and hours, respectively. The total volume of hydrogen gas generated during the test was calculated from the model equation. An upper bound on the total gas generated was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound limit on the total hydrogen generated during the 163 hour test was 0.332 ft{sup 3}/ft{sup 2}. The maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate for this scenario is greater than that previously measured in the 8 wt.% oxalic acid tests due to both the absence of sludge in the test (i.e., greater than 20:1 ratio of acid to sludge) and the use of polished coupons (vs. mill scale coupons). However, due to passivation of the carbon steel surface, the corrosion rate decays by an order of magnitude within the first three days of exposure such that the instantaneous hydrogen generation rates are less than that previously measure in the 8 wt.% oxalic acid tests. While the results of these tests are bounding, the conditions used in this study may not be representative of the ECC flowsheet, and the applicability of these results to the flowsheet should be evaluated for the following reasons: (1) The absence of sludge results in higher instantaneous hydrogen generation rates than when the sludge is present; and (2) Polished coupons do not represent the condition of the carbon steel interior of the tank, which are covered with mill scale. Based on lower instantaneous corrosion rates measured on mill scale coupons exposed to oxalic acid, lower instantaneous hydrogen generation rates are expected for the tank interior than measured on the polished coupons. Corrosion rates were determined from the coupon tests and also calculated from the measured hydrogen generation rates. Excellent agreement was achieved between the time averaged corrosion rate calculated from the hydrogen generation rates and the corrosion rates determined from the coupon tests. The corrosion rates were on the order of 18 to 28 mpy. Good agreement was also observed between the maximum instantaneo

Wiersma, B.

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

313

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

317

The effect of thermal treatment on the organization of copper and nickel nanoclusters synthesized from the gas phase  

SciTech Connect

The condensation of 85000 Cu or Ni atoms from the high-temperature gas phase has been simulated by molecular dynamics with the tight binding potential. The efect of the subsequent thermal treatment on the shape and structure of synthesized particles was studied by simulating their gradual heating in a range of 100-1200 K. Some tendencies are revealed that are characteristic of the influence of heat treatment on the nanoparticles synthesized from the gas phase. It is concluded that short-term heating leads to significant ordering of the internal structure in 70% of agglomerated nanoparticles with the predominant formation of spherical shapes. In order to explain this result, the main mechanisms of cluster formation from the gas phase have been analyzed and it is found that the agglomeration temperature plays the main role in the formation of clusters with unified shape and structure. This opens the fundamental possibility of obtaining Cu and Ni nanoclusters with preset size, shape, and structure and, hence, predictable physical properties.

Gafner, Yu. Ya., E-mail: ygafner@khsu.ru; Gafner, S. L.; Chepkasov, I. V. [Katanov Khakassian State University (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Testing fluidized bed incinerators for energy-efficient operation for the Southtowns Sewage Treatment Agency. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two methods for improving the energy efficiency of fluidized bed sludge incinerators were evaluated. The first method used paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents for municipal sludge instead of lime and ferric chloride. Automatic control of the incinerator was the second method evaluated for energy savings. To evaluate the use of paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents, varying quantities of paper pulp were added to the liquid sludge to determine the optimal sludge-to-paper pulp ratio. The effect of the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge on plant operations also was evaluated. When compared to sludge conditioned with lime and ferric chloride, the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge had similar cake release and feed characteristics, higher BTU values for the dry sludge solids, required less auxiliary fuel for incineration, and generated less ash for disposal. The paper pulp and polymer did not have any appreciable negative effects on the operation of the wastewater treatment plant. It was estimated that processing and incinerating the sludge conditioned with paper pulp and polymer resulted in a cost savings of up to $91.73 per dry ton of activated sludge solids. To evaluate the effect of automatic control, all the incinerator operating parameters including air flow rates, fuel oil feed rates, and sludge feed rates, were automatically monitored and controlled to minimize auxiliary fuel oil use and to keep the incinerator running at optimal conditions. Although effective, the estimated cost savings for automatic control of the incinerator were small.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

Maston, V.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A UNIFIED MONTE CARLO TREATMENT OF GAS-GRAIN CHEMISTRY FOR LARGE REACTION NETWORKS. II. A MULTIPHASE GAS-SURFACE-LAYERED BULK MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The observed gas-phase molecular inventory of hot cores is believed to be significantly impacted by the products of chemistry in interstellar ices. In this study, we report the construction of a full macroscopic Monte Carlo model of both the gas-phase chemistry and the chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. Our model treats icy grain mantles in a layer-by-layer manner, which incorporates laboratory data on ice desorption correctly. The ice treatment includes a distinction between a reactive ice surface and an inert bulk. The treatment also distinguishes between zeroth- and first-order desorption, and includes the entrapment of volatile species in more refractory ice mantles. We apply the model to the investigation of the chemistry in hot cores, in which a thick ice mantle built up during the previous cold phase of protostellar evolution undergoes surface reactions and is eventually evaporated. For the first time, the impact of a detailed multilayer approach to grain mantle formation on the warm-up chemistry is explored. The use of a multilayer ice structure has a mixed impact on the abundances of organic species formed during the warm-up phase. For example, the abundance of gaseous HCOOCH{sub 3} is lower in the multilayer model than in previous grain models that do not distinguish between layers (so-called two phase models). Other gaseous organic species formed in the warm-up phase are affected slightly. Finally, we find that the entrapment of volatile species in water ice can explain the two-jump behavior of H{sub 2}CO previously found in observations of protostars.

Vasyunin, A. I. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Herbst, Eric, E-mail: anton.vasyunin@gmail.com, E-mail: eh2ef@virginia.edu [Departments of Chemistry, Astronomy, and Physics, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [Departments of Chemistry, Astronomy, and Physics, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

Speciated Engine-Out Organic Gas Emissions from a PFI-SI Engine Operating on Ethanol/Gasoline Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine-out HC emissions from a PFI spark ignition engine were measured using a gas chromatograph and a flame ionization detector (FID). Two port fuel injectors were used respectively for ethanol and gasoline so that the ...

Kar, Kenneth

324

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Startup and Operations of the Siemens 84.3A in Peaking Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures to reduce power generation costs have led domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines using leading-edge technology. To assure the staying power of these turbines, EPRI launched a multi-year Durability Surveillance Program in 1991 to monitor advanced industrial gas turbines currently produced by major turbine manufacturers. This report discusses the startup and initial site testing of a new Siemens Model V84.3A combustion turbine at the Hawthorn Station op...

1997-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

Application of gas flotation and foam separation for the treatment of tar-sand wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of air flotation and foam separation for the treatment of tar sand, steam generation waste waters collected following an in-situ experiment in Vernal, Utah. It was found that the process waters were not amenable to treatment by means of polymer-aided air flotation or foam separation. Suspended solids were readily removed by the process, but dissolved organic substances were not affected significantly.

Boardman, G.D.; Nolan, B.T.; VanLeigh, L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A NOVEL CONTINUOUS-FLOW REACTOR FOR GAS HYDRATE Patricia Taboada-Serrano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane­produced water treatment, storage and transportation of natural gas, and gas separations of the guest gas, and by the regulation of operating parameters such as pressure, temperature, reactant ratios natural gas produced water management alternatives in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin

Pennycook, Steve

327

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to receive KOP material, enhances heat conduction, and functions as a heat source and sink during drying operations. This use of the copper insert represents a significant change to the thermal model compared to that used for the fuel calculations. A number of cases were run representing a spectrum of normal and upset conditions for the drying process. Dozens of cases have been run on cold vacuum drying of fuel MCOs. Analysis of these previous calculations identified four cases that provide a solid basis for judgments on the behavior of MCO in drying operations. These four cases are: (1) Normal Process; (2) Degraded vacuum pumping; (3) Open MCO with loss of annulus water; and (4) Cool down after vacuum drying. The four cases were run for two sets of input parameters for KOP MCOs: (1) a set of parameters drawn from safety basis values from the technical data book and (2) a sensitivity set using parameters selected to evaluate the impact of lower void volume and smaller particle size on MCO behavior. Results of the calculations for the drying phase cases are shown in Table ES-2. Cases using data book safety basis values showed dry out in 9.7 hours and heat rejection sufficient to hold temperature rise to less than 25 C. Sensitivity cases which included unrealistically small particle sizes and corresponding high reactive surface area showed higher temperature increases that were limited by water consumption. In this document and in the attachment (Apthorpe, R. and M.G. Plys, 2010) cases using Technical Databook safety basis values are referred to as nominal cases. In future calculations such cases will be called safety basis cases. Also in these documents cases using parameters that are less favorable to acceptable performance than databook safety values are referred to as safety cases. In future calculations such cases will be called sensitivity cases or sensitivity evaluations Calculations to be performed in support of the detailed design and formal safety basis documentation will expand the calculations presented in this document to include: additional features of th

SWENSON JA; CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; PLYS MG

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

Performance Evaluation of a Radial Deionization System for Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed effluent limitation guidelines for steam electric power generating units could affect not only how power plants use water but also how they discharge it. The revised guidelines propose discharge limits for selenium, mercury, arsenic, and nitrite/nitrate in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Final rule approval is expected by the middle of 2014. Additional regulation of these contaminants and other constituents may occur through ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

329

Creation of Exotic Features in Metal Oxides by Surface Treatment for Enhanced Gas Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

followed by oxidation in a well-defined pO2 regime near the M-MOx proximity line by a suitable buffer gas Model. Fig. 4. Thermodynamic criteria for several M/MOx coexistence and practical pO2 regimes for phase as a function of temperature for several M-MOx pairs. By manipulating the ambient pO2 across these lines, one

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

330

Evaluation of operating characteristics for a chabazite zeolite system for treatment of process wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory and pilot-scale testing were performed for development and design of a chabazite zeolite ion-exchange system to replace existing treatment systems at the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process wastewater treatment systems at ORNL need upgrading to improve efficiency, reduce waste generation, and remove greater quantities of contaminants from the wastewater. Previous study indicated that replacement of the existing PWTP systems with an ion-exchange system using chabazite zeolite will satisfy these upgrade objectives. Pilot-scale testing of the zeolite system was performed using a commercially available ion-exchange system to evaluate physical operating characteristics and to validate smaller-scale column test results. Results of this test program indicate that (1) spent zeolite can be sluiced easily and completely from a commercially designed vessel, (2) clarification followed by granular anthracite prefilters is adequate pretreatment for the zeolite system, and (3) the length of the mass transfer zone was comparable with that obtained in smaller-scale column tests. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the loading capacity of the zeolite for selected heavy metals. These test results indicated fairly effective removal of silver, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc from simple water solutions. Heavy-metals data collected during pilot-scale testing of actual wastewater indicated marginal removal of iron, copper, and zinc. Reduced effectiveness for other heavy metals during pilot testing can be attributed to the presence of interfering cations and the relatively short zeolite/wastewater contact time. Flocculating agents (polyelectrolytes) were tested for pretreatment of wastewater prior to the zeolite flow-through column system. Several commercially available polyelectrolytes were effective in flocculation and settling of suspended solids in process wastewater.

Kent, T.E.; Perona, J.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Taylor, P.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”of Natural gas testing LANDFILL GAS COMPOSITION Tapping into

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Operating Procedures and Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The principal operating variables are: Distance from inner cone of oxy-fuel gas flames or from air-fuel

334

Optimal fracture treatment design for dry gas wells maximizes well performance in the presence of non-Darcy flow effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a methodology based on Proppant Number approach for optimal fracture treatment design of natural gas wells considering non-Darcy flow effects in the design process. Closure stress is taken into account, by default, because it is the first factor decreasing propped pack permeability at in-situ conditions. Gel damage was also considered in order to evaluate the impact of incorporating more damaging factors on ultimate well performance and optimal geometry. Effective fracture permeability and optimal fracture geometry are calculated through an iterative process. This approach was implemented in a spreadsheet. Non-Darcy flow is described by the ? factor. All ? factor correlations available in the literature were evaluated. It is recommended to use the correlation developed specifically for the given type of proppant and mesh size, if available. Otherwise, the Pursell et al. or the Martins et al. equations are recommended as across the board reliable correlations for predicting non-Darcy flow effects in the propped pack. The proposed methodology was implemented in the design of 11 fracture treatments of 3 natural tight gas wells in South Texas. Results show that optimal fracture design might increase expected production in 9.64 MMscf with respect to design that assumes Darcy flow through the propped pack. The basic finding is that for a given amount of proppant shorter and wider fractures compensate the non-Darcy and/or gel damage effect. Dynamic programming technique was implemented in design of multistage fractures for one of the wells under study for maximizing total gas production. Results show it is a powerful and simple technique for this application. It is recommended to expand its use in multistage fracture designs.

Lopez Hernandez, Henry De Jesus

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hydrogen production from food wastes and gas post-treatment by CO{sub 2} adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dark fermentation process of food wastes was studied over an extended period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreasing the HRT of the process negatively affected the specific gas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of CO{sub 2} was successfully attained using a biomass type activated carbon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2} concentration in the range of 85-95% was obtained for the treated gas-stream. - Abstract: The production of H{sub 2} by biological means, although still far from being a commercially viable proposition, offers great promise for the future. Purification of the biogas obtained may lead to the production of highly concentrated H{sub 2} streams appropriate for industrial application. This research work evaluates the dark fermentation of food wastes and assesses the possibility of adsorbing CO{sub 2} from the gas stream by means of a low cost biomass-based adsorbent. The reactor used was a completely stirred tank reactor run at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) while the concentration of solids of the feeding stream was kept constant. The results obtained demonstrate that the H{sub 2} yields from the fermentation of food wastes were affected by modifications in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) due to incomplete hydrolysis. The decrease in the duration of fermentation had a negative effect on the conversion of the substrate into soluble products. This resulted in a lower amount of soluble substrate being available for metabolisation by H{sub 2} producing microflora leading to a reduction in specific H{sub 2} production. Adsorption of CO{sub 2} from a gas stream generated from the dark fermentation process was successfully carried out. The data obtained demonstrate that the column filled with biomass-derived activated carbon resulted in a high degree of hydrogen purification. Co-adsorption of H{sub 2}S onto the activated carbon also took place, there being no evidence of H{sub 2}S present in the bio-H{sub 2} exiting the column. Nevertheless, the concentration of H{sub 2}S was very low, and this co-adsorption did not affect the CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the activated carbon.

Redondas, V. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Leon, IRENA-ESTIA, Avda. de Portugal 41, Leon 24071 (Spain); Gomez, X., E-mail: xagomb@unileon.es [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Leon, IRENA-ESTIA, Avda. de Portugal 41, Leon 24071 (Spain); Garcia, S.; Pevida, C.; Rubiera, F. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Moran, A. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Leon, IRENA-ESTIA, Avda. de Portugal 41, Leon 24071 (Spain); Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

Chmielewski, Andrzej G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); University of technology, faculty of Process and Chemical Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Licki, Janusz [Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk (Poland)

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs Owned, 2008 . The operator of an oil or gas field is the company responsible for the field’s ...

338

In situ parametric study of alkali release in pulverized coal combustion: Effects of operating conditions and gas composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work concerns a parametric study of alkali release in a lab-scale, pulverized coal combustor (drop tube reactor) at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were made at steady reactor conditions using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF) and with direct optical access to the flue gas pipe. In this way, absolute gas-phase alkali species could be determined in situ, continuously, with sub-ppb sensitivity, directly in the flue gas. A hard coal was fired in the range 1000-1300{sup o}C, for residence times in the range 3-5 s and for air numbers {lambda} (air/fuel ratios) from 1.15 to 1.50. In addition, the amount of chlorine, water vapor and sulfur, respectively, was increased in known amounts by controlled dosing of HCl, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} into the combustion gas to determine effects of these components on release or capture of the alkali species. The experimental results are also compared with values calculated using ash/fuel analyses and sequential extraction to obtain a fuller picture of alkali release in pulverized fuel combustion. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

H. Schuermann; P.B. Monkhouse; S. Unterberger; K.R.G. Hein [Universitaet Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany). Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Dampfkesselwesen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Controlling fuel and diluent gas flow for a diesel engine operating in the fuel rich low-temperature-combustion mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flow of a diluent gas supplied to a motoring engine was controlled at a diluent to air mass flow ratios of 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. This arrangement was a significant set up for running the engine in the Low-Temperature ...

Lopez, David M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Department of Energy electric and hybrid vehicle site operator program at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company continues to expand an EV program that addresses the following: vehicle development and demonstration; vehicle technology assessment; infrastructure evaluation; participation in EV organizations; and meetings and events. This report highlights PG & E`s activities in each of these areas.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Pilot Study for the Extraction and Treatment of Groundwater From a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study of groundwater remediation at a former MGP site. The project included hydrogeologic investigations, bench- and pilot-scale treatability studies, and a cost analysis. The report documents influent and effluent levels of contaminants in groundwaters classified as high-strength, medium-strength, and low-strength, depending on the degree of contamination. Detailed descriptions of the treatment systems and practical observations are also included.

1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

Test results from the GA technologies engineering-scale off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect

One method for reducing the volume of HTGR fuel prior to reprocessing or spent fuel storage is to crush and burn the graphite fuel elements. The burner off-gas (BOG) contains radioactive components, principally H-3, C-14, Kr-85, I-129, and Rn-220, as well as chemical forms such as CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, and SO/sub 2/. The BOG system employs components designed to remove these constitutents. Test results are reported for the iodine and SO/sub 2/ adsorbers and the CO/HT oxidizer. Silver-based iodine adsorbents were found to catalyze the premature conversion of CO to CO/sub 2/. Subsequent tests showed that iodine removal could not be performed downstream of the CO/HT oxidizer since iodine in the BOG system rapidly deactivated the Pt-coated alumina CO catalyst. Lead-exchanged zeolite (PbX) was found to be an acceptable alternative for removing iodine from BOG without CO conversion. Intermittent and steady-state tests of the pilot-plant SO/sub 2/ removal unit containing sodium-exchanged zeolite (NaX) demonstrated that decontamination factors greater than or equal to 100 could be maintained for up to 50 h. In a reprocessing flowsheet, the solid product from the burners is dissolved in nitric or Thorex acid. The dissolver off-gas (DOG) contains radioactive components H-3, Kr-85, I-129, Rn-220 plus chemical forms such as nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/). In the pilot-scale system at GA, iodine is removed from the DOG by adsorption. Tests of iodine removal have been conducted using either silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) or AgNO/sub 3/-impregnated silica gel (AC-6120). Although each sorbent performed well in the presence of NO/sub x/, the silica gel adsorbent proved more efficient in silver utilization and, thus, more cost effective.

Jensen, D.D.; Olguin, L.J.; Wilbourn, R.G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs? Gas pipelines attract substantial reseach to improve safety and cut costs. They operate ...

344

Alaska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Underground Base Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Base...

345

Alaska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Underground Working Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Working...

346

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Integrated Operation of INL HYTEST System and High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Synthetic Natural Gas Production  

SciTech Connect

The primary feedstock for synthetic fuel production is syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Current hydrogen production technologies rely upon fossil fuels and produce significant quantities of greenhouse gases as a byproduct. This is not a sustainable means of satisfying future hydrogen demands, given the current projections for conventional world oil production and future targets for carbon emissions. For the past six years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been investigating the use of high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to produce the hydrogen feedstock required for synthetic fuel production. High-temperature electrolysis water-splitting technology, combined with non-carbon-emitting energy sources, can provide a sustainable, environmentally-friendly means of large-scale hydrogen production. Additionally, laboratory facilities are being developed at the INL for testing hybrid energy systems composed of several tightly-coupled chemical processes (HYTEST program). The first such test involved the coupling of HTSE, CO2 separation membrane, reverse shift reaction, and methanation reaction to demonstrate synthetic natural gas production from a feedstock of water and either CO or a simulated flue gas containing CO2. This paper will introduce the initial HTSE and HYTEST testing facilities, overall coupling of the technologies, testing results, and future plans.

Carl Marcel Stoots; Lee Shunn; James O'Brien

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pilot-Scale and Full-Scale Evaluation of Treatment Technologies for the Removal of Mercury and Selenium in Flue Gas Desulphurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overall evaluation of the various advanced treatment technologies that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has tested for removal of mercury and selenium from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water. EPRI conducted a literature survey followed by a preliminary laboratory-scale evaluation to screen promising technologies. For the technologies that were selected based on the success of laboratory-scale testing, EPRI worked with treatment vendors to further evaluate these techn...

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

A battery-operated, stabilized, high-energy pulsed electron gun for the production of rare gas excimers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the design of a new type of electron gun to be used for experiments of infrared emission spectroscopy of rare gas excimers. It is based on a filament heated by means of a pack of rechargeable batteries floated atop the high-voltage power supply. The filament current is controlled by a feedback circuit including a superluminescent diode decoupled from the high voltage by means of an optical fiber. Our experiment requires that the charge injection is pulsed and constant and stable in time. This electron gun can deliver several tens of nC per pulse of electrons of energy up to $100\\,$keV into the sample cell. This new design eliminates ripples in the emission current and ensures up to 12 hrs of stable performance.

Barcellan, L; Carugno, G; Galet, G; Galeazzi, G; Borghesani, A F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

AVESTAR® - Training - Combined Cycle Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exercise Startup Circulating Water System Startup Fuel Systems Draw vacuum in Condenser Start Gas Turbine (GT) and bring to rated speed on natural gas ITS operations to...

351

Microsoft PowerPoint - Microwave Off-gas srnlTechBriefp1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Off-Gas Treatment Microwave Off-Gas Treatment System at a glance  simple design  compact and portable  easy to operate  can be remotely operated  low cost, low maintenance  scalable for large and small volume operations  U.S. patent 6,534,754 The Microwave Off-Gas Treatment System uses microwave energy and high temperatures to treat off- gas emissions to reduce contaminants to acceptable or nondetectable levels. This allows the treated gaseous waste stream to be safety discharged to the atmosphere. New method Scientists at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), working with colleagues from the University of Florida (UF), have invented a unique system to treat off-gas emissions from safe discharge into the atmosphere. The compact and portable Microwave Off-Gas Treatment System is designed to

352

A battery-operated, stabilized, high-energy pulsed electron gun for the production of rare gas excimers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the design of a new type of hot-filament electron gun delivering fairly high current (a few hundreds of {mu} A) at high voltage (up to 100 kV) in continuous or pulsed mode. Its novel features are that the filament is heated by means of a pack of rechargeable batteries floated atop the high-voltage power supply in order to get rid of bulky isolation transformers, and that the filament current and, hence, the electron gun current, is controlled by a feedback circuit including a superluminescent diode decoupled from the high voltage by means of an optical fiber. This electron gun is intended for general purposes, although we have especially developed it to meet the needs of our experiment on the infrared emission spectroscopy of rare gas excimers. Our experiment requires that the charge injection into the sample is pulsed and constant and stable in time. The new electron gun can deliver several tens of nC per pulse of electrons of energy up to 100 keV into the sample cell. The new design also eliminates ripples in the emission current and ensures up to 12 h of stable performance.

Barcellan, L.; Carugno, G. [INFN Section, Padua (Italy); Berto, E.; Galet, G.; Galeazzi, G. [Department of Physics, University of Padua (Italy); Borghesani, A. F. [INFN Section, Padua (Italy); CNISM Unit, Department of Physics, University of Padua (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

356

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001 ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury: elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Tom Millar

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

359

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1992--February 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

During the first quarter of the above contract, all the elements of Task 1 were completed. The first quarterly report presented an overview of a wetland and its increasing use in industrial wastewater treatment. An idealized, reaction engineering description of wetlands was presented to demonstrate how the various processes that occur in a wetland can be modeled. Previous work on the use of wetlands to remove BOD, TSS, Phosphorus and Nitrogen was reviewed. Recent literature on the application of wetland technology to the treatment of petroleum-related wastewater was critically evaluated and an outline of the research plans for the first year was delineated. Further, our literature search (nominally completed under Task 1) unearthed more recent studies (some unpublished) and a summary was included in the second quarterly report. In the second quarterly report, results of our efforts on the construction of a laboratory-type wetland were also reported. Initial studies on the use of wetland amendments such as modified-clays and algae cells were presented and discussed. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+} and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland built as a part of this contract has been undertaken and these results are presented and discussed in this quarterly report. A number of studies on the design and preparation of modified-clays for the adsorption of Cr(VI) and {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) has been carried out during this quarter and these are also described and discussed in this report. The choice of {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) as an ionogenic organic compound was made on the basis of a recent personal communication to the Project Director that NA is a major contaminant in many oil and gas well wastewaters.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Stack gas treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hot stack gases transfer contained heat to a gravity flow of pebbles treated with a catalyst, cooled stacked gases and a sulfuric acid mist is withdrawn from the unit, and heat picked up by the pebbles is transferred to air for combustion or other process. The sulfuric acid (or sulfur, depending on the catalyst) is withdrawn in a recovery unit.

Reeves, Adam A. (P.O. Box 781, Rifle, CO 81650)

1977-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The operator of an oil or gas field is the company ... Operators in the United States are obligated to ... Reserves Production Reserves Production ...

364

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1993--March 24, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report, adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland (LW) was shown to be weak. On the other hand, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters (4), onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and CR(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Studies on the dynamics of uptake of phenol and NA by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were initiated and preliminary results indicated that both phenol and NA were sorbed onto components of LWs. A mass balance model has been developed to quantify the fate of phenol in LWs. The model is based on the postulate that the fate of phenol in LWs can be attributed to a combination of (1) evaporation of solute and solvent, (2) adsorption of phenol onto various components of LW and (3) its biodegradation, both in solution and at solid-liquid interface. As an initial approximation, the latter two processes have been lumped together and incorporated into the model as an unit operation. Both zero order and first order kinetics for the disappearance of phenol have been considered. Evaporative losses of water and phenol have also been taken into account and this model is presented and discussed in this quarterly report.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Permeability Gas Low Permeability Gas Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands DE-FC26-06NT42955 Goal The goal of this project is to develop methods and tools that can enable operators to design, optimize, and implement energized fracture treatments in a systematic way. The simulator that will result from this work would significantly expand the use and cost-effectiveness of energized fracs and improve their design and implementation in tight gas sands. Performer University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands account for 58 percent of the total proved natural gas reserves in the United States. As many of these tight gas sand basins mature, an increasing number of wells are being drilled or completed into nearly depleted reservoirs. This includes infill wells, recompletions, and field-extension wells. When these activities are carried out, the reservoir pressures encountered are not as high as the initial reservoir pressures. In these situations, where pressure drawdowns can be less than 2,000 psi, significant reductions in well productivity are observed, often due to water blocking and insufficient clean-up of fracture-fluid residues. In addition, many tight gas sand reservoirs display water sensitivity—owing to high clay content—and readily imbibe water due both to very high capillary pressures and low initial water saturations.

366

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulated Landfill Gas Intake Diagram STEADY STATE OPERATIONlandfill gas. Expanding the understanding of HCCI mode of engine operation

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

North Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators North Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

368

Alaska Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply &...

369

South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators South Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

370

New Jersey Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators New Jersey Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

371

North Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators North Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

372

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

373

South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators South Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

374

New Jersey Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators New Jersey Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage...

375

Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

376

South Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators South Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage...

377

North Carolina Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators North Carolina Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators Injections of Natural Gas into Storage...

378

Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico July 24, 2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Los Alamos Site Operations Proposed Pipeline Easement Environmental Assessment DOE OLASO July 24, 2002 iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND TERMS................................................................................................................vii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...................................................................................................................ix 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED................................................................................................................1

379

Performance Study on the Treatment of the vent gas of the Fermentation process of Compost by Biotrickling Filters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kitchen waste compositing plants emit odorous gas streams with sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds and other hydrocarbons. A pilot-scale biotrickling filter with a space of… (more)

shih, ya-ru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

Tao, Greg, G.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

H. R. 4564: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to provide a deduction and special net operating loss rules with respect to certain losses on domestic crude oil, to increase tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, to require the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to be filled with stripper well oil, and to eliminate certain restrictions on the sale of natural gas and on the use of natural gas and oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 10, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Secure Energy Supply Act of 1986 amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. Title I provides a deduction and special net operating loss treatment for certain losses on crude oil. Title II increases tariffs on petroleum and petroleum products, the revenues of which will cover authorized refunds. Title III provides that only stripper well oil or oil exchanged for stripper well oil will be used to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Title IV removes wellhead price controls and repeals Natural Gas Act jurisdiction over certain first sales of natural gas. Later titles repeal certain restrictions on the use of natural gas and petroleum, repeal incremental pricing requirements, and promote flexibility in rescheduling or marking down troubled loans. The bill was referred to the House Committees on Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Identifying technology barriers in adapting a state-of-the-art gas turbine for IGCC applications and an experimental investigation of air extraction schemes for IGCC operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Under contracted work with Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Clemson University, the prime contractor, and General Electric (GE) and CRSS, the subcontractors, made a comprehensive study in the first phase of research to investigate the technology barriers of integrating a coal gasification process with a hot gas cleanup scheme and the state-of-the-art industrial gas turbine, the GE MS-7001F. This effort focused on (1) establishing analytical tools necessary for modeling combustion phenomenon and emissions in gas turbine combustors operating on multiple species coal gas, (2) estimates the overall performance of the GE MS-7001F combined cycle plant, (3) evaluating material issues in the hot gas path, (4) examining the flow and temperature fields when air extraction takes place at both the compressor exit and at the manhole adjacent to the combustor, and (5) examining the combustion/cooling limitations of such a gas turbine by using 3-D numerical simulation of a MS-7001F combustor operated with gasified coal. In the second phase of this contract, a 35% cool flow model was built similar to GE`s MS-7001F gas turbine for mapping the flow region between the compressor exit and the expander inlet. The model included sufficient details, such as the combustor`s transition pieces, the fuel nozzles, and the supporting struts. Four cases were studied: the first with a base line flow field of a GE 7001F without air extraction; the second with a GE 7001F with air extraction; and the third and fourth with a GE 7001F using a Griffith diffuser to replace the straight wall diffuser and operating without air extraction and with extraction, respectively.

Yang, Tah-teh; Agrawal, A.K.; Kapat, J.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development of a tar decomposition model for application in a Chemical-Looping Reformer operated with raw gas from a biomass gasifier.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) represents one of the promising alternatives for biofuel manufacture. The transport sector is where SNG has been identified… (more)

Pestana, Maria Inês

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

385

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7FA Unit in Baseload Operation: Durability Surveillance at Florida Pow er & Lights Company's Martin Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures for reducing power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis in a multiyear project, launched in 1991, to assure the staying power of industrial gas turbines produced by major turbine manufacturers.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

388

TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Two gas storage fields were studied for this project. Overisel field, operated by Consumer's Energy, is located near the town of Holland, Michigan. Huntsman Storage Unit, operated by Kinder Morgan, is located in Cheyenne County, Nebraska near the town of Sidney. Wells in both fields experienced declining performance over several years of their annual injection/production cycle. In both fields, the presence of hydrocarbons, organic materials or production chemicals was suspected as the cause of progressive formation damage leading to the performance decline. Core specimens and several material samples were collected from these two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

Lawrence J. Pekot

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Coalbed Natural Gas Produced-Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead DE-FC26-05NT15551...

391

Flare-gas recovery success at Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect

It appears that some North American refining companies still cling to an old philosophy that flare gas recovery systems are unsafe, unreliable, uneconomic, or unnecessary. Shell Canada's recent experience with two modern systems has proven otherwise. Two of Shell Canada's refineries, at Sarnia, Ont., and Montreal East, Que., have now logged about 6 years' total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery units. The compression facilities in each utilize a two-stage reciprocating machine, one liquid seal drum per flare stack, and an automated load control strategy. The purpose was to recover the normal continuous flow of refinery flare gas for treatment and use in the refinery fuel gas system.

Allen, G.D.; Chan, H.H.; Wey, R.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

ends up in Clarington was delivered upstream. El Paso Natural Gas Pipeline issued an Emergency Critical Operating Condition Declaration for February 2 until further notice....

393

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

operational by April 1, 2010. Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company issued a notice of an emergency repair at its Compressor Station 827 near Alexandria, Louisiana. The pipeline...

394

Novel single stripper with side-draw to remove ammonia and sour gas simultaneously for coal-gasification wastewater treatment and the industrial implementation  

SciTech Connect

A large amount of wastewater is produced in the Lurgi coal-gasification process with the complex compounds carbon dioxide, ammonia, phenol, etc., which cause a serious environmental problem. In this paper, a novel stripper operated at elevated pressure is designed to improve the pretreatment process. In this technology, two noticeable improvements were established. First, the carbon dioxide and ammonia were removed simultaneously in a single stripper where sour gas (mainly carbon dioxide) is removed from the tower top and the ammonia vapor is drawn from the side and recovered by partial condensation. Second, the ammonia is removed before the phenol recovery to reduce the pH value of the subsequent extraction units, so as the phenol removal performance of the extraction is greatly improved. To ensure the operational efficiency, some key operational parameters are analyzed and optimized though simulation. It is shown that when the top temperature is kept at 40 C and the weight ratio of the side draw to the feed is above 9%, the elevated pressures can ensure the removal efficiency of NH{sub 3} and carbon dioxide and the desired purified water as the bottom product of the unit is obtained. A real industrial application demonstrates the attractiveness of the new technique: it removes 99.9% CO{sub 2} and 99.6% ammonia, compared to known techniques which remove 66.5% and 94.4%, respectively. As a result, the pH value of the wastewater is reduced from above 9 to below 7. This ensures that the phenol removal ratio is above 93% in the following extraction units. The operating cost is lower than that of known techniques, and the operation is simplified.

Feng, D.C.; Yu, Z.J.; Chen, Y.; Qian, Y. [South China University of Technology, Ghangzhou (China). School of Chemical Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Pot Gas Cooling Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... has been enormously increased by the suppliers of pot gas treatment plants, ... and Capillary Instabilities in Carbon-anode using Lattice Boltzmann Method.

396

Studies on operational and dynamic response characteristics of the potentiometric carbon dioxide gas-sensing probe by using a Teflon membrane  

SciTech Connect

The performance and dynamic response characteristics of the potentiometric carbon dioxide gas sensor with an alternative to the commercially available silicon rubber membrane are studied in this paper. This study was performed in the course to choose a low cost membrane and possibly to further optimize the time response of this sensor. The membrane used was a microporous Teflon membrane which is used in ammonia gas sensors. The results have shown that the CO[sub 2] gas-sensing probe with the Teflon membrane shows similar performance characteristics as the silicon rubber membrane, but improved stability with time. Convolution mathematics were also used to study the dynamic response characteristics of the gas sensor with the Teflon membrane and the results have shown that practically similar time constants are obtained as when a silicon rubber membrane is used. Therefore, the less costly membrane can replace the silicon rubber membrane when CO[sub 2] is being monitored and a gas-sensing probe can be constructed through this means, by using a Teflon membrane and a 1 mM NaHCO[sub 3]-100 mM NaCl internal filling solution. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Roditaki, A.; Nikolelis, D.P.; Papastathopoulos, D.S. (Univ. of Athens (Greece))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Operators: Roughly 14,000 Natural Gas: 252 Tcf (89% of U.S. Total) Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production,...

398

Beam lifetime and emittance growth in RHIC under normal operating conditions with the hydrogen gas jet, the cluster-jet and pellet targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The inelastic scattering of the beam and the residual gas molecules in RHIC could represent one of the limitations on the beam life time and emittance growth. This report covers the dominant central nuclear collisions influence on the beam lifetime and transverse emittance growth. The cross sections for the beam-gas electron radiative captures are an order of magnitude smaller. The capture cross sections include the radiative and non-radiative capture, and the capture from the electron-positron pair creation from the 'vacuum capture'.

Trbojevic, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Overview Intrastate natural gas pipelines operate within State borders and link natural gas producers to local markets and to the interstate pipeline network. Approximately 29 percent of the total miles of natural gas pipeline in the U.S. are intrastate pipelines. Although an intrastate pipeline system is defined as one that operates totally within a State, an intrastate pipeline company may have operations in more than one State. As long as these operations are separate, that is, they do not physically interconnect, they are considered intrastate, and are not jurisdictional to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). More than 90 intrastate natural gas pipelines operate in the lower-48 States.

400

GRI testing of ARI-LO-CAT II (trade name) for the direct treatment of high-pressure natural gas at NGPL`s Kermit, Texas site. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the GRI liquid redox pilot unit program is to gather data on the direct treatment of high-pressure natural gas using commercially-available liquid redox processes and emerging processes with good near-term potential to reduce sulfur recovery costs for the natural gas industry. ARI-LO-CAT II(Trademark) was the second technology tested as part of the program.

Holloway, C.S.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Trace Metals Determination in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are used on coal-fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions to air. While effective for this purpose, wet FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous blowdown stream that contains trace levels of metals adsorbed from flue gas. Power plant owners need to measure concentrations of these metals for purposes of process control, discharge monitoring, or design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. FGD water has proven to be a very difficult matrix to analyze a...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Drozdov, L. A., E-mail: lit@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V. [ZAO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A., E-mail: soburda@gmail.com [Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Utilization of natural gas in large-scale separation processes. Final report, September 1987-August 1988  

SciTech Connect

Several industrial separation processes were identified which could be operated in a cost-effective manner utilizing pipeline natural gas as a processing fluid. In one such process, natural gas stripping, hazardous materials are transferred from hazardous water to the natural gas phase. When the natural gas phase is later burned as fuel, the heating value is realized and hazardous materials are destroyed. The combination of extraction, natural gas stripping, and incineration may be used to remove and destroy hazardous material contained in soil. It is possible for this system to be portable so that it could be used for the treatment of contaminated soils at remote sites. Natural gas may also be used to flush hazardous materials from adsorbents and thus regenerate adsorption beds used to remove hazardous materials from water or gas streams. The regenerant gas stream, containing natural gas and hazardous materials, would be used as boiler fuel where the hazardous material would be destroyed.

Humphrey, J.L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA 7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA Summary This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enter into a contract with a licensed natural gas supplier in Washington State to construct, operate, and maintain a natural gas pipeline. The pipeline would deliver natural gas to support the Waste Treatment Plant and the 242-A Evaporator operations in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Douglas Chapin, NEPA Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550, MSIN A5-11 Richland, WA 99352 Documents Available for Download January 23, 2012 EIS-0467: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and

405

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, May 25, 1993-August 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland was shown to be weak. Secondly, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and Cr(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Uptake of NA by the soil component of the laboratory-type wetland was monitored as a function of pH. This quarterly report presents results from studies on the uptake of phenol and {beta}-naphthoic acid by laboratory-type wetlands designed and built during the earlier phases of this study. The uptake of phenol by the wetlands is quite rapid, and nearly complete in 50 hours, but it was also found that evaporative losses of phenol from the supernatant water during the same time period was considerable. On the other hand, {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) is sorbed quite slowly and there was no indication of evaporative losses in the case on NA.

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

PRISM 2.0: Personal Transportation Module of the U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) Model: A Guide to Operation and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The personal transportation/electric vehicle penetration module (Transportation Module) of the U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) integrated regional macroeconomic model is a structural economic model of personal vehicle purchase and driving behaviors that focuses on the adoption of electric vehicles. The module employs a representation of consumers’ demographics, existing vehicles, vehicle choices, and preferences for vehicle characteristics to model personal vehicle ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

OPTIMIZATION OF NATURAL GAS FIELD DEVELOPMENT USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Field development of natural gas reservoirs is one of the main aspects of exploration and production of natural gas for oil and gas operators. After… (more)

Olatunji, Adewale

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

411

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Electrochemical cell operation and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal control in fuel cell operation is affected through sensible heat of process gas by providing common input manifolding of the cell gas flow passage in communication with the cell electrolyte and an additional gas flow passage which is isolated from the cell electrolyte and in thermal communication with a heat-generating surface of the cell. Flow level in the cell gas flow passage is selected based on desired output electrical energy and flow level in the additional gas flow passage is selected in accordance with desired cell operating temperature.

Maru, Hansraj C. (Brookfield Center, CT)

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Authors: John and Deidre Boysen Venue:...

414

Lean-Burn Stationary Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine Operation with a Prototype Miniature Diode Side Pumped Passively Q-switched Laser Spark Plug  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet the ignition system needs of large bore lean burn stationary natural gas engines a laser diode side pumped passively Q-switched laser igniter was developed and used to ignite lean mixtures in a single cylinder research engine. The laser design was produced from previous work. The in-cylinder conditions and exhaust emissions produced by the miniaturized laser were compared to that produced by a laboratory scale commercial laser system used in prior engine testing. The miniaturized laser design as well as the combustion and emissions data for both laser systems was compared and discussed. It was determined that the two laser systems produced virtually identical combustion and emissions data.

McIntyre, D.L.; Woodruff, S.D.; McMillian, M.H.; Richardson, S.W.; Gautam, Mridul

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Problem of improving coke oven gas purification systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion of the problems of improving desulfurization processes of coke oven gas was presented. Of particular interest were control systems and increasing capacity of the coke ovens. Included in the discussion were the vacuum-carbonate and arsenic-soda sulfur removal systems. Problems involved with these systems were the number of treatment operations, the volume of the reagents used, and the operation of equipment for naphthalene and cyanide removal.

Goldin, I.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

JGI - Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations The Operations Department sees to it that JGI has the best possible facilities and support, ensuring that its operations are conducted in accordance with the...

417

Power Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Operations Outage Coordination Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning You are here: SN Home page > Power Operations Power Operations Western's Sierra Nevada Region...

418

Gas intrusion into SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

PLATO administers operator training  

SciTech Connect

Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is committed to an in-depth training program for substation operators. For the past two years, one important part of the training program has been a computer-based educational system with a CRT touch-response graphic display that is interactive with the trainee. This system, known as PLATO, reproduces a training situation so realistic that the operator becomes completely involved with the lesson. When used for pretraining prior to substation operating experience, it provides a hands-on insight into operating practices without jeopardizing personnel or equipment, or degrading customer service.

Buehner, R.E.

1979-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gas Utility Pipeline Tax (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All gas utilities, including any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as...

422

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's Engineering group has found a new site for the project at a Duke Energy gas processing plant in Milfay, Oklahoma.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability of the wells. The industry has been working on stimulation technology for more than 50 years, yet practices that are currently used may not always be optimum. Using information from the petroleum engineering literature, numerical and analytical simulators, surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various parameters such as the type of formation, the presence of natural fractures, reservoir properties, economics, and the experience of experts we have surveyed. This work provides a guide to operators concerning the selection of an appropriate type of fracture fluid for a specific set of conditions for a tight gas reservoir.

Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Compressed Air Management Program: A Performance Assessment Approach to Improving Industrial Compressed Air System Operation and Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Management Program (CAMP) provides Pacific Gas and Electric's (PG&E's) large industrial customers with measurement-based performance assessments of their compressed air systems. Under this program, the customer's system is inspected and both short-term, high resolution, and longer-term measurements are taken of power and pressure. These data are used in developing a system simulation based on the US DOE's AIRMaster+ computer model. Model results and professional judgment are used to identify a cost-effective strategy for improving the system. Recommendations are provided to the customer along with technical support for implementing these recommendations. After improvements are complete, the performance measurements are repeated so that PG&E and its customers can judge the effectiveness of the recommendations. The program uses a standardized toolkit (all off-the-shelf components) along with software developed exclusively for this application, to accomplish the required measurements and efficiently analyze and reduce the data for use in the AIRMaster+ model.

Qualmann, R. L.; Zeller, W.; Baker, M.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 121:569-operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATION

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

INEL Operable Unit 7-13 Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration options: INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Systems Analysis project  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Systems Analysis project is to identify and evaluate cradle-to-grave systems for the remediation of Transuranic (TRU)Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The BWID program will use the results of the BWID Systems Analysis in conjunction with identified Department of Energy (DOE) Complex buried waste needs to develop a long-term strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities throughout the DOE system. This report presents Buried Waste Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration option concepts in the form of block diagrams. These configuration options are: Retrieval/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; Retrieval/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; and Retrieval/Interim Storage/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment. Each option is presented as a complete end-to-end system.

Richardson, J.G.; Rudin, M.J.; O' Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Raivo, B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

NUCLEAR GAS ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study of the nuclear gas engine, consisting of a gas-cooled reactor directly coupled to a reciprocating engine, is presented. The principles of operation of the proposed gas engine are outlined and typical variations anre discussed. The nuclear gas engine is compared with other reciprocating engines and air compressors. A comparison between the ideal and actual cycles is made, with particular attention given to pumping, heat, and other losses to be expected. The applications and development of the nuclear gas engine are discussed. (W.D.M.)

Fraas, A.P.

1958-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

428

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

429

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

430

Dual Structure Turbine Disks Via Partial Immersion Heat Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

turbine disk forging. The method is termed partial immersion treatment. It includes ... to improve gas turbine operating efficiencies generally results in increased turbine inlet .... to aid in this manual advance. (Figure lb). ... A second Astroloy disk was ..... engineer. (prime contractor) was Mr. R. M. Gasior, of Cytemp Specialty.

431

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications: Environmental Monitoring Program. Volume 3, Appendix sections 8--14: Baseline Sampling Program report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains no text. It consists entirely of numerical data: Coke oven wastewater treatment performance; Ammonia still effluents to equalization tank; Stack gas analysis of coke oven batteries; CoaL consumption; Coke production; Supplemental OSHA employee exposure monitoring(hydrocarbons,ammonia, hydrogen sulfide); operating data; chemical products and coke oven gas production.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

432

Oklahoma Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Oklahoma Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

433

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Mississippi Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

434

Oil & Gas Broad Based Solicitation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operator Point of Contact Phone Email Heavy Oil Gas Flooding VSP Reservoir Characterization Iron Creek Energy Group and Nielson & Associates, Inc. Joe Sinner 3075272869...

435

Natural Gas Pipeline Safety (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states minimum safety standards for the transportation of natural gas by pipeline and reporting requirements for operators of pipelines.

436

Thermodynamic simulation of transfer of lead, cadmium, and zinc to the gas phase during oxidative and reductive thermal treatment of coals from some coal deposits of the Russian federation  

SciTech Connect

The results of thermodynamic study of the distribution of Pb, Cd, and Zn during the thermal processing of coals from the Kuznetsk and Moscow basins and the Berezovskoe coal deposit of the Kansk-Achinsk basin at different excess oxidant (air) factors and in an inert (argon) medium are presented. The equilibrium forms of compounds were revealed, and their concentrations in the gas and condensed phase were calculated. Trace elements get into the gas phase during the heat treatment of coals in both oxidizing and reducing media. Their most intense transfer to the gas phase takes place at a = 0.4. An increase in temperature enhances this process, and an increase in the ash content of coal decreased the extent of transfer. 9 refs., 10 tabs.

L.N. Lebedeva; L.A. Kost; E.G. Gorlov; E.V. Samuilov [FGUP Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant LAW Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis _Oct 21-31  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities Dates of Activity : 10/21/13 - 10/31/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) reviewed the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a

438

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Operations & Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

440

DOE-ID Operations Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offers a significant benefit to water-intensive industrial processes such as oil-gas fracking operations that use 3 to 5 million gallons of water per well (video at www.inl.gov...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas treatment operation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1-MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technologies group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The system has been installed in the field and initial startup activities have been completed. The system has not yet produced the flow rate required for continuous stable operation. NTE, the company hosting this test site/pilot plant, will drill additional wells to increase the inlet flow rate. The system is expected to be in full continuous operation by May 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

NUMERICAL STUDY OF CO-CURRENT WATER-DRY GAS FLOW IN GAS GATHERING SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The optimum operation of the surface production system is one of the key elements needed for the successful operation of natural gas well facilities, particularly… (more)

Fernandez Luengo, Juan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has started to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) continued to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

Chen, Shiaguo (Champaign, IL); Lu, Yonggi (Urbana, IL); Rostam-Abadi, Massoud (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

447