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Sample records for gas technology institute

  1. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Gas Technology Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gas Technology Institute will conduct research and development on hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion processes to make gasoline and diesel.

  2. Northwestern University Technological Institute Tight Shale Gas-Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Dongning

    Northwestern University Technological Institute Tight Shale Gas-Hydraulic Fracturing Seminar Series fracturing of horizontal wells is priceless Sidney Green, London Shale Gas Summit, 2010 #12;Vertical Well

  3. Northwestern University Technological Institute Tight Shale Gas-Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Dongning

    Northwestern University Technological Institute Tight Shale Gas-Hydraulic Fracturing Seminar Series Where are we Today: Reservoir and Completion Quality Is Tight Shale Gas and Oil the Answer ? Sidney and with different economic and environmental impacts · Tight Shale Gas and Oil is at least part of the answer

  4. IntegratedEnergySysteminHotel (GasTechnologyInstitute)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Document reductions in hotel operating costs through use of combined cooling, heating, and power. Provide.kelly@gastechnology.org Gas Technology Institute (GTI), of Des Plaines, Illinois, is collaborating with a UTC Power project on this project are UTC Power, Carrier Commercial Systems, and Host Marriott. Knowledge gained from this hotel

  5. TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 2005 TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 152-8550 2 12 1 E3-3 2005 8 TEL. 03 5734 2975 URL. http://www.titech.ac.jp/ PROFILE #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0201 CONTENTS 03 06 06 08 09 10 15 17 25 31 33 37 41 0201 #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE

  6. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  7. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions- Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation on Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions, given by David Cygan of the Gas Technology Institute, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

  8. IntegratedEnergySysteminRemoteCo-opApplication (GasTechnologyInstitute)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , will partner with Basin Electric to utilize waste heat from an existing pipeline compressor station's gas of the combined technologies into a prototype, with a real-time, web- based monitoring and control system, which into the overall system to produce firm power at a competitive rate. Leverage economy of scale by standardizing

  9. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ChemE Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Chemical Engineering Undergraduate technology, chemical engineers play a role in almost every industry and they collaborate with all types, creating and improving pharmaceuticals, fuels, polymers, plastics, cosmetics, cereals and more." Klavs

  10. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY INVITATION Description of work Estimated cost (1) (2) (3) 1 Construction of Institutional/Residential buildings, external development, HVAC, Elevators etc. for Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, at the campus

  11. TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;06 06 TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0201 CONTENTS 03 08 09 10 15 17 25 31 33 37 41 0201 08 23 TokyoTech #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0403 20 1 5 11 #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0605 4 3 2 5 5 4 3 #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

  12. Oil & Gas Science and Technology Rev. IFP, Vol. 61 (2006), No. 1, pp. 5772 Copyright 2006, Institut franais du ptrole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev. IFP, Vol. 61 (2006), No. 1, pp. 57­72 Copyright © 2006. #12;58 Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev. IFP, Vol. 61 (2006), No. 1 INTRODUCTION Increasingly

  13. Tokyo Institute of Technology Tokyo Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    Tokyo Institute of Technology 2004 #12; Tokyo Institute of Technology k O(n-k/2) (Efron et al 1996) 2O(B) (Shimodaira 2002, 2004) O(B) #12; Tokyo Institute of Technology of Technology 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 23 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 23 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  15. 2007200777 12121122 TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007200777 12121122 #12;06 06 TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0201 CONTENTS 03 08 09 10 15 17 25 31 33 37 41 0201 08 23 TokyoTech #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0403 20 1 5 11 #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0605 4 3 2 5 5 4 3 #12;TOKYO

  16. TRANSMITTAL Florida Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    TRANSMITTAL Florida Institute of Technology Department of Marine and Environmental Systems TO: Dr to West Marine for donating the marine coatings and other supplies. Thanks to Bill Bailey for all his.............................................................................................................. 16 4.2. Existing Energy Conversion Systems

  17. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL Sciences Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 y Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Institute of Technology, 1995. This report describes research done partly at the Artificial Intelligence

  18. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Cognitive Sciences and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  19. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This research was sponsored

  20. Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    to generation and propagation of noise from gas turbine engines. Aircraft noise is a critical technical issueReport Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise and systems engineering, gas turbine transmission systems and gas turbine noise. The UTC in gas turbine noise

  1. Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Report Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise and systems engineering, gas turbine transmission systems and gas turbine noise. The UTC in gas turbine noise to generation and propagation of noise from gas turbine engines. Aircraft noise is a critical technical issue

  2. Graz University of Technology Institute for Software Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graz University of Technology Institute for Software Technology Birgit Vogtenhuber Problem Analysis.054, 3 VU Birgit Vogtenhuber Institute for Software Technology Graz University of Technology email: bvogt of Technology Institute for Software Technology Birgit Vogtenhuber Problem Analysis and Complexity Theory, 716

  3. NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY PATENT POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY PATENT POLICY I. POLICY STATEMENT: As a senior public research university, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is committed to extending its knowledge through legislation encourages and promotes technological innovation through the development, commercial exploitation

  4. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Applications Gideon P. Stein Amnon Shashua Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Institute of Computer Science MIT of Technology, 1995 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

  5. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1570 August fl Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1996 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for this research was provided

  6. Institute for Software Technology Reverse Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Institute for Software Technology SOMA Reverse Engineering Univ.Prof. Dr. Franz Wotawa Institut Technology Inhalt Was versteht man unter Reverse Engineering? Techniken/Methoden Probleme VU Software Maintenance 3Institute for Software Technology Engineering vs. Reverse Engineering Idee Produkt/ SystemEngineering

  7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Nuclear Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · No Reprocessing · High Burnup >90,000 Mwd/MT · Direct Disposal of HLW #12;Massachusetts Institute of Technology it can compete with natural gas and still meet safety, proliferation resistance and waste disposal Safety · Improved Proliferation Resistance · Readily Disposable Waste Form #12;Massachusetts Institute

  8. Royal Institute of Technology Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    Royal Institute of Technology Cognitive Radio Model-Based Competence for Software Radios Joseph Communication Systems Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden Cognitive Radio Model-Based Competence for Software Radios Joseph Mitola III August 1999 A thesis submitted to the Royal Institute

  9. Institute for Software Technology Software Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Institute for Software Technology Software Maintenance VU 3.0 WS 2006 Univ.Prof. Dr. Franz Wotawa Institut für Softwaretechnologie wotawa@ist.tugraz.at VU Software Maintenance 2Institute for Software Technology Wozu Software Maintenance? Meine Software ist immer korrekt! Keine Modifikationen. Nur neue

  10. Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Web Survey Service Institutional Research,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Web Survey Service Institutional Research, Office.mit.edu/ist/isnews/v21/n02/210210.html 1. Coordination with the MIT Institutional Research & Web Survey Service. The MIT, intended audience, and desired schedule. The Web Survey Service will host certain web surveys

  11. Institute for Software Technology Klassische Themen der

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intelligence Prof. Dr. Franz Wotawa wotawa@ist.tugraz.at Institute for Software Technology History of AI Technology History of AI 5th century B.C. Aristotle introduced the syllogistic logic 16th century Famous. Institute for Software Technology History of AI 20th century - First Half Bertrand Russell and Alfred North

  12. Samuel Neaman Institute -Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, IsraelSamuel Neaman Institute -Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel Technology Comes Last, Not First

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRAGMATI C LEADERS SIMPLICITY SEEKERS ASPIRATION LOW HIGH LO W achieve explore live connect TECHNOLOGYSamuel Neaman Institute - Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, IsraelSamuel Neaman Institute - Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel 1 Technology Comes Last

  13. New Jersey Institute of Technology August 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ________________________________________________________ NJIT New Jersey Institute of Technology August 2011 #12;2 of 149 TABLE OF CONTENTS ENDORSEMENTS........................................................................................................ 16 REVISIONS AND APPROVAL HISTORY OF THIS HANDBOOK ................................ 17 1. THE INSTITUTE AND ITS ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION ............................. 18 1.1 History and Development

  14. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Computa­ tional Learning, and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute for the laboratory's artificial intelligence research is provided in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency

  15. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL parameters could possibly have application to other problems in vision. We investigate one such application and Cognitive Sciences and at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute

  16. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL research done at the Center for Biological & Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence

  17. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Computational Learning in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and at the Artificial Intelligence

  18. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL for Biological and Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts

  19. High Efficient Natural Gas Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by: Eric Burgis Energy Solutions Center 610-796-1946 eburgis@escenter.org High Efficient Natural Gas Technologies FUPWG 5814 2 Energy Solutions Center Inc. - All Rights...

  20. Emilio Collar and Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Collar and Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management Center Technology Fashions: Building on the Theory of Management Fashions #12;Information Technology Fashions #219 June 2002 #12;2 Information Technology Fashions: Building on the Theory of Management Fashions

  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Institute of Standards and Technology NIST Campus Gaithersburg, MD NET ZERO ENERGY Campus Gaithersburg, MD NET ZERO ENERGY RESIDENTIAL TEST FACILITY PROJECT: CONSULTANT: SHEET TITLE: SCALE Institute of Standards and Technology NIST Campus Gaithersburg, MD NET ZERO ENERGY RESIDENTIAL TEST FACILITY

  2. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1536 Institute of Technology, 1995 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory the National Science Foundation under contract ASC­9217041. Support for the A.I. Laboratory's artificial

  3. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1611 June and Cognitive Sciences, the Center for Biological and Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for the artificial intelligence research

  4. Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Nano Materials Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogawa, Mizuhito

    started in April 2002 as a renewal of the former Center for New Materials originally established as oneJapan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Nano Materials Technology (Lecture) Course Center for Nano Materials and Technology #12;The Center for Nano Materials and Technology (CNMT) has

  5. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL vision tasks, including the computation of image correspondence, object verification, image synthesis at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and within the Center for Biological and Computational Learning

  6. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL parameters could possibly have application to other problems in vision. We investigate one such application of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts

  7. ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SAFETY POLICY COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SAFETY POLICY COMMITTEE OFFICE SAFETY POLICY Approved: October 10 of pinch points before closing desk or file drawers. 3.14 File/desk drawers, bookcases, and cabinet doors

  8. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1537 of Technology, 1995 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and within Science Foundation under contract ASC­9217041. Support for the A.I. Laboratory's artificial intelligence

  9. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Christof

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL of Technology within the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Center for Biological Information Processing is the sluggish time course of the electrical signals in the very early stages of vision compared with our quick

  10. Institute of Photo Electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Photo Electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology of Nankai University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Photo-Electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology...

  11. Oregon Institute of Technology District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Institute of Technology District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oregon Institute of Technology District Heating Low Temperature...

  12. Gas hydrates: technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) implemented a gas hydrates R and D program that emphasized an understanding of the resource through (1) an assessment of current technology, (2) the characterization of gas hydrate geology and reservoir engineering, and (3) the development of diagnostic tools and methods. Recovery of natural gas from gas hydrates will be made possible through (1) improved instrumentation and recovery methods, (2) developing the capability to predict production performance, and (3) field verification of recovery methods. Gas hydrates research has focused primarily on geology. As work progressed, areas where gas hydrates are likely to occur were identified, and specific high potential areas were targeted for detailed investigation. A Geologic Analysis System (GAS) was developed. GAS contains approximately 30 software packages and can manipulate and correlate several types of geologic and petroleum data into maps, graphics, and reports. The system also contains all well information currently available from the Alaskan North Slope area. Laboratory research on gas hydrates includes the characterization of the physical system, which focuses on creating synthetic methane hydrates and developing synthetic hydrate cores using tetrahydrofuran (THF), consolidated rock cores, frost base mixtures, water/ice-base mixtures, and water-base mixtures. Laboratory work produced measurements of the sonic velocity and electrical resistivity of these synthetic hydrates. During 1983, a sample from a natural hydrate core recovered from the Pacific coast of Guatemala was tested for these properties by DOE/METC. More recently, natural hydrate samples acquired from the Gulf of Mexico are being tested. Modeling and systems analysis work has focused on the development of GAS and preliminary gas hydrate production models. 23 refs., 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY Ratified by the Institute Council on Environmental Health and Safety August 2008 POLICY Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia environmental health and safety laws and regulations; and Demonstrating leadership in pollution prevention

  14. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Institute for Software Technology Recommender Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardcover 45.90 American fiction, murder, neo-Nazism attributes #12;Institute for Software Technology 4 fiction, murder, neo- Nazism · User profile Title Genre Author Type Price Keywords ... Fiction Brunonia, Barry, Ken Follett Paperback 25.65 Detective, murder, New York · Simple approach · Compute

  16. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    and a Polymer Engineer with Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation in Greenville, SC. He has hadInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science www.ictas.vt.edu NEW HORIZONS ICTAS SEMINAR) 3. CBET-Broadening Participation Research Initiation Grant in Engineering Program (BRIGE) 4. Science

  17. GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BIOSAFETY MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    in the research facilities, and classrooms located at Georgia Institute of Technology and areas located off safety inspections of laboratories and support areas, provides fire safety services, processes and manages hazardous materials for proper disposal, provides emergency response for hazardous materials

  18. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts, which is likely to play a significant role in eventually making intelligent machines. Not surprisingly

  19. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland State University

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1293 April, 1991 Intelligence Without Reason Rodney A. BrooksPrepared for Computers and Thought, IJCAI-91 Abstract Computers and Thought are the two categories that together de ne Arti cial Intelligence as a discipline

  20. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland State University

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1439 August to fundamentally change the way arti cial intelligence, cognitive science, linguistics, and philosophy think about the organization of intelligence. We expect to be able to better reconcile the theories that will be developed

  1. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL by a grant from the NSF (ASC--9217041). Support for the laboratory's artificial intelligence research. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, the Center for Biological and Computational Learning, and the Artificial

  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    movements in stock market activity. Our theory is motivated by growing empirical evidence on the power, assuming a power law price impact of trades 11 3.1 Sketch of the theoryMassachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Economics Working Paper Series A THEORY

  3. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scassellati, Brian

    February, 1999 A Binocular, Foveated Active Vision System Brian Scassellati MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab project at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. The ac- tive vision system features a 3 degreeMASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1628

  4. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts of antique cars. Computer vision is well on its way to solve restricted versions of the problem of object

  5. CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION POLICY 12/3/03 Page 1 of 5 SUMMARY guidelines related to the funding and the estimating of costs. It also formalizes the review and approval construction project or major renovation with a project cost estimated to be $3 million or greater should

  6. Carnegie Mellon University CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Hittinger B.S.E., Polymer Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Mi Carnegie Mellon University CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL.S., Macromolecular Science, Case Western Reserve University Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA August, 2012

  7. The Lorenz Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    The Lorenz Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology #12;The Lorenz Center: A Fresh Approach to Climate Science Founded by Professor of Atmospheric Science Kerry Emanuel and Professor of Geophysics exciting new results in climate science to the general public. The 2011 inaugural lecture featured Paul

  8. Rachel Andrews Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachel Andrews Georgia Institute of Technology Oscar Franzese Energy & Transportation Science) are roller dynamometers currently used to measure CMV brake efficiency. During a PBBT test, the CMV driver. Acknowledgements: Gary Capps, Mary Beth Lascurain Energy & Transportation Science Division Zane Pannell Pellissippi

  9. Alexander Felfernig & Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felfernig & Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology 10 Wissensverarbeitung 5 Uniform Cost Search Technology 11 Wissensverarbeitung Generalization of bfs ­ Expand state with lowest related costsAlexander Felfernig & Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology 1 Wissensverarbeitung

  10. Alexander Felfernig & Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felfernig & Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology 10 Wissensverarbeitung 5 Uniform Cost Search for Software Technology 11 Wissensverarbeitung Generalization of bfs ­ Expand state with lowest related costsAlexander Felfernig & Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology 1 Wissensverarbeitung

  11. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Natural gas engine technology has evolved to meet the...

  12. Results...National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Standards and Technology (NIST) Workshop on Materials Test Procedures for Hydrogen Pipelines Results...National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Workshop on...

  13. VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology FY 2006 Annual Report U.S. Department of Commerce Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology #12;VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

  14. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturers; and promotion of quality management methods in key sectors, including manufacturing, educationDepartment of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology Three Year Programmatic's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in promoting national competitiveness and innovation

  15. Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics Human Robot Interaction Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Gerald Steinbauer 1 Advanced Robotics ­ Human Robot Interaction #12;Institute for Software Technology Motivation lik t h b t th t· we like to have robots

  16. Institute for Software Technology Model-Based Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    t Institute for Software Technology Model-Based Testing Ausgewählte Kapitel Softwaretechnologie 2 2013/14 B.K. Aichernig Model-Based Testing 1 / 38 #12;t Institute for Software Technology Testing-Based Testing 2 / 38 #12;t Institute for Software Technology Testing vs. Model Checking vs. Proving One proves

  17. COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 1 of 4 7 Institute of Technology (Caltech) that committed cost sharing is proposed, approved, administered;COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 2 of 4 7

  18. Technology options and effective policies to reduce greenhouse gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology options and effective policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve security); DNE21+ model. · National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); AIM model. · Natural Resources both the climate problem and security of supply, and thus provide synergies, while others represent

  19. Visiting Assistant Professor New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Visiting Assistant Professor New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology The Department. Send all material to New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Human Resources, Socorro, NM 87801 of Mathematics at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Tech- nology invites applications for a Visiting Assistant

  20. Alexander Felfernig and Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Software Technology 9 Wissensverarbeitung Environment of Rational Agents II · static vs. dynamic · canAlexander Felfernig and Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology 1 Wissensverarbeitung Alexander Felfernig and Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology Inffeldgasse 16b/2 A-8010 Graz

  1. Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt Miljø A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer Søren Østergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

  2. VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology 2012 Annual Report Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology U.S. Department of Commerce February 2013 #12;VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National

  3. VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology 2007 Annual Report Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology U.S. Department of Commerce March 3, 2008 #12;VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National

  4. Critical Materials Institute signs new member United Technologies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signs new member United Technologies Research Center Contacts: For release: Aug. 18, 2015 Alex King, Director, Critical Materials Institute, (515) 296-4505 Laura Millsaps, Ames...

  5. saturday, september 19, 2009 massachusetts institute of technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    saturday, september 19, 2009 massachusetts institute of technology RECENT NEWS Chemistry's Jo services | jobs | giving | Commencement community students | staff | faculty | parents | alumni calendars

  6. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BRAIN AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratté, Sylvie

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BRAIN AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES DEPARTMENT BCS Memo June 1994) , and Pustejovsky (1991b) among others) without having to incorporate these situational categories in our

  7. Updated 11/1/2012 GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Updated 11/1/2012 GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY OFFICE OF FINANCIAL SERVICES ADMINSTRATION Cash/Investment Management Debt Management Georgia Tech Facilities, Inc. Georgia Advanced Technology Ventures, Inc. Project Accounting Cost Accounting Rate Studies Negotiations Salary, Planning

  8. Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B.

    2006-08-15

    The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

  9. West Virginia University Institute of Technology Curriculum Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , Fall 2010 Athletic Coaching Education 025T Sport Management 026T Major Effective, Fall 2010 Technology Management BS 52.0205 Technology Management 027T Information Technology ET10 Inactive, Fall 2012 ForensicWest Virginia University Institute of Technology Curriculum Matrix Updated July 31 2014 Click

  10. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

  11. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY 1 Risk Management Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY 1 Risk Management Framework Computer Security Enterprise Risk Key activities in managing enterprise-level risk--risk resulting from the operation on a continuous basis #12;NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY 3 Risk Management Framework Security Life

  12. SUNITA PAYRA VERMA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Associate · In project entitled "Scale up to obtain super clean coal - Organo-refining and identification1 SUNITA PAYRA VERMA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology M/S 183 2001- 2005 Centre for Atmospheric Sciences Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IIT Delhi), India

  13. STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 Wave interference and photon tunneling can result in significantSTEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Wednesday November 3, 2010 for Energy Harvesting Professor Zhuomin Zhang George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Georgia

  14. COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 7) #12;COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California: A cost transfer is an after-the-fact transfer of costs (labor or non-labor) from a sponsored or non

  15. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DST) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assess the health risks and environmental effects associated with air toxic emissions (primarily mercury) from fossil-fuel fired utility boilers. EPRI has sponsored research on environmental mercury since 1983 to determine the factors that may influence human health, and to determine the role of electric power generating stations in contributing to those factors. Over the last four years, EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) has conducted EPRI and DOE sponsored testing to develop and demonstrate appropriate measurement methods and control technologies for power plant atmospheric mercury emissions. Building upon the experience and expertise of the EPRI ECTC, a test program was initiated at the Center in July to further evaluate dry sorbent-based injection technologies upstream of a cold-side ESP for mercury control, and to determine the effects of such sorbents on ESP performance. The results from this program will be compared to the results from previous DOE/EPRI demonstrations, and to other ongoing programs. The primary objectives of this test program are to: (1) Determine the levels of mercury removal achievable by dry sorbent injection upstream of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The process parameters to be investigated include sorbent residence time, sorbent type, sorbent size, sorbent loading, and flue gas temperature. (2) Determine the impact of sorbent injection on ESP performance.

  16. VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology 2008 Annual Report Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology U.S. Department of Commerce February 24, 2009 #12;VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED

  17. VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology 1 2009 Annual Report Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology U.S. Department of Commerce March 3, 2010 #12;VISITING COMMITTEE

  18. Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newsroom > Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in...

  19. Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential July 18, 2012 - 3:52pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa...

  20. New Jersey Institute of Technology Invention Disclosure Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NJIT New Jersey Institute of Technology Invention Disclosure Report -Confidential- Docket Number technology. Answering the below questions as completely as possible will enable the Office of Intellectual, and will help in assessing commercialization options. TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY, PROTECTION & TITLE 1. Please indicate

  1. Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Electrical Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    therefore solving the main drawbacks limiting this field of technology: High cost and poor reliability. Kadoor technology enables simple implementation within the CMOS process at low fabrication cost dueTechnion-Israel Institute of Technology Electrical Engineering Department The Sara and Moshe

  2. Battelle Memorial Institute Technologies Available for Licensing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America...

  3. Georgia Institute of Technology Systems Realization Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    builds large load-bearing structures, he uses dense solids; steel, concrete, glass. When nature does load-bearing structures, he uses dense solids; steel, concrete, glass. When nature does the same, she placement of voids · Made by forming gas in metal structure via: injection of gas into melt, use of blowing

  4. Carnegie Mellon University CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to security, reliability, increasing demand, aging infrastructure, competition and environmental impacts horizons, the technical constraints within the system and the environmental impacts of each technology of the technologies available and their relative #12;6 environmental impacts. Several promising options could satisfy

  5. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Rochester Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    this special volume of Heat Transfer Engineering covering the heat transfer- and fluid flow-related papers in the single-phase cate- gory. The papers cover laminar-turbulent transition in liquid as well as in gas flowsPLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Rochester Institute of Technology

  6. Tampere University of Technology Institute of Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    Tampere University of Technology Institute of Software Systems Verification Algorithm Research Group Tampere Verification Tool TVT tutorial Juha Nieminen, Terhi Kilamo, Timo Kivelä, Jaco Geldenhuys Sari Leppänen Antti Valmari #12;Tampere Verification Tool TVT tutorial Contents 1 Introduction 3 1

  7. Mechanism Design The Technion Israel Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanism Design Ron Lavi The Technion ­ Israel Institute of Technology http Budget Balancedness and Bayesian Mechanism Design Interdependent Valuations Future Directions References Importance Mechanism design is a sub-field of economics and game theory that studies the construction

  8. INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occupational Risk Assessment I.A. Papazoglou Human Reliability Z. Nivolianitou Comparative Consequence.A. Papazoglou Energy Technologies & Environmental Impacts A. Stubos Transport Phenomena in Porous Media A. Belesiotis Thermal Storage V. Belesiotis Solar Distillation - Desalination M. Mathioulakis Solar Air

  9. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    to ful ll the thesis requirement for the Master of Engineering degree in Electrical Engineering, and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry. #12;1 Introduction Object detection algorithms surveillance systems and their use in driver assistance systems in cars is being actively explored

  10. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Emerging Technologies in Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Emerging Technologies in Nuclear Science & Engineering ­ Development of novel techniques/tools using particle transport theory methodologies with Alireza Haghighat, Nuclear Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Department Virginia

  11. Carnegie Mellon University CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and health effects of a USA switch from coal to gas electricity generation I analyze the emission benefits, and the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. This research was also supported in part by the Climate parents, Geriann and Paul Lueken. #12;v ABSTRACT The U.S. electric power sector is in the early stages

  12. SETS, March 2006Institute of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellebrand, Sybille

    SETS, March 2006Institute of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Alg. & Tools" in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering (Master program or main study period for Diploma) · 30 min of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Overview ATPG Fault-models & BIST for interconnections Test

  13. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management Center for Coordination Science Crowston * School of Information Studies 4­206 Centre for Science and Technology, Syracuse University and Management Category: Techniques * Please address all correspondence to the first author. #12;Crowston

  14. Massachusetts Institute of Technology A Personal Supercomputer for Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CSAIL Massachusetts Institute of Technology A Personal Supercomputer for Climate Research James C and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory #12;#12;A Personal Supercomputer for Climate Research Computation of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 jhoe@lcs.mit.edu Chris Hill, Alistair Adcroft Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric

  15. NIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    -effectiveness. (2) Precise measurements, calibrations and standards help United States industry and manufacturingNIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act SECTION 1. FINDINGS and measurement standards needed to improve quality and reliability, and (B) new technological processes by which

  16. University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    with the MELCOR Code University of Wisconsin ­Madison Department of Engineering Physics Fusion Technology as fast as 800 kPa/s · MELCOR calculations were performed to determine whether the pressurization rate can be simulated · This paper reviews these experiments and utilizes MELCOR to simulate the experiments #12

  17. Carnegie Mellon University CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ~$15/tonne CO2 to the cost of abatement for solar thermal power, $25 for wind, and $33-$40 for PV. In this thesis I quantify the cost of variability of different renewable energy technologies and then explore energy into the electricity grid. Cost of Variability I calculate the cost of variability of solar

  18. INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Papazoglou Energy Technologies & Environmental Impacts A. Stubos Transport Phenomena in Porous Media A Assessment of Electrical Generation Systems I. Kollas SYSTEMS RELIABILITY & INDUSTRIAL SAFETY LABORATORY I Plasma in Tokamak Machines N. Tsois PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY N. Tsois Thermal Solar Collectors & Systems

  19. Carnegie Mellon University CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 emissions. The costs of variability are dependent on technology type. Variability cost for solar PV is $8-11/MWh, for solar thermal it is $5/MWh, and for wind it is around $4/MWh. Variability adds ~$15/tonne CO2 to the cost of abatement for solar thermal power, $25 for wind, and $33-$40 for PV

  20. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY YOUR DOOR TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    / PHARMACEUTICAL 03 COMPUTER SCIENCE 04 CRISIS MANAGEMENT 04 DATA MODELING AND ANALYSIS 05 DESIGN, ANALYSIS://shortprograms.mit.edu EMAIL: shortprograms@mit.edu 03 BIOTECHNOLOGY/PHARMACEUTICAL Controlled Release Technology: Delivery Systems for Pharmaceuticals and Other Agents Lead Instructor: R. Langer June 8-12, 2015 | $3,250 | 2

  1. Promising Technology: Condensing Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Condensing water heaters achieve higher efficiencies than conventional water heaters by capturing the latent heat from water vapor contained in the flue gases. Combustion gases are exhausted through a secondary heat exchanger where the latent heat of water vapor in the exhaust gas is transferred to the stored water. This technology enables the water heater to achieve thermal efficiencies up to 99%.

  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin, Michigan:Ohio:NewTechnology Jump to:

  3. Making the World Safe for Nuclear Energy 65 John Deutch, Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, served as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    Making the World Safe for Nuclear Energy 65 John Deutch, Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, served as Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition & Technology, Deputy Secretary of Defense, and Director of Central Intelligence in the Clinton

  4. Danish Technological Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa: Energy Resources JumpDaneTechnological

  5. Utilization Technology Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States:UserLaborUtilityUtilization Technology

  6. PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant Program PON-13-503 http ............................................................................................................................5 PIER NATURAL GAS RESEARCH PROGRAM

  7. DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars February 6: Live Webinar on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Bioenergy Technologies Office The Energy...

  8. National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Administration U.S. Department of Commerce February 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Institute of Standards and Technology · Technology Administration · U.S. Department of Commerce February 2007 ATP-Funded Green Process Technologies: Improving U.S. Industrial Competitiveness With Applications in Packaging, Metals Recycling, Energy, and Water Treatment GCR 06-897 Thomas Pelsoci A Benefit-Cost

  9. Sarah E. Reisman Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Sarah E. Reisman Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering · California Institute of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA. 2008-2014 Assistant Professor of Chemistry Division of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology

  10. The Lee Center for Advanced Networking CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Lee Center for Advanced Networking CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY #12;2 t h e l e e c e n v e r v i e w Natural Information Networks 6 Sense and Respond Systems 10 The Architecture Market Research in the Lee Center 38 Radio Transmitters 40 High-Q for Photons 42 Better Network Design

  11. Intelligent Storage Consortium A Center of the Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Intelligent Storage Consortium A Center of the Institute of Technology MEMBERSHIP ADVANTAGES I opportunities MISSION Explores pre-competitive development of intelligent object-based storage systems I, and public sector I OBJECTS INTERCONNECT STORAGE DEVICE BLOCKS FILE SYSTEM FILE SYSTEM USER COMPONENT FILE

  12. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    in atmospheric chemistry/air quality and climate and a growing reputation in oceanography, geophysicsSchool of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology Strategic Plan March 1 opportunities. Vision The vision of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is: To lead in innovative

  13. The Hurricane Sandy Twitter Corpus Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dredze, Mark

    The Hurricane Sandy Twitter Corpus Haoyu Wang Language Technologies Institute Carnegie Mellon response on which researchers can compare and contrast their work. This paper describes the Hurricane Sandy Hurricane Sandy. Introduction Preparing for and responding to natural disasters is a key function of public

  14. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastner, Marc A.

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Chemical Engineering Assistant Professor The MIT Department of Chemical Engineering (http://web.mit.edu/cheme/) invites candidates for faculty appointment may be possible. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in chemical engineering or a related field

  15. STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Wednesday, May 17, 2006 Engineering University of Massachusetts-Lowell Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS) are smart micro systems of Mechanical Engineering at University of Massachusetts at Lowell as an Assistant Professor. His on

  16. Massachusetts Institute of Technology AEGIS: Architecture for Tamper-Evident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CSAIL Massachusetts Institute of Technology AEGIS: Architecture for Tamper-Evident and Tamper and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory #12;#12;AEGIS: Architecture for Tamper-Evident and Tamper users with tamper-evident, authen- ticated environments in which any physical or soft- ware tampering

  17. IS C O N SIN FUSION TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isotopes Using Inertial Electrostatic Confinement B.B. Cipiti Fusion Technology Institute University FUSION OF ADVANCED FUELS TO PRODUCE MEDICAL ISOTOPES USING INERTIAL ELECTROSTATIC CONFINEMENT by Benjamin OF WISCONSIN MADISON WISCONSIN The Fusion of Advanced Fuels to Produce Medical Isotopes Using Inertial

  18. IS C O N SIN FUSION TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . #12;I. INTRODUCTION The inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion concept was first patented OF WISCONSIN MADISON WISCONSIN Composition of the Source Region Plasma in Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Electrostatic Confinement Devices D.R. Boris and G.A. Emmert Fusion Technology Institute University of Wisconsin

  19. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accreditation Program ISSUE DATE: December 19, 2013 LAB BULLETIN NUMBER: LB-80-2013 LAP: Energy Efficient to be added, to the Energy Efficient Lighting Products (EEL) program manager. httpDEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory

  20. HAMBURG UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE FOR SOFTWARE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    HAMBURG UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE FOR SOFTWARE SYSTEMS On The Extension and Integration of Existing SAP Enterprise Services in The Context of SOA4All PATRICK UN Supervisor: Prof. Dr. RALF MÖLLER Co The SOA4All project aims to provide an user-friendly service delivery plat- form to a wide range of users

  1. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory the technical requirements and guidance for the accreditation of laboratories under the NVLAP Voting System Standards (VSS-2002). The new edition incorporates changes resulting from the release of the 2005 Voluntary

  2. Georgia Institute of Technology School of Materials Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Materials Science and Engineering Faculty Policy and Committee Handbook #12;Introduction The purpose of this handbook is to document the MSE School's policies. The committee will function as the faculty-elected entity for down-selecting committee members (and chairs

  3. THE SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    THE SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK: REQUIRED FORMS A.1. Research Advisor Selection form (Chemistry and Biochemistry) A.2 Completion of Data of the program, you will complete courses that provide a bridge between introductory (undergraduate) material

  4. Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the medal· two sides of the medal · forward kinematics · inverse kinematics Gerald Steinbauer 8 Advanced Planar 3-R Manipulator l ki ti h i· planar kinematic chain · moves within one plane · all jointsInstitute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics Manipulation and Grasping

  5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    Institute of Technology Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel INFORMATION FOR USE BY INDUSTRY Revised July 2002 #12;ii MIT photograph/W. Litant A model is prepared for testing in the MIT Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel. #12 information and sketches of use to those planning a test program at the Wright Brothers Wind Tunnel have also

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austria Expert Systems: Application Example Alternative 1: ,,Fish Catcher Game" #12;Alexander Felfernig & Gerald Steinbauer Institute for Software Technology 2 Expert Systems ,,Fish Catcher Game" Develop needed to be able to catch all of the shown fish types). The game should contain at lest 20 levels

  7. Institute for Software Technology Ad anced RoboticsAdvanced Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment ­ no group work 3. practical assignment II (out 13.4, in 22.6) ­ automatically explore a building Advanced Robotics - Organization- 4- 50,0 5 #12;Institute for Software Technology Literature · R Int6. W. Mou and A. Kleiner. Online Learning Terrain Classification for Adaptive Velocity Control

  8. California Institute of Technology Office of Financial Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruck, Jehoshua (Shuki)

    1 California Institute of Technology Office of Financial Services Equipment Fabrication Process of the nature of the fabricated equipment in the proposal narrative and inclusion of the estimated costs be included in the proposal itself. When a proposal includes costs for fabrication, requests for internal

  9. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Analytical Physical Advanced Labs Analytical Biochemistry Inorganic Organic 4. Indicate the two chemistrySchool of Chemistry and Biochemistry Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 A Unit of the University System of Georgia TO: B.S. in Chemistry/B.S. in Biochemistry Degree Candidates

  10. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DELHI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Sanjiva

    FOR CREATION OF PERPETUAL POSITION OF RELIANCE PROFESSOR IN THE AREA OF POLYMER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING of polymer science and engineering at IITD.. 2. Title The perpetual position of Professor will be designatedMEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DELHI AND RELIANCE INDUSTRIES

  11. September 1999 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 1999 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute Computing Resources, January 1999 Enhancements to Data Encryption and Digital Signature Federal Standards, February 1999 Measurement and Standards for Computational Science and Engineering, March 1999 Guide

  12. Campus Technology Capabilities Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) provides a wide variety of technology resources to researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    of technology resources to researchers and students in numerous disciplines. It offers significant highCampus Technology Capabilities Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) provides a wide variety-performance and high-capacity computing, networking, and telecommunications resources that integrate and enable

  13. Speaker Release and Agreement _______________________ ("Speaker") hereby authorizes New Jersey Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    Institute of Technology and its agents, designees or representatives (collectively, "New Jersey Institute: __________________________________________________________________________ Event Location Date Select One: Speaker further authorizes New Jersey Institute of Technology for internal on-campus use only. Speaker further authorizes New Jersey Institute of Technology to broadcast

  14. National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and review as is required to assure the technical soundness of the standard, and seek satisfactory adjustment initiate and participate in the development of the standards, provide technical or other counselNational Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Administration, U.S. Department

  15. Southern California Smart Grid Symposium California Institute of TechnologyCalifornia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    appliances 16. Health technologies 17. Petroleum and 7. Agriculture and mechanization 8. Computers is imperfectinformation is imperfect · Concerns about low-income consumers may be exaggerated ­ People are often more

  16. ExcEllEncE In All WE Do STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    ExcEllEncE In All WE Do STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Editorial Style Guide Print and Digital Standards · 2015 #12;Stevens Institute of Technology · EDITORIAL STYLE GUIDE Page 2 CONTENTS WRITING GREAT ............................................................................ 20 Stevens History

  17. Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Gas Analysis Of...

  18. Gas Turbine Technology, Part A: Overview, Cycles, and Thermodynamic Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The growth of cogeneration technology has accelerated in recent years, and it is estimated that fifty percent of the cogeneration market will involve gas turbines. To several energy engineers, gas turbine engines present a new and somewhat...

  19. Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology Energy Systems Research Office Energy Technology Systems Integration http://www.energy.ca.gov/research/integratio n. It will identify immediate opportunities to improve the assessment, monitoring, and integrity management program

  20. Construction progresses at GE's Oil & Gas Technology Center ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home > Impact > Construction progressing at GE's newest research center, the Oil & Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)...

  1. Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139. b MIT Energy Initiative, Massachusetts Institute: 617-253-6609, Fax: 617-253-9845. Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, Vol. 1, No. 1. Copyright 2012 by the IAEE. All rights reserved. The Influence of Shale Gas on U.S. Energy and Environmental

  2. 2015 Georgia Institute of Technology NIST Transactive Energy Challenge Preparatory Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control ­ Black Start ­ Etc. 7 #12;© 2015 Georgia Institute of Technology Architecture Summary The grid© 2015 Georgia Institute of Technology NIST Transactive Energy Challenge Preparatory Workshop March, 2015 Santiago Grijalva Georgia Institute of Technology Co-Simulation of Decentralized Grid Control

  3. IllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    and management using smart grid technology, as well as several other research projects focusing on wind energyIllInoIs InstItute of technology's WInd energy research consortIum Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research (WISER) Illinois Institute of Technology On-campus wind turbine [OVER] The U

  4. seari.mit.edu 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 Using Pareto Trace to Determine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    ) and minimize aggregate cost (lifecycle cost) #12;seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 7seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 Using Pareto Trace to Determine System Conference March 25, 2009 #12;seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2 Managing System

  5. Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Gas INTRODUCTION Alternative energy technologies such asmotivations of alternative energy technologies: mitigatingaddresses the goal of alternative energy technology

  6. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciencewww.ictas.vt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    to advance technologies from laser drilling to power electronics, from natural gas storage to transgenic electrification, and natural gas storage. http://arpa-e.energy.gov/ #12;

  7. A threat taxonomy for mHealth privacy Institute for Security, Technology, and Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A threat taxonomy for mHealth privacy David Kotz Institute for Security, Technology, and SocietyHealth technologies. We develop a taxonomy of the privacy-related threats, and discuss some of the technologies

  8. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics NONLINEAR RESONANT OSCILLATIONS OF GAS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaofan

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 NONLINEAR RESONANT OSCILLATIONS OF GAS-cone and bulb, and appeared to find that the hone-cone shape #12;American Institute of Aeronautics

  9. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

  10. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Simulation of a Gas Turbine Combustor Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Numerical Simulation of a Gas Turbine of combustion by using nanosecond pulsed plasma actuators for a gas turbine combustor. Moreau [2] and Corke et

  11. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg Campus, 1999 NIST 260-150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a major role in the history of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), as well as its#12;National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg Campus, 1999 #12;NIST 260, Author Tomara Arrington, Composition and Design Standard Reference Materials Program Technology Services

  12. seari.mit.edu 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 Scenario Planning in Dynamic Multi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Institute of Technology 5 Background · Traditional SE ­ Cost As Independent Variable ­ Few Design Points;seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 7 Background · Traditional SE ­ Cost of Technology 8 Background · Traditional SE ­ Cost As Independent Variable ­ Few Design Points ­ Trades

  13. seari.mit.edu 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 Economics of Human Systems Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    of Technology 4 PM Concerns about HSI Cost Major Recent UAS Procurement O&MRDT&E MilPers Averaged over 3 years Total Budget >$1B, Costs #12;seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 5seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 Economics of Human Systems Integration

  14. seari.mit.edu 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 Better Early Estimation of Human Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    WWII #12;seari.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 4 Why Measure SE/HSI Cost? Aircraft of Technology 9 Disconnect Between SE/PM Estimate and Life Cycle Cost "Life Cycle Cost of Surface Combatants.mit.edu © 2009 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 10 Comparison of System Life Cycle Costs Surface Combatants

  15. Perfect Power Prototype for Illinois Institute of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad

    2014-09-30

    Starting in October 2008, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), in collaboration with over 20 participating members, led an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, promote, and commercialize a microgrid system and offer supporting technologies that will achieve Perfect Power at the main campus of IIT. A Perfect Power system, as defined by the Galvin Electricity Initiative (GEI), is a system that cannot fail to meet the electric needs of the individual end-user. The Principle Investigator of this Perfect Power project was Dr. Mohammad Shahidehpour, Director of the Robert W. Galvin Center for Electricity Innovation at IIT. There were six overall objectives of the Perfect Power project: (1) Demonstrate the higher reliability introduced by the microgrid system at IIT; (2) Demonstrate the economics of microgrid operations; (3) Allow for a decrease of fifty percent (50%) of grid electricity load; (4) Create a permanent twenty percent (20%) decrease in peak load from 2007 level; (5) Defer planned substation through load reduction; (6) Offer a distribution system design that can be replicated in urban communities.

  16. Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeway, Katy; Rogers, R.E.; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D.

    2000-02-01

    This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

  17. Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Stripper Well Consortium - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Driving Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newest APS Fellow Driving Groundbreaking Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to...

  19. Curriculum, Admissions, & Contact Information on Back Rochester Institute of Technology offers Masters and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Curriculum, Admissions, & Contact Information on Back Rochester Institute of Technology offers in digital imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic & applied research. Employers

  20. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center, 1994-- 1995: Report to the President

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the objectives of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center, its activities, and its staffing, particularly in 1994-1995.

  1. CONSTRUCTION SAFETY POLICY JANUARY 2014 Page 1 of 9 California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    CONSTRUCTION SAFETY POLICY ­ JANUARY 2014 Page 1 of 9 California Institute of Technology GUIDELINES..................................................4 HOW TO DISPOSE OF CYTOTOXIC WASTE.................................................................................................4 WASTE CYTOTOXIC DRUGS

  2. BIomass GasIfIcaTIon Summary of technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    or coal, into a clean gaseous fuel that can be burned in a gas engine to generate electricity-rankfuels,such as mallee and brown coal, into a clean gaseous fuel with very low tar concentration. This has the capacityBIomass GasIfIcaTIon Summary of technology Gasification converts a solid fuel, such as biomass

  3. IFP --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --(Script : 1er specimen) --1 --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --rev. IFP, Vol. xx (2009), No X, pp. 00-00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2009-01-01

    IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 1 -- Oil & Gas Science2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology - Rev. IFP, 65, 3 (2010) 435-444" DOI : 10.2516/ogst/2010007 #12;IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 2

  4. Gas Reactor Technology R&D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblems I n QEstimates - EnergyGasGasU.S.

  5. TOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    the nation's energy landscape. However, the environmental impacts associated with ``fracking'' for shale gasTOPIC: Shale Gas Emissions w/David Allen, Energy Institute HOST: Jeff Tester and Todd Cowen DATE: November 20th , 12:00 -1:00pm, 300 Rice Hall Atmospheric Impacts of Expanded Natural Gas Use Hydraulic

  6. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics PERFORMANCE INVESTIGATION OF SMALL GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 PERFORMANCE INVESTIGATION OF SMALL GAS TURBINE and topped engines. INTRODUCTION Gas turbines are typical power sources used in a wide size range, development, and application of small gas turbines yielding high power density and enabling low-cost air

  7. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Performance Optimization of Gas Turbines Utilizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Performance Optimization of Gas Turbines-tube or rotary pulse detonation engines (PDE) 2 to enhance and exceed the performance of gas turbines. As another for gas turbine applications has not yet been achieved, mostly due to circumstances other than

  8. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Rochester Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Rochester Institute of Technology://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713723051 Microchannels--Short History and Bright Future Satish G. Kandlikar a a Mechanical Engineering Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, USA. Online Publication Date: 01 January 2003

  9. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Rochester Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Rochester Institute of Technology G. Kandlikar a a Heat in History Editor, Mechanical Engineering Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York. Online Publication Date: 01 March 2003 To cite this Article Kandlikar

  10. BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES of NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY The successor of Schools of New Jersey (N.J.S.A. 18A:64E) is legislatively designated as New Jersey Institute of Technology for Industrial Education of Newark, New Jersey Originally Adopted by the Board of Trustees on March 20, 1959

  11. Copyright 2010 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, INCOSE, and PSM, subject to restrictions on page 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Copyright © 2010 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, INCOSE, and PSM, subject to restrictions by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, INCOSE, and PSM, Page 2 subject to restrictions on page 2 Additional, and to prepare derivative works from this document is granted, with attribution to LAI, INCOSE, PSM, and SEAri

  12. Copyright 2007 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, INCOSE, and PSM, subject to restrictions on page 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Copyright © 2007 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, INCOSE, and PSM, subject to restrictions by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, INCOSE, and PSM, Page 2 subject to restrictions on page 2 Copyright from this document is granted, with attribution to LAI, INCOSE, PSM, and SEARI, and the original author

  13. PARTISAN ACTIVITIES POLICY New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) adheres to a longstanding, deliberative policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARTISAN ACTIVITIES POLICY New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) adheres to a longstanding and responsibility is expressly set out in State Statute, N.J.S.A. 18A:64E-12 et seq., also known as the New Jersey Institute of Technology Act of 1995. Questions concerning compliance with this policy should be directed

  14. FINAL DRAFT 4/1/11 New Jersey Institute of Technology Number 12-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unallowable costs in accordance with OMB Circular A-21 and New Jersey Institute of Technology policiesFINAL DRAFT 4/1/11 New Jersey Institute of Technology Number 12-06 University Policies and Procedures Date of Issue: October 12, 2011 Subject: GRANTS AND CONTRACTS - UNALLOWABLE COSTS A. OVERVIEW

  15. Big Bear Solar Observatory -New Jersey Institute of Technology 2005 Greetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Big Bear Solar Observatory - New Jersey Institute of Technology 2005 Greetings The Center for Solar-Terrestrial Reasearch (CSTR) at New Jersey Institute of Technology operates Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), which provides a unique and precise measure of the Earth's reflectance (a critical climate parameter since

  16. Rectification and precession signals in the climate system Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Rectification and precession signals in the climate system P. Huybers Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA C. Wunsch Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge the amplitude of the seasonal cycle. In a linear climate system, there would be no energy near the 21,000 year

  17. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Office of the President Building 3-208

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Office of the President Building 3-208 77 Massachusetts served as the 17th President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) since July 2012. In his initiative to drive progress towards solutions around environment, climate and how to construct a sustainable

  18. Natural Gas Treatment and Fuel Gas Conditioning: Membrane Technology

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6AerosolsofMarshallMissionScienceApplied to New Gas

  19. Development and Testing of a Moving Granular Bed Filter at the Taiwan Industrial Technology Research Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, C.Y.; Hsiau, S-S.; Lee, H-T.; Smid, J.; Wu, T-C.

    2002-09-18

    The main purpose of developing high temperature gas cleaning technologies are to clean the gas under high temperature in order to be cost effective and to improve energy efficiency. Moving granular bed filters are technically and economically applicable for high temperature cleaning system because of low cost, possible to keep operation at a constant pressure drop, simple structure, easy in operation and maintenance, no high risk internals, and more tolerant to process thermal flow. Energy and Resource Laboratories, Taiwan Industrial Technology Research Institute (ERL/ITRI) has been developing a moving granular bed filter (MGBF) for BIGCC(Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) high temperature gas cleanup. The filter granules move downwards directed by louver-like guide plates and the hot gases penetrate the MGBF horizontally. Filtration mechanisms include collection of the dust cake over the bed media surface and deep bed filtration. Stagnant zones of filter granules combining with the dusts always exist along the louver walls. Such stagnant zones often corrode the louver-like guide plates, increase the system pressure drop and decrease the total reaction efficiency that may endanger MGBF operation. Series louver and inert structure research that modify the granular flow pattern have been designed to eliminate the formation of these stagnant zones. By connecting to an auxiliary dust/bed media separation system, MGBF can be operated continuously at a stable pressure drop with a stable high efficiency. There are several MGBF R&D activities in progress: (1) a 3-dimensional cold flow system for testing the MGBF filtration efficiency; (2) a high temperature gas cleanup experimental system that has been designed and installed; (3) a 2-dimensional flow pattern experimental system for approving design concepts.

  20. Promising Technology: Tankless Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tankless gas water heater does not have a storage tank, as a conventional water heater does. Instead, a tankless water heater instantaneously heats water flowing over the heat exchanger coils when there is hot water demand. Because there is no tank, tankless water heaters have no standby energy losses that are associated with storage units. Another non-energy saving benefit is that a tankless water heater is much more compact.

  1. Are distributed energy technologies a viable alternative for institutional settings? : lessons from MIT Cogeneration Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapia-Ahumada, Karen de los Angeles

    2005-01-01

    During the last decades, distributed energy (DE) resources received considerable attention and support because of the confluence of technology development - particularly gas turbines - and deregulation - which would allow ...

  2. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-10-01

    This report serves as the technology basis of a needed national climate change technology strategy, with the confidence that a strong technology R&D program will deliver a portfolio of technologies with the potential to provide very substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions along with continued economic growth. Much more is needed to define such a strategy, including identification of complementary deployment policies and analysis to support the seeping and prioritization of R&D programs. A national strategy must be based upon governmental, industrial, and academic partnerships.

  3. Bio Gas Technologies LTd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)DaddyInformationSystemsGas

  4. Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy ResourcesMaui Area (DOEMaui Area (DOEOpen Energy

  5. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  6. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY 1 Information Security Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY 1 Information Security Seminar Series FISMA AND TECHNOLOGY 5 FISMA Strategic Vision We are building a solid foundation of information security across one of the largest information technology infrastructures in the world based on comprehensive security standards

  7. Prof. Ing. Alessandro A.Golkar, PhD Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture for Large-Scale Infrastructures; Space Systems, Small Satellite Technology. OTHER CURRENTProf. Ing. Alessandro A.Golkar, PhD Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology 100 Novaya Ulitsa and Technology (Skoltech) in Moscow, Russian Federation, a private university opened in collaboration with MIT

  8. LTI PhD Graduate Student Handbook Page 1 Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LTI PhD Graduate Student Handbook Page 1 Language Technologies Institute PhD in Language and Information Technologies Student Handbook 2014-2015 Revised: August 14, 2014 #12;LTI PhD .................................................................................................................................. 5 1.1 The PhD in Language and Information Technologies

  9. Postdoctoral position in microfluidics for life and medical sciences at Technion -Israel Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    Postdoctoral position in microfluidics for life and medical sciences at Technion - Israel Institute of Technology The Microfluidic Technologies Laboratory at Technion, led by Prof. Moran Bercovici, is seeking of novel bio-microfluidic tools and assays. The Microfluidic Technologies Laboratory (microfluidics

  10. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series 21st Century Medical Diagnosis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    on technology since 1998, moving from print publications through email newsletters to blogs and has gainedInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series 21st Century Medical Diagnosis, serial entrepreneur and investor in emerging technologies Thursday, May 31, 2012, 10:30 - 11:30 am ICTAS

  11. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Lab Directors, . .

    2001-04-05

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

  12. Edwin R. Fuller, Jr., National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Edwin R.

    Steam CoolingAdvanced Air Cooling alloy development Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Evolution bucket material for Gas Turbines -- Steven Fishman Symposium Indianapolis, IN -- April 20, 2004 #12;Ceramics Division Thermal Barrier Coatings TBCs are needed as the gap between the turbine firing temperature and substrate

  13. Evaluating the income and employment impacts of gas cooling technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.; Laitner, S.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential employment and income benefits of the emerging market for gas cooling products. The emphasis here is on exports because that is the major opportunity for the U.S. heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. But domestic markets are also important and considered here because without a significant domestic market, it is unlikely that the plant investments, jobs, and income associated with gas cooling exports would be retained within the United States. The prospects for significant gas cooling exports appear promising for a variety of reasons. There is an expanding need for cooling in the developing world, natural gas is widely available, electric infrastructures are over-stressed in many areas, and the cost of building new gas infrastructure is modest compared to the cost of new electric infrastructure. Global gas cooling competition is currently limited, with Japanese and U.S. companies, and their foreign business partners, the only product sources. U.S. manufacturers of HVAC products are well positioned to compete globally, and are already one of the faster growing goods-exporting sectors of the U.S. economy. Net HVAC exports grew by over 800 percent from 1987 to 1992 and currently exceed $2.6 billion annually (ARI 1994). Net gas cooling job and income creation are estimated using an economic input-output model to compare a reference case to a gas cooling scenario. The reference case reflects current policies, practices, and trends with respect to conventional electric cooling technologies. The gas cooling scenario examines the impact of accelerated use of natural gas cooling technologies here and abroad.

  14. NEW AND NOVEL FRACTURE STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF EXISTING GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-12-01

    Gas storage wells are prone to continued deliverability loss at a reported average rate of 5% per annum (in the U.S.). This is a result of formation damage due to the introduction of foreign materials during gas injection, scale deposition and/or fines mobilization during gas withdrawal, and even the formation and growth of bacteria. As a means to bypass this damage and sustain/enhance well deliverability, several new and novel fracture stimulation technologies were tested in gas storage fields across the U.S. as part of a joint U.S. Department of Energy and Gas Research Institute R&D program. These new technologies include tip-screenout fracturing, hydraulic fracturing with liquid CO{sub 2} and proppant, extreme overbalance fracturing, and high-energy gas fracturing. Each of these technologies in some way address concerns with fracturing on the part of gas storage operators, such as fracture height growth, high permeability formations, and fluid sensitivity. Given the historical operator concerns over hydraulic fracturing in gas storage wells, plus the many other unique characteristics and resulting stimulation requirements of gas storage reservoirs (which are described later), the specific objective of this project was to identify new and novel fracture stimulation technologies that directly address these concerns and requirements, and to demonstrate/test their potential application in gas storage wells in various reservoir settings across the country. To compare these new methods to current industry deliverability enhancement norms in a consistent manner, their application was evaluated on a cost per unit of added deliverability basis, using typical non-fracturing well remediation methods as the benchmark and considering both short-term and long-term deliverability enhancement results. Based on the success (or lack thereof) of the various fracture stimulation technologies investigated, guidelines for their application, design and implementation have been developed. A final research objective was to effectively deploy the knowledge and experience gained from the project to the gas storage industry at-large.

  15. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  16. Automatic intrusion recovery with system-wide history B.S., Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Automatic intrusion recovery with system-wide history by Taesoo Kim B.S., Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009) S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2011) Submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY June 2014 c Massachusetts

  17. ID-No. of presentation: t3a01391 Authors: Christos Bouras, Computer Technology Institute, Patras, Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Greece Apostolos Gkamas, Computer Technology Institute, Patras, Greece Vaggelis Kapoulas, Computer Technology Institute, Patras, Greece Thrasyvoulos Tsiatsos, Computer Technology Institute, Patras, Greece ODL for the enterprises. In Greece the main PTT organisation, as part of its strategy to offer integrated telematics

  18. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciencewww.ictas.vt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC). He works in the Advanced Materials BranchInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciencewww.ictas.vt.edu NEW HORIZONS ICTAS SEMINAR

  19. Royal Institute of Technology: Functional Materials Division, ICT S e m i n a r

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Royal Institute of Technology: Functional Materials Division, ICT S e m i n a r Critical Issues Laboratories faculty researcher. Professor Kostic also worked in industry and has authored a number of patents

  20. RIT General Education Student Learning Outcomes July 2011 Rochester Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    accepted scholarly methods and properly acknowledge sources of information Ethical, Social, and GlobalRIT General Education Student Learning Outcomes July 2011 Rochester Institute of Technology General Education Student Learning Outcomes Updated July 2011 Communication Express oneself effectively in common

  1. GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 1 College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Electrical and Computer Engineering Industrial and Systems Engineering Materials Science and Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering IndustrialGEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY · COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 1 College of Engineering Aerospace

  2. Global City Teams Challenge National Institute of Standards and Technology, Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recreation, Mobile Communication, Smart Neighborhoods, etc. #12;Global City Teams Challenge TECH JAMGlobal City Teams Challenge National Institute of Standards and Technology, Administration Building ......................................................................................................................... 7 Global City Team Action Cluster Project Abstracts

  3. Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Johnson Graduate Student Travel Funds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Johnson Graduate Student Travel funds may be used to meet any remaining costs not covered by the research advisor, GSF award___________________________________________________ Dates of Conference_____________________________________________________ Total estimated costs

  4. GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY FABRICATED PROPERTY REPORT Revised 07-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY FABRICATED PROPERTY REPORT Revised 07-2014 TO: Property Control: ____________________________________________ Phone: _______________ COST OF PROPERTY Materials or Component Parts $ _______________ External Labor Costs $ _______________ Transportation $ _______________ Other Costs (explain on back

  5. Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Johnson Graduate Student Travel Funds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Johnson Graduate Student Travel funds may be used to meet any remaining costs not covered by the research advisor, SGA award_____________________________________________________ Total estimated costs for attending conference Transportation $_______________ Other Travel

  6. Oregon Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bills," said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. "OIT's use of cutting-edge technology and its commitment to a clean energy future help diversify our energy supply while also bringing...

  7. Illinois Institute of Technology 10 West 33rd Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    . It serves as a primary source of information for graduate students, faculty and administration. Prospective adviser from the stu- dent's major department is the best source for current curriculum information: The information in this bulletin is subject to change without notice. Published by Illinois Institute

  8. ACADEMIC YEAR 201415 llinois Institute of Technology is a private,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -focused, research university offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in engineering, science, architecture-KENT COLLEGE OF LAW Dean: Harold J. Krent COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Dean: Wiel Arets LEWIS COLLEGE OF HUMAN. The Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research (WISER) is an umbrella organization that joins energy

  9. Eidgenssische Technische Hochschule Zrich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grohs, Philipp

    ! Affiliation: D-MAVT Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems Bio-Inspired Robotics Lab ! Research Area-inspired robots Energetically efficient underactuated locomotion Development of biomimetic actuators and sensors. 3 months) !Course projects (ca. 3 weeks) !Seminar series (ca. 1-3 hours) Sample Projects at Bio

  10. 2005 Joseph Sussman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 WHERE TRANSPORTATION IS GOING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Development Quality of Life Social Equity Sustainability Environmental Issues INSTITUTIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems MIT #12;© 2005 Joseph Sussman Institute of Technology 9 C L I O S System · Social Factors ­ Risk · Political Factors ­ Geopolitics

  11. Advanced gas engine cogeneration technology for special applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plohberger, D.C.; Fessl, T.; Gruber, F.; Herdin, G.R. [Jenbacher Energiesystem AG, Jenbach (Austria)

    1995-10-01

    In recent years gas Otto-cycle engines have become common for various applications in the field of power and heat generation. Gas engines are chosen sometimes even to replace diesel engines, because of their clean exhaust emission characteristics and the ample availability of natural gas in the world. The Austrian Jenbacher Energie Systeme AG has been producing gas engines in the range of 300 to 1,600 kW since 1960. The product program covers state-of-the-art natural gas engines as well as advanced applications for a wide range of alterative gas fuels with emission levels comparable to Low Emission (LEV) and Ultra Low Emission Vehicle (ULEV) standards. In recent times the demand for special cogeneration applications is rising. For example, a turnkey cogeneration power plant for a total 14.4 MW electric power and heat output consisting of four JMS616-GSNLC/B spark-fired gas engines specially tuned for high altitude operation has been delivered to the well-known European ski resort of Sestriere. Sestriere is situated in the Italian Alps at an altitude of more than 2,000 m above sea level. The engines feature a turbocharging system tuned to an ambient air pressure of only 80 kPa to provide an output and efficiency of each 1.6 MW and up to 40% {at} 1,500 rpm, respectively. The ever-increasing demand for lower pollutant emissions in the US and some European countries initiates developments in new exhaust aftertreatment technologies. Thermal reactor and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems are used to reduce tailpipe CO and NO{sub x} emissions of engines. Both SCR and thermal reactor technology will shift the engine tuning to achieve maximum efficiency and power output. Development results are presented, featuring the ultra low emission potential of biogas and natural gas engines with exhaust aftertreatment.

  12. Preparation of environmental analyses for synfuel and unconventional gas technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R.M. (ed.)

    1982-09-01

    Government agencies that offer financial incentives to stimulate the commercialization of synfuel and unconventional gas technologies usually require an analysis of environmental impacts resulting from proposed projects. This report reviews potentially significant environmental issues associated with a selection of these technologies and presents guidance for developing information and preparing analyses to address these issues. The technologies considered are western oil shale, tar sand, coal liquefaction and gasification, peat, unconventional gas (western tight gas sands, eastern Devonian gas shales, methane from coal seams, and methane from geopressured aquifers), and fuel ethanol. Potentially significant issues are discussed under the general categories of land use, air quality, water use, water quality, biota, solid waste disposal, socioeconomics, and health and safety. The guidance provided in this report can be applied to preparation and/or review of proposals, environmental reports, environmental assessments, environmental impact statements, and other types of environmental analyses. The amount of detail required for any issue discussed must, by necessity, be determined on a case-by-case basis.

  13. Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingbo

    2014-01-01

    economics of black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogenerationblack liquor and biomass gasifier/gas turbine technology".entrained flow booster gasifier in New Bern, North Carolina;

  14. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat PumpsTechnologiesTechnologiesScience

  15. IS C O N SIN FUSION TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the low fraction of fusion energy released in neutrons (a few %) compared to 80% from the more collected in underground natural gas reserves (200 kg) and the 3He from decaying tritium in thermonuclear weapons and heavy water CANDU fission plants (300 kg). With an energy content of 10 MWe-y/kg of 3He burned

  16. MIT Nuclear Engineering Department Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel #12;5 CANES Modules in the Integrated Model Fission gas release model Thermal model MechanicalC) ­ irradiation-induced creep (PyC) ­ pressurization from fission gases ­ thermal expansion Stress contributors release (Kr,Xe) PyC swelling Mechanical model Failure model Mechanical Chemical Stresses FP distribution

  17. Edwin R. Fuller, Jr., National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Edwin R.

    and lifing of gas turbine parts Optimization of k during TBC material development Design of lower k TBC materials development used sparingly by turbine part designers typically not included in production Meeting Symposium HH: High-Temperature Thermal Spray Coatings-Thermal Barrier Coatings December 03, 2002

  18. Georgia Institute of Technology For more information contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    as a necessary complement to conventional oil and gas. Biofuel research at Georgia Tech intensified in 2004 Corporation chose Georgia Tech as its first strategic research alliance partner, according to Rick Zalesky Biofuels, the Georgia Research Alliance and one of the U.S. Department of Energy's new BioEnergy Research

  19. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Academia-based Translational Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    this relationship to reduce attrition rates in technology development.The seminar will also highlightInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Academia-based Translational Research and Industry Collaboration with Salim Shah, Chief Scientist, Office of Operations and Planning

  20. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Polymer Membranes for Energy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    and barrier packaging. His research group focuses on structure/property correlation development for Excellence in Industrial Gases Technology (2008), and the Strategic Environmental Research and DevelopmentInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Polymer Membranes for Energy

  1. Prof. Aldo Steinfeld, Institute of Energy Technology Research main activities and goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    directs the Solar Technology Laboratory at the Paul Scherrer Institute. He was born 1960 in Montevideo) Solar power generation Novel and more efficient technologies are being developed for concentrating solar optical configurations and reach uniform solar fluxes over 2000 suns at the PV cell. 2) Solar fuels

  2. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series New materials from polysaccharides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series New materials from discussed open new avenues both to improve present application and to establish novel application fields Engineering, Fibre and CelluloseTechnology,Turku, Finland. Dr. Heinze holds 19 patents and has authored 330

  3. Predicting Response to Political Blog Posts with Topic Models Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, William W.

    Predicting Response to Political Blog Posts with Topic Models Tae Yano Language Technologies Language Technologies Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA nasmith@cs.cmu.edu Abstract In this paper we model discussions in online po- litical weblogs (blogs). To do this, we extend La

  4. FINAL DRAFT 4-1-11 New Jersey Institute of Technology Number: 12-04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Technology policies and procedures. In order to maintain consistency in the treatment of cost transfersFINAL DRAFT 4-1-11 New Jersey Institute of Technology Number: 12-04 University Policies and Procedures Date of Issue: October 12, 2011 Subject: GRANTS AND CONTRACTS - COST TRANSFER A. OVERVIEW Cost

  5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Office of the President Building 3-208

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Office of the President Building 3-208 77 Massachusetts environment, climate and how to construct a sustainable human society. A major component of the initiative 1980, Dr. Reif has served as director of MIT's Microsystems Technology Laboratories and as department

  6. Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01

    the primary goal of alternative energy; and GHG/kWh onlyGas INTRODUCTION Alternative energy technologies such asmotivations of alternative energy technologies: mitigating

  7. Technion Israel Institute of Technology Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute (JTCII)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Daniel

    ) Faculty Hiring ­ New York City Tenure-track Faculty Position, JTCII at Cornell Tech, New York City (JTCII), a key component of the new Cornell Tech graduate-level campus in New York City. Cornell Tech institutions. It is a key component of the Cornell Tech campus in New York City, where these faculty positions

  8. 2 0 0 8 0 9 California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathematics 350 Applied Mechanics 351 Applied Physics 356 Art History 359 Astrophysics 364 Biochemistry Engineering 385 Chemistry 394 Civil Engineering 396 Computation and Neural Systems 400 Computer Science 409 Control and Dynamical Systems 412 Economics 415 Electrical Engineering 424 Energy Science and Technology

  9. Masdar Institute of Science and Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to:Institute of Science and

  10. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to localPartnership willLynnMASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE

  11. Shenzhen Institute of Nano Materials and Technology | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for LowInformation Nano Materials and Technology Jump to:

  12. Oil & Gas Science and Technology --Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles Copyright 2010 IFPEN Energies nouvelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles Copyright © 2010 IFPEN Energies to an effective thermal management system and to maintain safety, perfor- #12;2 Oil & Gas Science and Technology

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- California Institute of Technology -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont, SouthLaboratory - CT 06YorkBurro

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing - OH 40LomaHood Building - MA

  15. Massachusetts Institute of Technology - General Career Fair | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing Swimming Pool TemperatureWind and WaterMarkDepartmentRFIof

  16. Bob Jaffe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Insights from the Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergy Industrial LocalApril 15,DepartmentCritical

  17. The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Davies, J. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Zammit, M. [AC Rochester, NY (United States); Patterson, P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-02-01

    An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

  18. The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Davies, J. (General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)); Zammit, M. (AC Rochester, NY (United States)); Patterson, P. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

  19. California Institute of Technology Caltech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: Energy ResourcesCRED:CalendarResourcesPowerFuelTechnology

  20. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  1. New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Alexandrov, Boian S.; Boyer, Brian D.; Hill, Thomas R.; Macarthur, Duncan W.; Marks, Thomas; Moss, Calvin E.; Sheppard, Gregory A.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2008-06-13

    The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

  2. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert

    2013-04-20

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems had high priority within DOE SC at the start of the second phase of the SciDAC program, SciDAC-2, as it continues to do so today. Achieving expected levels of performance on high-end computing (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing architectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, the University of Southern California?s Information Sciences Institute organized the Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. Within PERI, USC?s primary research activity was automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity was spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and was based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other recent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our other major component was application engagement, to which we devoted approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with SciDAC-2 applications. This report is a summary of the overall results of the USC PERI effort.

  3. Proceedings of IGTI 2010 ASME 2010 International Gas Turbine Institute Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng

    of design parameters. Three design cases are performed with a low-aspect-ratio steam turbine blade testedProceedings of IGTI 2010 ASME 2010 International Gas Turbine Institute Conference June 14-18, 2010 (Switzerland) Baden, Switzerland ABSTRACT For low-aspect-ratio turbine blades secondary loss reduc- tion

  4. Proceedings of IGTI 2009 ASME 2009 International Gas Turbine Institute Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Feng

    - istic of steam turbine blading in low pressure turbines. The re- sults demonstrate that the designProceedings of IGTI 2009 ASME 2009 International Gas Turbine Institute Conference June 8-12, 2009, Orlando,FL, USA GT2009-60115 THREE-DIMENSIONAL AERODYNAMIC DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF A TURBINE BLADE BY USING

  5. Government works with technology to boost gas output/usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicoll, H.

    1996-10-01

    Specially treated ethane gas from fields of the Moomba area in the Cooper basin of South Australia now flows freely through 870 mi of interstate gas pipeline to an end-user in Sydney, New South Wales. This unprecedented usage of ethane is the result of a long-term cooperative agreement. The producer sought to provide the end-user with ethane gas for usage as a petrochemical feedstock to manufacture ethylene and plastic goods. The end-user had strict specifications for a low-CO{sub 2}, very dry ethane product with a small percentage of methane. In order to meet these, the producer committed millions of dollars to construct a high-technology, state-of-the-art ethane treatment facility in the Moomba area, and lay an extensive pipeline. Santos also contracted with the amines supplier to provide a high-performance, deep CO{sub 2} removal solvent with good corrosion prevention characteristics. The paper discusses the Moomba field overflow, gas treatment, government cooperation, and project completion.

  6. Gaguk Zakaria received his Stratum One (Bachelor of Science) degree in Electrical Engineering in 1985 from Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia, and his

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Engineering in 1985 from Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia, and his Master of Science degree

  7. Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-Gas Technologies, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  8. Electron Technology, 2, 213, pp. 139-147. Institute of Electron Technology P.A. Sci., Warsaw 1969 STATISTICAL NATURE OF THE INFRARED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Electron Technology, 2, 213, pp. 139-147. Institute of Electron Technology P.A. Sci., Warsaw 1969 and the statistical nature of the coherently detected signal at the 10.6 pm C02laser wavelength. Coherent detection

  9. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  10. Exploring the Optimum Role of Natural Gas in Biofuels Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Vann Bush, Managing Director, Energy Conversion, Gas Technology Institute

  11. Panel 2, Hydrogen Delivery in the Natural Gas Pipeline Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Natural Gas Pipeline Network DOE'S HYDROGEN ENERGY STORAGE FOR GRID AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WORKSHOP Sacramento, CA May 14, 2014 Brian Weeks Gas Technology Institute 2 2...

  12. LLL reducing with the most significant bits Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villard, Gilles

    at a lower cost than using the entire initial basis. An approach for LLL-reducing a basis B may then be: 1LLL reducing with the most significant bits Saruchi Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi analyse an efficient reduction algorithm when B is itself a small deformation of an LLL-reduced basis

  13. INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT MANAGEMENT Prof. Dr. Gerhard Vogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT MANAGEMENT Prof. Dr. Gerhard Vogel Head of materials low, share low, population density low 100% COSTS/ ENERGY/ EMISSIONS EFFICIENCY Density of materials high, Share high Density of materials low, share low, population density low Collection ­ social

  14. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Fish robotics: understanding the diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Fish robotics: understanding and hydrodynamic studies of fish locomotor function, and the implications for construction of robotic models-swimming fishes have led to the development of a variety of self-propelling robotic models. Data from

  15. National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee National Institute of Standards & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee National Institute of Standards & Technology to submit the 2006 Annual Report of the National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee (NCSTAC on implementation of the National Construction Safety Team (NCST) Act (P.L. 107-231) and our report reflects our

  16. Approved Program of Study for Undergraduate Minors Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    of depth courses related to energy systems. A list of acceptable courses which meet the depth requirementApproved Program of Study for Undergraduate Minors Georgia Institute of Technology Office of the Registrar 2015-2016 Minor in Energy Systems (Track for Chemistry and Biochemistry Students) Please type

  17. Fourth National Research Conference on Climate Change Indian Institute of Technology Madras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    Fourth National Research Conference on Climate Change Indian Institute of Technology Madras October Indian Climate Research Network, are organizing the Fourth National Research Conference on Climate Change on renewable energy. This event, the fourth in the series, intends to nurture and enhance a dedicated network

  18. Michael H. Veatch mike.veatch@gordon.edu Education Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    Leaders for Manufacturing grant: Cost of quality 1990-1992 Sloan School of Management, MIT ResearchMichael H. Veatch mike.veatch@gordon.edu Education Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 1981-1987 Responsible for developing and marketing logistics analysis techniques and for managing team

  19. July 7-10, 2015 National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    requirements, which cover cloud security, cloud services, technical language for SLAs, cloud metrics breaches, or to proactively support security and forensics cloud-based applications. In June, 2014 NISTJuly 7-10, 2015 National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD NIST Cloud

  20. New Jersey Institute of Technology Otto H. York Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    1 New Jersey Institute of Technology Otto H. York Department of Chemical Engineering Course: Ph of Chemical Engineering FMH 215, Tel: 973-596-3316, Fax: 973-596-8436, E-mail: khusid@njit.edu http of chemical engineering calculations based on material and energy balances on chemical processes; estimation

  1. massachusetts institute of technology --artificial intelligence laboratory Intelligent Market-Making in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    @ MIT massachusetts institute of technology -- artificial intelligence laboratory Intelligent , m a 0 2 1 3 9 u s a -- w w w. a i . m i t . e d u #12;#12;Intelligent Market-Making in Artificial on Graduate Students #12;Intelligent Market-Making in Artificial Financial Markets by Sanmay Das Submitted

  2. Artificial Markets and Intelligent Agents S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1995)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    1995-01-01

    Artificial Markets and Intelligent Agents by Tung Chan S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Departmental Committee on Graduate Students #12;#12;Artificial Markets and Intelligent Agents by Tung Chan Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

  3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology AEGIS: Architecture for Tamper-Evident and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CSAIL Massachusetts Institute of Technology AEGIS: Architecture for Tamper-Evident and Tamper Intelligence Laboratory #12;#12;The aegis Processor Architecture for Tamper-Evident and Tamper external to it, such as memory, are untrusted. aegis provides tamper-evident, authenticated envi- ronments

  4. TAIST Steering Committee, Tokyo Institute of Technology TAIST-Tokyo Tech Graduation Ceremony in 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAIST Welcoming Ceremonies, 2011 Each year, TAIST-Tokyo Tech hosts ceremonies to welcome new students 1 TAIST TAIST Steering Committee, Tokyo Institute of Technology TAIST-Tokyo Tech Graduation Ceremony in 2010 TAIST Tokyo Tech 2010 The third annual TAIST-Tokyo Tech Graduation Ceremony was held 4

  5. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Biorefinery -A Sustainable Molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Biorefinery - A Sustainable In future research, developing materials, fuels and energy devices from renewable resources would, intermediates and products in a`Biorefinery'. Our continuous efforts in this area led us to develop new

  6. Rochester Institute of Technology Master's Thesis Guidelines for Students and Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savakis, Andreas

    for a master's thesis. The thesis may involve quantitative data, qualitative data, or a combination of bothRochester Institute of Technology Master's Thesis Guidelines for Students and Faculty The objective, and defense of the master's thesis. These guidelines outline the expectations of the Criminal Justice

  7. Illinois Institute of Technology Policy for the Protection of Human Research Subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Illinois Institute of Technology Policy for the Protection of Human Research Subjects I. Ethical involving human subjects as set forth in the report of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research, entitled Ethical Principles and Guidelines

  8. Wave Energy Test Site Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Test Site (WETS). Design by Sound and Sea Technology for US Navy 30m 80m 60m Bunker #12;WaveWave Energy Test Site Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science`i Wave Energy Test Site (WETS), the United States' first grid- connected test site of this kind

  9. Anno CONTROPARTE OGGETTO RESPONSABILE DURATA Dar Es Salaam Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Motta 24 mesi United Nations Environment Program To implement a Solar water Heating project PROSOL FIRST JOINT THESIS PROJECT AMONG POLITECNICO DI MILANO AND DAR-ES SALAAM INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY solare per le industrie alimentari e per l'agricoltura in Messico Ing. M. Motta 8 mesi STUDIO FROSIO

  10. Publication list: Roy S. Smith Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH, Zurich)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lygeros, John

    Publication list: Roy S. Smith Professor Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH, Zurich.E. Morris. "Data Acquisition and Analysis in a Vehicle with a Commodore PET". J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum., Vol Validation for Robust Control: An Experimental Process Control Application," Automatica, Vol. 31, No. 11, pp

  11. Petroleum and geothermal production technology in Russia: Summary of information obtained during informational meetings with several Russian Institutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Teufel, L.W.

    1995-04-01

    Russian scientists and engineers have drilled the deepest holes in the world. It is recognized that this experience has given them an expertise in drilling superdeep holes, as well as other aspects of drilling, completions, and geophysics. More and more US oil and gas companies are vigorously expanding their exploration and development into Russia. It is important for them to identify and use Russian technology in drilling, completion, logging, and reservoir characterization to the extent possible, in order to both reduce drilling costs and help support the Russian economy. While these US companies are interested in becoming involved in and/or sponsoring research in Russia, they have been unsure as to which scientists and institutes are working on problems of interest. It was also important to determine in which areas Russian technology is farther advanced than in the West. Such technology could then be commercialized as part of the Industrial Partnering Program. In order to develop a clear understanding of these issues, two Sandia engineers with drilling and completions expertise and a geophysicist with expertise in reservoir analysis traveled to Russia to meet with Russian scientists and engineers to discuss their technologies and areas of interest. This report contains a summary of the information obtained during the visit.

  12. Eddy transport as a key component of the Antarctic overturning circulation1 Andrew F. Thompson, California Institute of Technology3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Andrew

    Eddy transport as a key component of the Antarctic overturning circulation1 2 Andrew F. Thompson, California Institute of Technology3 Karen J. Heywood, University of East Anglia4 Sunke Schmitdtko, University of East Anglia & GEOMAR5 Andrew L. Stewart, California Institute of Technology & University of California

  13. Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1998-02-01

    It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

  14. INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS CURRENT SCIENCE ASSOCIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    , Guwahati 40. Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad 41. Indian Institute of Technology, Indore 42

  15. Michael Coble, PhD National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Coble, PhD National Institute of Standards and Technology HITA / AABB Workshop SNP Antonio Torroni #12;http://blogs.nature.com/boboh/2010/04/06/more-on-branch-lengths-and-species-1) Me 16189 T-C 16192 C-T 16270 C-T 73 A-G 150 C-T 263 A-G 315.1 C No Clan Mother #12;http://blogs

  16. Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-07-30

    Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

  17. Geographically-Distributed Databases: A Big Data Technology for Production Analysis in the Oil & Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPE 167844 Geographically-Distributed Databases: A Big Data Technology for Production Analysis advances in the scientific field of "big-data" to the world of Oil & Gas upstream industry. These off-of-the-start IT technologies currently employed in the data management of Oil & Gas production operations. Most current

  18. Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will present a live webinar titled "The Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies" on Thursday, February 6, 2013, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. During the webinar, Mr. Zia Haq and Mr. Prasad Gupte, of BETO, and Mr. Timothy Skone, of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, will present an overview of Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids technology, advantages of using natural gas, and some key themes that were established at the September Natural Gas-Biomass to Liquids Workshop.

  19. iLabs: A Scalable Architecture for Sharing Online Experiments V. Judson Harward, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, jud@mit.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    iLabs: A Scalable Architecture for Sharing Online Experiments Authors: V. Judson Harward, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, jud@mit.edu Jesús A. del Alamo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, alamo@mit.edu Vijay S. Choudary, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

  20. Laboratory of Knowledge and Intelligent Computing (KIC) Department of Computer Engineering Technological Institute of Epirus, Arta, Greece http://kic.teiep.gr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimakopoulos, Vassilios

    Technological Institute of Epirus, Arta, Greece http://kic.teiep.gr The Symbolic Aggregate approXimation method Petros Karvelis (Ph.D.) Technological Institute of Arta, Greece Department of Computer Engineering) Department of Computer Engineering Technological Institute of Epirus, Arta, Greece http

  1. A FRAMEWORK FOR H-ANIM SUPPORT IN NVES Research Academic Computer Technology Institute (CTI), Greece and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CTI), Greece and Computer Engineering and Informatics Department (CEID), University of Patras, Greece, Greece chatzipr@ceid.upatras.gr V. Triglianos Research Academic Computer Technology Institute (CTI), Greece and Computer Engineering and Informatics Departmet (CEID) University of Patras, Greece triglian

  2. c Copyright 2009. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

    c° Copyright 2009. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School. If the MOSFET is in the pinch-off region, the following equations for ID hold: ID = K (VGS - VT H)2 (5) 2 #12

  3. Drift orbit topology of fast ions in tokamaks Plasma Science and Fusion Centre, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America Abstract. Graphical the presence of special orbit types (co-pinch orbits) causes first orbit loss of fusion products. 1

  4. Drift orbit topology of fast ions in tokamaks Plasma Science and Fusion Centre, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America Abstract. Graphical the presence of special orbit types (co­pinch orbits) causes first orbit loss of fusion products. 1

  5. Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-04-01

    A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Transit Users Group, which provides assistance to transit agencies implementing natural gas vehicles into their fleets.

  6. Gas Turbine Technology, Part B: Components, Operations and Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper builds on Part A and discusses the hardware involved in gas turbines as well as operations and maintenance aspects pertinent to cogeneration plants. Different categories of gas turbines are reviewed such as heavy duty aeroderivative...

  7. The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanty, Evi

    2009-06-02

    As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds...

  8. Technology Solutions Case Study: Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this project is to examine the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces, as measured by steady-state efficiency and AFUE. PARR identified twelve furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines Iowa metropolitan area and worked with a local HVAC contractor to retrieve them and test them for steady-state efficiency and AFUE in the lab. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace. After removal from the field the furnaces were transported to the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) laboratory, where PARR conducted steady-state efficiency and AFUE testing. The test results show that steady-state efficiency in the field was 6.4% lower than that measured for the same furnaces under standard conditions in the lab, which included tuning the furnace input and air flow rate. Comparing AFUE measured under ASHRAE standard conditions with the label value shows no reduction in efficiency for the furnaces in this study over their 15 to 24 years of operation when tuned to standard conditions. Further analysis of the data showed no significant correlation between efficiency change and the age or the rated efficiency of the furnace.

  9. A review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    condensing-extraction steam turbine (CEST) systems, the present-day commercial technology for electricity-competitive with conventional condensing-ex- traction steam-turbine (CEST) technology using biomass by-products of sugarcaneA review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its application

  10. Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Clean Cities program webinar elaborates first on successful past technology choices and then suggests future technological pathways that can be taken for the United States to expand its use of...

  11. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute: Final Report for the University of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Robert J

    2014-06-30

    This is the final technical report for the University of North Carolina activities under SciDAC-2 Performance Engineering Research Institute.

  12. Expert system technology for natural gas resource development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munro, R.G.

    1997-12-31

    Materials data are used in all aspects of the development of natural gas resources. Unconventional gas resources require special attention in their development and may benefit from heuristic assessments of the materials data, geological site conditions, and the knowledge base accumulated from previous unconventional site developments. Opportunities for using expert systems in the development of unconventional natural gas resources are discussed. A brief introduction to expert systems is provided in a context that emphasizes the practical nature of their service. The discussion then focuses on the development of unconventional gas reserves. Whenever possible, the likelihood of success in constructing useful expert systems for gas resource development is indicated by comparisons to existing expert systems that perform comparable functions in other industries. Significant opportunities are found for applications to site assessment, the interpretation of well log data, and the monitoring and optimization of gas processing in small-scale recovery operations.

  13. DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sources of natural gas such as Devonian shales, coals, and low permeability or "tight" sands. Recognizing the need for research and development to quantify these unconventional...

  14. Georgia Institute of Technology-Minor Degree in Chemistry Page 1 of 2 Date: January 14, 2014 IUCC approval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    credits) CHEM 4775 Polymer Science and Eng. I (3 credits) CHEM 4776 Polymer Science and Engi. II (3Georgia Institute of Technology- Minor Degree in Chemistry Page 1 of 2 Date: January 14, 2014 IUCC of Technology- Minor Degree in Chemistry Page 2 of 2 Date: January 14, 2014 IUCC approval CHEM 3511 Survey

  15. National Institute of Standards and Technology Act SECTION 1. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES (15 U.S.C. 271)1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Precise measurements, calibrations and standards help United States industry and manufacturing concernsNational Institute of Standards and Technology Act SECTION 1. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES (15 U.S.C. 271 and measurement standards needed to improve quality and reliability, and (B) new technological processes by which

  16. New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Fact sheet from Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. about its pilot-scale industrial membrane system that was funded by the SBIR program.

  17. New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for refinery and other applications MTR's current R&D is extending use of membranes to carbon sequestration and biofuels separations. www.mtrinc.com New Membrane Technology...

  18. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  19. Impacts of Unconventional Gas Technology in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to represent unconventional gas technologies and their impacts on projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000).

  20. Environmental benefits of advanced oil and gas exploration and production technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-10-01

    THROUGHOUT THE OIL AND GAS LIFE CYCLE, THE INDUSTRY HAS APPLIED AN ARRAY OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE. THIS REPORT FOCUSES SPECIFICALLY ON ADVANCES IN EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (E&P) OPERATIONS.

  1. IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser og international forskningssamarbejde. Det Internationale Energi Agentur ( IEA) er organiseret i en

  2. Published June 1, 2003. Distribution restricted to Sponsors until September 1, 2003. auto-id center massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139-4307, usa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Program in Logistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is currently working on MIT Auto corporate logistics and operations management positions. He has a Bachelors of Science in food technology massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139

  3. Development of Real-Time, Gas Quality Sensor Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Landfill gas (LFG), composed largely of methane and carbon dioxide, is used in over 645 operational projects in 48 states. These projects convert a large source of greenhouse gases into a fuel that...

  4. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  5. NOx reduction technology for natural-gas-industry prime movers. Special report, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldini, C.

    1990-08-01

    The applicability, performance, and costs are summarized for state-of-the-art NOx emission controls for prime movers used by the natural gas industry to drive pipeline compressors. Nearly 7700 prime movers of 300 hp or greater are in operation at compressor stations. NOx control technologies for application to reciprocating engines are catalytic reduction, engine modification, exhaust gas recirculation, and pre-stratified charge. Technologies discussed for application to gas turbines are catalytic reduction, water or steam injection, and low-NOx combustors.

  6. Polarized 3He Gas Circulating Technologies for Neutron Analyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watt, David; Hersman, Bill

    2014-12-10

    We describe the development of an integrated system for quasi-continuous operation of a large volume neutron analyzer. The system consists of a non-magnetic diaphragm compressor, a prototype large volume helium polarizer, a surrogate neutron analyzer, a non-depolarizing gas storage reservoir, a non-ferrous valve manifold for handling gas distribution, a custom rubidium-vapor gas return purifier, and wire-wound transfer lines, all of which are immersed in a two-meter external magnetic field. Over the Phase II period we focused on three major tasks required for the successful deployment of these types of systems: 1) design and implementation of gas handling hardware, 2) automation for long-term operation, and 3) improvements in polarizer performance, specifically fabrication of aluminosilicate optical pumping cells. In this report we describe the design, implementation, and testing of the gas handling hardware. We describe improved polarizer performance resulting from improved cell materials and fabrication methods. These improvements yielded valved 8.5 liter cells with relaxation times greater than 12 hours. Pumping this cell with 1500W laser power with 1.25nm linewidth yielded peak polarizations of 60%, measured both inside and outside the polarizer. Fully narrowing this laser to 0.25nm, demonstrated separately on one stack of the four, would have allowed 70% polarization with this cell. We demonstrated the removal of 5 liters of polarized helium from the polarizer with no measured loss of polarization. We circulated the gas through a titanium-clad compressor with polarization loss below 3% per pass. We also prepared for the next phase of development by refining the design of the polarizer so that it can be engineer-certified for pressurized operation. The performance of our system far exceeds comparable efforts elsewhere.

  7. Abdel-Hamid, Tarek (1984) The Dynamics of Software Development Project Management: An Integrative System Dynamics Perspective. Doctoral thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cambridge,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, David N.

    1984-01-01

    , Glenn et al. (1994) Managing Product Definition in High-Technology Industries: A Pilot Study. Doctoral thesis. Sloan School of Management. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cambridge, MA. Burchill of Management. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cambridge, MA. Clark, Kim B and Fujimoto, Takahiro (1991a

  8. Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: FWP 49462

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Supply by Source Source: DOE/EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2009. Note that Tcf refers to trillion cubic feet, IL Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory July 2010 Office of Fossil Energy #12;T #12;#12;Water Management in the Marcellus Shale Page 1 Chapter 1

  9. Strategic Utilization of Paper/Wood Waste for Biodiesel Fuel Art J. Ragauskas, Institute of Paper Science and Technology; Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Utilization of Paper/Wood Waste for Biodiesel Fuel Art J. Ragauskas, Institute of Paper lignocellulosics to biodiesel fuel Feedstocks ABSTRACT This poster examines the potential of utilizing waste paper

  10. Development of advanced technology of coke oven gas drainage treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashi, Tadayuki; Yamaguchi, Akikazu; Ikai, Kyozou; Kamiyama, Hisarou; Muto, Hiroshi

    1996-12-31

    In April 1994, commercial-scale application of ozone oxidation to ammonia liquor (which is primarily the water condensing from coke oven gas) to reduce its chemical oxygen demand (COD) was started at the Nagoya Works of Nippon Steel Corporation. This paper deals with the results of technical studies on the optimization of process operating conditions and the enlargement of equipment size and the operating purification system.

  11. Technology Makes Solid State Multi-Gas Emission Monitoring Possible 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    NEUTRAL BEAM GAS-FILTER CELL BEAM (al D~~~:_]IIl] '~05~~1, (bl lliill:~~:':_::JIIIII SO, 'N "ACFilter... arsenic se1enide (TAS) on a production basis has made it possible to buLld an electronically controlled acousto ,-,ptie tunable filter (AOTF) capable of operating in the infrared. Such a filter with integral .11 t rasonic trifnsduce r can be used...

  12. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    The member institutions of the Consortium continue to play a significant role in increasing the number of African Americans who enter the environmental professions through the implementation of the Consortium`s RETT Plan for Research, Education, and Technology Transfer. The four major program areas identified in the RETT Plan are as follows: (1) minority outreach and precollege education; (2) undergraduate education and postsecondary training; (3) graduate and postgraduate education and research; and (4) technology transfer.

  13. Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright © 2014 Inderscience fields in Saudi Arabia', Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp.115­131. Biographical economic recovery of oil and gas from a reservoir. The purpose of reservoir management is to control

  14. Oil & Gas Science and Technology Rev. IFP, Vol. 57 (2002), No. 5, pp. 591-599 Copyright 2002, ditions Technip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    2002-01-01

    Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev. IFP, Vol. 57 (2002), No. 5, pp. 591-599 Copyright © 2002 for compaction. #12;Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev. IFP, Vol. 57 (2002), No. 5 INTRODUCTION Compaction of porous rock is an important process in the oil and gas industry. Compaction caused by changes

  15. Published June 1, 2003. Distribution restricted to Sponsors until September 1, 2003. auto-id center massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139-4307, usa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    management for the last six years. He was Product Manager at Optimum Logistics, Director of Global Logistics a Master of Engineering in Logistics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD in Solid massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139

  16. Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation Between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1960-01-01

    Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation Between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

  17. Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Organization for Nuclear Research

    1960-01-01

    Arrangements for the Building and Use of a 150 cm Cloud Chamber in Co-operation between CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (ETH)

  18. Status report on the activity of the TT network The technology transfer network of institutions active in particle, astro-particle and nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Status report on the activity of the TT network The technology transfer network of institutions active in particle, astro-particle and nuclear physics

  19. Continuation of the activity of the TT network The technology transfer network of institutions active in particle, astro-particle and nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Continuation of the activity of the TT network The technology transfer network of institutions active in particle, astro-particle and nuclear physics

  20. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 12 (2003) 170181 PII: S0963-0252(03)59585-8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2003-01-01

    discharge are heated by collisional dissipation of wave energy. However, both experimental and theoreticalINSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol

  1. DOE - Fossil Energy: The Cleanest Coal Technology - A Real Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost Ground8 GasDEVELOPMENTS E Natural

  2. Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMayBuildingTheEasements & Rights|and theOE supports

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel Efficiency & Emissions »Alternative Fuels »

  4. New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3,4,04,5,797

  5. DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | DepartmentDOEDepartment ApprovesScott

  6. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING SEMICONDUCTOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Semicond. Sci. Technol. 21 (2006) 661664 doi:10.1088/0268-1242/21/5/016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Institute of Materials Chemistry, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, 33101 Tampere, Finland 2 Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 692, 33101 Tampere, Finland 3

  7. First Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment at the B.S. (California Institute of Technology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    .S. (California Institute of Technology) A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements Contents List of Figures vii List of Tables xxiii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Introduction for Existence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3.1 Spiral Galaxies

  8. Air Filtration for Fuel Cell Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Filtration for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth, hardware and protocols which will allow Fuel Cell Electric Buses (FCEB) to safely operate in Hawai & Significance A major challenge to implementing fuel cell technology into transportation is the degradation

  9. c Copywright 2008. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

    c° Copywright 2008. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School mode or the saturation region when vDS vGS - VTO, where VTO is the threshold or pinch-off voltage parameter which accounts for the change in with drain-source voltage. Because iG ' 0 in the pinch

  10. A FRAMEWORK FOR H-ANIM SUPPORT IN NVES Research Academic Computer Technology Institute (CTI), Greece and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouras, Christos

    is an architecture that integrates the kinematic, physical and behavioral aspects to control H-Anim virtual humans/VRML worlds with interactive H-Anim virtual humans whose behavior is based on the Sense-Decide- Act paradigm Computer Technology Institute (CTI), Greece tsiatsos@csd.auth.gr Keywords: Virtual reality, H-Anim

  11. Georgia Institute of Technology-Minor Degree in Chemistry Page 1 of 2 Date: February 12, 2013 IUCC approval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    ) CHEM 4699 Undergraduate Research CHEM 4740 Atmospheric Chemistry (3 credits) CHEM 4775 Polymer Science and Eng. I (3 credits) CHEM 4776 Polymer Science and Engi. II (3 credits) CHEM 4803 Special Topics (withGeorgia Institute of Technology- Minor Degree in Chemistry Page 1 of 2 Date: February 12, 2013 IUCC

  12. ANNUAL 2013-14 DEPARTMENT OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    ANNUAL 2013-14 · DEPARTMENT OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS · MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF MIT AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS. #12;Department Head Associate Head Editor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 33-240, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. http

  13. Technologies to characterize natural gas emissions tested in field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable15/2008Technologies

  14. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abruna, H.D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2012-06-29

    The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).

  15. Neutronic Analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E. H.; Newton, T. H.; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. G (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( NS)

    2011-03-02

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) reactor (MITR-II), based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a research reactor designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the MITR-II. This report presents the results of steady state neutronic safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of U-Mo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to demonstrate that the safety analyses meet current requirements for an LEU core replacement of MITR-II.

  16. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  17. Gas rotary engine technology development. Final Report, April-December 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnicki, T.A.; Goodrich, B.E.; Page, R.A.

    1990-12-01

    The feasibility of developing a small natural gas oil-cooled rotary engine for long life gas heat pump applications was explored. A literature search was conducted, rotary engine manufacturers were contacted and questioned, experts in engine materials and engine lubricants furnished reports, and discussions were held with engineering management and staff engineers to review rotary engine technology and discuss practical ideas for more durable engine designs.

  18. A fuel cycle framework for evaluating greenhouse gas emission reduction technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashton, W.B.; Barns, D.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Bradley, R.A. (USDOE Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Environmental Analysis)

    1990-05-01

    Energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions arise from a number of fossil fuels, processes and equipment types throughout the full cycle from primary fuel production to end-use. Many technology alternatives are available for reducing emissions based on efficiency improvements, fuel switching to low-emission fuels, GHG removal, and changes in end-use demand. To conduct systematic analysis of how new technologies can be used to alter current emission levels, a conceptual framework helps develop a comprehensive picture of both the primary and secondary impacts of a new technology. This paper describes a broad generic fuel cycle framework which is useful for this purpose. The framework is used for cataloging emission source technologies and for evaluating technology solutions to reduce GHG emissions. It is important to evaluate fuel mix tradeoffs when investigating various technology strategies for emission reductions. For instance, while substituting natural gas for coal or oil in end-use applications to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, natural gas emissions of methane in the production phase of the fuel cycle may increase. Example uses of the framework are given.

  19. Proceedings of the 1999 Oil and Gas Conference: Technology Options for Producer Survival

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    2000-04-12

    The 1999 Oil & Gas Conference was cosponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) on June 28 to 30 in Dallas, Texas. The Oil & Gas Conference theme, Technology Options for Producer Survival, reflects the need for development and implementation of new technologies to ensure an affordable, reliable energy future. The conference was attended by nearly 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, DOE, and other Government agencies. Three preconference workshops (Downhole Separation Technologies: Is it Applicable for Your Operations, Exploring and developing Naturally Fractured Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs from the Rocky Mountains to the Austin Chalk, and Software Program Applications) were held. The conference agenda included an opening plenary session, three platform sessions (Sessions 2 and 3 were split into 2 concurrent topics), and a poster presentation reception. The platform session topics were Converting Your Resources Into Reserves (Sessions 1 and 2A), Clarifying Your Subsurface Vision (Session 2B), and High Performance, Cost Effective Drilling, Completion, Stimulation Technologies (Session 3B). In total, there were 5 opening speakers, 30 presenters, and 16 poster presentations.

  20. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01

    coal mining, petroleum extraction and refining, coking, andCoal Mining and Dressing Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction Petroleum Processing, Coking andCoal Mining and Dressing Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction Petroleum Processing, Coking and

  1. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in COAL IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-09-30

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, has been re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for Coal IGCC powerplants. The new program has been re-titled as ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants'' to better match the new scope. This technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished in the reporting period April 1, 2004 to August 31, 2004 on the revised Re-Directed and De-Scoped program activity. The program Tasks are: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: This first materials task has been refocused to address Coal IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials use in gas turbines and remains in the program. This task will screen material performance and quantify the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in Coal IGCC applications. The materials of interest will include those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: This second task develops and demonstrates new sensor technologies to determine the in-service health of advanced technology Coal IGCC powerplants, and remains in the program with a reduced scope. Its focus is now on only two critical sensor need areas for advanced Coal IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor for detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation, and a Fuel Heating Value Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware.

  2. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2005-12-01

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

  3. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

  4. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  5. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  6. Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    01/2004 Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing to monitor total NOx (0-1000 ppm), CO (0-1000 ppm) and O2 (1-15%) within the convective pass of the boiler of such sensor systems will dramatically alter how boilers are operated, since much of the emissions creation

  7. Transformative Reduction of Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Opportunities for Change in Technologies and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura; Brown, Austin; Newes, Emily; Markel, Tony; Schroeder, Alex; Zhang, Yimin; Chipman, Peter; Johnson, Shawn

    2015-04-30

    The transportation sector is changing, influenced by concurrent, ongoing, dynamic trends that could dramatically affect the future energy landscape, including effects on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Battery cost reductions and improved performance coupled with a growing number of electric vehicle model offerings are enabling greater battery electric vehicle market penetration, and advances in fuel cell technology and decreases in hydrogen production costs are leading to initial fuel cell vehicle offerings. Radically more efficient vehicles based on both conventional and new drivetrain technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions per vehicle-mile. Net impacts also depend on the energy sources used for propulsion, and these are changing with increased use of renewable energy and unconventional fossil fuel resources. Connected and automated vehicles are emerging for personal and freight transportation systems and could increase use of low- or non-emitting technologies and systems; however, the net effects of automation on greenhouse gas emissions are uncertain. The longstanding trend of an annual increase in transportation demand has reversed for personal vehicle miles traveled in recent years, demonstrating the possibility of lower-travel future scenarios. Finally, advanced biofuel pathways have continued to develop, highlighting low-carbon and in some cases carbon-negative fuel pathways. We discuss the potential for transformative reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions through these emerging transportation-sector technologies and trends and present a Clean Transportation Sector Initiative scenario for such reductions, which are summarized in Table ES-1.

  8. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01

    renewables, including large hydropower, by 2020. In 2009,coal mining and hydropower), iron and steel, machinery, andoil, and natural gas. Hydropower, nuclear, and wind energy

  9. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01

    Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Products Unit Energy Use Emissionis that some energy inputs, in particular “other petroleum4 The energy industry itself (coal mining, petroleum

  10. 104 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2011 Copyright 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    104 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Inderscience techniques used in the top-down modelling presented in this study include production decline analysis, type, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp.104­133. Biographical notes: Amirmasoud Kalantari

  11. 168 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2009 Copyright 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    168 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2009 Copyright © 2009 Inderscience.Y. (2009) `Geology and coal potential of Somaliland', Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 2 of Africa. They are the oceanic spreading ridges of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden and the continental

  12. Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat-ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat- ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) where many seismic surveys have been acquired and will continue to be acquired. To apply seismic technology to gas-hydrate studies in the gulf in an optimal manner

  13. A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND FEASIBILITY EVALUATION OF NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW MEASUREMENT ALTERNATIVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendricks A. Behring II; Eric Kelner; Ali Minachi; Cecil R. Sparks; Thomas B. Morrow; Steven J. Svedeman

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation and open access in the natural gas pipeline industry has changed the gas business environment towards greater reliance on local energy flow rate measurement. What was once a large, stable, and well-defined source of natural gas is now a composite from many small suppliers with greatly varying gas compositions. Unfortunately, the traditional approach to energy flow measurement [using a gas chromatograph (GC) for composition assay in conjunction with a flow meter] is only cost effective for large capacity supplies (typically greater than 1 to 30 million scfd). A less costly approach will encourage more widespread use of energy measurement technology. In turn, the US will benefit from tighter gas inventory control, more efficient pipeline and industrial plant operations, and ultimately lower costs to the consumer. An assessment of the state and direction of technology for natural gas energy flow rate measurement is presented. The alternative technologies were ranked according to their potential to dramatically reduce capital and operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, while improving reliability and accuracy. The top-ranked technologies take an unconventional inference approach to the energy measurement problem. Because of that approach, they will not satisfy the fundamental need for composition assay, but have great potential to reduce industry reliance on the GC. Technological feasibility of the inference approach was demonstrated through the successful development of data correlations that relate energy measurement properties (molecular weight, mass-based heating value, standard density, molar ideal gross heating value, standard volumetric heating value, density, and volume-based heating value) to three inferential properties: standard sound speed, carbon dioxide concentration, and nitrogen concentration (temperature and pressure are also required for the last two). The key advantage of this approach is that inexpensive on-line sensors may be used to measure the inferential variables, which can then be applied (through the data correlations) to convert existing flow meters (ultrasonic, orifice, turbine, rotary, Coriolis, diaphragm, etc.) for on-line energy measurement. The practical issues for field development were evaluated using two transducers extracted from a $100 ultrasonic domestic gas meter, and a $400 infrared sensor.

  14. Monitoring protocol for Gas Research Institute natural gas vehicle field test projects. Topical report, March-October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londos, T.C.; Agan, D.D.

    1991-10-01

    In order to ensure the consistency and comparability of natural gas vehicle (NGV) operation and performance data, a data collection protocol was developed. Recommendations were also made for emission testing of NGVs. The protocol utilizes an online database management and reporting system for timely dissemination of data to interested parties within industry and government. Further evaluation and testing of the protocol will be completed before final documentation of the protocol.

  15. HAVO Fuel Cell Buses Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HAVO Fuel Cell Buses Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science`i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) is conducting research to develop and validate fuel cell air filtration systems in support of operating Fuel Cell electric buses in a variety of road grades, elevations, and air

  16. Technological and institutional `lock-in' as a barrier to sustainable Timothy J. Foxon,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a technology has large set-up or fixed costs, unit production costs decline as these as spread over increasing production volume. Thus, an existing technology often has significant `sunk costs' from earlier investments, learning curves have been empirically demonstrated for a number of technologies, showing unit costs

  17. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Duttlinger

    1999-12-01

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  18. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-10-31

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  19. Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2012 1 Copyright 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2012 1 Copyright © 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling of Oil and Gas Producing Shale Reservoirs; Case.Bromhal@netl.doe.gov Abstract: Producing hydrocarbon (both oil and gas) from Shale plays has attracted much attention in recent

  20. IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed the anode field of fuel cell stack is considered partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas. We present a model-based control analysis and design

  1. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  2. Greenhouse gas emission impacts of alternative-fueled vehicles: Near-term vs. long-term technology options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.

    1997-05-20

    Alternative-fueled vehicle technologies have been promoted and used for reducing petroleum use, urban air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, greenhouse gas emission impacts of near-term and long-term light-duty alternative-fueled vehicle technologies are evaluated. Near-term technologies, available now, include vehicles fueled with M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline by volume), E85 (85% ethanol that is produced from corn and 15% gasoline by volume), compressed natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. Long-term technologies, assumed to be available around the year 2010, include battery-powered electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles fueled with E85 (ethanol produced from biomass), and fuel-cell vehicles fueled with hydrogen or methanol. The near-term technologies are found to have small to moderate effects on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the long-term technologies, especially those using renewable energy (such as biomass and solar energy), have great potential for reducing vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. In order to realize this greenhouse gas emission reduction potential, R and D efforts must continue on the long-term technology options so that they can compete successfully with conventional vehicle technology.

  3. STATE OF THE ART AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NATURAL GAS ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M

    2003-08-24

    Current, state of the art natural gas engines provide the lowest emission commercial technology for use in medium heavy duty vehicles. NOx emission levels are 25 to 50% lower than state of the art diesel engines and PM levels are 90% lower than non-filter equipped diesels. Yet, in common with diesel engines, natural gas engines are challenged to become even cleaner and more efficient to meet environmental and end-user demands. Cummins Westport is developing two streams of technologies to achieve these goals for medium-heavy and heavy-heavy duty applications. For medium-heavy duty applications, lowest possible emissions are sought on SI engines without significant increase in complexity and with improvements in efficiency and BMEP. The selected path builds on the capabilities of the CWI Plus technology and recent diesel engine advances in NOx controls, providing potential to reduce emissions to 2010 values in an accelerated manner and without the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction or NOx Storage and Reduction technology. For heavy-heavy duty applications where high torque and fuel economy are of prime concern, the Westport-Cycle{trademark} technology is in field trial. This technology incorporates High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI{trademark}) of natural gas with a diesel pilot ignition source. Both fuels are delivered through a single, dual common rail injector. The operating cycle is entirely unthrottled and maintains the high compression ratio of a diesel engine. As a result of burning 95% natural gas rather than diesel fuel, NOx emissions are halved and PM is reduced by around 70%. High levels of EGR can be applied while maintaining high combustion efficiency, resulting in extremely low NOx potential. Some recent studies have indicated that DPF-equipped diesels emit less nanoparticles than some natural gas vehicles [1]. It must be understood that the ultrafine particles emitted from SI natural gas engines are generally accepted to consist predominantly of VOCs [2], and that lubricating oil is a major contributor. Fitting an oxidation catalyst to the natural gas engine leads to a reduction in nanoparticles emissions in comparison to engines without aftertreatment [2,3,4]. In 2001, the Cummins Westport Plus technology was introduced with the C Gas Plus engine, a popular choice for transit bus applications. This incorporates drive by wire, fully integrated, closed loop electronic controls and a standard oxidation catalyst for all applications. The B Gas Plus and the B Propane Plus engines, with application in shuttle and school buses were launched in 2002 and 2003. The gas-specific oxidation catalyst operates in concert with an optimized ring-pack and liner combination to reduce total particulate mass below 0.01g/bhphr, combat ultrafine particles and control VOC emissions.

  4. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-10-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 10 through 14 of the project entitled: Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report documents the second series of tests performed on a GMW10 engine/compressor after modifications to add high pressure Fuel and a Turbocharger. It also presents baseline testing for air balance investigations and initial simulation modeling of the air manifold for a Cooper GMVH6.

  5. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-07-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report documents the second series of tests performed on a turbocharged HBA-6T engine/compressor. It also presents baseline testing for air balance investigations and initial simulation modeling of the air manifold for a Cooper GMVH6.

  6. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-05-31

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

  7. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is managed through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which deploys a national natural gas program via the Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCNG) and a national oil program through the National Petroleum Technology Office (NTPO). This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY02. Activities were maintained at recent record levels. Strategic planning from multiple sources within the framework of the organization gives PTTC the vision to have even more impact in the future. The Houston Headquarters (HQ) location has strived to serve PTTC well in better connecting with producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom line information stimulates cooperative ventures with other organizations. Efforts to build the contact database, exhibit at more trade shows and a new E-mail Technology Alert service are expanding PTTC's audience. All considered, the PTTC network has proven to be an effective way to reach domestic producers locally, regionally and nationally.

  8. Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Jun

    2004-01-01

    operation of gas turbines (especially combustion turbines inthe development of gas turbines, especially combustion gas

  9. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01

    a dramatic scaling up of alternative energy technologies inChina’s original alternative energy goal was to achieve 15%near-term deployment of alternative energy sources in China.

  10. Design, Analysis and Development of Micro Gas Turbine for propulsion of Micro UAVs Micro gas turbines or simply micro turbines are very promising technology for propelling micro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    Design, Analysis and Development of Micro Gas Turbine for propulsion of Micro UAVs Micro gas turbines or simply micro turbines are very promising technology for propelling micro unmanned aerial vehicles. These micro turbines vary in size and power. They can be hand held producing a fraction

  11. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  12. Using Multi-user Distributed Virtual Environments in Education Computer Technology Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Multi-user Distributed Virtual Environments in Education Ch. Bouras Computer Technology and distributed virtual environments. The communicative character of the distributed virtual environments would and tutorials. Such technologies may mitigate some of the problems of isolation that distance learning brings

  13. Oil & Gas Science and Technology Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles, Vol. 66 (2011), No. 4, pp. 693-704 Copyright c 2011, IFP Energies nouvelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles, Vol. 66 (2011), No. 4, pp. 693 that these disturbances are related to the inherent distributed #12;694 Oil & Gas Science and Technology ­ Rev. IFP

  14. Demonstration of Enabling Spar-Shell Cooling Technology in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, James

    2014-12-29

    In this Advanced Turbine Program-funded Phase III project, Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. (FTT) has developed and tested, at a pre-commercial prototypescale, spar-shell turbine airfoils in a commercial gas turbine. The airfoil development is based upon FTT’s research and development to date in Phases I and II of Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grants. During this program, FTT has partnered with an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), Siemens Energy, to produce sparshell turbine components for the first pre-commercial prototype test in an F-Class industrial gas turbine engine and has successfully completed validation testing. This project will further the commercialization of this new technology in F-frame and other highly cooled turbine airfoil applications. FTT, in cooperation with Siemens, intends to offer the spar-shell vane as a first-tier supplier for retrofit applications and new large frame industrial gas turbines. The market for the spar-shell vane for these machines is huge. According to Forecast International, 3,211 new gas turbines units (in the >50MW capacity size range) will be ordered in ten years from 2007 to 2016. FTT intends to enter the market in a low rate initial production. After one year of successful extended use, FTT will quickly ramp up production and sales, with a target to capture 1% of the market within the first year and 10% within 5 years (2020).

  15. Strategies for the Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration

    2009-01-01

    New technologies will be a critical component--perhaps the critical component--of our efforts to tackle the related challenges of energy security, climate change, and air pollution, all the while maintaining a strong economy. But just developing new technologies is not enough. Our ability to accelerate the market penetration of clean energy, enabling, and other climate-related technologies will have a determining impact on our ability to slow, stop, and reverse the growth in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Title XVI, Subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Administration to report on its strategy to promote the commercialization and deployment (C&D) of GHG intensity-reducing technologies and practices. The Act also requests the Administration to prepare an inventory of climate-friendly technologies suitable for deployment and to identify the barriers and commercial risks facing advanced technologies. Because these issues are related, they are integrated here within a single report that we, representing the Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI), are pleased to provide the President, the Congress, and the public. Over the past eight years, the Administration of President George W. Bush has pursued a series of policies and measures aimed at encouraging the development and deployment of advanced technologies to reduce GHG emissions. This report highlights these policies and measures, discusses the barriers to each, and integrates them within a larger body of other extant policy. Taken together, more than 300 policies and measures described in this document may be viewed in conjunction with the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's (CCTP's) Strategic Plan, published in September 2006, which focuses primarily on the role of advanced technology and associated research and development (R&D) for mitigating GHG emissions. The CCTP, a multi-agency technology planning and coordination program, initiated by President Bush, and subsequently authorized in EPAct2005, is responsible for preparing this report on behalf CCCSTI. This report systematically examines the market readiness of key technologies important to meeting climate change mitigation goals. It assesses the barriers and business risks impeding their progress and greater market application. Importantly, by documenting the hundreds of Federal policies, programs, regulations, incentives, and other activities that are in effect and operating today to address these barriers, it provides a broad context for evaluating the adequacy of current policy and the potential need, if any, for additional measures that might be undertaken by government or industry. Finally, it draws conclusions about the current situation, identifies gaps and opportunities, and suggests analytical principles that should be applied to assess and formulate policies and measures to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of these technologies.

  16. Illinois Institute of Technology | Paul V. Galvin Library | Reference Services library.iit.edu | (312) 567-3616 | 35 W 33rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Illinois Institute of Technology | Paul V. Galvin Library | Reference Services library and request history, retrieve your requested documents, and see what books from WorldCat you have checked out

  17. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Duttlinger

    2001-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization efficiently has an impact on business economics as the focus remains on proven applicable technologies, which target cost reduction and efficiency gains.

  18. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, March 1996. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with various impinger capture solutions. Also, the installation of the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit was completed in March. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD Unit and were utilized in the HAP test configuration this month. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold- standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  19. The Role of Research Institutes and Universities in Science and Technology Decision-making in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUN, Fuquan

    2013-01-01

    technology support pro- grams, high-tech R&D projects, basicSome plans, such as the high-tech R&D projects, were firstgov- ernments, but the high-tech R&D project and the basic

  20. New information technologies in public participation : a challenge to old decision-making institutional frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferraz de Abreu, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    2002-01-01

    Given the progress in information technology (IT) in the past 30 years, I hypothesized that new conditions exist for considerable improvements in public participation in decision-making. In order to test my hypothesis, I ...

  1. National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee National Institute of Standards Annual Report of the National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee (NCSTAC) of the National of the National Construction Safety Team (NCST) Act (P.L. 107-231) and our report reflects our views

  2. voluntary product standard ps 1-07 National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and review as is required to assure the technical soundness of the standard, and seek satisfactory adjustment initiate and participate in the development of the standards, provide technical or other counselStructural Plywood voluntary product standard ps 1-07 National Institute of Standards

  3. Fuel Cell Contamination Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cell Contamination Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science, airborne and system contaminants on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs of contaminants, HNEI is seeking to develop preventive as well as performance recovery procedures. Challenge

  4. Accelerator Compiler for the VENICE Vector Processor B.A.Sc, Harbin Institute of Technology, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemieux, Guy

    Accelerator Compiler for the VENICE Vector Processor by Zhiduo Liu B.A.Sc, Harbin Institute the compiler design for VENICE, a new soft vector processor (SVP). The compiler is a new back-end target compilation from high-level programs into VENICE assembly code, thus avoiding the process of writing assembly

  5. MCBH "Fast Fill" Hydrogen Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    options. Light duty vehicles have largely been designed to use high pressure (700 bar) hydrogen storagePac compressor increases the hydrogen pressure to 438 bar for storage in a bank of Dynatek composite tanks (48 kgMCBH "Fast Fill" Hydrogen Station Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth

  6. Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability Institutional change integrates technology, policy, and behavior to make new...

  7. Institute a modest carbon tax to reduce carbon emissions, finance clean energy technology development, cut taxes, and reduce the deficit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muro, Mark; Rothwell, Jonathan

    2012-11-15

    The nation should institute a modest carbon tax in order to help clean up the economy and stabilize the nation’s finances. Specifically, Congress and the president should implement a $20 per ton, steadily increasing carbon excise fee that would discourage carbon dioxide emissions while shifting taxation onto pollution, financing energy efficiency (EE) and clean technology development, and providing opportunities to cut taxes or reduce the deficit. The net effect of these policies would be to curb harmful carbon emissions, improve the nation’s balance sheet, and stimulate job-creation and economic renewal.

  8. Carbon brainprint – An estimate of the intellectual contribution of research institutions to reducing greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterton, Julia; Parsons, David; Nicholls, John; Longhurst, Phil; Bernon, Mike; Palmer, Andrew; Brennan, Feargal; Kolios, Athanasios; Wilson, Ian; Ishiyama, Edward; Clements-Croome, Derek; Elmualim, Abbas; Darby, Howard; Yearley, Thomas; Davies, Gareth

    2015-05-07

    Ceramic coatings for jet engine turbine blades to improve engine efficiency Cranfield Improved delivery vehicle logistics to save fuel Cranfield Training for landfill gas inspectors to improve methane capture Cranfield Novel offshore vertical axis wind... of air travel, this was 196 excluded from the assessment. 197 3.2 Novel offshore vertical axis wind turbines 198 Researchers within the School of Engineering at Cranfield University were part of a 199 consortium to develop further the concept of Novel...

  9. Staff exchange with Spokane Intercollegiate Research and Technology Institute (SIRTI), final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in U.S. industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms.

  10. National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Material Test Systems in High Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    Pressure Hydrogen Gas at AIST Tsukuba Takashi Iijima, Bai An Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage Group for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage) Collaborative Research Center between Kyusu University and AIST for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage (HYDROGENIUS) AIST Tsukuba Hydrogen Dynamics in Metals Research Team

  11. Compressed natural gas measurement issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Freeman, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    The Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition`s Measurement and Metering Task Group (MMTG) was established on July 1st, 1992 to develop suggested revisions to National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) Handbook 44-1992 (Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Technical Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices) and NIST Handbook 130-1991 (Uniform Laws & Regulations). Specifically, the suggested revisions will address the sale and measurement of compressed natural gas when sold as a motor vehicle fuel. This paper briefly discusses the activities of the MMTG and its interaction with NIST. The paper also discusses the Institute of Gas Technology`s (IGT) support of the MMTG in the area of natural gas composition, their impact on metering technology applicable to high pressure fueling stations as well as conversion factors for the establishment of ``gallon gasoline equivalent`` of natural gas. The final portion of this paper discusses IGT`s meter research activities and its meter test facility.

  12. Please keep a copy for your records August, 11, Telecom_ Study_Plan_Project Management_8-21-2011.docx Stevens Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    : Services & Technology 3 MGT 609 Project Management 3 MGT 600 Managerial Accounting (or MGT 6xx AccountingPlease keep a copy for your records August, 11, Telecom_ Study_Plan_Project Management_8-21-2011.docx Stevens Institute of Technology Castle Point on Hudson Hoboken, NJ 07030 FAX 201

  13. The Rochester Institute of Technology Research Report Spring/Summer 2015 www.rit.edu/research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Technology Consortium (NY-BEST). It serves as another important piece to the upstate energy storage ecosystem with the support of NYSERDA, New York Empire State Development, and the New York Battery and Energy Storage to ensure that Rochester remains the printing capital of the world. I hope you enjoy reading about

  14. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciencewww.ictas.vt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    THE SPEAKER Steve Diamond is a Research Biologist with the US EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORDInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciencewww.ictas.vt.edu NEW HORIZONS ICTAS SEMINAR- tionseemstohavelittleeffectofphotoreactivity.TheseresultswillbedescribedwithreferencetotheUSEPAfocuson developing methods for assessing hazard

  15. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2006-01-24

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report presents results of design analysis performed on the TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

  16. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-01-28

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey test performed on an HBA-6 engine/compressor installed at Duke Energy's Bedford Compressor Station. This is one of several tests planned, which will emphasize identification and reduction of compressor losses. Additionally, this report presents a methodology for distinguishing losses in compressor attributable to valves, irreversibility in the compression process, and the attached piping (installation losses); it illustrates the methodology with data from the survey test. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

  17. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-07-27

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey site test performed on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. This test completes planned screening efforts designed to guide selection of one or more units for design analysis and testing with emphasis on identification and reduction of compressor losses. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

  18. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-10-27

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first summarizes key results from survey site tests performed on an HBA-6 installed at Duke Energy's Bedford compressor station, and on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. The report then presents results of design analysis performed on the Bedford HBA-6 to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

  19. Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Prabir

    2008-12-31

    Identifying gas species and their quantification is important for optimization of many industrial applications involving high temperatures, including combustion processes. CISM (Center for Industrial Sensors and Measurements) at the Ohio State University has developed CO, O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and CO{sub 2} sensors based on TiO{sub 2} semiconducting oxides, zirconia and lithium phosphate based electrochemical sensors and sensor arrays for high-temperature emission control. The underlying theme in our sensor development has been the use of materials science and chemistry to promote high-temperature performance with selectivity. A review article presenting key results of our studies on CO, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} sensors is described in: Akbar, Sheikh A.; Dutta, Prabir K. Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies for Combustion Processes, PowerPlant Chemistry, 9(1) 2006, 28-33.

  20. EPA reports advances in scrubber technology at Flue Gas Desulfurization symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smock, R.

    1982-07-01

    The overall message of the recent Symposium on Flue Gas Desulfurization was that the technology for sulfur dioxide scrubbing has matured enough for discussions to focus on future improvements rather than whether scrubbers work at all. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations will not change in the near future, however, unless there are changes in the Clean air Act to deal with acid rain, despite the improvements in performance data. The symposium covered reports on dual-alkali scrubbing, organic buffer additives, the probability that scrubber wastes will not be classified as hazardous, simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, and continuous monitoring programs. 3 figures, 4 tables. (DCK)

  1. Feng Xue | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergy Technologies |FeatureFellows Fellows|

  2. Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This report presents information about the Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin: its location, production, geology, resources, proved reserves, and the technology being used for development. This is the first in a series intending to share information about technology-based oil and natural gas plays.

  3. Economic Modeling of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -617-253-6609) Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Room E52-444 50 Memorial Drive Cambridge, MA 02139 ABSTRACT) technologies. The CCS technologies are based on a natural gas combined cycle plant and an integrated coal gasification combined cycle plant. Additionally, the role of natural gas combined cycle plants without capture

  4. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  5. FCCSET/CEHR summer institutes for teacher development in science, mathematics, and technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the profiling procedure that grantees used to carry out a formative evaluation of their summer institutes. It discusses programmatic issues identified through profiling as well as how well the profiling process worked for the grantees. The report contains recommendations on both programmatic issues and profiling for NSTC/DOE, NCISE (the technical assistance provider), and the grantees themselves. In early September NCISE held its second workshop for NSTC grantees. Data from the evaluation of this two-day event generated six recommendations for DOE and the technical assistance provider. This NCISE report summarizes the two-year process NCISE used in attempting to help the grantees establish some indicators of success. A number of indicators were identified the first year with others added the second year. Additionally, a compilation of the various measures for the indicators of success developed collaboratively by NCISE and grantees is included. Although these indicators are not mandatory, they do provide guides for grantees in assessing the impact of the institutes. Embedded in the report are several recommendations for NSTC/DOE and the technical assistance provider.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Technology Control Center, report to the Steering committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This report describes test for air pollution control of flue gas and mercury as a result of coal combustion. The NYSEG Kintigh Station provided flue gas to the Center 100% of the time during this performance period. As the Kintigh Station operated with a variety of coals, fluctuations in the Center`s inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations were experienced. Safety training for the month was conducted by the O&M Superintendent, Maintenance Supervisor and Shift Supervisors. {open_quotes}Personal Protective Equipment{close_quotes} was the topic of the month. Inspections of the ECTC Facility and safety equipment (SCR air-packs, fire extinguishers, etc.) were completed and recorded this month. All systems were found to be in good condition. By continuing to emphasize safe work habits at the Center, we have raised the total number of days without a lost time injury to 1426 as of 4/30/96. The monthly safety meeting with the NYSEG Kintigh Station was held on April 30, 1996 with both NYSEG and ECTC representatives. The topics of discussion included an overview of NYSEG`s upcoming alternate fuel burn, an update on plant staffing changes, and a discussion of future safety training activities.

  7. Demonstration of safeguards technology at the Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), Arzamas-16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuferev, V.; Skripka, G.; Augustson, R.H. [and others

    1995-09-01

    As part of the US-Russian Lab-to-Lab program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC&A), a testbed facility has been established in a laboratory of the VNIIEF to demonstrate safeguards technology to nuclear facility operators. The design of the testbed MPC&A system provides the functions of nondestructive measurements for plutonium and highly enriched uranium, item control, personnel access control, radiation portal monitoring, search equipment, and computerized on-line accounting. The system controls, monitors, and accounts for nuclear material and people as the material moves through three MBAs. It also assists with physical inventory taking. A total of 39 instruments and control systems are being demonstrated in the present version of the testbed. Of these, about half are of Russian design and fabrication, including the software for the item monitoring and the accounting systems. These two computer systems are on an ethernet network and connected in a client-server local area architecture. The item monitoring system is integrated with the accounting system, providing alarm and status information to a central dispatcher terminal. The operation of the MPC&A testbed has been demonstrated under routine and alarm conditions in collaboration with safeguards staff from the six participating US national labs. Workshops and training for Russian nuclear facility operators are in progress. As needs for additional MPC&A technology at specific plants are identified, these are incorporated into the testbed and used to certify the hardware and software for implementation at the plant.

  8. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2003-12-15

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers to make timely, informed technology decisions. Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 3 Satellite Offices that encompass all of the oil- and natural gas-producing regions in the U.S. Active volunteer leadership from the Board and regional Producer Advisory Groups keeps activities focused on producer's needs. Technical expertise and personal networks of national and regional staff enable PTTC to deliver focused, technology-related information in a manner that is cost and time effective for independents. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with matching state and industry funding, forming a unique partnership. This final report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments. In this final fiscal year of the contract, activities exceeded prior annual activity levels by significant percentages. Strategic planning implemented during the year is focusing PTTC's attention on changes that will bear fruit in the future. Networking and connections are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom-line information stimulates cooperative ventures. In FY03 PTTC's regions held 169 workshops, drawing 8,616 attendees. There were nearly 25,000 reported contacts. This represents a 38% increase in attendance and 34% increase in contacts as compared to FY02 activity. Repeat attendance at regional workshops, a measure of customer satisfaction and value received, remained strong at 50%. 39% of participants in regional workshops respond ''Yes'' on feedback forms when asked if they are applying technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC. This feedback confirms that producers are taking action with the information they receive. RLO Directors captured examples demonstrating how PTTC activities influenced industry activity. Additional follow-up in all regions explored industry's awareness of PTTC and the services it provides. PTTC publishes monthly case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' and monthly Tech Connections columns in the ''American Oil and Gas Reporter''. Email Tech Alerts are utilized to notify the O&G community of DOE solicitations and demonstration results, PTTC key technical information and meetings, as well as industry highlights. Workshop summaries are posted online at www.pttc.org. PTTC maintains an active exhibit schedule at national industry events. The national communications effort continues to expand the audience PTTC reaches. The network of national and regional websites has proven effective for conveying technology-related information and facilitating user's access to basic oil and gas data, which supplement regional and national newsletters. The regions frequently work with professional societies and producer associations in co-sponsored events and there is a conscious effort to incorporate findings from DOE-supported research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects within events. The level of software training varies by region, with the Rocky Mountain Region taking the lead. Where appropriate, regions develop information products that provide a service to industry and, in some cases, generate moderate revenues. Data access is an on-going industry priority, so all regions work to facilitate access to public source databases. Various outreach programs also emanate from the resource centers, including targeted visits to producers.

  9. The Impact of New Technologies on Radiation Oncology Events and Trends in the Past Decade: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, Margie A.; Pastrana, Gerri; Amols, Howard I.; Killen, Aileen; Alektiar, Kaled

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To review the type and frequency of patient events from external-beam radiotherapy over a time period sufficiently long to encompass significant technology changes. Methods and Materials: Ten years of quality assurance records from January 2001 through December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed to determine the frequency of events affecting patient treatment from four radiation oncology process steps: simulation, treatment planning, data entry/transfer, and treatment delivery. Patient events were obtained from manual records and, from May 2007 onward, from an institution-wide database and reporting system. Events were classified according to process step of origination and segregated according to the most frequently observed event types. Events from the institution-wide database were evaluated to determine time trends. Results: The overall event rate was 0.93% per course of treatment, with a downward trend over time led by a decrease in treatment delivery events. The frequency of certain event types, particularly in planning and treatment delivery, changed significantly over the course of the study, reflecting technologic and process changes. Treatments involving some form of manual intervention carried an event risk four times higher than those relying heavily on computer-aided design and delivery. Conclusions: Although the overall event rate was low, areas for improvement were identified, including manual calculations and data entry, late-day treatments, and staff overreliance on computer systems. Reducing the incidence of pretreatment events is of particular importance because these were more likely to occur several times before detection and were associated with larger dosimetric impact. Further improvements in quality assurance systems and reporting are imperative, given the advent of electronic charting, increasing reliance on computer systems, and the potentially severe consequences that can arise from mistakes involving complex intensity-modulated or image-guided treatments.

  10. Oil and Gas Science and Technology, 2009, 64(5), 629-636, doi: 10.2516/ogst/2009042 DDDiiissscccuuussssssiiiooonnn ooofff aaagggggglllooommmeeerrraaatttiiiooonnn mmmeeeccchhhaaannniiisssmmmsss bbbeeetttwwweeeeeennn hhhyyydddrrraaattteee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Oil and Gas Science and Technology, 2009, 64(5), 629-636, doi: 10.2516/ogst/2009042 1. KKeeyywwoorrddss:: gas hydrate formation ; water/oil emulsions ; hydrate slurry ; agglomeration ; Population@emse.fr hal-00480033,version1-3May2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology 64, 5

  11. Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Jun

    2004-01-01

    the Relibability of Advanced Gas Turbines,” POWER Magazine.Scheibel (1997) “Current Gas Turbine Developments and Futurefor Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines,” October 2000. Available online

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Lake Michigan Corridor Alternative Fuel Implementation Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Institute of Gas Technology at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Lake Michigan...

  13. Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01

    alternative energy technology – climate change mitigation –alternative energy technologies: mitigating climate change.technology develops to mitigate emissions or to slow the onset of climate

  14. Clean Coal Technology: Reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} using gas reburning, sorbent injection, and integrated technologies. Topical report No. 3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (also referred to as the CCT Program), is a unique government/industry cost-shared effort to develop these advanced coal-based technologies. The CCT Program provides numerous options for addressing a wide range of energy and environmental issues, including acid rain, global climate change, improved energy efficiency, energy security, and environmental qualitiy. It is intended to demonstrate a new generation of full-scale, ``showcase`` facilities built through the United States. Gas Reburning, Sorbent Injection and Integrated Technologies -- the subject of this Topical Report -- are one such set of promising innovative developments. In addition to discussing the technologies involved, this report will describe two specific projects, results to date, and the commercial promise of these processes. The objectives of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection were to have a 60% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions and a 50% reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions. These objectives have been achieved at the tangentially-fired boiler at the Hennepin site of Illinois Power and at the cyclone-fired boiler operated by City Water, Light and Power in Springfield, Illinois. The other project, Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners had the goal of a 70% NO{sub x} reduction from the wall-fired boiler operated by Public Service of Colorado at Denver. In early preliminary testing, this goal was also achieved. Energy and Environmental Research (EER) is now ready to design and install Gas Rebunting and Sorbent Injection systems, and Gas Reburning-Low NO{sub x}, Burner systems for any utility or industrial application. These technologies are offered with performance and emission control guarantees.

  15. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcwilliams, A. J.

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  16. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-01-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 10 through 14 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents tests performed on a KVG103 engine/compressor installed at Duke's Thomaston Compressor Station. This is the first series of tests performed on a four-stroke engine under this program. Additionally, this report presents results, which complete a comparison of performance before and after modification to install High Pressure Fuel Injection and a Turbocharger on a GMW10 at Williams Station 60. Quarterly Reports 7 and 8 already presented detailed data from tests before and after this modification, but the final quantitative comparison required some further analysis, which is presented in Section 5 of this report. The report further presents results of detailed geometrical measurements and flow bench testing performed on the cylinders and manifolds of the Laboratory Cooper GMVH6 engine being employed for two-stroke engine air balance investigations. These measurements are required to enhance the detailed accuracy in modeling the dynamic interaction of air manifold, exhaust manifold, and in-cylinder fuel-air balance.

  17. Institute of Chemical Engineering page 1 Chemical Process Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auzinger, Winfried

    as well as catalytic tar removal from producer gas originating from thermo-chemical hydrocarbon conversion of hydrocarbons in secondary units · Research and development on novel of gas cleaning technologies #12;Institute at TU Wien: · Development and research on novel gasification processes · Measurement results and data

  18. National Center for Standards and Certification Information (NCSCI) Policy The U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it establish equivalence among documentary standards or technical regulations. Documentary standards include1 National Center for Standards and Certification Information (NCSCI) Policy The U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Center for Standards

  19. 2014 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Correspondence to: Yogendra N. Shastri, Room 311, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -stage grinding process and the energy requirement and bulk densities for the particle sizes between 1 mm and 25 at the county-specific centralized storage and pre-processing facilities could reduce the costs by as much as $6. Shastri, Room 311, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai

  20. Invited Lecture Note on "Mechatronics," Workshop on Mechatronics, National Institute of Technology, Nagpur, Maharastra, Jan03, 2005, pp. 1-4.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    Invited Lecture Note on "Mechatronics," Workshop on Mechatronics, National Institute of Technology, Nagpur, Maharastra, Jan03, 2005, pp. 1-4. Mechatronics--An Experience at IIT Delhi Dr. S.K. Saha-mail: saha@mech.iitd.ernet.in; Homepage: http://paniit.iitd.ernet.in/~saha Introduction Mechatronics

  1. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 12 (2003) 295301 PII: S0963-0252(03)62133-X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 12 (2003) 295­301 PII: S0963-0252(03)62133-X Plasma structure in a pulsed discharge environment J-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000, USA E-mail: fsalama@mail.arc.nasa.gov Received 4 April 2003 Published 6 May

  2. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 12 (2003) 302312 PII: S0963-0252(03)62087-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2003-01-01

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol pressures (above 20 mTorr), electrons in an ICP discharge are heated by collisional dissipation of wave energy. Power deposition in lower pressure discharges, however, involves a collisionless electron heating

  3. Ecotox Centre: Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology | Eawag/EPFL Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    ("fracking") Shale gas is natural gas ­ mainly methane ­ trapped within the micropores of shale formations the rock under pressure ("fracking") so as to open the tiny pores where the gas is held. First, a vertical

  4. Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01

    CarbonPlanet, 2007, Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Country,In this discussion of greenhouse gas emissions and energyGreenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy

  5. Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright © 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Building the foundation for Prudhoe Bay oil production optimisation using neural networks E-mail: siskd@Bp.com Abstract: Field data from the Prudhoe Bay oil field in Alaska was used

  6. 2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright © 2009 Inderscience@yahoo.com Hafez Hafez ADCO-PDD, Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Email

  7. Analysis of operational, institutional and international limitations for alternative fuel vehicles and technologies: Means/methods for implementing changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This project focused upon the development of an approach to assist public fleet managers in evaluating the characteristics and availability of alternative fuels (AF`s) and alternative fuel vehicles (AFV`s) that will serve as possible replacements for vehicles currently serving the needs of various public entities. Also of concern were the institutional/international limitations for alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Detroit and other public agencies in the Detroit area were the particular focus for the activities. As the development and initial stages of use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles proceeds, there will be an increasing need to provide information and guidance to decision-makers regarding differences in requirements and features of these fuels and vehicles. There wig be true differences in requirements for servicing, managing, and regulating. There will also be misunderstanding and misperception. There have been volumes of data collected on AFV`S, and as technology is improved, new data is constantly added. There are not, however, condensed and effective sources of information for public vehicle fleet managers on vehicle and equipment sources, characteristics, performance, costs, and environmental benefits. While theoretical modeling of public fleet requirements has been done, there do not seem to be readily available ``practical``. There is a need to provide the best possible information and means to minimize the problems for introducing the effective use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

  8. California Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1, 2013,Cafe Scientifique Cafe4 CalendarCalendarJuly

  9. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By Sarah Schlieder * July 9, 2015 TweetCubic

  10. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By Sarah Schlieder * July 9, 2015 TweetCubic13/2011

  11. Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingbo

    2014-01-01

    International Energy Agency (IEA). 2007. Tracking IndustrialInternational Energy Agency (IEA). 2009. Energy TechnologyInternational Energy Agency (IEA). 2010a. Energy Technology

  12. Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling using Microwave Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mark Hunt; Mahlon Dennis

    2007-07-31

    The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

  13. Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

  14. Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R. D.

    1981-07-01

    This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, and biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparcity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected sections of this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  15. Creating a Pathway to Sustainability IIT Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    ............................................................................................................3 Clean Coal Technology Production of Methane from Hydrates and Unconventional Sources Biofuels IIT first developed a formal affiliation with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), establishing member hired by IIT to establish the Energy Technology education and research program. As part

  16. Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

    2010-09-30

    One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to < 35% for new coal-based power plants which include CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration addresses both the growing social concern for global climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gas and in particular CO{sub 2} and the need to control cost increases to power production necessary to meet this social objective. Similar improvements to technologies for trace contaminants are getting similar pressure to reduce environmental emissions and reduce production costs for the syngas to enable production of chemicals from coal that is cost competitive with oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this report describes the development efforts which expand this sorbent development effort to include Se, Cd, and P as well as Hg and As. Additional research has focused on improving removal performance with the goal of achieving effluent concentrations that are suitable for chemical production applications. By contrast, sorbent development for CO{sub 2} capture has focused on regenerable sorbents that capture the CO{sub 2} byproduct at higher CO{sub 2} pressures. Previous research on CO{sub 2} sorbents has demonstrated that the most challenging aspect of developing CO{sub 2} sorbents is regeneration. The research documented in this report investigates options to improve regeneration of the CO{sub 2} capture sorbents. This research includes effort on addressing existing regeneration limitations for sorbents previously developed and new approaches that focus initially on the regeneration performance of the sorbent.

  17. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A.

    2011-05-01

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  18. Bioscience Technology Bioscience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Bioscience Technology Bioscience Technology Advantage Business Media 100 Enterprise Drive Rockaway, co-director of George Washington University's Institute for Proteomics Technology and Applications-by-point. Manufacturers have stampeded to offer the new technology. Applied Biosystems got out in front in 2004 when

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Massachusetts Institute...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hood Building - MA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, HOOD BUILDING (MA.01 ) Eliminated from further...

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory Institutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consortium consists of the University of New Mexico, New Mexico State University, and New Mexico Tech. The Engineering Institute Information Science and Technology Institute...

  1. DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana.

  2. Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

    2002-09-01

    Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

  3. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2005-09-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

  4. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2006-05-31

    This project has documented and demonstrated the feasibility of technologies and operational choices for companies who operate the large installed fleet of integral engine compressors in pipeline service. Continued operations of this fleet is required to meet the projected growth of the U.S. gas market. Applying project results will meet the goals of the DOE-NETL Natural Gas Infrastructure program to enhance integrity, extend life, improve efficiency, and increase capacity, while managing NOx emissions. These benefits will translate into lower cost, more reliable gas transmission, and options for increasing deliverability from the existing infrastructure on high demand days. The power cylinders on large bore slow-speed integral engine/compressors do not in general combust equally. Variations in cylinder pressure between power cylinders occur cycle-to-cycle. These variations affect both individual cylinder performance and unit average performance. The magnitude of the variations in power cylinder combustion is dependent on a variety of parameters, including air/fuel ratio. Large variations in cylinder performance and peak firing pressure can lead to detonation and misfires, both of which can be damaging to the unit. Reducing the variation in combustion pressure, and moving the high and low performing cylinders closer to the mean is the goal of engine balancing. The benefit of improving the state of the engine ''balance'' is a small reduction in heat rate and a significant reduction in both crankshaft strain and emissions. A new method invented during the course of this project is combustion pressure ratio (CPR) balancing. This method is more effective than current methods because it naturally accounts for differences in compression pressure, which results from cylinder-to-cylinder differences in the amount of air flowing through the inlet ports and trapped at port closure. It also helps avoid compensation for low compression pressure by the addition of excess fuel to achieve equalizing peak firing pressure, even if some of the compression pressure differences are attributed to differences in cylinder and piston geometry, clearance, and kinematics. The combination of high-pressure fuel injection and turbocharging should produce better mixing of fuel and air in lean mixtures. Test results documented modest improvements in heat rate and efficiency and significant improvements in emissions. The feasibility of a closed-loop control of waste-gate setting, which will maintain an equivalence ratio set point, has been demonstrated. This capability allows more direct tuning to enhance combustion stability, heat rate, or emissions. The project has documented the strong dependence of heat rate on load. The feasibility of directly measuring power and torque using the GMRC Rod Load Monitor (RLM) has been demonstrated. This capability helps to optimize heat rate while avoiding overload. The crankshaft Strain Data Capture Module (SDCM) has shown the sensitivity to changes in operating conditions and how they influence crankshaft bending strain. The results indicate that: balancing reduces the frequency of high-strain excursions, advanced timing directly increases crankshaft dynamic strain, reduced speed directly reduces strain, and high-pressure fuel injection reduces crankshaft strain slightly. The project demonstrated that when the timing is advanced, the heat rate is reduced, and when the timing is retarded, the heat rate is increased. One reason why timing is not advanced as much as it might be is the potential for detonation on hot days. A low-cost knock detector was demonstrated that allowed active control to use timing to allow the heat rate benefit to be realized safely. High flow resistance losses in the pulsation control systems installed on some compressors have been shown to hurt efficiency of both compressor and engine/compressor system. Improved pulsation control systems have the potential to recover almost 10% of available engine power. Integrity enhancements and reduced component failure probability will enhance aggregate

  5. Hawai`i Hydrogen Power Park Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai`i Hydrogen Power Park Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science value of integrated hydrogen energy systems, operating in real-world environments. The Power Park`i #12;Hawai`i Hydrogen Power Park Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science

  6. Reactor User Interface Technology Development Roadmaps for a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Outlet Temperature of 750 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Mckirdy

    2010-12-01

    This report evaluates the technology readiness of the interface components that are required to transfer high-temperature heat from a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) to selected industrial applications. This report assumes that the HTGR operates at a reactor outlet temperature of 750°C and provides electricity and/or process heat at 700°C to conventional process applications, including the production of hydrogen.

  7. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2008-02-12

    Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

  8. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy Headquarters Categorical| Department of Energy Cha-Ching!Chapter 4 TransmissionGas

  9. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 236249 www.iop.org/Journals/ps PII: S0963-0252(01)17082-9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Francis F.

    2001-01-01

    helicon waves; the wave energy is subsequently converted to electron energy, thus raising the electronINSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA SOURCES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Plasma Sources Sci. Technol-1594, USA 2 Plasma & Materials Technologies, Inc (now Trikon Technologies, Inc), 9255 Deering Avenue

  10. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

    2005-12-01

    This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

  11. This article was downloaded by: [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur] On: 22 October 2014, At: 10:46

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jayant K.

    reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form prices of crude oil and natural gas, the focus has sh

  12. Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingbo

    2014-01-01

    greenhouse gas emissions from lime kilns at kraft pulpIn this trial, the total lime requirement has been reducedreactions instead of just lime causticizing and may cause

  13. Case Studies from the Climate Technology Partnership: Landfill Gas Projects in South Korea and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larney, C.; Heil, M.; Ha, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper examines landfill gas projects in South Korea. Two case studies provide concrete examples of lessons learned and offer practical guidance for future projects.

  14. Alternative-fuels technology: Natural gas vehicles as a way to curb urban air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the use of natural gas as an alternative fuel in various vehicles. Safety and emissions resulting from combustion are briefly discussed.

  15. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leadership in radiation-hardened integrated circuits, institute revolutionary work in super-lattices that deliver the framework for custom semiconductor materials and develop...

  16. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antonia Antoniou Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia Mechanical Behavior of Hierarchical Nanoporous Metals Thursday, August 27, 2015 1:30 - 2:30pm MSL Auditorium...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Pennsylvania Partnership for Promoting Natural Gas Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  18. Rarefied gas dynamics and its applications to vacuum technology F. Sharipov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharipov, Felix

    . A methodology for modelling the Holweck pump is described. An extensive list of publications on these topics of gas dynamics (Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, heat transfer between two plates, flow past a sphere, etc, but no numerical calculation of rarefied gas flows could be realized at that time. In 1954 the so-called model

  19. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION, Environmental and Ecological Effects," August 2013. KEY WORDS: Greenhouse gases, transportation energy, electric options is an important step in formulating a cohesive strategy to abate U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG

  20. Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the US and other major countries and regions. To do so, I add a dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG goods over time, given specification of resource availabilities. With the CNG vehicle specification I am able to evaluate the effect of the CNG option on transportation emissions, oil imports, natural gas use

  1. Technology Cooperation Agreement Pilot Project development-friendly greenhouse gas reduction, May 1999 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.

    1999-05-11

    The Technology Cooperation Agreement Pilot Project (TCAPP) was launched by several U.S. Government agencies (USAID, EPA and DOE) in August 1997 to establish a model for climate change technology cooperation with developing and transition countries. TCAPP is currently facilitating voluntary partnerships between the governments of Brazil, China, Kazakhstan, Korea, Mexico, and the Philippines, the private sector, and the donor community on a common set of actions that will advance implementation of clean energy technologies. The six participating countries have been actively engaged in shaping this initiative along with international donors and the private sector. This program helps fulfill the US obligation to support technology transfer to developing countries under Article 4.5 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. TCAPP also provides a mechanism to focus resources across international donor programs on the technology cooperation needs of developing and transition countries.

  2. Natural gas vehicle technology and fuel performance evaluation program. Final report, November 1994-May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevilacqua, O.M.

    1997-06-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive study which examined the impact of natural gas fuel composition variability on natural gas vehicle (NGV) emissions and performance. This study involved eight light-duty NGVs and five different blends of natural gas. The test vehicles were selected to establish a representative sample of state-of-the-art dedicated and bi-fuel models. Fuel blends included common commercial blends, and other gases representing `fringe` compositions. For each vehicle-fuel combination, the tests measured vehicle tailpipe and modal emissions, fuel economy, and driveability. Results show that the impacts of fuel variability are generally minor.

  3. An Advisory System For Selecting Drilling Technologies and Methods in Tight Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilisi, Nicolas

    2010-01-16

    ranging between 177 Tcf and 379 Tcf. During the past few decades, gas production from tight sands field developments have taken place all around the world from South America (Argentina), Australia, Asia (China, Indonesia), the Russian Federation, Northern...

  4. The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    gas, and hydro- electricity, plus high storage capacity toelectricity supply: generating capacity, energy storage, andand storage (CCS)—each have the potential to become the principal long-term electricity

  5. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01

    Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, Northwestof Depressurization for Gas Production from Gas Hydrate5L-38 Gas Hydrate Thermal Production Test Through Numerical

  6. Krishna | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps HeatTechnologies |TechnologiesTechnologiesBlandine

  7. 6/10/12 UK team advances measurement of gas bubbles in pipelines. | Technology news | Process Engineer... 1/2processengineering.theengineer.co.uk/.../1012631.article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    process in the manufacturing, power, oil & gas and petrochemical industries. For instance, the sharp6/10/12 UK team advances measurement of gas bubbles in pipelines. | Technology news | Process | Process Engineer... 2/2processengineering.theengineer.co.uk/.../1012631.article The work centred

  8. Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Science and Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA), syip@mit.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    , stress corrosion fatigue of metals in harsh oil-well environment, and creep in irradiated nuclear reactor (aging) phenomena in complex but technologically significant materials, such as hardening of cement paste

  9. Preparing prospective teacher education students at two-year post secondary institutions: an assessment of proficiency in technology usage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavenall, Pamela Elaine Rogers

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the proficiency or lack of proficiency of prospective teacher education students at two-year community colleges to use and integrate instructional technologies. In addition, this study also examined...

  10. Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingbo

    2014-01-01

    Report. U.S. Department of Energy. Contract No. : DE-FC07-in the Cement Industry". Energy Procedia 1 (1): 87-94. Beck,for U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology

  11. Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingbo

    2014-01-01

    condense water vapor by capillarity and recovery waste heat.heat recovery technology enables the capture, recovery, and reuse of all sensible and latent waste heat, as well as water

  12. A SIP SPATIAL AUDIO SERVER FOR THE EVE PLATFORM Research Academic Computer Technology Institute (CTI), Greece and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute (CTI), Greece and Computer Engineering and Informatics Department (CEID), University of Patras, Greece, bouras@cti.gr V. Triglianos Computer Engineering and Informatics Departmet (CEID) University of Patras, Greece triglian@ceid.upatras.gr Th. Tsiatsos Department of Informatics, Aristotle University

  13. The Road We've Traveled: 12 Years of Undergraduate Software Engineering at the Rochester Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, James R

    The Road We've Traveled: 12 Years of Undergraduate Software Engineering at the Rochester Institute lecturer, and several adjuncts. The program's development was first described in "The Road Less Traveled the road we've traveled, changes made, and how the program changed along the way, and consider the path

  14. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focuses on multi-scale, multiphysics approaches to understanding natural systems, "engineering the earth" with sensing and drilling technologies and characterizing geomaterials...

  15. Status of flue-gas treatment technologies for combined SO[sub 2]/NO[sub x] reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.); Markussen, J.M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments and passage of state legislation leading to more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO.) regulations have fueled research and development efforts on the technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and NO[sub x]. The integrated removal of both SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue-gas-cleanup systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

  16. Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    A technology demonstration program of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles was conducted at FL Bliss, Texas to demonstrate the use of CNG as an alternative fuel. The demonstration program at FL Bliss was the first Army initiative with CNG-fueled vehicles under the legislated Alternative Motor Fuels Act. This Department of Energy (DOE)-supported fleet demonstration consisted of 48 General Services Administration (GSA)-owned, Army-leased 1992 dedicated CNG General Motors (GM) 3/4-ton pickup trucks and four 1993 gasoline-powered Chevrolet 3/4-ton pickup trucks.

  17. SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2004 SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PRODUCTS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Information technology security prod ucts are essential to better secure infor mation technology (IT) systems

  18. Creating a Pathway to Sustainability IIT Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    ............................................................................................................5 Clean Coal Technology Production of Methane from Hydrates and Unconventional Sources Biofuels of the Future Demonstrates IIT Vision Engineering a Clean Water Supply in Haiti Community Outreach Education IIT first developed a formal affiliation with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), establishing

  19. Volume 104, Number 1, JanuaryFebruary 1999 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the experimental conditions and the analyte matrix, approximately 100 of the hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed and ozone depletion. Key words: air pollutants; database; gas standards; infrared spectrometer. Accepted of the hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed in the 1990 U.S.EPA Clean Air Act amendment [4] (CAAA) can

  20. Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Energy Outlook (EIA, 2006), also shown in the figure. Another feature of projections only a few.S. shale gas resources to economic viability affects the nation's energy outlook and the expected role shale resources is changing the U.S. energy outlook. Shale deposits, found in many parts of the U