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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport and its infrastructure Coordinating Lead Authors:5 Transport and its infrastructure Chandler, K. , E. Eberts,5 Transport and its infrastructure Sausen, R. , I. Isaksen,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Transportation Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Infrastructure New Technologies * Potential need for dual-use casks * DOE should look toward industry & international communities for innovations * Industry unclear about delivery & receipt locations * Advances in physical & tracking technologies need to be factored in * Cost-benefit analysis of new technology Training & Dry Runs * Begin as soon as possible * Suggested order: #1-demonstrations, #2-training, #3-dry-runs * Don't re-invent the wheel- look at international programs * Allows DOE to test POC info/training * Standardization of training & materials * DOE should consider centralized training center * Use real equipment in dry- runs * Need for regionalized dry runs Packages * Full-scale Testing - Funds requested in 2003, potential use of

3

Natural Gas Transportation - Infrastructure Issues and Operational Trends  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report examines how well the current national natural gas pipeline network has been able to handle today's market demand for natural gas. In addition, it identifies those areas of the country where pipeline utilization is continuing to grow rapidly and where new pipeline capacity is needed or is planned over the next several years.

Information Center

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Infrastructure AND Sustainable Developmentnext two decades, urban infrastructure will be under immenseboth expansions in infrastructure that supports automobile

Boarnet, Marlon G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

Minnesota, University of

6

Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee...

7

Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Before the House Transportation and Infrastructure...

8

Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

9

Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report looks at the level of growth that occurred within the U.S. natural gas transportation network during 2004. In addition, it includes discussion and an analysis of recent gas pipeline development activities and an examination of additional projects proposed for completion over the next several years.

Information Center

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Market Impacts of Changing Natural Gas Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is in the midst of a multifaceted and rapid expansion of its natural gas supply infrastructure, spanning every segment of the industry from drilling and production to transportation, storage, and capabilities to import liquefied natural gas (LNG). This report takes stock of these many developments at a time of great change, pointing to their implications for the gas and electric industries.

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to promote use of natural gas Incentives to promote naturalincentives to moderate private car use, coal-based synfuels shifts to imported natural gas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and alternative transport fuels; • R&D outcomes in several areas, especially biomassprices and the economic viability of alternative transport fuels; • R&D outcomes in several areas, especially biomass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. OECD, 2004b: Current international shipping market trends -trends continue. In contrast, transport energy use in the mature market

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Buses: Interim EvaluationECMT, 2007). Natural Gas (CNG / LNG / GTL) Natural gas,It may be stored in compressed (CNG) or liquefied (LNG) form

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be competitive, but the quantity of waste oils is minisculeoils are currently being used as biodiesel transport fuel in limited quantities and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including oil sands, shale oil, coal-to-liquids, biofuels,heavy oil, oil sands and oil shale), natural gas or coal, or

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

propulsion system Recent research on rail propulsion hasRail in England and France. Swedish National Road and Transport ResearchResearch Laboratory guide (2004) contained international evidence of diversion rates from car to new urban rail

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

20

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Impact of Transportation Infrastructure on the Value of Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table A.6 Transportation Infrastructure in Neighborhood of Table A.7 Transportation Infrastructure in Neighborhood of Table A.8 Transportation Infrastructure in neighborhood of 

Barrett, James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.infrastructureafrica.org/system/files/Africa%27s%20Transport%20Inf Transport Toolkit Region(s): Africa & Middle East Related Tools The BEST Experiences with Bioethanol Buses The Sourcebook on Sustainable Urban Transport Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS Transport infrastructure is a key requirement for economic growth. In Africa today, networks are sparse, conditions poor, transit slow and

23

Review of Transportation Issues and Comparison of Infrastructure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Renewable Fuels The DAI study estimates the infrastructure investment costs and the transportation costs

24

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas - Energy Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Natural Gas Supply Oil and Natural Gas Supply Energy Infrastructure NETL's Energy Infrastructure and Security Research Group (EISRG) has a key supporting role in emergency preparedness and response. The EISRG develops high-level analytical visualizations that are used to study critical U.S. energy infrastructures and their inter-relationships during natural and manmade emergencies. By deploying resources and providing vital information in a timely manner, EISRG improves the ability of government agencies and the energy sector to prevent, prepare for, and respond to hazards, emergencies, natural disasters, or any other threat to the nation's energy supply. NETL coordinated and provided information on an ongoing basis during every major landfall event of the 2005 hurricane season , including Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as during Hurricanes Charley, Frances, and Ivan in 2004. NETL also has participated in exercises to prepare for events with varying degrees of impact, such as pipeline disruptions, local power outages, and transportation interruptions, such as the 2005 Powder River Basin rail service suspension, which resulted in curtailment of coal deliveries to major customers over a six-month period.

25

Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making,” Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

Boarnet, Marlon G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

h presentation slides: Natural Gas and hydrogen Infrastructure opportunities: markets and Barriers to Growth Matt Most, Encana Natural Gas 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl...

27

Is Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) an Effective Tool to Conserve Biodiversity Against Transport Infrastructure Development?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of transport infrastructure plans and programmes.national trans- port infrastructure developments includingnationwide transport infrastructure developments including

Varga, Csaba

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY Based on the finding of a growing potential...

29

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Argonne National Laboratory held a Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop October 18-19,...

30

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development

31

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on AddThis.com...

32

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Vehicle Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Initiative to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Initiative on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Initiative on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Initiative on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Initiative on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Initiative on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Initiative on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

33

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2009 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2009.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

34

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2007 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2007.

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council: 2006 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2006.

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the meeting minutes and other documents of the National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) for 2008.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

(NGV) and Infrastructure Rebate - Oklahoma Natural Gas to someone by E-mail (NGV) and Infrastructure Rebate - Oklahoma Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Rebate - Oklahoma Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Rebate - Oklahoma Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Rebate - Oklahoma Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Rebate - Oklahoma Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Infrastructure Rebate - Oklahoma Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas

38

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Subcontract Report Strategy for the Integration of NREL/SR-540-38720� Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into September 2005 � the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle � Fueling Infrastructure of the � Interstate Clean Transportation � Corridor Project � April 22, 2004 - August 31, 2005 Gladstein, Neandross & Associates � Santa Monica, California � NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation

39

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gas Gas Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Natural Gas Infrastructure Loans Effective July 1, 2013, the Wyoming Partnership Challenge (Challenge) may issue loans to businesses for the cost of the engineering, design, real

40

Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. natural gas vehicle and infrastructure projects.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed Gas Service Thad Adams, George Rawls, Poh-Sang Lam and Robert Sindelar Savannah River National...

42

INTERNATIONAL FUTURES PROGRAMME PROJECT ON STRATEGIC TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE TO 2030 PENSION FUNDS INVESTMENT IN INFRASTRUCTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growing importance of investment needs to 2030 for infrastructure in telecommunication, electricity, water and transport, while highlighting at the same time the notion of an emerging “infrastructure gap”. To bridge this “infrastructure gap ” institutional investors were identified as one of the most promising candidates and it was decided to further review opportunities and barriers to investment in infrastructure from the standpoint of pension funds. A survey of a sample of the most significant actors was then launched by the OECD within the framework of the OECD Project on Transcontinental Infrastructure 2030-2050. The main countries

A Survey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Urban Flooding: Implications for Transportation Infrastructure and Travel Disruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrology. Transportation infrastructure and travel patternsnot only damaged various infrastructures but also disruptednot hold true in new infrastructure design and management (

Chang, Heejun; Lafrenz, Martin; Jung, II-Won; Figliozzi, Miguell; Platman, Deena

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Impact of Natural Gas Infrastructure on Electric Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--Combined-cycle unit, electricity market, natural gas infrastructure, pipeline contingency, pumped-storage hydro, renew gas utilities typically rely on the natural gas storage to augment supplies flowing through) in the natural gas system, deliver natural gas from city gate stations, underground storage facilities, and other

Fu, Yong

45

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop:Infrastructure: A Practitioner s Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop for Transportation, Policy, O i d L i iOperations, and Logistics George Mason University #12;The idea of benefit fas well as the nearer future) and a wide view (in the sense of allowing for sideeffects of many

46

Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure- EAC 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Recommendations from the Electricity Advisory Committee on actions to be taken by the Department of Energy given the interdependence of the Nation’s electric infrastructure and natural gas...

47

Suggested Questions for Panel Discussion: Infrastructure and Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suggested Questions for Panel Discussion: Infrastructure and Transportation Moderator: Kirk Panelists: Jim Wood, Director of the Office of Policy Planning, Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT will face due to future changes in climate/climate variability, and sea levels? Jim Wood: One

Watson, Craig A.

48

Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for Hydrogen/Mixed Gas Service Retrofitting Existing NG Pipelines fro Hydrogen/Hythane Service New Pipeline Installation and ROW Lower South Carolina Electric and Gas University of South Carolina Praxair Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group

49

The geography of strategy : an exploration of alternative frameworks for transportation infrastructure strategy development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces the notion of a strategy development framework for transportation infrastructure systems. A strategy development framework has several dimensions: the organizations that own.infrastructure, the ...

Dunn, Travis P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Planning roadside infrastructure for information dissemination in intelligent transportation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider an intelligent transportation system where a given number of infrastructured nodes (called Dissemination Points, DPs) have to be deployed for disseminating information to vehicles in an urban area. We formulate our problem as a Maximum Coverage ... Keywords: Maximum coverage, Network deployment, Vehicular networks

O. Trullols; M. Fiore; C. Casetti; C. F. Chiasserini; J. M. Barcelo Ordinas

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2011 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) is a group of individuals whose organizations have a vested interest in the emergence and growth of electric transportation, in particular, the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) industries as well as truck stop electrification (TSE) and port electrification. IWC includes representatives from electric utilities, vehicle manufacturing industries, component manufacturers, government agencies, related industry associations, and standards ...

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council: 2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC) is a group of individuals whose organizations have a vested interest in the emergence and growth of electric transportation, in particular, the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) industries, as well as truck stop electrification (TSE) and port electrification. The IWC includes representatives from electric utilities, vehicle manufacturing industries, component manufacturers, government agencies, related industry associations, and stand...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES: * Convene industry and other stakeholders to share current status/state-of-the art for natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure. * Identify key challenges (both technical and non-technical, such as permitting, installation, codes and standards) preventing or delaying the widespread deployment of natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure. Identify synergies between natural gas and hydrogen fuels. * Identify and prioritize opportunities to address the challenges reported above, and determine roles and opportunities for both government and industry stakeholders. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011 9:00-10:00 AM Registration and Continental Breakfast 10:00-10:15 AM Welcome n Dr. Peter Littlewood, Argonne Associate Laboratory Director for

54

Evaluating the Safety of a Natural Gas Home Refueling Appliance (HRA); Natural Gas Infrastructure Evaluation (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and infrastructure R&D through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to help the United States reduce its dependence on imported petroleum and to pave the way to a future transportation network based on hydrogen. Natural gas vehicles can also reduce emissions of regulated pollutants compared with vehicles powered by conventional fuels such as gasoline and diesel.

55

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Natural Gas in the Rocky Mountains: Developing Infrastructure  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Supplement to EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook analyzes current natural gas production, pipeline and storage infrastructure in the Rocky Mountains, as well as prospective pipeline projects in these States. The influence of these factors on regional prices and price volatility is examined.

Information Center

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL-12/8 ANL-12/8 summAry report Natural Gas and Hydrogen I n f r a s t r u c t u r e O p p O r t u n I t I e s WorksHop October 18-19, 2011 Argonne National Laboratory | Argonne, IL compiled by romesh Kumar & shabbir ahmed february 21, 2012 AckNoWLedGemeNts Active participation by the Workshop attendees is gratefully acknowledged. Special thanks to the plenary speakers for their insightful comments and their help in leading the discussions as panel session moderators, including: Steve Chalk (DOe/ee), Bill Liss (Gas Technology Institute), Brian Bonner (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.), and

58

To appeared in "Securing Transportation Systems, Protecting Critical Infrastructures Series (Book)", 2012 On the Rationality and Optimality of Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To appeared in "Securing Transportation Systems, Protecting Critical Infrastructures Series (Book)", 2012 On the Rationality and Optimality of Transportation Networks Defense -- a Network Centrality Eng., Ben-Gurion University {puzis,elovici}@bgu.ac.il 3 Transportation Research Institute, Technion

59

HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. These amorphous alloys appear to maintain their corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature. Visionary research is proposed to extend the application of corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous metal coatings, and variants of these coatings, to protection of the Nation's transportation infrastructure. Specific objectives of the proposed work are: (1) fabrication of appropriate test samples for evaluation of concept; (2) collection of production and test data for coated steel reinforcement bars, enabling systematic comparison of various coating options, based upon performance and economic considerations; and (3) construction and testing of concrete structures with coated steel reinforcement bars, thereby demonstrating the value of amorphous-metal coatings. The benefits of ceramic coatings as thermal barriers will also be addressed.

Farmer, J C

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reclaiming residual space from elevated transport infrastructure : time, space, and activity under the Chicago Brown Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies the non-transport functions of the residual space generated by elevated transport infrastructure and its relationship with abutting neighborhoods The space under the Chicago Brown Line, among all other ...

Su, Jing, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

63

Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure -...

64

In Summary: Risk of Infrastructure Failure in the Natural Gas Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In Summary: Risk of Infrastructure Failure in the Natural Gas Industry. Increasing demand could put additional stress on capacity-constrained areas

65

Distributed control applied to combined electricity and natural gas infrastructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — The optimization of combined electricity and natural gas systems is addressed in this paper. The two networks are connected via energy hubs. Using the energy hub concept, the interactions between the different infrastructures can be analyzed. A system consisting of several interconnected hubs forms a distributed power generation structure where each hub is controlled by its respective control agent. Recently, a distributed control method has been applied to such a system. The overall optimization problem including the entire system is decomposed into subproblems according to the control agents. In this paper, a parallel and serial version of that method is discussed. Simulation results are obtained through experiments on a three-hub benchmark system. I.

Michèle Arnold; Rudy R. Negenborn; Göran Andersson; Bart De Schutter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Multi-Agent-Based simulation for analysis of transport policy and infrastructure measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we elaborate on the usage of multi-agent-based simulation (MABS) for quantitative impact assessment of transport policy and infrastructure measures. We provide a general discussion on how to use MABS for freight transport analysis, focusing ... Keywords: MABS, freight transportation, multi-agent systems, multi-agent-based simulation, supply chain simulation, transport policy assessment

Johan Holmgren; Linda Ramstedt; Paul Davidsson; Jan A. Persson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Sector-Specific information infrastructure issues in the oil, gas, and petrochemical sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter we have discussed vulnerabilities and mitigating actions to improve safety, security and continuity of the information and process infrastructure used in the oil, gas and petrochemical sector. An accident in the oil and gas industry can ...

Stig O. Johnsen; Andreas Aas; Ying Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

4. Trends in Natural Gas Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 39 Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates 4. Trends in Natural Gas Transportation Rates

69

Assessing the Changes In Safety Risk Arising From the Use of Natural Gas Infrastructure For Mixtures of Hydrogen and Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6/02/2005 6/02/2005 Assessing the changes in safety risk arising from the use of natural gas infrastructures for mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas NATURALHY G. Hankinson Loughborough University, UK 2 16/02/2005 Naturalhy project safety work package NATURALHY 3 16/02/2005 Outline NATURALHY To identify and quantify the major factors influencing safety in the transportation, distribution, and delivery of hydrogen/natural gas mixtures by means of existing natural gas infrastructures. 4 16/02/2005 Purpose NATURALHY To provide information to allow risk assessments to be performed to assist decisions concerning: * The amount of hydrogen that can be introduced into natural gas systems * The conditions under which such systems should be operated, and * The identification of vulnerable locations where

70

Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. natural gas vehicle and infrastructure projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the project will be located. Some jurisdictions also have unique ordinances or regulations that could apply. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards_basics.html. Find natural gas vehicle and infrastructure codes and standards in these categories: * Fire Code Requirements * General CNG Requirements and Equipment Qualifications * CNG Engine Fuel Systems * CNG Compression, Gas Processing, Storage, and Dispensing Systems

71

Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop, October 18-19, 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL : Summary Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Workshop was to identify opportunities for accelerating the use of both natural gas (NG) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as motor fuels and in stationary power applications. Specific objectives of the Workshop were to: (1) Convene industry and other stakeholders to share current status/state-of-the-art of NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure; (2) Identify key challenges (including non-technical challenges, such as permitting, installation, codes, and standards) preventing or delaying the widespread deployment of NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure. Identify synergies between NG and H{sub 2} fuels; and (3) Identify and prioritize opportunities for addressing the challenges identified above, and determine roles and opportunities for both the government and industry stakeholders. Plenary speakers and panel discussions summarized the current status of the NG and H{sub 2} infrastructure, technology for their use in transportation and stationary applications, and some of the major challenges and opportunities to more widespread use of these fuels. Two break-out sessions of three groups each addressed focus questions on: (1) infrastructure development needs; (2) deployment synergies; (3) natural gas and fuel cell vehicles (NGVs, FCVs), specialty vehicles, and heavy-duty trucks; (4) CHP (combined heat and power), CHHP (combined hydrogen, heat, and power), and synergistic approaches; and (5) alternative uses of natural gas.

Kumar, R. comp.; Ahmed, S. comp. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)--which include all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles--provide a new opportunity for reducing oil consumption by drawing power from the electric grid. To maximize the benefits of PEVs, the emerging PEV infrastructure--from battery manufacturing to communication and control between the vehicle and the grid--must provide access to clean electricity, satisfy stakeholder expectations, and ensure safety. Currently, codes and standards organizations are collaborating on a PEV infrastructure plan. Establishing a PEV infrastructure framework will create new opportunities for business and job development initiating the move toward electrified transportation. This paper summarizes the components of the PEV infrastructure, challenges and opportunities related to the design and deployment of the infrastructure, and the potential benefits.

Markel, T.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)—which include all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles—provide a new opportunity for reducing oil consumption by drawing power from the electric grid. To maximize the benefits of PEVs, the emerging PEV infrastructure—from battery manufacturing to communication and control between the vehicle and the grid—must provide access to clean electricity, satisfy stakeholder expectations, and ensure safety. Currently, codes and standards organizations are collaborating on a PEV infrastructure plan. Establishing a PEV infrastructure framework will create new opportunities for business and job development initiating the move toward electrified transportation. This paper summarizes the components of the PEV infrastructure, challenges and opportunities related to the design and deployment of the infrastructure, and the potential benefits.

T. Markel Nrel; Tony Markel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

National Electric Transportation Infrastructure Working Council (IWC): 2012 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Electric Transportation IWC is a group of individuals whose organizations have a vested interest in the emergence and growth of electric transportation, in particular, the plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) industries, as well as truck stop electrification (TSE) and port electrification. IWC includes representatives from electric utilities, vehicle manufacturing industries, component manufacturers, government agencies, related industry associations, and standards organizations. The ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and qualitatively demonstrated in tests on three different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Transportation Sector Market Transition: Using History and Geography to Envision Possible Hydrogen Infrastructure Development and Inform Public Policy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the challenges to building an infrastructure for hydrogen, for use as transportation fuel. Deployment technologies and policies that could quicken deployment are addressed.

Brown, E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluates opportunities to integrate hydrogen into the fueling stations of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor--an existing network of LNG fueling stations in California and Nevada.

Gladstein, Neandross and Associates

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

79

High power gas transport laser  

SciTech Connect

Continuous wave output power from a gas transport laser is substantially increased by disposing a plurality of parallel cylindrically tubular cathodes in the main stream transversely of the direction of gas flow and spaced above a coextensive segmented anode in the opposite wall of the channel. Ballast resistors are connected between the cathodes, respectively, and the power supply to optimize the uniform arcless distribution of current passing between each cathode and the anode. Continuous output power greater than 3 kW is achieved with this electrode configuration.

Fahlen, T.S.; Kirk, R.F.

1978-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

Interdependency of security-constrained electricity and natural gas infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation relies increasingly on the natural gas supply system as additional natural gas-fired power plants are installed in restructured power systems. In this context, the economics and the reliability of electric power and natural ...

Cong Liu / Mohammad Shahidehpour

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Public acceptance of natural gas infrastructure development in the UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for underground gas storage (UGS) the development of LNG terminals with above-ground storage tanks projects listed; underground gas storage projects proposed or under development in Cheshire, Lancashire, and Yorkshire; and the liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals at Milford Haven and the Isle of Grain

82

Center for Advanced Infrastructure & Transportation Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that of concrete. #12;20 Center for Advanced Infrastructure & Transportation Annual Report 2003-2004 Geopolymer TIS Evaluation (Area No.1) Geopolymer Column Wrapping Column wrapping with fiber- reinforced polymer, therefore, limits the ingress of salt and water as long as the bond between the concrete and FRP remains

83

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in the third quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: first field test; test data analysis.

Anthony J. Smalle; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in the fourth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: second field test; test data analysis for the first field test; operational optimization plans.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in the fifth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: completion of analysis of data from first visit to second site; preparation for follow-up testing.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infracture''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and tested on four different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Corridors from the Southwest | From Canada | From Rocky Mountain Area | Details about Transportation Corridors The national natural gas delivery network is intricate and expansive, but most of the major transportation routes can be broadly categorized into 11 distinct corridors or flow patterns. 5 major routes extend from the producing areas of the Southwest 4 routes enter the United States from Canada 2 originate in the Rocky Mountain area. A summary of the major corridors and links to details about each corridor are provided below. Corridors from the Southwest Region

89

Materials for Oil and Gas Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2008 ... The demand on materials for transporting oil, natural gas, and other fluids, including hydrogen, ethanol, etc. is severe in terms of material ...

90

Project identification and evaluation techniques for transportation infrastructure : assessing their role in metropolitan areas of developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project identification and evaluation of transportation infrastructure play a vital role in shaping and sustaining the forms of cities all over the world. These cities differ substantially in character and urban form and ...

Kumar, Vimal, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Logistical and transportation infrastructure in Asia : potential for growth and development to support increasing trade with Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the implications of the rapid growth in demand for trade between Europe and Asia for the existing transportation network and logistical infrastructure. In general terms, technologies need to improve ...

Deonás, Nikolaos, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Accession No. 4. Title and Subtitle Impacts of Energy Developments on the Texas Transportation System Infrastructure 7. Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas’s energy sector has a critical impact—historically and currently—on both the state economy and the Texas transportation system. The state’s various transportation modes, including rail, highways, pipelines, and ports, form a system that supports the energy sector in a number of ways. Examples include the (a) movement of various components during the construction and implementation of the energy source (e.g., wind turbines and solar farms), (b) provision of enabling infrastructure (e.g., transmission lines), and (c) movement of the intermediate and final products in some energy supply chains (e.g., low sulfur mid-west coal by Class 1 unit trains to the major coal burning plants in Texas). It is thus critical that TxDOT develop a better understanding of the current and future impacts of the energy sector on Texas’s transportation system, as well as quantify these impacts to ensure both adequate maintenance and its future sustainability. 17. Key Words Texas transportation system, energy, supply chains, wind turbines, solar farms, transmission lines, coal, oil, natural gas, environmental. 19. Security Classif. (of report)

A Prozzi; Sergey Grebenschikov; Ambarish Banerjee; Jorge Prozzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The impacts of improving Brazil's transportation infrastructure on the world soybean market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of adequate transportation infrastructure in Brazil has been a bottleneck for the soybean producers for many years. Moreover, the costly inland transportation incurred from this bottleneck has resulted in a loss in competitiveness for Brazil compared to other exporting countries, especially the United States. If transportation costs are reduced by introducing improved infrastructure, Brazil is expected to increase its competitiveness in the world soybean market by increasing its exports and producer revenues. On the other hand, the United States and other significant soybean competing exporting countries are expected to lose market share as well as producer revenues. This study uses a spatial equilibrium model to analyze transportation infrastructure improvements proposed by the Brazilian government vis-à-vis enhance the nation’s soybean transportation network. The analyzed transportation improvements are: (i) the development of the Tapajós-Teles Pires waterway; (ii) the completion of the BR- 163 highway; (iii) the construction of the Mortes-Araguaia waterway; (iv) the Ferronorte railroad expansion to Rondonópolis and the linkage between the city of Rio Verde to Uberlândia; and (v) the Ferropar railroad expansion to the city of Dourados. The model specifies the Brazilian inland transportation network and the international ocean shipments. The model divides Brazil into 18 excess supply regions and 8 excess demand regions. The competing exporting countries are the United States, Argentina, Rest of South America (Bolivia, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Canada, and India. The importing countries are composed of China, European Union, Southeast Asia, Mexico, and the Rest of the World. Results suggest these proposed transportation improvements yield potential noteworthy gains to Brazil with producer revenues increasing more than $500 million and exports increasing by 177 thousand metric tons. Consequently, the world soybean price declines by $1.16 per metric ton and producer revenues and exports in the United States fall by 63 thousand metric tons and $104.89 million, respectively. Although the absolute gains in price, revenues, and exports for Brazil are considerable, they only represent in relative changes 1.48, 2.35, and 0.32 percent, respectively. Similarly, the loss in price, revenue, and export value for the United States is also low, declining by 0.23, 0.23, and 0.12 percent, respectively.

Costa, Rafael de Farias

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The impacts of improving Brazil's transportation infrastructure on the world soybean market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of adequate transportation infrastructure in Brazil has been a bottleneck for the soybean producers for many years. Moreover, the costly inland transportation incurred from this bottleneck has resulted in a loss in competitiveness for Brazil compared to other exporting countries, especially the United States. If transportation costs are reduced by introducing improved infrastructure, Brazil is expected to increase its competitiveness in the world soybean market by increasing its exports and producer revenues. On the other hand, the United States and other significant soybean competing exporting countries are expected to lose market share as well as producer revenues. This study uses a spatial equilibrium model to analyze transportation infrastructure improvements proposed by the Brazilian government vis-a?-vis enhance the nation's soybean transportation network. The analyzed transportation improvements are: (i) the development of the Tapajo?s-Teles Pires waterway; (ii) the completion of the BR- 163 highway; (iii) the construction of the Mortes-Araguaia waterway; (iv) the Ferronorte railroad expansion to Rondono?polis and the linkage between the city of Rio Verde to Uberla?ndia; and (v) the Ferropar railroad expansion to the city of Dourados. The model specifies the Brazilian inland transportation network and the international ocean shipments. The model divides Brazil into 18 excess supply regions and 8 excess demand regions. The competing exporting countries are the United States, Argentina, Rest of South America (Bolivia, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Canada, and India. The importing countries are composed of China, European Union, Southeast Asia, Mexico, and the Rest of the World. Results suggest these proposed transportation improvements yield potential noteworthy gains to Brazil with producer revenues increasing more than $500 million and exports increasing by 177 thousand metric tons. Consequently, the world soybean price declines by $1.16 per metric ton and producer revenues and exports in the United States fall by 63 thousand metric tons and $104.89 million, respectively. Although the absolute gains in price, revenues, and exports for Brazil are considerable, they only represent in relative changes 1.48, 2.35, and 0.32 percent, respectively. Similarly, the loss in price, revenue, and export value for the United States is also low, declining by 0.23, 0.23, and 0.12 percent, respectively.

Costa, Rafael de Farias

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a Refueling Infrastructure for Hydrogen Vehicles:Building a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure. Annu. Rev. Energybuilding up hydrogen infrastructure that are guided by the

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect

Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

East Coast Infrastructure  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast Infrastructure. Uncheck or check an item to hide or show it in the map. ... Infrastructure—Energy Information Administration (GasTran System), ...

98

Infrastructure investments and resource adequacy in the restructured US natural gas market : is supply security at risk?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to analyze the development of US natural gas infrastructure over the last two decades and to discuss its perspectives. In particular, we focus on the relationship between the regulatory ...

Hirschhausen, Christian von

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

951 951 April 2010 Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation Preprint T. Markel To be presented at the MIT Energy Initiative Transportation Electrification Symposium Cambridge, Massachusetts April 8, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

100

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7951 7951 April 2010 Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation Preprint T. Markel To be presented at the MIT Energy Initiative Transportation Electrification Symposium Cambridge, Massachusetts April 8, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Eligibility...

102

Vehicle-to-Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2V2I) Intelligent Transportation System Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract – In this paper, I describe the vehicle-tovehicle-to-infrastructure (V2V2I) architecture, which is a hybrid of the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-toinfrastructure (V2I) architectures. The V2V2I architecture leverages the benefits of fast queries and responses from the V2I architecture, but with the advantage of a distributed architecture not having a single point-of-failure from the V2V architecture. In the V2V2I architecture, the transportation network is broken into zones in which a single vehicle is known as the Super Vehicle. Only Super Vehicles are able to communicate with the central infrastructure or with other Super Vehicles, and all other vehicles can only communicate with the Super Vehicle responsible for the zone in which they are currently traversing. I describe the Super Vehicle Detection (SVD) algorithm for how a vehicle can find or become a Super Vehicle of a zone and how Super Vehicles can aggregate the speed and location data from all of the vehicles within their zone to still ensure an accurate representation of the network. I perform an analysis using FreeSim to determine the trade-offs experienced based on the size and number of zones within a transportation network and describe the benefits of the V2V2I architecture over the pure V2I or V2V architectures. I.

Jeffrey Miller

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Social infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current urbanization patterns and aging transportation infrastructures have marginalized millions of US citizens. The result is that 4 .5 million US residents live within 100 meters of a four-lane highway' and have become ...

Kurlbaum, Ryan E. (Ryan Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for natural gas. Vehicle Safety: Vehicle Fuel Systems: Vehicle Containers: Vehicle Fuel System Components: Dispensing Component Standards: Dispensing Operations: Dispensing Vehicle Interface: Storage Containers: Storage Pressure Relief Devices: Storage System Siting: Storage and Production: Building and Fire Code Requirements: Organization Name Standards Development Areas AGA American Gas Association Materials testing standards API American Petroleum Institute

105

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production.

106

The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis… (more)

Murphy, Paul Jarod

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The transition to hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and infrastructure requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel, used in an internal combustion engine optimized for maximum efficiency and as part of a hybrid-electric vehicle, will give excellent performance and range with emissions below one-tenth the ultra-low emission vehicle standards being considered in California as Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicles. These vehicles can also be manufactured with increased but not excessive cost. Hydrogen-fueled engines have demonstrated indicated efficiencies of more than 50% under lean operation. Combining optimized engines and other advanced components, the overall vehicle efficiency should approach 40%, compared with 13% for a conventional vehicle in the urban driving cycle. The optimized engine-generator unit is the mechanical equivalent of the fuel cell but at a cost competitive with today`s engines. The increased efficiency of hybrid-electric vehicles now makes hydrogen fuel competitive with today`s conventional vehicles. Conservative analysis of the infrastructure options to support a transition to a hydrogen-fueled light-duty fleet indicates that hydrogen may be utilized at a total cost comparable to the 3.1 cents/km U.S. vehicle operators pay today while using conventional automobiles. Both on-site production by electrolysis or reforming of natural gas and liquid hydrogen distribution offer the possibility of a smooth transition by taking advantage of existing large-scale energy infrastructures. Eventually, renewable sources of electricity and scalable methods of making hydrogen will have lower costs than today. With a hybrid-electric propulsion system, the infrastructure to supply hydrogen and the vehicles to use it can be developed today and thus be in place when fuel cells become economical for vehicle use.

Schock, R.N.; Berry, G.D.; Ramback, G.D.; Smith, J.R.

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Use of Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Transportation Infrastructure Condition Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis provides an assessment of the effectiveness of micro unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAVs) as a tool for collecting condition data for transportation infrastructure based on multiple field experiments. The primary experiment entails performing a level of service (LOS) condition assessment on multiple roadside sample units at various locations across the state of Texas. A secondary field experiment entails performing a pavement condition index (PCI) survey on airfield pavements. The condition of these sample units were assessed twice: onsite (i.e., ground truth) and by observing digital images (still and video) collected via a MUAV. The results of these surveys are then analyzed to determine if there are statistically significant differences in the standard deviation and mean values of the condition ratings. This study shows that in favorable site conditions, the MUAV demonstrates promise for improving current roadway inspection methods. However, limitations of the MUAVs field performance show that there is need for improvement in this technology before it can be implemented.

Hart, William Scott

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Transportation fuels from synthetic gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-five experimental Fischer-Tropsch synthesis runs were made with 14 different catalysts or combinations of catalysts using a Berty reactor system. Two catalysts showed increased selectivity to transportation fuels compared to typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. With a catalyst consisting of 5 wt % ruthenium impregnated on a Y zeolite (run number 24), 63 to 70 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the gasoline boiling range. Using a 0.5 wt % ruthenium on alumina catalyst (run number 22), 64 to 78 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the diesel fuel boiling range. Not enough sample was produced to determine the octane number of the gasoline from run number 24, but it is probably somewhat better than typical Fischer-Tropsch gasoline (approx. 50) and less than unleaded gasoline (approx. 88). The diesel fuel produced in run number 22 consisted of mostly straight chained paraffins and should be an excellent transportation fuel without further refining. The yield of transportation fuels from biomass via gasification and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with the ruthenium catalysts identified in the previous paragraph is somewhat less, on a Btu basis, than methanol (via gasification) and wood oil (PERC and LBL processes) yields from biomass. However, the products of the F-T synthesis are higher quality transportation fuels. The yield of transportation fuels via the F-T synthesis is similar to the yield of gasoline via methanol synthesis and the Mobil MTG process.

Baker, E.G.; Cuello, R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Planning a sustainable community: infrastructure development and natural areas management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with county infrastructure projects. Despiteby transportation infrastructure. Field-investigationfor innovative design of infrastructure, land-acquisition

Swanson, Sherri R.; Kurz, Raymond C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies The Infrastructure Challenge of...

112

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey site test performed on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. This test completes planned screening efforts designed to guide selection of one or more units for design analysis and testing with emphasis on identification and reduction of compressor losses. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report presents results of design analysis performed on the TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey test performed on an HBA-6 engine/compressor installed at Duke Energy's Bedford Compressor Station. This is one of several tests planned, which will emphasize identification and reduction of compressor losses. Additionally, this report presents a methodology for distinguishing losses in compressor attributable to valves, irreversibility in the compression process, and the attached piping (installation losses); it illustrates the methodology with data from the survey test. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first summarizes key results from survey site tests performed on an HBA-6 installed at Duke Energy's Bedford compressor station, and on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. The report then presents results of design analysis performed on the Bedford HBA-6 to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

The role of research in improving infrastructure : an analysis of U.S. transportation research & development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure systems are central to quality of life and economic competitiveness in nations worldwide, but daunting challenges stand in the way of providing systems capable of delivering needed infrastructure services. ...

Frazier, Kyle Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Method of pipeline transportation of natural gas  

SciTech Connect

A USSR-developed method for transporting natural gas in the form of hydrates increases pipeline transmission capacity by at least 3-4 times as compared to a conventional pipeline and reduces the specific capital investment since thin-walled carbon-steel pipes can be used instead of cryogenic-resistant ones. In the approach, natural gas in hydrate form is loaded into wheeled containers or capsules which are then propelled through a pipeline by compressed and cooled natural gas. The physical state of the gas hydrates is preserved during their transport by keeping the pressure between 715 and 285 psi (50 and 20 kg/sq cm) and the temperature between -40/sup 0/ and +14/sup 0/F (-40/sup 0/ and -10/sup 0/C).

Chersky, N.V.; Klimenko, A.P.; Bokserman, J.I.; Kalina, A.I.; Karimov, F.A.

1975-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan); Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Join Shell and Purdue for a series of discussions that will explore preventative measures to minimize risk of oil spills, the future of natural gas infrastructure, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize risk of oil spills, the future of natural gas infrastructure, and the challenges we face in our-deepwater Exploration" 10:30am ­ 11:30am Panel Discussion: "Natural Gas and the Logistics of Changing Infrastructures ENERGY DAY A Symposium on the New Frontiers in Oil and Natural Gas Exploration #12;

120

Look at Western Natural Gas Infrastructure During the Recent El Paso Pipeline Disruption, A  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network in 2000 and provides an assessment of the current levels of available capacity to transport supplies from production areas to markets throughout the United States during the upcoming heating season. It also examines how completion of currently planned expansion projects and proposed new pipelines would affect the network.

Information Center

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Robust Infrastructure Design for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online enrichment monitor (OLEM) is being developed to continuously measure the relative isotopic composition of UF6 in the unit header pipes of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP). From a safeguards perspective, OLEM will provide early detection of a facility being misused for production of highly enriched uranium. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and if coupled with load cell monitoring can provide isotope mass balance verification. The OLEM design includes power and network connections for continuous monitoring of the UF6 enrichment and state of health of the instrument. Monitoring the enrichment on all header pipes at a typical GCEP could require OLEM detectors on each of the product, tails, and feed header pipes. If there are eight process units, up to 24 detectors may be required at a modern GCEP. Distant locations, harsh industrial environments, and safeguards continuity of knowledge requirements all place certain demands on the network robustness and power reliability. This paper describes the infrastructure and architecture of an OLEM system based on OLEM collection nodes on the unit header pipes and power and network support nodes for groupings of the collection nodes. A redundant, self-healing communications network, distributed backup power, and a secure communications methodology. Two candidate technologies being considered for secure communications are the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture cross-platform, service-oriented architecture model for process control communications and the emerging IAEA Real-time And INtegrated STream-Oriented Remote Monitoring (RAINSTORM) framework to provide the common secure communication infrastructure for remote, unattended monitoring systems. The proposed infrastructure design offers modular, commercial components, plug-and-play extensibility for GCEP deployments, and is intended to meet the guidelines and requirements for unattended and remotely monitored safeguards systems.

Younkin, James R [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Middleware for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooperative vehicle-infrastructure systems." COM Safety:of Transportation. Vehicle-Infrastructure Integration (VII).for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure Systems Christian

Manasseh, Christian; Sengupta, Raja

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy Basics: Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation...

124

Session 2A Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials  

Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials • State of the art ... – Novel methods for liquid permeability measurement of saturated ...

125

Transport coefficients of a massive pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review or main results concerning the transport coefficients of a light meson gas, in particular we focus on the case of a massive pion gas. Leading order results according to the chiral power-counting are presented for the DC electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and bulk viscosity. We also comment on the possible correlation between the bulk viscosity and the trace anomaly in QCD, as well as the relation between unitarity and a minimum of the quotient $\\eta/s$ near the phase transition.

D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Transport properties of a meson gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent results on a systematic method to calculate transport coefficients for a meson gas (in particular, we analyze a pion gas) at low temperatures in the context of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Our method is based on the study of Feynman diagrams with a power counting which takes into account collisions in the plasma by means of a non-zero particle width. In this way, we obtain results compatible with analysis of Kinetic Theory with just the leading order diagram. We show the behavior with temperature of electrical and thermal conductivities and shear and bulk viscosities, and we discuss the fundamental role played by unitarity. We obtain that bulk viscosity is negligible against shear viscosity near the chiral phase transition. Relations between the different transport coefficients and bounds on them based on different theoretical approximations are also discussed. We also comment on some applications to heavy-ion collisions.

D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN CANADA by Rose: Analysis of Measures for Reducing Transportation Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Canada Project Number the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions

128

Energy Basics: Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is...

129

The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis focuses on identifying opportunities to reduce market ...

Murphy, Paul Jarod

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Future of Transportation Finance: Gas Tax Plus and Beyond The Future of Transportation Finance ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY 2005 JAMES L. OBERSTAR FORUM ON TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY #12;This report summarizes the fourth James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over

Minnesota, University of

131

Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE  

SciTech Connect

This project has documented and demonstrated the feasibility of technologies and operational choices for companies who operate the large installed fleet of integral engine compressors in pipeline service. Continued operations of this fleet is required to meet the projected growth of the U.S. gas market. Applying project results will meet the goals of the DOE-NETL Natural Gas Infrastructure program to enhance integrity, extend life, improve efficiency, and increase capacity, while managing NOx emissions. These benefits will translate into lower cost, more reliable gas transmission, and options for increasing deliverability from the existing infrastructure on high demand days. The power cylinders on large bore slow-speed integral engine/compressors do not in general combust equally. Variations in cylinder pressure between power cylinders occur cycle-to-cycle. These variations affect both individual cylinder performance and unit average performance. The magnitude of the variations in power cylinder combustion is dependent on a variety of parameters, including air/fuel ratio. Large variations in cylinder performance and peak firing pressure can lead to detonation and misfires, both of which can be damaging to the unit. Reducing the variation in combustion pressure, and moving the high and low performing cylinders closer to the mean is the goal of engine balancing. The benefit of improving the state of the engine ''balance'' is a small reduction in heat rate and a significant reduction in both crankshaft strain and emissions. A new method invented during the course of this project is combustion pressure ratio (CPR) balancing. This method is more effective than current methods because it naturally accounts for differences in compression pressure, which results from cylinder-to-cylinder differences in the amount of air flowing through the inlet ports and trapped at port closure. It also helps avoid compensation for low compression pressure by the addition of excess fuel to achieve equalizing peak firing pressure, even if some of the compression pressure differences are attributed to differences in cylinder and piston geometry, clearance, and kinematics. The combination of high-pressure fuel injection and turbocharging should produce better mixing of fuel and air in lean mixtures. Test results documented modest improvements in heat rate and efficiency and significant improvements in emissions. The feasibility of a closed-loop control of waste-gate setting, which will maintain an equivalence ratio set point, has been demonstrated. This capability allows more direct tuning to enhance combustion stability, heat rate, or emissions. The project has documented the strong dependence of heat rate on load. The feasibility of directly measuring power and torque using the GMRC Rod Load Monitor (RLM) has been demonstrated. This capability helps to optimize heat rate while avoiding overload. The crankshaft Strain Data Capture Module (SDCM) has shown the sensitivity to changes in operating conditions and how they influence crankshaft bending strain. The results indicate that: balancing reduces the frequency of high-strain excursions, advanced timing directly increases crankshaft dynamic strain, reduced speed directly reduces strain, and high-pressure fuel injection reduces crankshaft strain slightly. The project demonstrated that when the timing is advanced, the heat rate is reduced, and when the timing is retarded, the heat rate is increased. One reason why timing is not advanced as much as it might be is the potential for detonation on hot days. A low-cost knock detector was demonstrated that allowed active control to use timing to allow the heat rate benefit to be realized safely. High flow resistance losses in the pulsation control systems installed on some compressors have been shown to hurt efficiency of both compressor and engine/compressor system. Improved pulsation control systems have the potential to recover almost 10% of available engine power. Integrity enhancements and reduced component failure probability will enhance aggregate

Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Transportation of Natural Gas and Petroleum (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation of Natural Gas and Petroleum (Nebraska) Transportation of Natural Gas and Petroleum (Nebraska) Transportation of Natural Gas and Petroleum (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Oil and Gas Conservation Commission This statute enables and regulates the exercise of eminent domain by persons, companies, corporations, or associations transporting crude oil,

134

Physical Infrastructure: Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Due to years of limited investment and maintenance, the US transportation infrastructure network (including approximately 6.5 million kilometers of ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

135

Optimizing the Norwegian Natural Gas Production and Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The network for transport of natural gas on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, with 7,800 km of subsea pipelines, is the world's largest offshore pipeline network. The gas flowing through this network represents approximately 15 percent of European consumption, ... Keywords: decision support system, energy, mixed-integer programming, natural gas, network transportation

Frode Rømo; Asgeir Tomasgard; Lars Hellemo; Marte Fodstad; Bjørgulf Haukelidsæter Eidesen; Birger Pedersen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel TRANSPORTATION ENERGY alternative fuel, and purified landfill gas could provide a renewable domestic source of it. Landfills from landfills and use it in natural gas applications such as fueling motor vehicles. Project

137

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Consumption) Transport Modal Service Supply Chain ­ Fuel Parts Manufacture Vehicle Assembly Warehousing the upstream and downstream processes associated with alternative vehicle fuel infrastructure supply technologies, in addition to the end use or "tailpipe" emissions that are directly correlated with vehicle

138

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/aviation-and-marine-report-2009.pdf Cost: Free References: Greenhouse Gas emissions from aviation and marine transportation: mitigation potential and policies[1] "This paper provides an overview of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from aviation and marine transportation and the various mitigation options to

139

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Transported...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transported (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

140

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Transported...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transported (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transported (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

142

Gas transport, sorption, and mechanical response of fractured coal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fractured coal exhibits strong and dynamic coupling between fluid transport and mechanical response especially when the pore fluid is a sorbing gas. This complex interaction… (more)

Wang, Shugang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

New pipeline project could lower natural gas transportation costs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... natural gas transportation costs to New York City could be reduced with the expansion of the existing Texas Eastern Transmission pipeline from Linden, New ...

144

The efficient use of natural gas in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The efficient use of natural gas in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation systems are an often overlooked critical infrastructure component. These systems comprise a widely diverse elements whose operation impact all aspects of society today. This chapter introduces the key transportation sectors and illustrates ...

Mark Hartong; Rajn Goel; Duminda Wijesekera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Title Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5236-5250 Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, atria, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, indoor pollutant dispersion, mixed convection, turbulence model

148

Assessing the Potential of Using Hydrate Technology to Capture, Store and Transport Gas for the Caribbean Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monetizing gas has now become a high priority issue for many countries. Natural gas is a much cleaner fuel than oil and coal especially for electricity generation. Approximately 40 percent of the world's natural gas reserves remain unusable because of lack of economic technology. Gas produced with oil poses a challenge of being transported and is typically flared or re-injected into the reservoir. These are gas transportation issues we now face. Gas hydrate may be a viable means of capturing, storing and transporting stranded and associated gas. For example, stranded gas in Trinidad could be converted to gas hydrates and transported to the islands of the Caribbean. This study will seek to address some of the limitations from previous studies on transporting natural gas as a hydrate while focusing on small scale transportation of natural gas to the Caribbean Islands. This work proposes a workflow for capturing, storing and transporting gas in the hydrate form, particularly for Caribbean situations where there are infrastructural constraints such as lack of pipelines. The study shows the gas hydrate value chain for transportation of 5 MMscf/d of natural gas from Trinidad to Jamaica. The analysis evaluated the water required for hydrate formation, effect of composition on hydrate formation, the energy balance of the process, the time required for formation, transportation and dissociation and preliminary economics. The overall energy requirement of the process which involves heating, cooling and expansion is about 15-20 percent of the energy of the gas transported in hydrate form. The time estimated for the overall process is 20–30 hrs. The estimated capital cost to capture and transport 5 MMscf/d from Trinidad to Jamaica is about US$ 30 million. The composition of the gas sample can affect the conditions of formation, heating value and the expansion process. In summary, there is great potential for transporting natural gas by gas hydrate on a small scale based on the proposed hydrate work flow. This study did not prove commerciality at this time, however, some of the limitations require further evaluations and these include detailed modeling of the formation time, dissociation time and heat transfer capabilities.

Rajnauth, Jerome Joel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains

150

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE  

SciTech Connect

This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport or Transport or Mobil Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for mobile combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically from mobile combustion sources, including vehicles under the direct control

152

Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Station Storage Storage Cost $500/kg Natural gas feedstocknatural gas steam methane reforming (SMR) –includes hydrogen production and storagefor storage, distribution or use H 2 Natural gas Figure 3

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Analysis Margo Melendez & Keith Parks January 26, 2006 Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis (GIA) Utilizes GIS, geographically segregated data, and transition expertise to add the spatial component to infrastructure analysis NREL Core Competencies * Geographic data, tools, and expertise * Flexibility to address a wide array of transition issues NREL Capability Diagram Geographically-based Infrastructure Analysis GIS Transportation Technologies & Systems Electric & Hydrogen Technologies Energy Analysis Office GIA Activities Previous and Ongoing * HYDS ME - Evaluates best infrastructure options * Interstate Infrastructure Analysis - Minimal infrastructure to facilitate interstate travel during transition New Analyses * Quantifying transitional hydrogen demand

154

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transportation Process & Flow  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Process and Flow Process and Flow About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Transportation Process and Flow Overview | Gathering System | Processing Plant | Transmission Grid | Market Centers/Hubs | Underground Storage | Peak Shaving Overview Transporting natural gas from the wellhead to the final customer involves several physical transfers of custody and multiple processing steps. A natural gas pipeline system begins at the natural gas producing well or field. Once the gas leaves the producing well, a pipeline gathering system directs the flow either to a natural gas processing plant or directly to the mainline transmission grid, depending upon the initial quality of the wellhead product.

155

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge sector is believed to be responsible for 28.4% of our greenhouse gas emissions (see figure), including 33% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCs

156

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transporting Natural Gas in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 LNG (liquefied natural gas) import facilities and 100 LNG peaking facilities (see map). Learn more about the natural gas pipeline network:

157

Outsourcing transportation infrastructure maintenance : a theoretical approach with application to JR East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In transportation agencies, how to reduce maintenance and operation cost is one of the biggest and most common concerns, because their revenue is not expected to increase drastically in the future. One of the solutions ...

Hirano, Jun, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

159

Geographically Based Infrastructure Margo Melendez & Keith Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagram Geographically-based Infrastructure Analysis GIS Transportation Technologies & Systems Electric resulting H2 demand and changing demand ­ Estimate infrastructure needs and usage ­ Predict transition

160

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure – Optimizing Transitionseconomies and lower infrastructure costs. REFERENCES 1. NRC,a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs May 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). OsComp Systems designed and tested the novel compressor design with funding from the DOE-supported Stripper Well Consortium, an industry-driven organization whose members include natural gas and petroleum producers,

162

Natural Gas Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for natural gas.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: oil or gas field exploration, decision making under uncertainty, multistage stochastic be addressed. E-mail: grossmann@cmu.edu #12;2 1. Introduction Oil and gas field exploration and production1 A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

164

Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

Underwood, Richard Paul (Allentown, PA); Makitka, III, Alexander (Hatfield, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control This legislation prohibits the waste of oil or gas and the pollution of water, air, or land. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to implement regulations designed to prevent the waste of oil and gas, promote environmental stewardship, and regulate the exploration,

166

Center for Advanced Infrastructure & Transportation Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medical Home Project 150,462 08-104 Allouche, Erez Applications of Inorganic Polymer Concrete (Geopolymer Prostate Cancer Detection System ULM 2,000 Erez Allouche Applications of Inorganic Polymer Concrete (Geopolymer') in Transportation Structures Located in Harsh Environments LTRC 30,000 Kody Varah- ramyan

167

The Transportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Criteria Pollutnat Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Transportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step TowardTransportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step toward

Ganson, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains hydrocarbons such as ethane and propane and other gases such as nitrogen,

169

multi-stage stochastic programming on shale gas infrastructure and production planning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The rich resource of Marcellus gas has recently boosted up the interest of people as the drilling technology advances. Apart from the difficulties in exploration… (more)

Wu, Xiaohuang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, January 2006 1 The natural gas product fed into the mainline gas transportation system in the United States must meet specific quality measures in order for the pipeline grid to operate properly. Consequently, natural gas produced at the wellhead, which in most cases contains contaminants 1 and natural gas liquids, 2 must be processed, i.e., cleaned, before it can be safely delivered to the high-pressure, long-distance pipelines that transport the product to the consuming public. Natural gas that is not within certain specific gravities, pressures, Btu content range, or water content levels will

171

Infrastructural Optimism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

means envisioning a new mobility network that incorporatesproposed plans for new public mobility infrastructure. Among2 For them, New Orleans’ damaged mobility infrastructure was

Samuels, Linda C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Transportation and Handling of Medium Btu Gas in Pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-derived medium btu gas can be safely transported by pipeline over moderate distances, according to this survey of current industrial pipeline practices. Although pipeline design criteria will be more stringent than for natural gas pipelines, the necessary technology is readily available.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

Bertini, Robert L.

174

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1670P Thermal thermal environments different from regulatory standards. Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security

175

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-0987P Transportation of the safe and secure transport of radioactive and hazardous materials. AWaytoEnsureSafeTransport Sandia

176

Genetic Algorithms for Agent-Based Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, electric power, telecommunication, and financial networks. This paper describes initial research combining agent-based infrastructure modeling software and genetic algorithms (GAs) to help optimize infrastructure protection and restoration decisions. This research proposes to apply GAs to the problem of infrastructure modeling and analysis in order to determine the optimum assets to restore or protect from attack or other disaster. This research is just commencing and therefore the focus of this paper is the integration of a GA optimization method with a simulation through the simulation’s agents.

May Permann

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas (INEEL/EXT-02-00992)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

992 992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Patrick Laney July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC INEEL/EXT-02-00992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Sponsored by Natural Gas Pipeline Infrastructure Reliability Program National Energy Technology Laboratory INEEL Field Work Proposal # 4340-70 Prepared by: Patrick Laney Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho With Contributions From: Ian Kopp Kenway Corporation Augusta, Maine July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Fossil Energy Technologies Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

178

Second Cybersecurity Infrastructure Framework Workshop ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... framework to reduce cybersecurity risks for critical infrastructure from May 29 ... industry experts in all sectors—such as energy, finance, transportation ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Hydrogen Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in China Prof. Jinyang Zheng Director of IPE, Zhejiang University Director of Engineering Research Center for High Pressure Process Equipment and Safety, Ministry of Education Vice Director of China National Safety Committee of Pressure Vessels Vice President of CMES-P.R. China China Representative of ISO/TC197 and ISO/TC58 U.S. Department of Transportation and U. S. Department of Energy Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Development of Vehicles,Dec.10-11,2009, Washington Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG,CNG-H2,H2 Vehicles and Fuels in China Content Hydrogen Production CNG Refueling Station Hydrogen Refueling Station Shanxi HCNG Project U.S. Department of Transportation and U. S. Department of Energy Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Gasifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, coal supplies over 55% of the electricity consumed in the United States and will continue to do so well into the next century. One of the technologies being developed for advanced electric power generation is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system that converts coal to a combustible gas, cleans the gas of pollutants, and combusts the gas in a gas turbine to generate electricity. The hot exhaust from the gas turbine is used to produce steam to generate more electricity from a steam turbine cycle. The utilization of advanced hot-gas particulate and sulfur control technologies together with the combined power generation cycles make IGCC one of the cleanest and most efficient ways available to generate electric power from coal. One of the strategic objectives for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) IGCC research and development program is to develop and demonstrate advanced gasifiers and second-generation IGCC systems. Another objective is to develop advanced hot-gas cleanup and trace contaminant control technologies. One of the more recent gasification concepts to be investigated is that of the transport reactor gasifier, which functions as a circulating fluid-bed gasifier while operating in the pneumatic transport regime of solid particle flow. This gasifier concept provides excellent solid-gas contacting of relatively small particles to promote high gasification rates and also provides the highest coal throughput per unit cross-sectional area of any other gasifier, thereby reducing capital cost of the gasification island.

Swanson, M.L.; Hajicek, D.R.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

world is nearing a peak in conventional oil production thatconventional oil production will peak, with many arguing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, store regenerative braking energy and to operate2 emissions. However, regenerative braking energy cannot beas electrical energy if regenerative braking is available (

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Long Term (2020-2030) -Full Background Report.WBCSD, 2004a: Mobility 2030: Meeting the Challenges toin 2030.. 359

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methyl esters (DME) and Fischer-Tropsch liquids, as well astransport fuels using Fischer-Tropsch or other conversionconcluded that biodiesel, Fischer-Tropsch synthetic kerosene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry focus on minicars and farm cars rather than larger vehicles, incentives for use of high tech in minicars – electric,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examples are: • Toyota Prius, Mercedes E-class sedans,1998 introduction of the Toyota Prius hybrid in the Japanesefull hybrids’ such as the Prius offering perhaps 40–50% fuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazil Ethanol from cellulosic feedstock, IEA Biodiesel fromfeedstock costs are generally far higher than for sugar, starch or cellulosic

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particular on reducing battery cost and specific energy andstorage Cost, battery Cost Cost, availability (biomass,scale, as well as battery longevity, cost and specific

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 (IEA, 2006b) includes higher oil price assumptions thanBiodiesel Average crude oil price, US$/bbl Figure 5.9:the short term in case oil prices continue to soar. The use

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Greenhouse gas action plan for the transportation sector in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research has been to identify ways in which the state of Iowa can do its part in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in its transportation sector. A variety of strategies and policy actions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Iowa are explored in this report. Some of these actions would be relatively easy to implement, while others would require significant changes in how people live and travel. The authors` work on this research effort has been conducted in tandem with a larger study to develop a greenhouse gas action plan for Iowa.

Ney, R.A.; Schnoor, J.L.; Foster, N.S.J.; Forkenbrock, D.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Regional Gas Infrastructure -- Is It Ready for the Power Boom?: How Changes in Gas and Electric Industries Affect Reliability an d Competitiveness of Gas-Fired Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boom in gas-fired capacity additions, coupled with today's overheated gas market, make questions of gas supply a top priority for gas and electric industry planners. The relationships between the gas and electric industries are changing -- with the latter becoming a premium customer of the former. While the commodity market is national in scope, many of the impacts and planning challenges are best understood on a regional basis. This report examines five regions where gas-fired capacity additions are...

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

193

Office of Infrastructure Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Transport Produce Crude Oil Refined products ... PADD 2 Crude Stocks Over ... North American natural gas production areas and pipeline capacities ...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electromagnetic fields and transport coefficients in a hot pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent results on finite temperature electromagnetic form factors and the electrical conductivity in a pion gas. The standard Chiral Perturbation Theory power counting needs to be modified for transport coefficients. We pay special attention to unitarity and to possible applications for dilepton and photon production.

A. Gomez Nicola; D. Fernandez-Fraile

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gas transport model for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A node-bond percolation model is presented for the gas permeability and pore surface area of the coarse porosity in woven fiber structures during densification by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Model parameters include the number of nodes per unit volume and their spatial distribution, and the node and bond radii and their variability. These parameters relate directly to structural features of the weave. Some uncertainty exists in the proper partition of the porosity between ``node`` and ``bond`` and between intra-tow and inter-tow, although the total is constrained by the known fiber loading in the structure. Applied to cloth layup preforms the model gives good agreement with the limited number of available measurements.

Starr, T.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Gas-to-liquids synthetic fuels for use in fuel cells : reformability, energy density, and infrastructure compatibility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel cell has many potential applications, from power sources for electric hybrid vehicles to small power plants for commercial buildings. The choice of fuel will be critical to the pace of its commercialization. This paper reviews the various liquid fuels being considered as an alternative to direct hydrogen gas for the fuel cell application, presents calculations of the hydrogen and carbon dioxide yields from autothermal reforming of candidate liquid fuels, and reports the product gas composition measured from the autothermal reforming of a synthetic fuel in a micro-reactor. The hydrogen yield for a synthetic paraffin fuel produced by a cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch process was found to be similar to that of retail gasoline. The advantages of the synthetic fuel are that it contains no contaminants that would poison the fuel cell catalyst, is relatively benign to the environment, and could be transported in the existing fuel distribution system.

Ahmed, S.; Kopasz, J. P.; Russell, B. J.; Tomlinson, H. L.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation-specific policies, they recommend (in addition to the land use policies mentioned above), that they combine an upstream trading system with a carbon efficiency standard similar to the current CAFE standard. Under this approach a fuel price signal would be complemented by incentives for manufacturers to produce more carbon efficient vehicles. To prevent vehicle manufacturers from being forced to pay more than other sectors for reducing GHG emissions, they recommend that the vehicle makers be allowed to pay a cash penalty equal to the market price of allowances in lieu of meeting carbon efficiency requirements.

Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

LP-Gas transport safety claims confirmed  

SciTech Connect

According to data compiled by the National LPG Association and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the majority of accidents involving LPG transport are not caused by the LPG or by malfunction of the container. In a 34 yr period, only 14 incidents occurred in which permanent storage tanks larger than 500 gal were ruptured. Fewer than 600 of the 44,432 railroad derailments between 1969 and 1975 involved uninsulated pressure-tank cars (generally but not entirely cars containing LPG), and of these derailed cars, only 170 lost some or all of their lading. Over 70% of the derailments were caused by track or equipment problems. LPG trucks in the last five years were involved in only 192 highway and bulk plant incidents; of these, 50 involved tank trucks with leakage which was controlled, and 32 involved fire or container rupture. Most fire or rupture accidents occurred in bulk plant facilities during loading operations, but the installation of new emergency shutoff valves, required by NFPA 58, should diminish this type of accident.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Bayesian Network Methodology for Infrastructure Seismic Risk Assessment and Decision Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and management of infrastructure systems: Review and newbridges. ? Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, (1–11,of Critical Transportation Infrastructure. ? Applications of

Bensi, Michelle Terese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Built Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Built Infrastructure Print E-mail Climate change and its associated impacts, including thawing permafrost, changing sea-levels, rising temperatures, shifts in species distribution...

203

Infrastructure as Landscape [Infrastructure as Landscape, Landscape as Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for appropriating infrastructure as landscape offersPress, 1991). PLACES10:3 STRANG: INFRASTRUCTURE AS LANDSCAPEInfrastr Infrastructure and Landscape In 1964, cultural

Strang, Gary L

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Analysis of Energy Infrastructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Energy Infrastructures Analysis of Energy Infrastructures Project Summary Full Title: Analysis of Energy Infrastructures and Potential Impacts from an Emergent Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Project ID: 250 Principal Investigator: David Reichmuth Brief Description: Sandia National Laboratories is using a system dynamics approach to simulate the interaction of vehicle adoption and infrastructure for hydrogen, electricity, natural gas, and gasoline. Purpose It is envisioned that the transition to hydrogen vehicles will begin by taking advantage of the existing infrastructure for natural gas. This project will study the impact of hydrogen vehicles on demand for natural gas, electricity, and gasoline. The impact of existing energy infrastructures on hydrogen infrastructure growth will also be considered.

205

Systems Infrastructure (SYS 18)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure John Hicks, Karencomponents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests,

Richard Guy; John Hicks; Karen Weeks

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

SYS 5: Systems Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure Kevin Chang, Johnnents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests, and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

208

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure – Optimizing TransitionsInitiating hydrogen infrastructures: preliminary analysis ofOgden, J.M. Modeling Infrastructure for a Fossil Hydrogen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Methanol production from biomass and natural gas as transportation fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (1) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the US, (2) minimizes emissions of criteria pollutants, (3) reduces greenhouse gas emissions from production and use, (4) is cost-competitive with petroleum fuel, and (5) is compatible with the emerging vehicle technologies, especially those powdered by fuel cells. The methanol yield, production cost, and potential for reduction of overall fuel-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated and compared to those of reformulated gasoline. The results show that a process utilizing natural gas and biomass as cofeedstocks can meet the five requirements more effectively than individual processes utilizing those feedstocks separately. When end-use efficiencies are accounted for, the cost per vehicle mile traveled would be less than that of gasoline used in current vehicles. CO{sub 2} emissions from the vehicle fleet would be reduced 66% by methanol used in fuel cell vehicles and 8--36% in flexible-fuel or dedicated-methanol vehicles during the transition period. Methanol produced from natural gas and biomass, together in one process, and used in fuel cell vehicles would leverage petroleum displacement by a factor of about 5 and achieve twice the overall CO{sub 2} emission reduction obtainable from the use of biomass alone.

Borgwardt, R.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting energy demand from gasoline to electricity. GHG benefits. HEVs are optimal or near-optimal for minimum cost in most scenarios. High gas prices and low

Michalek, Jeremy J.

211

Railroad system of Texas: A component of the state and national transportation infrastructure. Research report, September 1996--November 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Railroads continue to play an important role in the Texas transportation system. This study addresses the potential for implementing a rail planning process in the Texas Department of Transportation. The study is documented in three reports, produced in coordinated and parallel efforts by the Center for Transportation Research and the Texas Transportation Institute. This report documents the work performed by TTI, whereby a rail planning framework is presented which formalizes the planning process and presents the key elements as a series of discrete and logical steps. These steps may be used to guide TxDOT in the formation of goals, identification of issues and affected parties, selection of appropriate analytical methodologies, location of data sources, and implementation of results. The report also presents an in-depth discussion of several key issues facing transportation agencies. These include rail line abandonment, intermodal service planning, and urban rail rationalization. A discussion of the Texas rail system covers the Class 1 railroads, shortline railroads, Amtrak, and the Mexican rail system.

Roop, S.S.; Warner, J.E.; Rosa, D.; Dickinson, R.W.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling Gas Transport in the Shallow Subsurface During the ZERT CO2 Release Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Forum (PERF) Dense Gas Dispersion Modeling Project,Atmospheric dispersion of dense gases, Ann. Rev. Fluidgas (LNG) terminals and transport, and emphasize atmospheric dispersion

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel: Benefits, Challenges, and Implementation (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation for the Clean Cities Website highlighting the benefits, challenges, and implementation considerations when utilizing natural gas as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Steel Plate Processing for Line Pipes in Oil and Gas Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This has further helped in reducing the specific steel consumption in oil and gas transportation. The current focus on less wall thickness at increased strength ...

215

Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns.

Information Center

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

New pipeline project could lower natural gas transportation costs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The spread between the price of natural gas at a supply ... Bottlenecks exist moving Marcellus natural gas out of Pennsylvania and delivering natural gas into ...

217

Risk assessment of storage and transport of liquefied natural gas and LP-gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A method for assessing the societal risk of transporting liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) is described, and is illustrated by application to the transport of LPG by tank truck and LNG by tanker ship in the U.S. Data on past experience and projected future handling of these liquefied gases are used with analysis of flammable plume formation and ignition, and population distributions, to estimate the risks of fatalities from tank truck and tanker ship accidents. From an estimated 52 significant accidents per year with LPG tank trucks at the present truck-associated transportation rate of 20 billion gallons of LPG per year, a fatality rate of 1.2 per year is calculated. For the projected 1980 importation of 33 billion gallons by tanker ship, a fatality rate of 0.4 per year is calculated, using a conservatively high one chance in 20,000 of a significant accident per trip. Comparison with fires and explosions from all causes in the U.S. and Canada leading to 10 or more fatalities shows that these are 100 times more frequent than the predicted frequency of comparable LPG and LNG accidents. Tabulations of experience with spills of flammable volatile liquids are included. (GRA)

Simmons, J.A.

1974-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

218

Synchrophasor Communication Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details ongoing work begun in 2011 evaluating benefits of various wide-area communications approaches for transport of synchrophasor measurements, with a focus on latency. Recent discussions on synchrophasor use in the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI) community have included consideration of automated closed-loop control over an Internet protocol (IP) network infrastructure.The project’s focus in 2012 has been twofold: NASPInet architecture design and ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Commuting and health in Cambridge: a study of a 'natural experiment' in the provision of new transport infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The impacts of a specific intervention - the opening of the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway (defined below under ‘Intervention’) - and of other changes in the phy- sical environment will be examined using a controlled quasi-experimental design within the overall... land use type and ‘greenness’ based on detailed land use maps and an enhanced transport network layer using a protocol developed previously [64]. The main cross-sectional analyses will consist of mul- tivariate regression analyses of the demographic...

Ogilvie, David; Griffin, Simon J; Jones, Andy; Mackett, Roger; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna R; Jones, Natalia; Cohn, Simon; Yang, Lin; Chapman, Cheryl

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers by Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak Bachelor means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion State University) Abstract Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability

Victoria, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada Paul Steenhof a,*, Clarence committed to reducing its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 6% below 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012 annual reduction of greenhouse gases of 6% below 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012. The transportation

222

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Year-in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S....

223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives -  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Infrastructure Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives - SchagrinGAS to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives - SchagrinGAS on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives - SchagrinGAS on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives - SchagrinGAS on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives - SchagrinGAS on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives - SchagrinGAS on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Infrastructure and Fuel Incentives - SchagrinGAS on AddThis.com... More in this section...

224

Impact of the 2001 World Trade Center Attack on Critical Interdependent Infrastructures*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; transportation; information and communications; electric power; banking and finance; gas and oil production, water and sewer systems date back nearly 6,000 years in world history [3] and have been essential in nature. By enriching the history of infrastructure interdependence, researchers can better assess both

Mendonça, David

225

Mass transport characterization of a novel gas sparged ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

nitrogen gas through the reactor increased the mass transfer coefficient by an ... demonstrated that the gas±liquid transfer coefficient was greater than that for the

226

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol. Given that future natural gas supply is limited, despite forecasts of increased domestic. If the objective of a policy were the reduction of GHG emissions using a limited supply of natural gas, the bestNATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11 Natural

229

Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is as a result of the more expensive fuel storage tank required to store natural gas safely and effectively). Because of the relative density of natural gas and size of CNG storage containers, CNG vehicles typically1 Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation

230

Thermal Green's functions of the energy-momentum tensor and transport coefficients of the SU(3) Yang-Mills gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Green's functions of the energy-momentum tensor and transport coefficients of the SU(3) Yang-Mills gas

Karsch, Frithjof

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

Brian K Castle

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

Holmes, Michael Jerome (Thompson, ND); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh (Allentown, PA)

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pipelines to Power Lines: Gas Transportation for Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation represents a major growth market for the natural gas industry; but the large, high pressure, highly variable loads required for individual power generators can be difficult to serve. This report, cosponsored by the Gas Research Institute and EPRI, is a design stage assessment of the engineering and costs of the pipelines needed to handle these types of loads.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Infrastructure sectors and the information infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The protection of Critical Information Infrastructures (CIIs) is usually framed in the larger context of protecting all the Critical Infrastructures (CIs) that a Nation or a group of Nations (as is the case of the European Union) consider as essential ...

Andrea Glorioso; Andrea Servida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets; Opportunities for liquefied natural gas supply infrastructure and demand growth in United States and International markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is… (more)

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Transportation in Developing Countries: Greenhouse Gas Scenarios for Delhi, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hand, compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleumcost of owning and operating CNG and LPG vehicles couldto store the fuels. Each CNG bus, for example, currently

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

239

Location and Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facts, Figures Location and Infrastructure Location and Infrastructure LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and...

240

Microelectronics Manufacturing Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... But the manufacturing infrastructure is aging. ... to create an integrated infrastructure for manufacturing ... will enhance the value and utility of portable ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through December 1999.

NONE

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through June 1998.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through January 2000.

NONE

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through October 1999.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through November 1999.

NONE

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through February 1999.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through September 1999.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hydrogen Fueling Systems and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Fueling Systems and Infrastructure Storage & Delivery Production Conversion & Application emissions: renewable based feedstock · Flexibility #12;Targets and Status Hydrogen Delivery 858280%Energyk1.2M1.4M$/mileTrunk lines Hydrogen Gas Pipelines 877065%Energy efficiency 0.531.011.11$/kg H2Cost

252

Accommodating the Green Gas Infrastructure for Road Traffic: A feasibility and conceptual design study of a new distribution system for (Bio-)CNG.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The emergence of green gas is a promising development within the Dutch gas market. Green gas is biogas with natural gas quality and can lead… (more)

Van Rooij, R.L.M.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Gas Balancing Rules Must Take into account the Trade-off between Offering Pipeline Transport and Pipeline Flexibility in Liberalized Gas Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the value and cost of line-pack flexibility in liberalized gas markets through the examination of the techno-economic characteristics of gas transport pipelines and the trade-offs between the different ...

Keyaerts, Nico

254

Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

Air Products and Chemicals

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Field and numerical studies of tracer gas transport and surface gas tranfer in laterally uniform, partially stratified estuaries  

SciTech Connect

Techniques for determination of reaeration rates in natural waterbodies are reviewed. The tracer gas technique for reaeration rate determination offers many advantages over other existing methods and is widely used in rivers and streams. The tracer gas method seems to be the most promising of available techniques for estuarine reaeration rate determination. The two-dimensional late-rally averaged equations describing flow and transport in estuaries are derived and discussed. A laterally averaged numerical model of estaurine hydrodynamics and transport is modified so that tracer gas releases may be simulated. Field studies conducted as a part of the study are described. Two dye releases were made in the upper Houston Ship Channel; two dye tracer gas releases were later made in the same region. The data from these studies are presented and analyzed. Mechanical mixing by shipping traffic proved to be the predominant mixing mechanism and a hindrance to further studies at that site. An intensive field study was conducted in the Colorado River estuary. Field data included velocities, salinity profiles, water surface elevations, and dye concentration data from three dye releases. The data from this study are used to calibrate and test the numerical model of estuarine tracer gas transport.

Bales, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Transportation in Developing Countries: Greenhouse Gas Scenarios for Shanghai, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engines are re-optimized for CNG and are calculated on amanufacturing the engine), then CNG would produce even moreChina natural gas (CNG). The taxi fleet is currently being

Zhou, Hongchang; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

259

Cyber Infrastructure Group Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Infrastructure Group. Welcome. The Cyber Infrastructure Group (775.04) addresses the integration and interoperability ...

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines – Transporting Natural Gas U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

proposed development of several more over the next several years. ... Liquefied natural gas ... region through import terminals located in

262

Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P e rc e n t o f D a y 's T ra n s a c tio n s Mon Fri 3 Analysis of Storage Options and Costs Storage Problem Production plants operate at constant rate, but demand varies...

263

Transportation Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

over 2.5 million miles per year. By replacing these buses with compressed natural gas (CNG) alternatives and funding the construction of additional CNG infrastructure, DOE will...

264

Geochemistry, Fate, and Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling of Subsurface Cyanide Contamination at a Manufactured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the geochemistry, fate, and three-dimensional transport modeling of subsurface cyanide contamination at a manufactured gas plant.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy Transmission and Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Energy Transmission and Infrastructure Northern Ohio (OH) was to lay the conceptual and analytical foundation for an energy economy in northern Ohio that will: • improve the efficiency with which energy is used in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors for Oberlin, Ohio as a district-wide model for Congressional District OH-09; • identify the potential to deploy wind and solar technologies and the most effective configuration for the regional energy system (i.e., the ratio of distributed or centralized power generation); • analyze the potential within the district to utilize farm wastes to produce biofuels; • enhance long-term energy security by identifying ways to deploy local resources and building Ohio-based enterprises; • identify the policy, regulatory, and financial barriers impeding development of a new energy system; and • improve energy infrastructure within Congressional District OH-09. This objective of laying the foundation for a renewable energy system in Ohio was achieved through four primary areas of activity: 1. district-wide energy infrastructure assessments and alternative-energy transmission studies; 2. energy infrastructure improvement projects undertaken by American Municipal Power (AMP) affiliates in the northern Ohio communities of Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; 3. Oberlin, OH-area energy assessment initiatives; and 4. a district-wide conference held in September 2011 to disseminate year-one findings. The grant supported 17 research studies by leading energy, policy, and financial specialists, including studies on: current energy use in the district and the Oberlin area; regional potential for energy generation from renewable sources such as solar power, wind, and farm-waste; energy and transportation strategies for transitioning the City of Oberlin entirely to renewable resources and considering pedestrians, bicyclists, and public transportation as well as drivers in developing transportation policies; energy audits and efficiency studies for Oberlin-area businesses and Oberlin College; identification of barriers to residential energy efficiency and development of programming to remove these barriers; mapping of the solar-photovoltaic and wind-energy supply chains in northwest Ohio; and opportunities for vehicle sharing and collaboration among the ten organizations in Lorain County from the private, government, non-profit, and educational sectors. With non-grant funds, organizations have begun or completed projects that drew on the findings of the studies, including: creation of a residential energy-efficiency program for the Oberlin community; installation of energy-efficient lighting in Oberlin College facilities; and development by the City of Oberlin and Oberlin College of a 2.27 megawatt solar photovoltaic facility that is expected to produce 3,000 megawatt-hours of renewable energy annually, 12% of the College’s yearly power needs. Implementation of these and other projects is evidence of the economic feasibility and technical effectiveness of grant-supported studies, and additional projects are expected to advance to implementation in the coming years. The public has benefited through improved energydelivery systems and reduced energy use for street lighting in Elmore, Oak Harbor, and Wellington; new opportunities for assistance and incentives for residential energy efficiency in the Oberlin community; new opportunities for financial and energy savings through vehicle collaboration within Lorain County; and decreased reliance on fossil fuels and expanded production of renewable energy in the region. The dissemination conference and the summary report developed for the conference also benefited the public, but making the findings and recommendations of the regional studies broadly available to elected officials, city managers, educators, representatives of the private sector, and the general public.

Mathison, Jane

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Publication of "Year in Review 2010: Energy Infrastructure Events...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in: U.S. energy infrastructure Energy flows within and into the United States Oil and gas exploration, production, movement, and demand worldwide Published daily, excluding Federal...

267

DOE News Release - DOE Funds 23 Alternative Fuel Vehicle Infrastructur...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alternative fuel infrastructure projects include 11 E85 (85 percent ethanol) projects, 8 CNG (compressed natural gas) projects, and 4 B20 (20 percent biodiesel) projects. The 12...

268

DOE News Release - DOE Funds Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

find locations offering alternative fuels such as ethanol (E85), compressed natural gas (CNG), and propane. DOE has targeted infrastructure development and promotion projects that...

269

Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure – Optimizingof the 2005 National Hydrogen Association Meeting,the lowest-cost Hydrogen delivery mode , Manuscript

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Kinetics of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents for transport reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, to understand effects of space time of reaction gas mixtures on initial reaction kinetics of the sorbent-hydrogen sulfide system, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 sorbent and AHI-1 was examined. These sorbents were obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbents in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 1,000--4,000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 450--600 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.03--0.09 s. The range of reaction duration is 4--14,400 s.

K.C. Kwon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

SciTech Connect

Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Improving California’s Infrastructure Services: The California Infrastructure Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the US to improve infrastructure planning, provision andtool for improving infrastructure planning, provision andBuilding Canada: Modern infrastructure for a Strong Canada (

David E. Dowall; Robin Ried

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Strategy for Infrastructure: The California Infrastructure Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has an enormous backlog of infrastructure investment needs,proposed two critical infrastructure policy institutions:and the Performance- Based Infrastructure Initiative (PBI

Dowall, David E.; Ried, Robin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A practical model to predict gas hydrate formation, dissociation and transportability in oil and gas flowlines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The oil and gas industry is facing very challenging production issues with offshore explorations in deeper and colder waters. Longer subsea tiebacks will be required… (more)

Zerpa, Luis Eduardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 130 mm particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-525 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

K.C. Kwon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of EX-SO3 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 110 {micro}m particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-550 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.

K.C. Kwon

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. In this report, the reactivity of AHI-5 was examined. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 9000-18000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-500 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.071-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-10800 s.

K.C. Kwon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Russia's sorry infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The loss of the nuclear submarine Kursk and the fire in Moscow's TV tower are indications of an infrastructure in grievous disrepair. The outlook for Russia's technological infrastructure remains grim, experts insist. Almost 70 percent of the population ...

J. Oberg

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Financing infrastructure projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure is of great importance to the development and economic growth of communities. Due to the increased demand on sophisticated infrastructure, governments' budgets are not anymore able to satisfy this growing ...

Eid, Serge Emile

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Parking Infrastructure and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A B O U T how parking infrastructure affects energy demand,the extensive parking infrastructure, including the costs ofdata on parking infrastructure. For example, consider the

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Aprad; Madanat, Samer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas transport model for chemical vapor infiltration. Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A node-bond percolation model is presented for the gas permeability and pore surface area of the coarse porosity in woven fiber structures during densification by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Model parameters include the number of nodes per unit volume and their spatial distribution, and the node and bond radii and their variability. These parameters relate directly to structural features of the weave. Some uncertainty exists in the proper partition of the porosity between {open_quotes}node{close_quotes} and{open_quote}bond{close_quotes} and between intra-tow and inter-tow, although the total is constrained by the known fiber loading in the structure. Applied to cloth layup preforms the model gives good agreement with the limited number of available measurements.

Starr, T.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ���¢��������real-world���¢������� retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation���¢��������s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products���¢�������� Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user���¢��������s fueling experience.

Edward C. Heydorn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 136,000 refuse trucks were in operation in the United States in 2007. These trucks burn approximately 1.2 billion gallons of diesel fuel a year, releasing almost 27 billion pounds of greenhouse gases. In addition to contributing to global climate change, diesel-fueled refuse trucks are one of the most concentrated sources of health-threatening air pollution in most cities. The landfills that they ultimately place their waste in are the second largest source of human-related methane emissions in the United States, accounting for approximately 23 percent of these emissions in 2007. At the same time, methane emissions from landfills represent a lost opportunity to capture and use a significant energy resource. Many landfill-gas-to-energy (LFGTE) projects are underway in an attempt to curb emissions and make better use of this energy. The methane that is extracted from these landfills can be converted into a transportation fuel, sold as a pipeline-quality natural gas, operate turbines for electricity, or be flared. The unique relationship that occurs between refuse trucks' constant visits to the landfill and the ability of the landfill itself to produce a transportation fuel creates an ability to accomplish emissions reduction in two sectors with the implementation of using landfill gas to fuel refuse trucks. Landfill owners and operators are very reluctant to invest in large capital LFGTE projects without knowing their long-term feasibility. The costs and benefits associated with each LFGTE project have been presented in such a way that owners/operators can make informed decisions based on economics while also implementing clean energy technology. Owners/operators benefit from larger economic returns, and the citizens of the surrounding cities benefit from better air quality. This research focused on six scenarios: converting landfill gas (LFG) to liquefied natural gas (LNG) for use as a transportation fuel, converting LFG to compressed natural gas (CNG) for use as a transportation fuel, converting LFG to pipeline-quality natural gas, converting LFG to electricity, flaring LFG, and doing nothing. For the test case of a 280-acre landfill, the option of converting LFG to CNG for use as a transportation fuel provided the best benefit-cost ratio at 5.63. Other significant benefit-cost findings involved the LFG-to-LNG option, providing a 5.51 benefit-cost ratio. Currently, the most commonly used LFGTE option of converting LFG to electricity provides only a 1.35 benefit-cost ratio while flaring which is the most common mitigation strategy provides a 1.21, further providing evidence that converting LFG to LNG/CNG for use as a transportation fuel provides greater economic benefits than the most common LFGTE option or mitigation strategy.

Sprague, Stephen M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGIONAL REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhD Melissa Klingenberg, PhD Hydrogen Program Hydrogen Program Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Resource Dynamics Corporation (RDC) Tradeoff/Sensitivity Analyses of Hydrogen Delivery Approaches EDO Fiber Science High Pressure/High Strength Composite Material Development and Prototyping CTC * Program Management * Hydrogen Delivery - CH 4 /H 2 co-transport - H 2 separation - Delivery approaches * Advanced Materials - Characterization - Testing/Analyses - Predictive Modeling * Sensors SRNL Pipeline Life Management Program Develop infrastructure technology for a H 2 economy Aims to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen

286

Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

Liebrock, Lorie M. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Duggan, David Patrick

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A computer model of gas generation and transport within TRU waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model has been developed to predict radiolytic gas generation and transport within Transuranic (TRU) waste drums and surrounding enclosures. Gas generation from the radiolytic decomposition of organic material contaminated with plutonium is modeled and the concentrations of gas throughout the waste drum and enclosures are determined using a diffusional transport model. The model accurately reproduces experimentally measured gas concentrations. With polyethylene waste in unvented drums, the model predicts that the concentration of hydrogen gas can exceed 4 mole percent (lower flammable limit) with only about 5 curies of plutonium. If the drum liner is punctured and an unrestricted 0.75-in. carbon composite filter vent is installed in the drum lid, the plutonium loading can be increased to 240 Ci without generating flammable gas mixtures. Larger diameter filters can be used to increase the curie loading. The model has been used to show that shipments of 1000 Ci of plutonium-238 contaminated waste from Savannah River to the WIPP site are feasible using the TRUPACT shipping container. 10 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, F.G. III

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet U.S. transportation energy demand.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have indicated that substitutes for conventional petroleum resources will be needed to meet U.S. transportation energy demand in the first half of this century. One possible substitute is natural gas which can be used as a transportation fuel directly in compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas vehicles or as resource fuel for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. This paper contains a preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet future U.S. transportation fuel demand. Several scenarios of natural gas demand, including transportation demand, in the U.S. to 2050 are developed. Natural gas resource estimates for the U. S. are discussed. Potential Canadian and Mexican exports to the U.S. are estimated. Two scenarios of potential imports from outside North America are also developed. Considering all these potential imports, U.S. natural gas production requirements to 2050 to meet the demand scenarios are developed and compared with the estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The comparison results in a conclusion that (1) given the assumptions made, there are likely to be supply constraints on the availability of U.S. natural gas supply post-2020 and (2) if natural gas use in transportation grows substantially, it will have to compete with other sectors of the economy for that supply-constrained natural gas.

Singh, M. K.; Moore, J. S.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

ICME Infrastructure Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industrial-standard, robust infrastructure. Challenges and opportunities relative to an ICME infrastructure will be presented. Proceedings Inclusion? Undecided ...

290

Fluxnet Synthesis Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dataset Collaboration Infrastructure Deb Agarwal (LBNL),for the support infrastructure. As a result of this effort,

Agarwal, Deborah A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Fueling Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) engages in public-private

292

Pipeline transportation and underground storage are vital and complementary components of the U  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, June 2005 1 This report looks at the level of growth that occurred within the U.S. natural gas transportation network during 2004. In addition, it includes a discussion and an analysis of recent gas pipeline development activities and an examination of additional projects proposed for completion over the next several years. Questions or comments on the contents of this article should be directed to James Tobin at james.tobin@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-4835. Expansion of the U.S. natural gas transmission network slowed in 2004, both in terms of added transportation capacity and new pipeline mileage. Only about 1,450 miles

293

Critical Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling: A Survey of U.S. and International Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nation’s health, wealth, and security rely on the production and distribution of certain goods and services. The array of physical assets, processes, and organizations across which these goods and services move are called "critical infrastructures".1 This statement is as true in the U.S. as in any country in the world. Recent world events such as the 9-11 terrorist attacks, London bombings, and gulf coast hurricanes have highlighted the importance of stable electric, gas and oil, water, transportation, banking and finance, and control and communication infrastructure systems. Be it through direct connectivity, policies and procedures, or geospatial proximity, most critical infrastructure systems interact. These interactions often create complex relationships, dependencies, and interdependencies that cross infrastructure boundaries. The modeling and analysis of interdependencies between critical infrastructure elements is a relatively new and very important field of study. The U.S. Technical Support Working Group (TSWG) has sponsored this survey to identify and describe this current area of research including the current activities in this field being conducted both in the U.S. and internationally. The main objective of this study is to develop a single source reference of critical infrastructure interdependency modeling tools (CIIMT) that could be applied to allow users to objectively assess the capabilities of CIIMT. This information will provide guidance for directing research and development to address the gaps in development. The results will inform researchers of the TSWG Infrastructure Protection Subgroup of research and development efforts and allow a more focused approach to addressing the needs of CIIMT end-user needs. This report first presents the field of infrastructure interdependency analysis, describes the survey methodology, and presents the leading research efforts in both a cumulative table and through individual datasheets. Data was collected from open source material and when possible through direct contact with the individuals leading the research.

Not Available

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

Sutton, W.H.

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, “Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle,” May 2008.

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

AN ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR FISSION-PRODUCT TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION FROM GAS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

An important mechanism in the transport and deposition of very small particles from gas streams to the surfaces of a conduit is diffusion due to the Brownian movement of particles. The heat-mass analogy is used to describe the diffusion, and equations are derived for the deposition of fission products from a gas stream to wall surfaces as a function of the distance along the conduit. Effects of radioactive decay on the validity of the heat-mass analogy in applying standard heat transfer relations to predict material transfer to wall surfaces are discussed. (auth)

Ozisik, M. N.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

National Infrastructure Protection Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Infrastructure Protection Plan 2006 Preface Preface i The ability to protect the critical infrastructure and key resources (CI/KR) of the United States is vital to our national security, public health and safety, economic vitality, and way of life. U.S. policy focuses on the importance of enhancing CI/KR protection to ensure that essential governmental missions, public services, and economic functions are maintained in the event of a

298

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.jisea.org Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan

299

ICME: Informatics and Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2010... interfaces and data management systems that can be read by computers are important to enable a cyber infrastructure, their use in materials ...

300

Infrastructure Operation Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e-Infrastructures for scientific communitiesD4Science – No. 212488 www.d4science.eu DOCUMENT INFORMATION Project Project acronym: Project full title:

Dsa. B; Pedro Andrade; Pedro Andrade; Pasquale Pagano; Andrea Manieri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Research and development of Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Fuel cell infrastructure and commercialization study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper has been prepared in partial fulfillment of a subcontract from the Allison Division of General Motors under the terms of Allison`s contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-90CH10435). The objective of this task (The Fuel Cell Infrastructure and Commercialization Study) is to describe and prepare preliminary evaluations of the processes which will be required to develop fuel cell engines for commercial and private vehicles. This report summarizes the work undertaken on this study. It addresses the availability of the infrastructure (services, energy supplies) and the benefits of creating public/private alliances to accelerate their commercialization. The Allison prime contract includes other tasks related to the research and development of advanced solid polymer fuel cell engines and preparation of a demonstration automotive vehicle. The commercialization process starts when there is sufficient understanding of a fuel cell engine`s technology and markets to initiate preparation of a business plan. The business plan will identify each major step in the design of fuel cell (or electrochemical) engines, evaluation of the markets, acquisition of manufacturing facilities, and the technical and financial resources which will be required. The process will end when one or more companies have successfully developed and produced fuel cell engines at a profit. This study addressed the status of the information which will be required to prepare business plans, develop the economic and market acceptance data, and to identify the mobility, energy and environment benefits of electrochemical or fuel cell engines. It provides the reader with information on the status of fuel cell or electrochemical engine development and their relative advantages over competitive propulsion systems. Recommendations and descriptions of additional technical and business evaluations that are to be developed in more detail in Phase II, are included.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

Dept. of Energy/Dept. of Transportation Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program: program plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is the program plan for a cooperative project of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) of the Department of Transportation and the Division of Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) of the Department of Energy to test and evaluate the use of gas-turbine engines in transit buses. UMTA is responsible for furnishing buses from UMTA grantees, technical direction for bus/engine integration, and coordination of operational use of buses in selected cities. TEC is responsible for providing gas turbines, data acquisition/reduction services, and management for the complete project. The project will be carried out in three phases. In Phase I, prototype turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be tested at a test facility to obtain baseline data. Five turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in revenue service in one city. In Phase II, preproduction turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be baseline tested and ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities. In Phase III, production gas turbine engines will be used. Only the turbine-powered bus will run baseline tests in this phase. Ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Chapter 6: Infrastructure 131 Chapter 6: Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipelines, storage facilities, liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification terminals and gas processing units, with a focus on pipelines, LNG import terminals, processing and storage; affecting the natural gas of production. Natural Gas Storage Natural gas is stored in underground storage facilities to help meet seasonal

Reuter, Martin

308

Hot-gas filter testing with the transport reactor demonstration unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot-gas filter element performance (particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability) as a function of temperature and filter face velocity during short-term operation (100-200 hours). This filter vessel will be utilized in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot-gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the power systems development facility (PSDF) utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and, indirectly, the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville.

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O.; Haley, J.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

310

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Development Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the hot-gas cleanup (HGC) work on the transport reactor demonstration unit (TRDU) located at the Environmental Research Center is to demonstrate acceptable performance of hot-gas filter elements in a pilot-scale system prior to long-term demonstration tests. The primary focus of the experimental effort in the 2-year project will be the testing of hot- gas filter elements as a function of particulate collection efficiency, filter pressure differential, filter cleanability, and durability during relatively short-term operation (100-200 hours). A filter vessel will be used in combination with the TRDU to evaluate the performance of selected hot- gas filter elements under gasification operating conditions. This work will directly support the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the M.W. Kellogg transport reactor located at Wilsonville, Alabama and indirectly the Foster Wheeler advanced pressurized fluid-bed combustor, also located at Wilsonville and the Clean Coal IV Pinon Pine IGCC Power Project. This program has a phased approach involving modification and upgrades to the TRDU and the fabrication, assembly, and operation of a hot-gas filter vessel (HGFV) capable of operating at the outlet design conditions of the TRDU. Phase 1 upgraded the TRDU based upon past operating experiences. Additions included a nitrogen supply system upgrade, upgraded LASH auger and 1807 coal feed lines, the addition of a second pressurized coal feed hopper and a dipleg ash hopper, and modifications to spoil the performance of the primary cyclone. Phase 2 included the HGFV design, procurement, and installation. Phases 3 through 5 consist of 200-hour hot-gas filter tests under gasification conditions using the TRDU at temperatures of 540-650{degrees}C (1000-1200{degrees}F), 9.3 bar, and face velocities of 1.4, 2. and 3.8 cm/s, respectively. The increased face velocities are achieved by removing candles between each test.

Swanson, M.L.; Ness, R.O., Jr. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

The UNICORE Grid infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UNICORE (Uniform Interface to Computer Resources) is a software infrastructure supporting seamless and secure access to distributed resources. UNICORE allows uniform access to different hardware and software platforms as well as different organizational ... Keywords: Abstract Job, HPC portal, Java, UNICORE, grid infrastructure, seamless access

Mathilde Romberg

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Defending Critical Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply new bilevel and trilevel optimization models to make critical infrastructure more resilient against terrorist attacks. Each model features an intelligent attacker (terrorists) and a defender (us), information transparency, and sequential actions ... Keywords: bilevel program, critical infrastructure protection, homeland defense, homeland security, mixed-integer program, trilevel program

Gerald Brown; Matthew Carlyle; Javier Salmerón; Kevin Wood

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies; Natural Gas Trasit Users Group (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and and infrastructure research, development, and deployment through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to help the United States reduce its dependence on imported petro- leum and to pave the way to a future transportation network based on hydrogen. Natural gas vehicles can also reduce emissions of regulated pollutants compared with vehicles powered by conventional fuels such as gasoline

314

PNNL Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Name Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center...

315

Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Analysis of CO2 Separation from Flue Gas, Pipeline Transportation, and Sequestration in Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was written to satisfy a milestone of the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration task of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration project. The report begins to assess the costs associated with separating the CO2 from flue gas and then injecting it into an unminable coal seam. The technical challenges and costs associated with CO2 separation from flue gas and transportation of the separated CO2 from the point source to an appropriate sequestration target was analyzed. The report includes the selection of a specific coal-fired power plant for the application of CO2 separation technology. An appropriate CO2 separation technology was identified from existing commercial technologies. The report also includes a process design for the chosen technology tailored to the selected power plant that used to obtain accurate costs of separating the CO2 from the flue gas. In addition, an analysis of the costs for compression and transportation of the CO2 from the point-source to an appropriate coal bed sequestration site was included in the report.

Eric P. Robertson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

318

ElisaTM - Car to infrastructure communication in the field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Car to infrastructure (C2I) communication as an aspect of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) is a topic that is currently under wide research. Most works however deal with theoretical analysis, simulative evaluation or closed testbeds. There are ... Keywords: C2C, C2I, C2X, Car to car, Car to infrastructure, Traffic light communication

Benno Schweiger; Christian Raubitschek; Bernard Bäker; Johann Schlichter

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a multi-species lattice gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargoes being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) to characterize the motion of the interacting cargoes, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of non-equilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation/deposition processes introduce qualitatively new features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or {\\it shocks}. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various {\\it in-vivo} situations.

Sudipto Muhuri; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

320

GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling Hydrogen Scenario Meeting August 9-10, 2006 Keith Parks, NREL GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling * Station Analysis - Selection Criteria - Los...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Group E Charging Infrastructure Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Domicile & Workplace Charging: Being available were vehicles spend a lot of time (Level 1/2) * Gas Station model * Fast charging * Battery Swap * Flow Batteries: Electrolyte swap for long distance traveling * Dynamic Wireless Charging * Strategically placed and visible * Widespread and visible Charging Infrastructure (Group E) July 30, 2012 Breakout Session #2 - Refine Consumer Acceptance Concepts and Infrastructure Scenarios * DOE Actions for Fast Charging Scenario: * R&D on power transfer rates for batteries * Energy storage research to minimize grid impacts and demand charges

322

A Computational Approach to the Real Option Management of Network Contracts for Natural Gas Pipeline Transport Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commodity merchants use real option models to manage their operations. A central element of such a model is its underlying operating policy. We focus on network contracts for the transport capacity of natural gas pipelines, specific energy conversion ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, capacity valuation, commodity and energy conversion assets, energy-related operations, heuristics, math programming, natural gas pipelines, operations management practice, operations management/finance interface, petroleum/natural gas industries, real options, sensitivities, spread options

Nicola Secomandi; Mulan X. Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Economic implications of natural gas vehicle technology in U.S. private automobile transportation; Implications of natural gas vehicle technologies on household transportation in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transportation represents almost 28 percent of the United States' energy demand. Approximately 95 percent of U.S. transportation utilizes petroleum, the majority of which is imported.… (more)

Kragha, Oghenerume Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

WesternGovernors’Asociation Transportation Fuels for the Future Natural Gas and Propane WGA Hydrogen Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The following report is based on the contributions of the individuals and organizations listed below. The Team members were chosen for their breadth of knowledge and industry or policy experience. The group was assembled with the goal of having a wide scope of interests including industry, academia and environmental analysis. The group also worked towards consensus viewpoints on the critical issues impacting the development of natural gas and propane as commercially available alternative fuels. This consensus model helped to achieve a balanced perspective on the challenges and potential solutions to further commercial development of this alternative transportation fuel.

Tom Brotherton Weststart/calstart; Curtis Donaldson; Cleanfuel Usa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

326

IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fuelin

327

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure JOHN DAVIS: Nearly everyone who owns a plug-in electric vehicle has some capacity to replenish the battery at home, either with a dedicated 220-volt charger, or by...

328

Guidelines for Infrastructure Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are already over 60,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) on the road, and PEVs sales are rapidly growing. Although several hundred million dollars have been invested in infrastructure to support PEVs, additional investment will be needed as the number of non-petroleum-fueled vehicles increases. This project attempted to answer the question: how much charging infrastructure is really required for PEVs? This question is difficult to answer due to significant differences between the way PEVs and ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

MFC Communications Infrastructure Study  

SciTech Connect

Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Characterizing the impact of diffusive and advective soil gas transport on the measurement and interpretation of the isotopic signal of soil respiration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state transport models. The affect of natural fluctuations in advective soil gas transport was little to nonCharacterizing the impact of diffusive and advective soil gas transport on the measurement signature of soil respiration, we seek to learn the isotopic composition of the carbon respired in the soil

Bond, Barbara J.

331

CIMS: a framework for infrastructure interdependency modeling and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks, such as transportation, utilities, telecommunication, and even financial networks. While modeling and simulation tools have provided insight into ...

Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Milos Manic

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Program Type Grant Program Loan Program Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help

333

Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure "A sustainable society is one which satisfies its needs without diminishing the prospects of future generations." - Lester R. Brown, Founder and President, Worldwatch Institute Department of Energy facilities managers have a significant role to play in achieving the goals of E.O. 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental Energy and Transportation Management and E.O. 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. The expectation is that DOE will build, operate and maintain energy efficient, environmentally sensitive buildings that provide a comfortable and productive working environment. DOE Sustainable Environmental Stewardship will reduce the

334

Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

Suski, N; Wuest, C

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

335

Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

Jeong, Hyunju [Georgia Institute of Technology; Pandit, Arka [Georgia Institute of Technology; Crittenden, John [Georgia Institute of Technology; Xu, Ming [University of Michigan; Perrings, Charles [Arizona State University; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Li, Ke [University of Georgia; French, Steve [Georgia Institute of Technology

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CRITICAL FOUNDATIONS PROTECTING AMERICA'S INFRASTRUCTURES The Report of the President's Commission ...

337

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

338

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Print banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

339

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Transportation and Air Quality Transportation Energy Policy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

340

Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com...

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Inspection on AddThis.com...

343

Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Today’s society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS©, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS© development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwin’s theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS© to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS© infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS© and the preliminary results.

Not Available

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geographically-Based Infrastructure Geographically-Based Infrastructure Analysis for California Joan Ogden Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis Presented at the USDOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Meeting Washington, DC August 9-10, 2006 Acknowledgments UC Davis Researchers: Michael Nicholas Dr. Marc Melaina Dr. Marshall Miller Dr. Chris Yang USDOE: Dr. Sig Gronich Research support: USDOE; H2 Pathways Program sponsors at UC Davis * Refueling station siting and sizing are key aspects of designing H2 infrastructure during a transition * Initial H2 stations may be co-located with vehicle fleets * Wider consumer adoption of H2 vehicles depends on fuel availability and cost (which are related to station number, size and location), + other factors. * Decision when and where to deploy network

345

EV Charging Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charging Infrastructure Charging Infrastructure JOHN DAVIS: Virtually anywhere in the U.S. you can bring light to a room with the flick of a finger. We take it for granted, but creating the national electric grid to make that possible took decades to accomplish. Now, in just a few years, we've seen the birth of a new infrastructure that allows electric vehicles to quickly recharge their batteries at home, work, or wherever they may roam. But this rapid growth has come with a few growing pains. Starting with less than 500 in 2009, there are now over 19,000 public-access charging outlets available to electric vehicles owners at commuter lots, parking garages, airports, retail areas and thousands of

346

Infrastructure: A technology battlefield in the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major part of technological advancement has involved the development of complex infrastructure systems, including electric power generation, transmission, and distribution networks; oil and gas pipeline systems; highway and rail networks; and telecommunication networks. Dependence on these infrastructure systems renders them attractive targets for conflict in the twenty-first century. Hostile governments, domestic and international terrorists, criminals, and mentally distressed individuals will inevitably find some part of the infrastructure an easy target for theft, for making political statements, for disruption of strategic activities, or for making a nuisance. The current situation regarding the vulnerability of the infrastructure can be summarized in three major points: (1) our dependence on technology has made our infrastructure more important and vital to our everyday lives, this in turn, makes us much more vulnerable to disruption in any infrastructure system; (2) technologies available for attacking infrastructure systems have changed substantially and have become much easier to obtain and use, easy accessibility to information on how to disrupt or destroy various infrastructure components means that almost anyone can be involved in this destructive process; (3) technologies for defending infrastructure systems and preventing damage have not kept pace with the capability for destroying such systems. A brief review of these points will illustrate the significance of infrastructure and the growing dangers to its various elements.

Drucker, H.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

The role of Wireless Sensor Networks in the area of Critical Information Infrastructure Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical Infrastructures, such as energy, banking, and transport, are an essential pillar to the well-being of the national and international economy, security and quality of life. These infrastructures are dependent on a spectrum of highly interconnected ... Keywords: Critical Information Infrastructure Protection, Network Security, Wireless Sensor Networks

Rodrigo Roman; Cristina Alcaraz; Javier Lopez

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

349

The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Final Report on National NGV Infrastructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work fimded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to (1) identi& barriers to establishing sustainable natural gas vehicle (NGV) infrastructure and (2) develop planning information that can help to promote a NGV infrastructure with self-sustaining critical maw. The need for this work is driven by the realization that demand for NGVS has not yet developed to a level that provides sufficient incentives for investment by the commercial sector in all necessary elements of a supportive infrastructure. The two major objectives of this project were: (1) to identifi and prioritize the technical barriers that may be impeding growth of a national NGV infrastructure and (2) to develop input that can assist industry in overcoming these barriers. The approach used in this project incorporated and built upon the accumulated insights of the NGV industry. The project was conducted in three basic phases: (1) review of the current situation, (2) prioritization of technical infrastructure btiiers, and (3) development of plans to overcome key barriers. An extensive and diverse list of barriers was obtained from direct meetings and telephone conferences with sixteen industry NGV leaders and seven Clean Cities/Clean Corridors coordinators. This information is filly documented in the appendix. A distillation of insights gained in the interview process suggests that persistent barriers to developing an NGV market and supporting infrastructure can be grouped into four major categories: 1. Fuel station economics 2. Value of NGVs from the owner/operator perspective 3. Cooperation necessary for critical mass 4. Commitment by investors. A principal conclusion is that an efficient and effective approach for overcoming technical barriers to developing an NGV infrastructure can be provided by building upon and consolidating the relevant efforts of the NGV industry and government. The major recommendation of this project is the establishment of an ad hoc NGV Infrastructure Working Group (NGV-I WG) to address the most critical technical barriers to NGV infrastructure development. This recommendation has been considered and approved by both the DOE and GRI and is the basis of continued collaboration in this area.

GM Sverdrup; JG DeSteese; ND Malcosky

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Distributed RFID Tag Storage Infrastructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We leverage increasing passive RFID tag memory to propose distributed RFID tag storage infrastructures (D-RFID stores). A D-RFID store is a large set of tags with significantly sized re-writeable storage. Interrogators interact with D-RFID stores by reading from and writing to tags, providing a wide range of possible applications that are otherwise resource-inefficient. Examples include tagging trees in a forest to track hikers, interactive smart posters to provide location-based social interaction and collaboration, and tags transporting digital information in situations where reliable network connectivity is not available. We propose a system architecture for D-RFID stores by describing the tag distribution in space and time, different storage structures, and the middleware linking the different components together. We also describe assurance in our system. We motivate D-RFID stores through examples and describe potential avenues of research. 1

Victor K. Y. Wu; Mirko Montanari; Nitin H. Vaidya; Roy H. Campbell

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

353

National Infrastructure Protection Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this context, our critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) may be directly exposed to the event themselves or indirectly exposed as a result of the dependencies and interde- pendencies among CIKR. Within the CIKR protection mission area, national priorities must include preventing catastrophic loss of life

Sen, Pradeep

354

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST Sandia Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND 2012-1846P CustomTraining Sandia providesPRAsandhowtheycanbemanaged to increase levels of safety and security. Like othertrainings,Sandiaexpertsdesigncoursesto beasbroadorin

355

Multi-component gas transport in CANDU fuel rods during severe accidents.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The multi-component transport of steam, hydrogen and stable fission gas in the fuel-to-clad gap of defective CANDU fuel rods, during severe accident conditions, is investigated. Based on a general Stefan-Maxwell treatment this work considers how incoming steam will diffuse into a breached rod against a counter-current flow of non-condensable fission gases and out-flowing hydrogen that is produced from the internal reaction of steam with the Zircaloy cladding or urania. The ability of the oxidized clad to act as a physical barrier to either hydrogen or oxygen diffusion was further investigated in the current work with a molecular-dynamics approach, with the interactions between atoms represented by a Modified Embedded Atom Method. During the initial Zircaloy oxidation phase in the CRL experiments, the model was able to predict the reduced fission product release kinetics as well as the timing for the completion of the clad-oxidation process. In this simulation, the model (with an effective gap size of 20 {micro}m) was able to successfully predict whether singlesided or double-sided oxidation had occurred in accordance with the metallographic examination. However, in order to account for the observed release kinetics after the completion of clad oxidation, it was necessary to assume a greater atmospheric exchange due to possible cracking of the brittle oxide layer. With the assumption of cracking (by assuming a reduced path length for gas transport), the model was successfully able to reproduce the fission product release kinetics and the final fuel stoichiometry as determined from end-of-test weight gain measurements. This analysis particularly shows that local hydrogen production (from the internal fuel oxidation process) will result in a reduced local oxygen potential in the fuel-to-clad gap compared to that which occurs in the bulk coolant.

Szpunar, B; Lewis, B. J.; Arimescu, V. I.; Dickson, R. S.; Dickson, L. W.; Baskes, M. I. (Michael I.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Expansion of the U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

unconventional resources. Furthermore, infrastructure additions related to imports of natural gas, including ... Office of Oil and Gas, September 2009 11

357

Hydrogen Production Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production Infrastructure Options Analysis January 26, 2006 Brian D. James Julie Perez Peter Schmidt (703) 243 - 3383 Brian_James@DirectedTechnologies.com Directed Technologies, Inc. Page 1 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Agenda 1. Project Description and Objective 2. Team Members 3. Approach 4. Model Theory, Structure and Assumptions 5. Model Description 1. Logic 2. Features 3. Cost Components (Production, Delivery & Dispensing) 6. Los Angeles Transitional Example 7. Model Flexibility Page 2 of 39 26 January 2006 2006-1-26 DOE Transition Workshop Team Members & Interactions Start: May 2005 (effective) End: Summer 2007 * Directed Technologies, Inc.- Prime * Sentech, Inc., Research Partner * Air Products, Industrial Gas Supplier * Advisory Board * Graham Moore, Chevron Technology Ventures

358

Measurement of gas transport through fiber preforms and densified composites for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas transport via pressure-driven permeation or via concentration-driven diffusion is a key step in the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. This paper describes methods for the measurement of these properties for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon-fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel-fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon-fiber three-dimensional (3-D) weave composite. The permeability of Nicalon cloth layup preforms is strongly dependent on the packing density over the range of 29--40 vol% but is only weakly dependent on the orientation of the alternating cloth layers. The permeability of Nextel braid preforms is dependent on the thread count and the weight for cloths with similar construction and packing density. The gas permeability of the finer wave (6.3 tows/cm (16 tows/in.)) is approximately one-half that of the coarser weave (3.5 tows/cm (9 tows/in.)). Results are reported for a small number of infiltrated composites with Nextel fiber reinforcement. Attempts to mount a Nicalon-fiber 3-D weave preform specimen have been unsuccessful. Results for a small number of composite specimens with 3-D weave reinforcement are reported.

Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure ur critical infrastructure--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure O ur critical infrastructure-- roads, bridges, transit-of-the-art approach to asset management of public infrastructure. ORNL's Capabilities · Simulation-based, optimization. · Innovative optimization tools to assess tradeoffs between construction, maintenance, and demolition over

360

Underground Infrastructure Research and Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

productivity, environmental improvement and renewal of the aging underground infrastructure. OrganizationalCenter for Underground Infrastructure Research and Education CUIRE Board Members Sam Arnaout Pipe Association Tim Kennedy, AMERON NOV Chad Kopecki, Dallas Water Utilities David Marshall, Tarrant

Texas at Arlington, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & Manufacturing (IIEDM) Project. ... designed to support distributed supply chain integration and e ...

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

362

Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NextEnergy (Detroit) Station Infrastructure Lessons Learned 4 UNITED STATES Department of Energy Infrastructure Lessons Learned Infrastructure Legal Contracts Legal agreements take...

363

Integrating Infrastructure Planning: The Role of Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating Infrastructure Planning: The Role of Schools B Ypolice protection, and infrastructure that makes citiesplan to upgrade critical infrastructure. The plan calls for

McKoy, Deborah; Vincent, Jeffrey M.; Makarewicz, Carrie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mobile element into the networking infrastructure.Our fluid infrastructure design saves significant energy inIntelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Aman

Kansal, Aman; Somasundara, Arun; Jea, David C; Srivastava, Mani B; Estrin, D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Re-imagining Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Re-imagining Infrastructure Re-imagining Infrastructure Document was provided during March 4, 2011 DOE-QTR meeting Re-imagining Infrastructure More Documents & Publications INL...

366

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Amanto develop a fluid infrastructure: mobile components arebuilt into the system infrastructure for enabling specific

Aman Kansal; Arun Somasundara; David Jea; Mani Srivastava; Deborah Estrin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station Location Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the primary transit infrastructure finance method.Paper 2009-04 Transit Infrastructure Finance Through StationWP-2009-04 Transit Infrastructure Finance Through Station

Ian Carlton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Resilient Everyday Infrastructure [To Rally Discussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and redundant civic infrastructure. Opposite: Users at theand gardens are users of infrastructure, demanding more andResilient Everyday Infrastructure William R. Morrish When a

Morrish, William R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Improving Utilization of Infrastructure Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key advantage of infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) clouds is providing users on-demand access to resources. To provide on-demand access, however, cloud providers must either significantly overprovision their infrastructure (and pay a high price for ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Infrastructure-as-a-Service, High Throughput Computing

Paul Marshall; Kate Keahey; Tim Freeman

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Roadmap to Funding Infrastructure Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roadmap to Funding Infrastructure Development Roadmap to Funding Infrastructure Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Roadmap to Funding Infrastructure Development Agency/Company /Organization: OECD/ITF Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.internationaltransportforum.org/jtrc/DiscussionPapers/DP201209.pdf Related Tools European Green Cars Initiative Asian Development Bank - Transport TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS This paper discusses the initiatives and procedures necessary for the successful development of large-scale transportation Public Private Partnership projects from a developer's point of view. The topics covered in this paper include: Project Procurement, Proper Risk Allocation, and

371

Managing critical information infrastructure security compliance: a standard based approach using ISO/IEC 17799 and 27001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information technology constitutes a substantial component of the critical infrastructure of many nations Systems used by utilities and service industries such as electricity, water, wastewater treatment and gas are key components of these critical infrastructures ...

Wipul Jayawickrama

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Development Infrastructure Grant Program (Mississippi) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Infrastructure Grant Program (Mississippi) Development Infrastructure Grant Program (Mississippi) The Development Infrastructure Grant Program (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Construction Developer Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Schools Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $150,000 Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Grant Program Provider Community Service Divison The Development Infrastructure Grant Program (DIP) is a grant program that is available to fund publicly owned infrastructure, including electricity generation and distribution. Funding from this program can be used by municipalities and counties to assist with the location or expansion of businesses. Usage of the funds must be directly related to the

373

CIMS: A FRAMEWORK FOR INFRASTRUCTURE INTERDEPENDENCY MODELING AND ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, utilities, telecommunication, and even financial networks. While modeling and simulation tools have provided insight into the behavior of individual infrastructure networks, a far less understood area is that of the interrelationships among multiple infrastructure networks including the potential cascading effects that may result due to these interdependencies. This paper first describes infrastructure interdependencies as well as presenting a formalization of interdependency types. Next the paper describes a modeling and simulation framework called CIMS© and the work that is being conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to model and simulate infrastructure interdependencies and the complex behaviors that can result.

Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Milos Manic

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue security is a major concern for utilities. Theft of electric service in the United States is widespread. In 2006, the revenue estimate for non-technical losses was 6.5 billion. Non-technical losses are associated with unidentified and uncollected revenue from pilferage, tampering with meters, defective meters, and errors in meter reading. In this report, revenue security describes the use of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) technology to minimize non-technical losses.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meier AKMeier@lbl.gov (510) 486-4740 Links Transportation and Air Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

376

Public Power Infrastructure Protection Act (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Infrastructure Protection Act (Nebraska) Power Infrastructure Protection Act (Nebraska) Public Power Infrastructure Protection Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Nebraska Public Power District This statute affirms the state's commitment to protecting electric

377

Reliable Muddle: Transportation Scenarios for the 80% Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goal for 2050 (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation describing transportation scenarios for meeting the 2050 DOE goal of reducing greenhouse gases by 80%.

Melaina, M.; Webster, K.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perspectives . . . . . . . . . . . . Gas-Liquid Interface5.4 A Novel Gas-Liquid Interface Model . . . . 5.4.1Chapter 5 deals with a novel gas/liquid interface. Chapter 6

Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Environment. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from AviationD17): 4560. EPA (2006). Greenhouse Gas Emissions from theInventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a component of conventional high temperature water gas shift iron oxide based catalysts. The catalysts contained Fe-Al-Cr-Cu-O and were synthesized by co-precipitation. A series of catalysts were prepared with 5 to 50 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with 8 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 4 wt% CuO, and the balance Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All of the catalysts were compared to a reference WGS catalyst (88 wt% FeO{sub x}, 8 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 4 wt% CuO) with no alumina. Alumina addition to conventional high temperature water gas shift catalysts at concentrations of approximately 15 wt% increased CO conversion rates and increase thermal stability. A series of high temperature water gas shift catalysts containing iron, chromia, and copper oxides were prepared with small amounts of added ceria in the system Fe-Cr-Cu-Ce-O. The catalysts were also tested kinetically under WGS conditions. 2-4 wt% ceria addition (at the expense of the iron oxide content) resulted in increased reaction rates (from 22-32% higher) compared to the reference catalyst. The project goal of a 10,000 liter per day WGS-membrane reactor was achieved by a device operating on coal derived syngas containing significant amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide. The membrane flux was equivalent to 52 scfh/ft{sup 2} based on a 600 psi syngas inlet pressure and corresponded to membranes costing $191 per square foot. Over 40 hours of exposure time to syngas has been achieved for a double membrane reactor. Two modules of the Chart reactor were tested under coal syngas for over 75 hours with a single module tested for 50 hours. The permeance values for the Chart membranes were similar to the REB reactor though total flux was reduced due to significantly thicker membranes. Overall testing of membrane reactors on coal derived syngas was over 115 hours for all reactors tested. Testing of the REB double membrane device exceeded 40 hours. Performance of the double membrane reactor has been similar to the results for the single reactor with good maintenance of flux even after these long exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Of special in

Thomas Barton; Tiberiu Popa

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized...

382

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Type Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development Program The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation provides funding for alternative fueling infrastructure...

383

Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure Sustainable Buildings and Infrastructure Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate...

384

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations Advanced Metering Infrastructure Security Considerations The purpose of this report is to provide utilities implementing Advanced...

385

Civil Infrastructure - Advanced Sensing Technologies and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Municipal utilities are not able to ... will complete the infrastructure manager's toolkit ... more effectively the challenges presented by aging infrastructure. ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program The Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program (EVITP) provides training and certification for people installing electric...

387

Infrastructure and Operations | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Infrastructure and Operations develops and executes NNSA's infrastructure investment, maintenance, and operations programs and policies. Printer-friendly version...

388

California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project Place California Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product String representation...

389

STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy, Climate & Infrastructure Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analyses are essential to enhancing the usefulness and credibility of risk and safety analyses by providing storage, transportation, and disposal. Sandia maintains world- class computing facilities and supporting

391

Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CTC Team CTC Team 1 Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Presentation by: The Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Team January 6, 2004 The CTC Team 2 Presentation Outline Introduction of CTC Team CTC Background Technical Approach - CTC Team Member Presentations Conclusions The CTC Team 3 The CTC Project Team Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Hydrogen Separation Hydrogen Sensors Resource Dynamics Corp. Tradeoff Analyses of Hydrogen

392

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2012 | Release Date: Mar. 15, 14, 2012 | Release Date: Mar. 15, 2012 | Next Release: Mar. 22, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Alternative Transportation Fuels Infrastructure Increases from Mid-2000s Levels. Natural gas vehicles can run on either compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG). LNG and CNG fueling infrastructure has grown over the past several years, and recently, companies in the private sector have announced plans to invest in infrastructure and new technology. Currently, the vast majority of vehicles that use natural gas are powered by CNG, and over 900 of these fueling stations exist in the United States, with more than 50 percent restricted to private access only. The state with

393

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A full fuel-cycle analysis of energy and emissions impacts of transportation fuels produced from natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of its abundance and because it offers significant energy and evironmental advantages, natural gas has been promoted for use in motor vehicles. A number of transportation fuels are produced from natural gas; each is distinct in terms of upstream production activities and vehicle usage. In this study, the authors avaluate eight fuels produced from natural gas - compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, dimethyl ether, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, and electricity--for use in five types of motor vehicles--spark-ignition vehicles, compression-ignition vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, battery-powered electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles. Because of great uncertainties associated with advances both in fuel production and vehicle technologies, they evaluate near-term and long-term fuels and vehicle technologies separately. Furthermore, for long-term options, they establish both an incremental technology scenario and a leap-forward technology scenario to address potential technology improvements. The study reveals that, in general, the use of natural gas-based fuels reduces energy use and emissions relative to use of petroleum-based gasoline and diesel fuel, although different natural gas-based fuels in different vehicle technologies can have significantly different energy and emissions impacts.

Wang, M.Q.; Huang, H.S.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Economic implications of natural gas vehicle technology in U.S. private automobile transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation represents almost 28 percent of the United States' energy demand. Approximately 95 percent of U.S. transportation utilizes petroleum, the majority of which is imported. With significant domestic conventional ...

Kragha, Oghenerume Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Transportation in Developing Countries: An Overview of Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation can be achieved at relatively low incomes — but at a high economic, environmental, and social cost.

Sperling, Daniel; Salon, Deborah

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Plub Borough, PA); Antenucci, Annette B. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

CTS Councils provide a forum for transportation professionals and researchers to exchange information on current transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CTS Councils provide a forum for transportation professionals and researchers to exchange information on current transportation issues and trends. They bring together University faculty and staff on the following multidisciplinary topic areas: Transportation and the Economy; Transportation Infrastructure

Minnesota, University of

399

Final Report - Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Power of Experience The Power of Experience Final Report Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis DOE Award Number: DE-FG36-05GO15032 Project director/principal investigator: Tan-Ping Chen Consortium/teaming Partners: Air Liquide, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, NREL, Tiax, ANL Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis ii TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................... 1-1 1.1 HOW THE RESEARCH ADDS TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE AREA INVESTIGATED. 1-1 1.2 TECHNICAL EFFECTIVENESS AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF THE METHODS OR TECHNIQUES INVESTIGATED OR DEMONSTRATED .................................................... 1-1 1.3 HOW THE PROJECT IS OF BENEFIT TO THE PUBLIC..................................................... 1-1

400

NREL: Energy Analysis: Transmission Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Infrastructure Transmission Infrastructure Grid expansion and planning to allow large scale deployment of renewable generation Large scale deployment of renewable electricity generation will require additional transmission to connect renewable resources, which are wide-spread across the US, but regionally-constrained, to load centers. Long-term transmission planning, based on potential future growth in electric loads and generation resource expansion options, is critical to maintaining the necessary flexibility required for a reliable and robust transmission system. NREL's analyses support transmission infrastructure planning and expansion to enable large-scale deployment of renewable energy in the future. NREL's transmission infrastructure expansion and planning analyses show

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

IT Infrastructure for Strategic Agility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nvesting in IT infrastructure is one of the most challenging tasks facing senior managers who often feel ill equipped to make these decisions. Investing in the right ...

Weill, Peter

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

Materials for Infrastructure Applications - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2008 ... This presentation was given as part of the special Materials in Society session " Materials for Infrastructure: Building Bridges in the Global ...

403

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency. Small events that have no impact on supplies Events that require supply/demand responses Events that result in a ...

404

Data Infrastructure - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software Infrastructure for First-Principles Electronic Structure Computations: Francois Gygi1; 1University of California Davis First-Principles simulations play an ...

405

ADVANCE TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE INFRASTRUCTURE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... relationship to a public utility operation is ... place an added stress on this aging infrastructure. ... management approaches by utilities, and is supporting ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

406

Michigan E85 Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The first quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and reduced regional GHG emissions by 375 tons in the first year of station deployment.

Sandstrom, Matthew M.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

A pilot-scale Process Development Unit for transport and fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has designed and is currently constructing an on-site, hot gas desulfurization (HGD) Process Development Unit (PDU). The PDU is designed to use regenerable solid metal oxide sorbents that absorb hydrogen sulfide from high-temperature, high-pressure simulated coal-gasification fuel gas that is generated by a METC designed syngas generator. The simulated coal gas is a mixture of partially combusted natural gas, water, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. PDU process conditions will be representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling. The PDU supports the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) mission at METC by providing a test bed for development of IGCC cleanup systems that offer low capital cost, operating costs, and costs of electricity. METC intends to develop additional industrial involvement opportunities as the project progresses towards operations. The primary objectives of the PDU are to (1) fill the gap between small-scale testing and large-scale demonstration projects by providing a cost effective test site for transport and fluid-bed desulfurization reactor and sorbent development, (2) demonstrate sorbent suitability over a wide range of parameters, and (3) generate significant information on process control for transport and fluidized bed based desulfurization. PDU data is expected to be used to optimize process performance by expanding the experience for larger scale demonstration projects such as Sierra Pacific Power Company`s Clean Coal Technology project.

McMillian, M.H.; Bissett, L.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Integration of a Structural Water-Gas-Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 The InTegraTIon of a STrucTural WaTer- gaS-ShIfT caTalyST WITh a VanadIum alloy hydrogen TranSporT deVIce Description The purpose of this project is to produce a scalable device that simultaneously performs both water-gas-shift (WGS) and hydrogen separation from a coal-derived synthesis gas stream. The justification of such a system is the improved efficiency for the overall production of hydrogen. Removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas (syngas) stream allows the WGS reaction to convert more carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and maximizes the total hydrogen produced. An additional benefit is the reduction in capital cost of plant construction due to the removal of one step in the process by integrating WGS with the membrane separation device.

409

NETL: News Release - DOE's Strategic Gas Center Now Operational  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Strategic Center for Natural Gas will oversee federal research efforts in gas exploration, production and storage, infrastructure reliability, and advanced gas use...

410

Infrastructure Assurance Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems take days to provide essential assessment data following an event like a pipeline break and liquefied natural gas [LNG] production facilities) for each state served by pipelines Benefits NGFast can

Kemner, Ken

411

Order 636 has worrisome leftovers for small LDCs. [Natural gas pipeline transportation regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an interview with a representative of a local natural gas distribution company, giving his opinion of the economic effects of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Order 636. This regulation provides that all natural gas, pipelines, and local gas distribution companies (LDC's) contract and manage their own supply and demand sales and purchases. The goal of the legislation was to provide a stable natural gas market which would allow for long term contract sales of natural gas. This paper discusses the economic and business impacts this regulation will have on LDC's which use to spot market purchase the majority of their gas from lowest price suppliers. The end result of this regulation would reduce the available of easily accessible spot market gas and require LCD's to begin negotiating their own contracts.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Critical infrastructure security curriculum modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical infrastructures have succumbed to the demands of greater connectivity. Although the scheme of connecting these critical equipment and devices to cyberspace has brought us tremendous convenience, it also enabled certain unimaginable risks and ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, course modules, critical infrastructures, cybersecurity, programmable logic controllers, security, vulnerability

Guillermo A. Francia, III

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cyber and physical infrastructure interdependencies.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the work discussed in this document is to understand the risk to the nation of cyber attacks on critical infrastructures. The large body of research results on cyber attacks against physical infrastructure vulnerabilities has not resulted in clear understanding of the cascading effects a cyber-caused disruption can have on critical national infrastructures and the ability of these affected infrastructures to deliver services. This document discusses current research and methodologies aimed at assessing the translation of a cyber-based effect into a physical disruption of infrastructure and thence into quantification of the economic consequences of the resultant disruption and damage. The document discusses the deficiencies of the existing methods in correlating cyber attacks with physical consequences. The document then outlines a research plan to correct those deficiencies. When completed, the research plan will result in a fully supported methodology to quantify the economic consequences of events that begin with cyber effects, cascade into other physical infrastructure impacts, and result in degradation of the critical infrastructure's ability to deliver services and products. This methodology enables quantification of the risks to national critical infrastructure of cyber threats. The work addresses the electric power sector as an example of how the methodology can be applied.

Phillips, Laurence R.; Kelic, Andjelka; Warren, Drake E.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cyberwarfare on the Electricity Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The report analyzes the possibility of cyberwarfare on the electricity infrastructure. The ongoing deregulation of the electricity industry makes the power grid all the more vulnerable to cyber attacks. The report models the power system information system components, models potential threats and protective measures. It therefore offers a framework for infrastructure protection.

Murarka, N.; Ramesh, V.C.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduced Compressed Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reduced

416

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Fuels and Power Notes Marine Total Reductionfootprints. Marine Alternative fuels and power sources also3.2 Marine Transportation 3.3 Alternative Fuels and Power

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions

418

Integrating Habitat Fragmentation Analysis into Transportation Planning Using the Effective Mesh Size Landscape Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to planned future transportation projects (Thorne et al.impact of these future transportation projects on habitatthe effects of transportation infrastructure. In the future,

Girvetz, Evan H; Thorne, James H.; Berry, Alison M; Jaeger, Jochen A.G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

H. R. 4604: a bill to promote competition in the natural gas market, to ensure open access to transportation service, to encourage production of natural gas, to provide natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices, to eliminate demand restraints, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Policy Act Amendments of 1986 promotes competition in the natural gas market. Title I ensures open access to transportation service by requiring that interstate pipelines not discriminate in providing transportation services. Title II encourages production of natural gas by removing wellhead price controls and repealing jurisdiction over first sales. Title III provides natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices and eliminates demand restraints. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Category:Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metering Infrastructure Metering Infrastructure Jump to: navigation, search Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure category Pages in category "Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure" The following 31 pages are in this category, out of 31 total. A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Black Hills Power, Inc. Smart Grid Project Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project C CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid Project Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project City of Fulton, Missouri Smart Grid Project City of Glendale Water and Power Smart Grid Project City of Quincy, FL Smart Grid Project City of Westerville, OH Smart Grid Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Distributed Data Integration Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This can result in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. A related issue is keeping up with current trends in information technology often taxes the end-user's expertise and time. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and technologies, use them almost exclusively, and develop a resistance to innovations that can enhance their productivity. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information and the latest technologies. In order to address this problem we are developing a end-user centric, domain-sensitive workflow-based infrastructure, shown in Figure 1, that will allow scientists to design complex scientific workflows that reflect the data manipulation required to perform their research without an undue burden. We are taking a three-tiered approach to designing this infrastructure utilizing (1) abstract workflow definition, construction, and automatic deployment, (2) complex agent-based workflow execution and (3) automatic wrapper generation. In order to construct a workflow, the scientist defines an abstract workflow (AWF) in terminology (semantics and context) that is familiar to him/her. This AWF includes all of the data transformations, selections, and analyses required by the scientist, but does not necessarily specify particular data sources. This abstract workflow is then compiled into an executable workflow (EWF, in our case XPDL) that is then evaluated and executed by the workflow engine. This EWF contains references to specific data source and interfaces capable of performing the desired actions. In order to provide access to the largest number of resources possible, our lowest level utilizes automatic wrapper generation techniques to create information and data wrappers capable of interacting with the complex interfaces typical in scientific analysis. The remainder of this document outlines our work in these three areas, the impact our work has made, and our plans for the future.

Critchlow, T; Ludaescher, B; Vouk, M; Pu, C

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract new  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract new Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract new cyclists Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract new cyclists Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Transport Agency Focus Area: Non-Motorized Transport Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/research/reports/449/ Transport Toolkit Region(s): Australia/North America Related Tools Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool New Videos: Stories of Auto-Rickshaws in India Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS Investigated what type of cycling infrastructure would encourage 'new

423

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

424

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that organizes future transportation scenarios (includingclimate change. In this future, transportation activity andhow potential transportation futures in California could

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Advanced Metering Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the development of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Metering has historically served as the cash register for the utility industry. It measured the amount of energy used and supported the billing of customers for that usage. However, utilities are starting to look at meters in a whole different way, viewing them as the point of contact with customers in supporting a number of operational imperatives. The combination of smart meters and advanced communications has opened up a variety of methods for utilities to reduce operating costs while offering new services to customers. A concise look is given at what's driving interest in AMI, the components of AMI, and the creation of a business case for AMI. Topics covered include: an overview of AMI including the history of metering and development of smart meters; a description of the key technologies involved in AMI; a description of key government initiatives to support AMI; an evaluation of the current market position of AMI; an analysis of business case development for AMI; and, profiles of 21 key AMI vendors.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF RISK FACTORS AFFECTING TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS USING PIPELINES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the United States today, there are thousands of miles, long grids and networks of pipelines conveying natural gas across the nation. Recent pipeline leaks… (more)

Uzoh, Chukwuma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speed Redcutions on Vessel-Based Emissions for InternationalAviation-Related GHG Emissions: A Systems Analysis forthe Environment. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Transportation Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A First Step Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for greenhouse gas emissions, Department of Chemical andStep Toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization ChrisStep toward City-Driven Emissions Rationalization Submitted

Ganson, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Major Changes in Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Capacity, 1998-2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation graphically illustrates the areas of major growth on the national natural gas pipeline transmission network between 1998 and the end of 2008.

Information Center

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Game-Dynamic Model of Gas Transportation Routes and Its Application . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to study an optimal structure of a system of international gas pipelines competing for a gas market. We develop a game-dynamic model of the operation of several interacting gas pipeline projects with project owners acting as players in the game. The model treats the projects' commercialization times as major players' controls. Current quantities of gas supply are modeled as approximations to Nash equilibrium points in instantaneous "gas supply games", in which each player maximizes his/her current netprofit due to the sales of gas. We use the model to analyze the Turkish gas market, on which gas routes originating from Russia, Turkmenistan and Iran are competing. The analysis is carried out in three steps. At step 1, we model the operation of the pipelines as planned and estimate the associated profits. At step 2, we optimize individual projects, with respect to their profits, assuming that the other pipelines operate as planned. At step 3, we find numerical Nash equilibrium commercialization policies for the entire group of the pipelines. The simulations show the degrees to which the planned regimes are not optimal compared to the Nash equilibrium ones. Another observation is that in equilibrium regimes the pipelines are not always being run at their full capacities, which implies that the proposed pipeline capacities might not be optimal. The simulation results turn out to be moderately sensitive to changes in the discount rate and highly sensitive to changes in the price elasticity of gas demand.

Ger Klaassen; Ivan Matrosov; Alexander Roehrl; Alexander Tarasyev; Arkadii Kryazhimskii

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their Impact on the Electric Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Vehicle Transportation Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional Alternative Transportation Vehicles - Compressed Air Vehicles (CAVs) * Use electricity from the grid to power air compressor that stores compressed air - Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) * Connection to grid is in competing demand for fuel * Still an internal combustion engine (ICE) - Hydrogen Vehicles * Use fuel cell technology, no connection to electricity grid 4 General Takeaways * CAVs - Unproven technology - Poor environmental performance - High cost * NGVs - Poor environmental performance - Lack of refueling infrastructure - Cheaper fuel cost than ICEs - No direct impact on electric power grid * Hydrogen - Unproven technology

432

Infrastructure Time: Long-term Matters in Collaborative Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating information infrastructure through communitymythology and infrastructure. In L. Bud-Frierman (Ed. ),Towards information infrastructure studies: Ways of knowing

Karasti, Helena; Baker, Karen S.; Millerand, Florence

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Networks, deregulation, and risk : the politics of critical infrastructure protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RMStandards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RM2- 13; GAO. ?Critical Infrastructure Protection: Multiple

Ellis, Ryan Nelson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Designing and embedding reliable virtual infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a virtualized infrastructure where physical resources are shared, a single physical server failure will terminate several virtual servers and crippling the virtual infrastructures which contained those virtual servers. In the worst case, more failures ... Keywords: infrastructure virtualization

Wai-Leong Yeow; Cédric Westphal; Ula? Kozat

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Fermilab data storage infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework.

Jon A Bakken et al.

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submitted manuscript has been submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- AC05-96OR22464. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non- exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." ORNL/TM-1999/258 AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION David L. Greene Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory November 1999 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . .

437

Synchrophasor Communication Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project evaluated the benefits of various approaches to wide-area communications used for the transport of synchrophasor measurements both within the utility and to external entities such as regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system operators (ISOs). The project also assessed the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative net (NASPInet) concept developed by the North American Synchrophasors Initiative's Data and Network Management Task Team. The NASPInet is a major effort by the...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Synthesis Reports (TSRs) are brief summaries of currently available information on topics of interest to WSDOT staff. Online and print sources may include newspaper and periodical articles, NCHRP and other TRB programs, AASHTO, the research and practices of other state DOTs and related academic and industry research. Internet hyperlinks in the TSRs are active at the time of publication, but host server changes can make them obsolete.

Jeff Doyle; Michel Wendt; Wsdot Library

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

440

Investigating the strategic impacts of natural gas on transportation fuel diversity and vehicle flexibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The near-total dependence of the U.S. transportation system on oil has been attributed to exposing consumers to price volatility, increasing the trade imbalance, weakening U.S. foreign policy options, and raising climate ...

Chao, Alice K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Inversion of long-lived trace gas emissions using combined Eulerian and Lagrangian chemical transport models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method for estimating emissions of long-lived trace gases from a sparse global network of high-frequency observatories, using both a global Eulerian chemical transport model and Lagrangian particle dispersion ...

Manning, A. J.

442

Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases

443

Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrastructure Associates Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.offinf.com Region...

444

State Experience in Hydrogen Infrastructure in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure in California Gerhard H Achtelik Jr. February 17, 2011 Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop California Environmental Protection Agency Air...

445

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs Associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal Project Summary Full Title: Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production...

446

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

447

Facilities and Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities and Infrastructure Facilities and Infrastructure Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and...

448

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IPHE Infrastructure Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE...

449

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Infrastructure and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure and Safety Photo - Aerial view of the klystron gallery. The Infrastructure and Safety directorate is committed to creating, operating and sustaining world-class,...

450

Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for Worker Safety...

451

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness...

452

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis Project ID: 273 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

453

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Analysis Project ID: 268 Principal Investigator: Marc Melaina...

454

Microsoft Word - Infrastructure_Introduction_2011.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Program - Infrastructure Element U.S. Department of Energy - National Energy Technology Laboratory The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Sequestration...

455

Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Analysis: Milestone Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This milestone report identifies a minimum infrastructure that could support the introduction of hydrogen vehicles and develops and evaluates transition scenarios supported by this infrastructure.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

IPHE Infrastructure Workshop - Workshop Proceedings, February...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plan *Identify risks and benefits *Allocate equity Responsible Parties *Program management office *All stakeholders E-16 IPHE INFRASTRUCTURE WORKSHOP E-17 IPHE INFRASTRUCTURE...

457

Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO Webinar: International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges-NOW, DOE, and NEDO December 16, 2013 8:00AM...

458

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Vehicle Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling Infrastructure Rebates - Texas Gas Service to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling Infrastructure Rebates - Texas Gas Service on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling Infrastructure Rebates - Texas Gas Service on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling Infrastructure Rebates - Texas Gas Service on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling Infrastructure Rebates - Texas Gas Service on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) and Fueling Infrastructure Rebates - Texas Gas Service on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas

459

Analytical formulas, general properties and calculation of transport coefficients in the hadron gas: shear and bulk viscosities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elaborated calculations of the shear and the bulk viscosities in the hadron gas, using the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD) model cross sections, are made. These cross sections are analyzed and improved. A special treatment of the resonances is implemented additionally. All this allows for better hydrodynamical description of the experimental data. The previously considered approximation of one constant cross section for all hadrons is justified. It's found that the bulk viscosity of the hadron gas is much larger than the bulk viscosity of the pion gas while the shear viscosity is found to be less sensitive to the hadronic mass spectrum. The maximum of the bulk viscosity of the hadron gas is expected to be approximately in the temperature range ${T=150 190 MeV}$ with zero chemical potentials. This range covers the critical temperature values found from lattice calculations. We comment on some important aspects of calculations of the bulk viscosity, which were not taken into account or were not analyzed well previously. Doing this, a generalized Chapman-Enskog procedure, taking into account deviations from the chemical equilibrium, is outlined. Some general properties, features, the physical meaning of the bulk viscosity and some other comments on the deviations from the chemical equilibrium supplement this discussion. Analytical closed-form expressions for the transport coefficients and some related quantities within a quite large class of cross sections can be obtained. Some examples are explicitly considered. Comparisons with some previous calculations of the viscosities in the hadron gas and the pion gas are done.

Oleg Moroz

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Options Analysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report, by the Nexant team, documents an in-depth analysis of seven hydrogen delivery options to identify the most cost-effective hydrogen infrastructure for the transition and long term. The pro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Towards Manageable Mobile Agent Infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of managing distributed mobile agent infrastructures. First, the weaknesses of current mobile agent implementations will be discussed and identified from the manageability viewpoint. The solutions devised and experimented ...

Paulo Simões; Paulo Marques; Luís Moura Silva; João Gabriel Silva; Fernando Boavida

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Towards an Infrastructure for Authorization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been a great deal of debate about whether a large-scale "publickey infrastructure" is needed for electronic commerce and, if so, whether the technical difficulty of building and deploying such an infrastructure will impede the growth of electronic commerce. We argue here that much of the controversy is attributable to the fact that the term "public-key infrastructure" has not been clearly and correctly defined. We explain why the informal definition most often associated with the term, i.e., that of a global mapping between users' identities and public keys, is not the right definition for electronic commerce and hence that whether such a mapping can and will be built and deployed with available resources is not an especially pressing question. Finally, we describe an alternative type of infrastructural development that we believe really would enable electronic commerce. 1

Position Paper Joan; Joan Feigenbaum

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Modeling hydrogen fuel distribution infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis' fundamental research question is to evaluate the structure of the hydrogen production, distribution, and dispensing infrastructure under various scenarios and to discover if any trends become apparent after ...

Pulido, Jon R. (Jon Ramon), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum gases, and compressed natural gas, but their totalNatural Gas (LNG) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Liquefied

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development  

SciTech Connect

This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Letter Report: Scoping Analysis of Gas Phase Transport from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report documents the results of a computer model to quantify the travel time of tritium (radioactive hydrogen) from an underground nuclear detonation in 1969 toward a proposed producing gas well located 1,500 feet (457 meters) away.

Clay Cooper

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

467

Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization  

SciTech Connect

This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

Donley, C.D.

1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Techno Security's Guide to Securing SCADA: A Comprehensive Handbook On Protecting The Critical Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Around the world, SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) systems and other real-time process control networks run mission-critical infrastructure--everything from the power grid to water treatment, chemical manufacturing to transportation. ... Keywords: Computer Science, Security

Jack Wiles

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

An agent-based tool for infrastructure interdependency policy analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructure interdependencies such as those between the electric power and natural gas markets. These markets are undergoing fundamental transformations including major changes in electric generator fuel sources. Electric generators that use natural gas as a fuel source are rapidly gaining market share. These generators introduce direct interdependency between the electric power and natural gas markets. These interdependencies have been investigated using the emergent behavior of CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool Version 2.0 Plus Natural Gas (SMART II+).

North, M. J.

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

471

A Framework for Testing Innovative Transportation Solutions: A Case Study of Carlink—A Commuter Carsharing Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with compressed natural gas (CNG) Honda Civics, smartcards,startup delays, and limited CNG infrastructure (3). Thesmartcards alone. Limited CNG Infrastructure: During CarLink

Shaheen, Susan; Novick, Linda

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A Framework for Testing Innovative Transportation Solutions: A Case Study of CarLink--A Commuter Carhsaring Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with compressed natural gas (CNG) Honda Civics, smartcards,startup delays, and limited CNG infrastructure (3). Thesmartcards alone. Limited CNG Infrastructure: During CarLink

Shaheen, Susan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Assessing Reliability in Transportation Energy Supply Pathways: A Hydrogen Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term prospects for natural gas supply. Washington DC: SR/worldwide, subjecting natural gas supply to many of the samenatural gas and petroleum infrastructure: (1) primary energy supply, (

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

DRFM: A new package for the evaluation of gas-phase transport properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a complete and modernized procedure to evaluate pure species, binary and mixture transport properties of gases in the low density limit. This includes a description of the relationships used to calculate these quantities and the means used to obtain the necessary input data. The purpose of this work is to rectify certain limitations of previous transport packages, specifically: to employ collision integrals suitable for high temperatures, to modernize the mixture formula, and to modernize the input data base. This report includes a set of input parameters for: the species involved in H{sub 2}-, CO - air combustion, the noble gases, methane and the oxides of nitrogen.

Paul, P.H.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes controlled hydrogen fleet & infrastructure analysis undertaken for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

477

Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

Wickramarachchi, Praneeth, E-mail: praneeth1977@yahoo.co.uk [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nagamori, Masanao [Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Moldrup, Per [Environmental Engineering Section, Dept. of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Komatsu, Toshiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

479

Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Infrastructure and Facilities Management Home > content > Infrastructure and Facilities Management Infrastructure and Facilities Management NNSA restores, rebuilds, and revitalizes the physical infrastructure of the

480

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Funding The Ethanol Infrastructure Incentive Program provides funding to offset the cost of installing ethanol blender pumps at retail fueling stations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas transportation infrastructure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

482

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop: Workshop: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles December 11, 2009 John Garbak, Todd Ramsden Keith Wipke, Sam Sprik, Jennifer Kurtz Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Innovation for Our Energy Future Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration Project Objectives and Targets * Objectives - Validate H 2 FC Vehicles and Infrastructure in Parallel - Identify Current Status and Evolution of the Technology - Objectively Assess Progress Toward Technology Readiness - Provide Feedback to H 2 Research and Development Photo: NREL Solar Electrolysis Station, Sacramento, CA Performance Measure

483

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Year-in-Review: 2010 Year-in-Review: 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy August 2011 OE/ISER Report 8/31/11 i For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about information in this report may be directed to Alice Lippert, Senior Technical Advisor (alice.lippert@hq.doe.gov). Contributors include Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Robert Laramey, Carleen Lewandowski, Max

484

SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

485

Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

Eckels, David E. (Ankeny, IA); Hass, William J. (Ames, IA)

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

PRISM 2.0: Personal Transportation Module of the U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) Model: A Guide to Operation and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The personal transportation/electric vehicle penetration module (Transportation Module) of the U.S. Regional Economy, Greenhouse Gas, and Energy (US-REGEN) integrated regional macroeconomic model is a structural economic model of personal vehicle purchase and driving behaviors that focuses on the adoption of electric vehicles. The module employs a representation of consumers’ demographics, existing vehicles, vehicle choices, and preferences for vehicle characteristics to model personal vehicle ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

487

Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2297, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other than gasoline, the link between the gas tax and utilization of the infrastructure is weakening not remained constant. Rather there is a growing need to maintain and improve the existing, aging infrastructure while expanding and enhancing facilities available to motorists. America's infrastructure received

Burris, Mark W.

488

Emissions of Transport Refrigeration Units with CARB Diesel, Gas-to-Liquid Diesel, and Emissions Control Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel in situ method was used to measure emissions and fuel consumption of transport refrigeration units (TRUs). The test matrix included two fuels, two exhaust configurations, and two TRU engine operating speeds. Test fuels were California ultra low sulfur diesel and gas-to-liquid (GTL) diesel. Exhaust configurations were a stock muffler and a Thermo King pDPF diesel particulate filter. The TRU engine operating speeds were high and low, controlled by the TRU user interface. Results indicate that GTL diesel fuel reduces all regulated emissions at high and low engine speeds. Application of a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions, sometimes almost entirely. The application of both GTL diesel and a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions at high engine speed, but showed an increase in oxides of nitrogen at low engine speed.

Barnitt, R. A.; Chernich, D.; Burnitzki, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Miyasato, M.; Lucht, E.; van der Merwe, D.; Schaberg, P.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Meeting an 80% Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation by 2050: A Case Study in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from ,Board, 2008. California Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory.A. , 2003. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from US

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

NREL: Technology Deployment - Fuels, Vehicles, and Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in-depth information about biodiesel, electricity, ethanol, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane, as well as the vehicles that use these fuels and the infrastructure used to deliver...

491

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Grants The Kentucky Corn Growers' Association (KyCGA) offers grants of $5,000 per pump to retailers installing new E85 dispensers in Kentucky. For more

492

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Infrastructure Grants The Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Program provides financial assistance to qualified E85 and biodiesel retailers. Cost-share grants are available for

493

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Grants The Colorado Corn Blender Pump Pilot Program provides funding assistance for each qualified station dispensing mid-level ethanol blends. Projects

494

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Infrastructure Biofuel Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Cent