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1

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

proved natural gas reserves (3) 2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR,

3

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Germany 51 254 700 ... June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources 18

4

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources: An Assessment of 137 Shale Formations in 41 Countries Outside the United States June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources 1 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

5

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas and billion barrels (Bbbl) of shale oil for each major shale formation. Risked Recoverable Gas and Oil, reported in trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of shale gas and

6

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the natural gas potential of the Devonian Age shales of West Virginia. For this, the study: (1) compiles the latest geological and reservoir data to establish the gas in-place; (2) analyzes and models the dominant gas production mechanisms; and (3) examines alternative well stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering the in-place gas. The major findings of the study include the following: (1) The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Huron, Rhinestreet, and Marcellus intervals) in West Virginia is estimated to range from 11 to 44 trillion cubic feet. (2) The Devonian shales in this state entail great geological diversity; the highly fractured, permeable shales in the southwest respond well to traditional development practices while the deep, tight shales in the eastern and northern parts of the state will require new, larger scale well stimulation technology. (3) Beyond the currently developed Huron and Rhinestreet shale intervals, the Marcellus shale offers a third attractive gas zone, particularly in the north central portion of the state. 21 references, 53 figures, 27 tables.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Methodology to Determine both the Technically Recoverable Resource and the Economically Recoverable Resource in an Unconventional Gas Play  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past decade, the worldwide demand for energy has continued to increase at a rapid rate. Natural gas has emerged as a primary source of US energy. The technically recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have increased from approximately 1,400 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) to approximately 2,100 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2010. The recent declines in gas prices have created short-term uncertainties and increased the risk of developing natural gas fields, rendering a substantial portion of this resource uneconomical at current gas prices. This research quantifies the impact of changes in finding and development costs (FandDC), lease operating expenses (LOE), and gas prices, in the estimation of the economically recoverable gas for unconventional plays. To develop our methodology, we have performed an extensive economic analysis using data from the Barnett Shale, as a representative case study. We have used the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the values of the Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for all the wells in a given gas play, to determine the values of the P10 (10th percentile), P50 (50th percentile), and P90 (90th percentile) from the CDF. We then use these probability values to calculate the technically recoverable resource (TRR) for the play, and determine the economically recoverable resource (ERR) as a function of FandDC, LOE, and gas price. Our selected investment hurdle for a development project is a 20 percent rate of return and a payout of 5 years or less. Using our methodology, we have developed software to solve the problem. For the Barnett Shale data, at a FandDC of 3 Million dollars, we have found that 90 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 46 dollars/Mcf, 50 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 9.2 dollars/Mcf, and 10 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 5.2 dollars/Mcf. The developed methodology and software can be used to analyze other unconventional gas plays to reduce short-term uncertainties and determine the values of FandDC and gas prices that are required to recover economically a certain percentage of TRR.

Almadani, Husameddin Saleh A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil at 95 Percent, Mean, and 5 Percent Probabilities for Given Oil Prices as a Percentage of Technically Recoverable Oil for the ANWR 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope...

9

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: Proved Reserves: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves, 2010 (August 2012).

10

Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Proved Reserves, Crude Oil," "Proved Reserves, Lease Condensate," and "Proved Reserves, Natural Gas" in Glossary. 7 Includes Federal offshore and State ...

11

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

so as to include NGPL. 7 Totals might not equal the sum of the components due to independent rounding. 8 Total of regions. June 2013

12

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Oil and Gas Supply...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Resources Table 46. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources Alaskan Natural Gas The outlook for natural gas production from the North Slope of Alaska is affected...

13

Table 3. Wet natural gas production and resources (trillion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR, including reserve

14

Shale gas is a global phenomenon - Today in Energy - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technically recoverable natural gas resources in the assessed basins totaled 5,760 Tcf. ... natural gas, offshore, Russia, shale. Email; Share; Print;

15

Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee Unconventional Gas Research Group, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Curtin University, Australia Shale gas is becoming an important source feet (Tcf) of technically recoverable shale gas resources. Western Australia (WA) alone

16

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

NETL: News Release - New Report Indicates More Recoverable Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2003 New Report Indicates More Recoverable Natural Gas in Wyoming Basins Than Previously Reported More Evidence that Technology Development Could Radically Enhance...

18

Natural Gas from Shale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, protective environmental practices and data development, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of gas technically recoverable where they once were not.

19

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

20

Quantitative analysis of the economically recoverable resource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to obtain estimates of the economically recoverable gas in the Appalachian Basin. The estimates were obtained in terms of a probability distribution, which quantifies the inherent uncertainty associated with estimates where geologic and production uncertainties prevail. It is established that well productivity on a county and regional basis is lognormally distributed, and the total recoverable gas is Normally distributed. The expected (mean), total economically recoverable gas is 20.2 trillion cubic feet (TCF) with a standard deviation of 1.6 TCF, conditional on the use of shooting technology on 160-acre well-spacing. From properties of the Normal distribution, it is seen that a 95 percent probability exists for the total recoverable gas to lie between 17.06 and 23.34 TCF. The estimates are sensitive to well spacings and the technology applied to a particular geologic environment. It is observed that with smaller well spacings - for example, at 80 acres - the estimate is substantially increased, and that advanced technology, such as foam fracturing, has the potential of significantly increasing gas recovery. However, the threshold and optimum conditions governing advanced exploitation technology, based on well spacing and other parameters, were not analyzed in this study. Their technological impact on gas recovery is mentioned in the text where relevant; and on the basis of a rough projection an additional 10 TCF could be expected with the use of foam fracturing on wells with initial open flows lower than 300 MCFD. From the exploration point of view, the lognormal distribution of well productivity suggests that even in smaller areas, such as a county basis, intense exploration might be appropriate. This is evident from the small tail probabilities of the lognormal distribution, which represent the small number of wells with relatively very high productivity.

Pulle, C.V.; Seskus, A.P.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Lewan (2002) concluded that much of the thermogenic gas produced in this basin is the result of cracking of oil to gas in deeply buried reservoirs. The efficiency of expulsion, migration and trapping has been estimated to range from 0.5 to 10 percent for certain basins (Schmoker, 1994: Zimmerman, 1999). The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin is 910 billion barrels using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated is 1,540 billion barrels using the Platte River software application. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 3,130 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 4,050 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Claypool and Mancini (1989) report that the conversion of oil to gas in reservoirs is a significant source of thermogenic gas in this basin. The Manila and Conecuh Subbasins are oil-prone. Although these subbasins are thermally mature for oil generation and expulsion, they are not thermally mature for secondary, non-associated gas generation and expulsion. The gas produced from the highly productive gas condensate fields (Big Escambia Creek and Flomaton fields) in these subbasins has been interpreted to be, in part, a product of the cracking of oil to gas and thermochemical reduction of evaporite sulfate in the reservoirs (Claypool and Mancini, 1989). The areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior Salt Basins with high potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs (>15,000 ft) have been identified. In the North Louisiana Salt Basin, these potential reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies, especially the Smackover, Cotton Valley, Hosston, and Sligo units. The estimate of the secondary, non-associated gas generated from cracking of oil in the source rock from depths below 12,000 feet in this basin is 4,800 TCF. Assuming an expul

Ernest A. Mancini

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Winter 2003) to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Technical Committee Meeting (Winter 2003) on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural...

23

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Table 15. Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 15. Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Underground - Minable Coal Surface - Minable Coal Total Coal-Resource State Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base

25

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Greenhouse Gas Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation Third-party resources Utilities Energy efficiency program...

26

Natural Gas as a Fuel for Heavy Trucks: Issues and Incentives (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1997, Rogner published a paper containing an estimate of the natural gas in place in unconventional reservoirs for 11 world regions. Rogner's work was assessing the unconventional gas resource base, and is now considered to be very conservative. Very little is known publicly about technically recoverable unconventional gas resource potential on a global scale. Driven by a new understanding of the size of gas shale resources in the United States, we estimated original gas in place (OGIP) and technically recoverable resource (TRR) in highly uncertain unconventional gas reservoirs, worldwide. We evaluated global unconventional OGIP by (1) developing theoretical statistic relationships between conventional hydrocarbon and unconventional gas; (2) fitting these relationships to North America publically available data; and (3) applying North American theoretical statistical relationships to evaluate the volume of unconventional gas resource of the world. Estimated global unconventional OGIP ranges from 83,300 (P10) to 184,200 (P90) Tcf. To assess global TRR from unconventional gas reservoirs, we developed a computer program that we call Unconventional Gas Resource Assessment System (UGRAS). In the program, we integrated a Monte Carlo technique with an analytical reservoir simulator to estimate the original volume of gas in place and to predict production performance. We used UGRAS to evaluate the probabilistic distribution of OGIP, TRR and recovery factor (RF) for the most productive unconventional gas formations in the North America. The P50 of recovery factor for shale gas, tight sands gas and coalbed methane is 25%, 79% and 41%, respectively. Finally, we applied our global OGIP assessment and these distributions of recovery factor gained from our analyses of plays/formations in the United States to estimate global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource. Global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource is estimated from 43,000 (P10) to 112,000 (P90) Tcf.

Dong, Zhenzhen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E. (eds.)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E. [eds.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ź . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

None

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ź . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97{reg_sign}. Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

NONE

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

34

Technical-Economic Calculation of Gas Pipeline Network Based on Value Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By technical-economic calculation of the gas pipeline network, the economic diameter can be determined and the project investment can be saved. According to the principle of value engineering, a mathematical model is constructed for technical-economic ... Keywords: value engineering, gas pipeline network, function analysis, technical-economic calculation

Liu Jiayou; Zhao Yanxin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: United States Geological Survey, "Economics of Undiscovered Oil in the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge," 1998. Return to 2.

36

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

37

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF UPGRADING DAIRY MANURE-DERIVED BIOGAS FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the current technical and economical feasibility of processing dairy manure-derived biogas to natural gas quality for injection… (more)

Saikkonen, Kelly

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several Hanford waste tanks have been observed to exhibit periodic releases of significant quantities of flammable gases. Because potential safety issues have been identified with this type of waste behavior, applicable tanks were equipped with instrumentation offering the capability to continuously monitor gases released from them. This document was written to cover three primary areas: (1) describe the current technical basis for requiring flammable gas monitoring, (2) update the technical basis to include knowledge gained from monitoring the tanks over the last three years, (3) provide the criteria for removal of Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System(s) (SHMS) from a waste tank or termination of other flammable gas monitoring activities in the Hanford Tank farms.

Estey, S.D.

1998-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

A recoverable versatile photo-polymerization initiator catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A photo-polymerization initiator based on an imidazolium and an oxometalate, viz., (BMIm)2(DMIm) PW12O40 (where, BMIm = 1-butyl-3-methylimizodium, DMIm = 3,3'-Dimethyl-1,1'-Diimidazolium) is reported. It polymerizes several industrially important monomers and is recoverable hence can be reused. The Mn and PDI are controlled and a reaction pathway is proposed.

Chen, Dianyu; Roy, Soumyajit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure technology development and marketing, small scale liquefied natural gas (LNG) production, and codes & standards. Many attendees also toured Pacific Gas & Electric's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gas shales characterization and technology development and transfer. Annual technical report, October 1991-September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Technology Transfer work area was to compile and publish the Technology Review, Sponsor Gas Shales Workshops, and manage the Marietta College Natural Gas Supply Information Center. In the Technical and Economic Evaluations work area, the objective was to quantify the gas shale resource and determine the potential economic benefits of future shale research. The objectives of the third work area, Field Projects in the Antrim Shale were to improve gas producibility from the Antrim Shale by optimizing stimulations and production practices and to develop log-based gas content and gas in-place calculations.

Wicks, D.; Decker, D.; Reeves, S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion cubic feet (tcf). Appalachian Basin - The geological formations that roughly follow the Appalachian Mountain range and contain

43

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

Joel L. Morrison

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

44

Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

ALASKA NORTH SLOPE OIL AND GAS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

additions to Northern Alaska economically recoverable oil and gas resources from exploration during 2005 to 2050 interval. (Current cumulative production, ERR, and...

46

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Greenhouse Gas Emissions | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

47

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Why is Shale Gas Important?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Why is Shale Gas Important? Why is Shale Gas Important? With the advance of extraction technology, shale gas production has led to a new abundance of natural gas supply in the United States over the past decade, and is expected to continue to do so for the foreseeable future. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the unproved technically recoverable U.S. shale gas resource is estimated at 482 trillion cubic feet. 1 Estimated proved and unproved shale gas resources amount to a combined 542 trillion cubic feet (or 25 percent) out of a total U.S. resource of 2,203 trillion cubic feet. 2 U.S. shale gas production has increased 12-fold over the last

48

Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation, Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation, Gulf of Mexico: In Situ Field Study with Laboratory Characterizations of Exposed and Buried Gas Hydrates DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-02NT41328 Dates: 3/4/02 - 3/3/06 Prepared by: Miriam Kastner, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California 92093 Ian MacDonald, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 Prepared for US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2006 2 Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

49

Methanol production with elemental phosphorus byproduct gas: technical and economic feasibility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using a typical, elemental, phosphorus byproduct gas stream in methanol production is assessed. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of a substitute for natural gas. The first part of the study establishes economic tradeoffs between several alternative methods of supplying the hydrogen which is needed in the methanol synthesis process to react with CO from the off gas. The preferred alternative is the Battelle Process, which uses natural gas in combination with the off gas in an economically sized methanol plant. The second part of the study presents a preliminary basic design of a plant to (1) clean and compress the off gas, (2) return recovered phosphorus to the phosphorus plant, and (3) produce methanol by the Battelle Process. Use of elemental phosphorus byproduct gas in methanol production appears to be technically feasible. The Battelle Process shows a definite but relatively small economic advantage over conventional methanol manufacture based on natural gas alone. The process would be economically feasible only where natural gas supply and methanol market conditions at a phosphorus plant are not significantly less favorable than at competing methanol plants. If off-gas streams from two or more phosphorus plants could be combined, production of methanol using only offgas might also be economically feasible. The North American methanol market, however, does not seem likely to require another new methanol project until after 1990. The off-gas cleanup, compression, and phosphorus-recovery system could be used to produce a CO-rich stream that could be economically attractive for production of several other chemicals besides methanol.

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

[Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research]. Technical Quarterly Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major Accomplishments by Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) during this reporting period are highlighted below and amplified in later sections of this report: AGTSR distributed 50 proposals from the 98RFP to the IRB for review, evaluation and rank-ordering during the summer; AGTSR conducted a detailed program review at DOE-FETC on July 24; AGTSR organized the 1998 IRB proposal review meeting at SCIES on September 15-16; AGTSR consolidated all the IRB proposal scores and rank-orderings to facilitate the 98RFP proposal deliberations; AGTSR submitted meeting minutes and proposal short-list recommendation to the IRB and DOE for the 98RFP solicitation; AGTSR reviewed two gas turbine related proposals as part of the CU RFP State Project for renovating the central energy facility; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from the University of Pittsburgh, Wisconsin, and Minnesota; AGTSR assisted GTA in obtaining university stakeholder support of the ATS program from California, Pennsylvania, and Colorado; AGTSR assisted GTA in distributing alert notices on potential ATS budget cuts to over 150 AGTSR performing university members; AGTSR submitted proceedings booklet and organizational information pertaining to the OAI hybrid gas turbine workshop to DOE-FETC; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR updated the university consortium poster to include new members and research highlights; For DOE-FETC, the general AGTSR Fact Sheet was updated to include new awards, workshops, educational activity and select accomplishments from the research projects; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR prepared three fact sheets highlighting university research supported in combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted pictures on materials research for inclusion in the ATS technology brochure; For DOE-FETC, AGTSR submitted a post-2000 roadmap showing potential technology paths AGTSR could pursue in the next decade; AGTSR distributed the ninth newsletter UPDATE to DOE, the IRB: and two interested partners involved in ATS; AGTSR submitted information on its RFP's, workshops, and educational activities for the 1999 ASMWIGTI technology report for worldwide distribution; AGTSR coordinated university poster session titles and format with Conference Management Associates (CMA) for the 98 ATS Annual; and AGTSR submitted 2-page abstract to CMA for the 98 ATS Review titled: ''AGTSR: A Virtual National Lab''.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation-specific policies, they recommend (in addition to the land use policies mentioned above), that they combine an upstream trading system with a carbon efficiency standard similar to the current CAFE standard. Under this approach a fuel price signal would be complemented by incentives for manufacturers to produce more carbon efficient vehicles. To prevent vehicle manufacturers from being forced to pay more than other sectors for reducing GHG emissions, they recommend that the vehicle makers be allowed to pay a cash penalty equal to the market price of allowances in lieu of meeting carbon efficiency requirements.

Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geopressured Geothermal Resource and Recoverable Energy Estimate for the Wilcox and Frio Formations, Texas (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An estimate of the total and recoverable geopressured geothermal resource of the fairways in the Wilcox and Frio formations is made using the current data available. The flow rate of water and methane for wells located in the geopressured geothermal fairways is simulated over a 20-year period utilizing the TOUGH2 Reservoir Simulator and research data. The model incorporates relative permeability, capillary pressure, rock compressibility, and leakage from the bounding shale layers. The simulations show that permeability, porosity, pressure, sandstone thickness, well spacing, and gas saturation in the sandstone have a significant impact on the percent of energy recovered. The results also predict lower average well production flow rates and a significantly higher production of natural gas relative to water than in previous studies done from 1975 to 1980. Previous studies underestimate the amount of methane produced with hot brine. Based on the work completed in this study, multiphase flow processes and reservoir boundary conditions greatly influence the total quantity of the fluid produced as well as the ratio of gas and water in the produced fluid.

Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

ODC/EPA 17 elimination from DOD technical data and gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, DOD and USAF policy, the Environment Systems Division of the Human Systems Program Office, Human Systems Center, Brooks AFB TX has developed a program to systematically eliminate references to particularly active Class I Ozone Depleting Chemicals (ODC) from gas turbine engine technical data. Additionally, Executive Order 12856 and subsequent DOD directives drive the reduction in volume usage of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 17 toxins. Program scope includes the validation of requirements for usage, examination of commercially available alternatives, identification of solutions implemented by manufacturers, and qualification of potential alternatives where necessary. Technical and management approaches are discussed. In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, DOD and USAF policy, the Environment Systems Division of the Human Systems Program Office, Human Systems Center, Brooks AFB TX has developed a program to systematically eliminate references to particularly active Class I Ozone Depleting Chemicals (ODC) from gas turbine engine technical data. Additionally, Executive Order 12856 and subsequent DOD directives drive the reduction in volume usage of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 17 toxins. Program scope includes the validation of requirements for usage, examination of commercially available alternatives, identification of solutions implemented by manufacturers, and qualification of potential alternatives where necessary. Technical and management approaches are discussed.

Manty, B.A.; McCall, M.P.; DeGarmo, L.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

Sherwood, D.J.

1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

55

Collection of technical data for tight gas sands in support of the massive hydraulic fracturing system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed to study case histories of logging problems/requirements in tight gas sand areas, provide production histories/completion information on selected Uinta Basin tight gas sand wells, provide geologic guidance and additional technical input for computer simulation of tight gas sand well behavior, and develop information about production histories, completion techniques and reservoir rock characteristics from selected tight gas sand key wells in the Piceance and Green River Basins. A list of gas sand wells in the Uinta Basin is included along with gas production statistics, completion and reservoir data, and well production data. (JRD)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage

57

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers It Seems Like Shale Gas Came Out  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

It Seems Like Shale Gas Came Out It Seems Like Shale Gas Came Out of Nowhere - What Happened? Knowledge of gas shale resources and even production techniques has been around a long time (see "Technological Highlights" timeline). But even as recently as a few years ago, very little of the resource was considered economical to produce. Innovative advances - especially in horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing and other well stimulation technologies - did much to make hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of shale gas technically recoverable where it once was not. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, along with industry partners, was heavily involved in the innovation chain, and helped to make some of these techniques, as well as protective

58

Technical Protocols for Assessing Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Mobility in the Subsurface at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research that has been conducted on dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mobility at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and presents technical protocols for conducting DNAPL mobility assessments at MGP sites using currently available methodologies and/or technologies. The technical protocols address each of the primary zones of the subsurface environment: vadose zone, saturated zone, and bedrock (both competent and fractured). The report a...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Authors: Robert Hunter (ASRC Energy), Scott Digert (BPXA), Tim Collett (USGS), Ray Boswell (USDOE) Venue: AAPG National Meeting Gas Hydrate session, Oral Presentation, San Antonio, TX, April 22, 2008 (http://www.AAPG.org [external site]) Abstract: This BP-DOE collaborative research project is helping determine whether or not gas hydrate can become a technically and economically recoverable gas resource. Reservoir characterization, development modeling, and associated studies indicate that 0-0.34 trillion cubic meters (TCM) gas may be technically recoverable from the estimated 0.92 TCM gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). Reservoir modeling indicates sufficient potential for technical recovery to justify proceeding into field operations to acquire basic reservoir and fluid data from the Mount Elbert gas hydrate prospect in the Milne Point Unit (MPU). Successful drilling and data acquisition in the Mount Elbert-01 stratigraphic test well was completed during February 3-19, 2007. Data was acquired from 131 meters of core (30.5 meters gas hydrate-bearing), extensive wireline logging, and wireline production testing operations using Modular Dynamics Testing (MDT). The stratigraphic test validated the 3D seismic interpretation of the MPU gas hydrate-bearing Mount Elbert prospect. Onsite core sub- sampling preserved samples for later analyses of interstitial water geochemistry, physical properties, thermal properties, organic geochemistry, petrophysics, and mechanical properties. MDT testing was accomplished within two gas hydrate-bearing intervals, and acquired during four long shut-in period tests. Four gas samples and one pre-gas hydrate dissociation formation water sample were collected. MDT analyses are helping to improve understanding of gas hydrate dissociation, gas production, formation cooling, and long-term production potential as well as help calibrate reservoir simulation models.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessing the viability of compressed natural gas as a transportation fuel for light-duty vehicles in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent optimistic revisions to projections for recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have generated renewed interest in the possibility of greater utilization of… (more)

Kennedy, Castlen Moore

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

Christopher Orme

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 6, 2011) Continuing last week’s net decline, the Henry Hub price this week fell 8 cents from $4.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 30, to $4.17 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 6. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (May 2011) contract fell from $4.355 per MMBtu to $4.146 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,579 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 1, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 11 to 891. A new study released by EIA estimated technically recoverable shale

66

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model. [Cyclic thermal injection  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research, Technical Quarterly Progress Report. October 1, 1998--December 31, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major accomplishments during this reporting period by the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) are: AGTSR submitted FY99 program continuation request to DOE-FETC for $4M; AGTSR submitted program and workshop Formation to the Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) initiative; AGTSR distributed research accomplishment summaries to DOE-FETC in the areas of combustion, aero-heat transfer, and materials; AGTSR reviewed and cleared research papers with the IRB from Arizona State, Cornell, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Clemson, Texas and Georgia Tech; AGTSR prepared background material for DOE-FETC on three technology workshops for distribution at the DOE-ATS conference in Washington, DC; AGTSR coordinated two recommendations for reputable firms to conduct an economic impact analysis in support of new DOE gas turbine initiatives; AGTSR released letters announcing the short-list winners/non-winners from the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR updated fact sheet for 1999 and announced four upcoming workshops via the SCIES web page AGTSR distributed formation to EPRI on research successes, active university projects, and workshop offerings in 1999 AGTSR continued to conduct telephone debriefings to non-winning PI's born the 98RFP solicitation AGTSR distributed completed quarterly progress report assessments to the IRB experts in the various technology areas AGTSR provided Formation to GE-Evandale on the active combustion control research at Georgia Tech AGTSR provided information to AlliedSignal and Wright-Pat Air Force Base on Connecticut's latest short-listed proposal pertaining to NDE of thermal barrier coatings AGTSR submitted final technical reports from Georgia Tech - one on coatings and the other on active combustion control - to the HU3 for review and evaluation AGTSR coordinated the format, presentation and review of 28 university research posters for the ATS Annual Review Meeting in November, 1998 AGTSR published a research summary paper at the ATS Annual Review pertaining to the university consortium's activities AGTSR published and presented a paper on the status of ATS catalytic combustion R&D at the RTA/NATO Gas Turbine Combustion Symposium, October 12-16,1998 in Lisbon, Portugal IRE approved a 12-month add-on request from Penn State University to conduct an added research task in their multistage unsteady aerodynamics project AGTSR reviewed a research extension white paper from Clemson University with the IRB to conduct an added task pertaining to their mist/steam cooling research project AGTSR coordinated new research topics with the IR.Band select universities to facilitate R&D roadmapping needs at the Aero-Heat Transfer III workshop in Austin, TX AGTSR distributed FY97 research progress reports to DOE and the XRB; and AGTSR solicited new R&D topics from the IRB experts for the 1999 RFP.

NONE

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and high pressures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane. Due to these characteristics, the reservoirs provide two sources of energy: chemical energy from the recovered methane, and thermal energy from the recovered fluid at temperatures high enough to operate a binary power plant for electricity production. Formations with the greatest potential for recoverable energy are located in the gulf coastal region of Texas and Louisiana where significantly overpressured and hot formations are abundant. This study estimates the total recoverable onshore geopressured geothermal resource for identified sites in Texas and Louisiana. In this study a geopressured geothermal resource is defined as a brine reservoir with fluid temperature greater than 212 degrees F and a pressure gradient greater than 0.7 psi/ft.

Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

NETL: News Release - Nation May Have Less Access To Natural Gas Than  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 6, 2001 June 6, 2001 Nation May Have Less Access To Natural Gas Than Thought Study of Rocky Mountain Region Continues Implementation of National Energy Policy; Reviews Restrictions to Energy Exploration on Federal Lands WASHINGTON, DC - Access to one of the nation's most promising natural gas-bearing regions in the Rocky Mountains may be much more restricted than previously thought, a U.S. Department of Energy study has concluded. - Greater Green River Basin Map Working virtually on a tract-by-tract basis, analysts studied federal lands in the Greater Green River Basin of Wyoming and Colorado and found that nearly 68 percent of the area's technically recoverable natural gas resource - as much as 79 trillion cubic feet of natural gas - is either closed to development or under significant access restrictions.

71

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

72

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes hydropower, solar, wind, ... Energy Resources; 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates,

73

Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Geology and potential uses of the geopressure resources of the Gulf Coast. [6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy, 200 Tcf of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US ERDA has supported efforts to evaluate the potential contribution to the national energy supply of geopressured geothermal resources in the Gulf Coast. Efforts include a program of resource assessment and programs to examine utilization of the resource for the production of electricity and as a source of industrial-process heat. Work on resource assessment has suggested the presence of perhaps as much as 6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy and of 200 Tcf of methane. This program has emphasized finding significantly large sand bodies within the geopressured stratigraphic section in addition to defining the distribution of abnormal fluid pressures and formation temperatures. Regional sand facies analyses conducted thus far indicate five locations in the Frio formation of Central and South Texas where adequately large geopressured geothermal resources may be present. Engineering studies of energy-conversion systems based on total-flow, flashed-steam, and binary-cycle concepts show that development of electric power from the Gulf Coast geopressure resource is technically feasible. Study of use of the resource as process heat in pulp and paper mills and new sugar refineries has shown that these uses also are technically sound. The thermal content of a barrel of geothermal brine can cost as little as 9 mills when credited for recoverable hydraulic energy and methane. The value of heat approaches 50 mills per bbl for certain applications. All programs have pointed out clearly the need for better specific understanding of the resource, especially its dissolved methane content and its ability to produce for tens of years.

Howard, J.H.; House, P.A.; Johnson, P.M.; Towse, D.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.; Hornburg, C.D.; Morin, O.J.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen's significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an analysis of test results indicates that hydrogen enhanced natural gas HCCI (versus neat natural gas HCCI at comparable stoichiometry) had the following characteristics: (1) Substantially lower intake temperature needed for stable HCCI combustion; (2) Inconclusive impact on engine BMEP and power produced; (3) Small reduction in the thermal efficiency of the engine; (4) Moderate reduction in the unburned hydrocarbons in the exhaust; (5) Slight increase in NOx emissions in the exhaust; (6) Slight reduction in CO2 in the exhaust; and (7) Increased knocking at rich stoichiometry. The major accomplishments and findings from the project can be summarized as follows: (1) A model was calibrated for accurately predicting heat release rate and peak pressures for HCCI combustion when operating on hydrogen and natural gas blends. (2) A single cylinder research engine was thoroughly mapped to compare performance and emissions for micro-pilot natural gas compression ignition, and HCCI combustion for neat natural gas versus blends of natural gas and hydrogen. (3) The benefits of using hydrogen to extend, up to a limit, the stable operating window for HCCI combustion of natural gas at higher intake pressures, leaner air to fuel ratios or lower inlet temperatures was documented.

John Pratapas; Daniel Mather; Anton Kozlovsky

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Materials in Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the performance of innovative thermal barrier coating systems for applications at high temperatures in advanced industrical gas turbines.

Ramesh Subramanian

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Resources Figure 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate, Total Technically Dry Natural Gas, Total...

79

RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA  

SciTech Connect

Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Aspects on Bioenergy as a Technical Measure to Reduce Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas emission assessments of energy supply systems have traditionally included the CO2 emissions produced as the fuel is burned. A lot of models and… (more)

Wihersaari, Margareta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Aspects on bioenergy as a technical measure to reduce energy related greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas emission assessments of energy supply systems have traditionally included the CO2 emissions produced as the fuel is burned. A lot of models and… (more)

Wihersaari, Margareta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to...

83

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

[Fuel substitution of vehicles by natural gas: Summaries of four final technical reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains summary information on three meetings and highlights of a fourth meeting held by the Society of Automotive Engineers on natural gas fueled vehicles. The meetings covered the following: Natural gas engine and vehicle technology; Safety aspects of alternately fueled vehicles; Catalysts and emission control--Meeting the legislative standards; and LNG--Strengthening the links.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--October 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Technologies Inc. and its subcontractors, during the period April 1, 1993 through October 31, 1994 under Phase II of the DOE Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development program. The objective of the program is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through the implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Preliminary technical data report: WyCoalGas project water system. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The WyCoalGas, Inc. Proposed coal gasification plant site is approximately 16 miles north of Douglas, Wyoming, located generally in Sections 27 and 34, T35N, R70W of the sixth prinicpal meridian. The plant site is located in typical high plateau plains of central Wyoming. Climate in the area is typical of semi-arid central Wyoming and is subject to wide variations in temperature. Precipitation in the area averages about 14 inches per year, of which about 10 inches fall during the April-September irrigation season. Projected water requirements at the plant site are 6020 acre-feet per year. Since the proposed plant site is not near any major streams or rivers, water must be transported to it. Water will be supplied from four sources - two surface water and two groundwater. The two surface water sources are LaPrele Reservoir and flood flows from the North Platte River with a 1974 appropriations date. LaPrele Reservoir is located approximately 14 miles west of Douglas, Wyoming, and is shown on Figure A-1. Water will be released from LaPrele Reservoir and flow down LaPrele Creek to the North Platte River. Water from the North Platte River will be diverted at a point in Section 7 of T33N, R71W. The LaPrele water and excess water from the North Platte will be pumped from the river and stored in Panhandle Reservoir No. 1, which is also referred to as Combs Reservoir. A pipeline will convey water from Panhandle Reservoir No. 1 to the coal gasification plant site. The two groundwater sources are located north of Douglas and west of Douglas.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GTI and Krupp Uhde have been jointly developing advanced technology for removing high concentrations of acid gas from high-pressure natural gas for over a decade. This technology, the Morphysorb{reg_sign} process, based on N-formyl and N-acetyl morpholine mixtures, has now been tested in a large-scale facility and this paper presents preliminary results from acceptance testing at that facility. Earlier publications have discussed the bench-scale and pilot plant work that led up to this important milestone. The site was Duke Energy's new Kwoen sour gas upgrader near Chetwynd B.C., Canada. This facility has a nameplate capacity of 300 MMscfd of sour natural gas. The objective of the Morphysorb process at this site was to remove 33 MMscfd of acid gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) for reinjection downhole. This represents about half the acid gas present in the feed to the plant. In so doing, proportionately more of the plant ''sales'' gas, which is sent for final processing at the nearby Pine River plant, can be sent down the line without coming up against the sulfur removal capacity limits of Pine River plant, than could with other solvents that were evaluated. Other benefits include less loss of methane downhole with the rejected acid gas and lower circulation and recycle compression horsepower than with competitive solvents. On the downside, the process is expected to have higher solvent vaporization losses than competitive solvents, but this is a comparatively minor drawback when weighed against the value of the benefits. These benefits (and drawbacks) were developed into quantitative ''acceptance'' criteria, which will determine if the solvent will continue to be used at the site and for award of monetary bonuses to the process developer (GTI).

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

TECHNICAL AND OPERATING SUPPORT FOR PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF MORPHYSORB ACID GAS REMOVAL PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 14 years, the Gas Technology Institute and jointly with Uhde since 1997 developing Morphysorb{reg_sign} a new physical solvent-based acid gas removal process. Based on extensive laboratory, bench, pilot-plant scale experiments and computer simulations, DEGT Gas Transmission Company, Canada (DEGT) has chosen the process for use at its Kwoen processing facility near Chetwynd, British Columbia, Canada as the first commercial application for the Morphysorb process. DOE co-funded the development of the Morphysorb process in various stages of development. DOE funded the production of this report to ensure that the results of the work would be readily available to potential users of the process in the United States. The Kwoen Plant is designed to process 300 MMscfd of raw natural gas at 1,080-psia pressure. The sour natural gas contains 20 to 25 percent H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. The plant reduces the acid gas content by about 50% and injects the removed H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} into an injection well. The Kwoen plant has been operating since August 2002. Morphysorb{reg_sign} is a physical solvent-based process used for the bulk removal of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}S from natural gas and other gaseous streams. The solvent consists of N-Formyl morpholine and other morpholine derivatives. This process is particularly effective for high-pressure and high acid-gas applications and offers substantial savings in investment and operating cost compared to competitive physical solvent-based processes. GTI and DEGT first entered into an agreement in 2002 to test the Morphysorb process at their Kwoen Gas Treating Plant in northern BC. The process is operating successfully without any solvent related problems and has between DEGTC and GTI. As of December 2003, about 90 Bcf of sour gas was processed. Of this about 8 Bcf of acid gas containing mainly H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was injected back into the depleted reservoir and 82 Bcf sent for further processing at DEGTC's Pine River Plant. This report discusses the operational performance at Kwoen plant during the performance test as well as the solvent performance since the plant started up. The Morphysorb performance is assessed by Duke Energy according to five metrics: acid gas pickup, recycle gas flow, total hydrocarbon loss in acid gas stream, Morphysorb solvent losses and foaming related problems. Plant data over a period of one year show that the Morphysorb solvent has performed extremely well in four out of five of these categories. The fifth metric, Morphysorb solvent loss, is being evaluated over a longer-term period in order to accurately assess it. However, the preliminary indications based on makeup solvent used to date are that solvent losses will also be within expectations. The analysis of the solvent samples indicates that the solvent is very stable and did not show any sign of degradation. The operability of the solvent is good and no foaming related problems have been encountered. According to plant operators the Morphysorb unit runs smoothly and requires no special attention.

Nagaraju Palla; Dennis Leppin

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

Sutton, W.H.

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Novel High-Heat Transfer Low-NO{sub x} Natural Gas Combustion System. Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-heat transfer low NO(sub x) natural gas combustion system. The objectives of this program are to research, develop, test, and commercialize a novel high-heat transfer low-NO{sub x} natural gas combustion system for oxygen-, oxygen-enriched air, and air-fired furnaces. This technology will improve the process efficiency (productivity and product quality) and the energy efficiency of high-temperature industrial furnaces by at least 20%. GTI's high-heat transfer burner has applications in high-temperature air, oxygen-enriched air, and oxygen furnaces used in the glass, metals, cement, and other industries. Development work in this program is focused on using this burner to improve the energy efficiency and productivity of glass melting furnaces that are major industrial energy consumers. The following specific project objectives are defined to provide a means of achieving the overall project objectives. (1) Identify topics to be covered, problems requiring attention, equipment to be used in the program, and test plans to be followed in Phase II and Phase III. (2) Use existing codes to develop models of gas combustion and soot nucleation and growth as well as a thermodynamic and parametric description of furnace heat transfer issues. (3) Conduct a parametric study to confirm the increase in process and energy efficiency. (4) Design and fabricate a high-heat transfer low-NOx natural gas burners for laboratory, pilot- and demonstration-scale tests. (5) Test the high-heat transfer burner in one of GTI's laboratory-scale high-temperature furnaces. (6) Design and demonstrate the high-heat transfer burner on GTI's unique pilot-scale glass tank simulator. (7) Complete one long term demonstration test of this burner technology on an Owens Corning full-scale industrial glass melting furnace. (8) Prepare an Industrial Adoption Plan. This Plan will be updated in each program Phase as additional information becomes available. The Plan will include technical and economic analyses, energy savings and waste reduction predictions, evaluation of environmental effects, and outline issues concerning manufacturing, marketing, and financing. Combustion Tec, Owens Corning, and GTI will all take active roles in defining this Plan. During Phase I, the first three objectives were addressed and completed along with the design component of the fourth objective. In Phase II, the fabrication component of the fourth objective was completed along with objectives five and six. Results of the Phase I work were reported in the Phase I Final Report and are summarized in this Final Technical Report. Work for Phase II was divided in four specific Tasks. Results of the Phase II work were reported in the Phase II Final Report and are also summarized in this Final Technical Report. No Phase III Final Report was prepared, so this Final Technical Report presents the results of Phase III commercial demonstration efforts. A description of each Task in Phases I, II, and III is presented in this report.

Abbasi, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goal is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate their potential application for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGVs). Focus is to design and engineer adsorbents that meet or exceed performance and cost targets established for low-pressure natural gas storage materials. Potentially, about two million tons adsorbent could be consumed in NGVs by year 2000. If successful, the results could lead to use of Illinois coal in a market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. Activated carbon samples were prepared from IBC-106 coal by controlling both the preoxidation temperature and time, and the devolatilization temperature in order to eliminate coal caking. A 4.6 cc pressurized vessel was constructed to measure the Vm/Vs methane adsorption capacity (volume of stored methane at STP per volume storage container). Several IBC-106 derived activated carbons showed methane adsorption capacities comparable to that of a 1000 m{sup 2}/g commercial activated carbon. Results indicated that surface area and micropore volume of activated carbons are important for natural gas storage. Work is in progress to synthesize samples from IBC-106 coal with optimum pore diameter for methane adsorption.

Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, Jian; Lizzio, A.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A cooperative development of gas turbines for electric power generation in USA is underway. Since the first AGTSR program manager has retired, a search for a new manager has begun. Reports during this period include membership, combustion instability white paper, and a summary paper for the ASME IGTI conference.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant systems verification. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following tasks are included in this project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Test facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. This report briefly describes the subtasks still to be completed: Power plant system test with reformed natural gas; Upgrading of existing, US government-owned, test facilities; and Advanced MCFC component research.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate oojective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. This report presents a summary of technical progress of the well log analysis of Kuparuk Field, Northslope, Alaska.

Sharma, G.D.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

Durham, M.D.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of Technical Impracticability Determinations and Their Applicability to Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation and remediation of former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites often present many challenges due to the presence of dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), the age of releases, complex geology, persistent compounds, and site ownership by third parties. As a result, it is often difficult or impossible to remediate former MGP sites to pre-release conditions or regulatory-established default soil and groundwater quality criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and many states ...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Bioconversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to develop an integrated two-stage fermentation process for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to a mixture of alcohols. This is achieved in two steps. In the first step, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum converts carbon monoxide (CO) to butyric and acetic acids. Subsequent fermentation of the acids by Clostridium acetobutylicum leads to the production of butanol and ethanol. The tasks for this quarter were: development/isolation of superior strains for fermentation of syngas; evaluation of bioreactor configuration for improved mass transfer of syngas; recovery of carbon and electrons from H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}; initiation of pervaporation for recovery of solvents; and selection of solid support material for trickle-bed fermentation. Technical progress included the following. Butyrate production was enhanced during H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} (50/50) batch fermentation. Isolation of CO-utilizing anaerobic strains is in progress. Pressure (15 psig) fermentation was evaluated as a means of increasing CO availability. Polyurethane foam packing material was selected for trickle bed solid support. Cell recycle fermentation on syngas operated for 3 months. Acetate was the primary product at pH 6.8. Trickle bed and gas lift fermentor designs were modified after initial water testing. Pervaporation system was constructed. No alcohol selectivity was shown with the existing membranes during initial start-up.

Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.

1994-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Gas turbine demonstration of pyrolysis: derived fuels. Third technical progress report, July 1, 1979-December 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing pyrolytic oil and char as a fuel for a combustion turbine engine. This is the first phase of an extended program with the ultimate goal of commercializing a gas turbine engine and electrical generating system which is independent of petroleum-based fuels. Maximum use of existing technology and current production engine hardware (Teledyne CAE Model J69-T-29 Turbojet Engine) is being incorporated for a sequence of test evaluations rating from isolated combustor component tests to full scale engine demonstration tests. The technical goals to be achieved during the course of this project are: pyrolytic fuel characterization in terms of its properties and constituents; pyrolytic fuel combustion technology in gas turbine application in terms of pyrolytic oil atomization, quantity of char burned, emissions, performance and associated combustion system aerothermodynamics; pyrolytic fuel (oil and char slurry) handling, mixing, and storage technology; and engine materials compatibility with the the pyrolytic fuel and its combustion products. Progress achieved during the period from July 1979 through Deember 1981 in design, analysis, an project management hardware fabrication and procurement, fuel chemistry and properties, and combustor rig tests are summarized.

Jasas, G.; Kasper, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Novel carbons from Illinois coal for natural gas storage. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a technology for producing microengineered adsorbent carbons from Illinois coal and to evaluate the potential application of these novel materials for storing natural gas for use in emerging low pressure, natural gas vehicles (NGV). Potentially, about two million tons of adsorbent could be consumed in natural gas vehicles by year 2000. If successful, the results obtained in this project could lead to the use of Illinois coal in a growing and profitable market that could exceed 6 million tons per year. During this reporting period, a pyrolysis-gasification reactor system was designed and assembled. Four carbon samples were produced from a {minus}20+100 mesh size fraction of an Illinois Basin Coal (IBC-106) using a three-step process. The three steps were: coal oxidation in air at 250 C, oxicoal (oxidized coal) devolatilization in nitrogen at 425 C and char gasification in 50% steam-50% nitrogen at 860 C. These initial tests were designed to evaluate the effects of pre-oxidation on the surface properties of carbon products, and to determine optimum reaction time and process conditions to produce an activated carbon with high surface area. Nitrogen-BET surface areas of the carbon products ranged from 700--800 m{sup 2}/g. Work is in progress to further optimize reaction conditions in order to produce carbons with higher surface areas. A few screening tests were made with a pressurized thermogravimetric (PTGA) to evaluate the suitability of this instrument for obtaining methane adsorption isotherms at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from one to 30 atmospheres. The preliminary results indicate that PTGA can be used for both the adsorption kinetic and equilibrium studies.

Rostam-Abadi, M.; Sun, J.; Lizzio, A.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Fatemi, M. [Amoco Research Center, Naperville, IL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR�¹����s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument�¹����s robustness in a real-world situation.

Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

TECHNICAL SCOPE OF GAS-COOLED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT IRRADIATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

A set of 55 experiments hss been outiined to provide a minimum irradiation program for selection of UO/sub 2/, pellet geometry and fabricntion techniques, and canning technology. These experiments fall into three catagories: prototype: untts in which radial dimension and heat fluxes sre close to proposed design values, but irradiation times are long; reduced-size prototype for accelerated tests in which most variables will be studied; and miniaurized pellet irradiation to obtain high burnup for fission gas release studies. Reactor space has been found generally available and several installations are now examining their capabilities to participate in the program. A tentative schedule has been drawn to illustrate the feasibility of the program. (auth)

1958-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pilot-plant technical assessment of wet flue gas desulfurization using limestone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed on a countercurrent pilot-scale packed scrubber for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The flow rate of the treated flue gas was around 300 Nm{sup 3}/h, so the pilot-plant capacity is one of the largest with respect to other published studies on a pilot-plant wet FGD. The tests were carried out at an SO{sub 2} inlet concentration of 2000 ppm by changing the recycle slurry pH to around 4.8 and the L/G ratio to between 7.5 and 15. Three types of limestone were tested, obtaining desulfurization efficiencies from 59 to 99%. We show the importance of choosing an appropriate limestone in order to get a better performance from the FGD plant. Thus, it is important to know the reactivity (on a laboratory scale) and the sorbent utilization (on a pilot-plant scale) in order to identify if a limestone is reactive enough and to compare it with another type. In addition, by using the transfer-unit concept, a function has been obtained for the desulfurization efficiency, using the L/G ratio and the recycle slurry pH as independent variables. The Ca/S molar ratio is related to these and to the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. This function, together with a simplified function of the operation variable cost, allows us to determine the pair (L/G ratio and pH) to achieve the desired SO{sub 2} removal with the minimum operation cost. Finally, the variable operation costs between packed towers and spray scrubbers have been compared, using as a basis the pilot packed tower and the industrial spray column at the Compostilla Power Station's FGD plant (in Leon, Spain).

Ortiz, F.J.G.; Vidal, F.; Ollero, P.; Salvador, L.; Cortes, V.; Gimenez, A. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Technical progress report, October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity towards completing Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Phase I work was begun again in December. Effort to complete the Phase I work was temporarily suspended upon receipt of the ATS Phase II RFP the last week in August. The Westinghouse ATS team`s efforts were directed at preparing the ATS Phase II proposal which was submitted November 18. It is planned to finish Phase I work and submit the topical report by the end of February 1993. The objective of the four slogging combustor tests conducted during this reporting period (i.e., tests SL3-1 through SL3-4) were to perform sulfur capture experiments using limestoneand iron oxide based sorbents and to collect exhaust vapor phase and solids bound alkali measurements using the Westinghouse and Ames Laboratory alkali probes/monitors. The most significant, if not outstanding result revealed by these tests is that the Ames alkali monitor indicates that the vapor phase sodium is approximately 23--30 ppbw and the vapor phase potassium is approximately 5--20 ppbw. For reference, alkalilevels of 20 ppbw are acceptable in Westinghouse gas turbines fueled with crude oil.

Not Available

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

111

Isobutanol-methanol mixtures from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1995  

SciTech Connect

The contract objectives are: to design a catalytic material for the synthesis of isobutanol with a productivity of 200 g isoalcohols/g-cat-h and a molar isobutanol/methanol ratio near unity; and to develop structure-function rules for the design of catalysts for the selective conversion of synthesis gas to isoalcohols. Several catalyst samples have been prepared by controlled co-precipitation from aqueous mixtures of metal nitrates. The composition of these materials is based on reports of best available catalysts for methanol synthesis, for isobutanol synthesis, and for methanol coupling reactions. The mechanical construction and pressure testing of the microreactor system has been completed. The in-situ infrared spectrophotometer equipped with a nitrogen purge is fully operational. The temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) unit has been designed; construction will begin during the third quarter FY`95. Air Products and Chemicals has provided us with a sample of a BASF isobutanol synthesis catalyst and with catalytic data obtained on this catalyst in a LaPorte test run. This catalyst will serve as a benchmark for the certification of our new microreactor system.

Iglesia, E.

1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

EMC 2006: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Program Overview. Electronic materials relate to, are produced, or are operated by the controlled flow of electrons through a semiconductor, a gas, ...

113

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana AAPG 2012 Annual Convention and Exhibition Ariel Esposito and Chad Augustine April 24, 2012 NREL/PR-6A20-54999 2 * Geopressured Geothermal o Reservoirs characterized by pore fluids under high confining pressures and high temperatures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane o Soft geopressure: Hydrostatic to 15.83 kPa/m o Hard geopressure: 15.83- 22.61 kPa/m (lithostatic pressure gradient) * Common Geopressured Geothermal Reservoir Structure o Upper thick low permeability shale o Thin sandstone layer o Lower thick low permeability shale * Three Potential Sources of Energy o Thermal energy (Temperature > 100°C - geothermal electricity generation)

114

Dec2006_BP_QuartRpt.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technically recoverable from 33 TCF gas-in-place (GIP) Eileen trend gas hydrate beneath industry infrastructure within the Milne Point Unit (MPU), Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), and...

115

Alaska Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Permitting Project  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report for Project 15446, covering the grant period of October 2002 through March 2006. This project connects three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for an advanced information technology infrastructure to better support resource development and resource conservation. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells. The broad goal of this grant is to increase domestic production from Alaska's known producing fields through the implementation of preferred upstream management practices. (PUMP). Internet publication of extensive and detailed geotechnical data is the first task, improving the permitting process is the second task, and building an advanced geographical information system to offer continuing support and public access of the first two goals is the third task. Excellent progress has been made on all three tasks; the technical objectives as defined by the approved grant sub-tasks have been met. The end date for the grant was March 31, 2006.

Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 6, 2011) Continuing last week’s net decline, the Henry Hub price this week fell 8 cents from $4.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 30, to $4.17 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 6. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (May 2011) contract fell from $4.355 per MMBtu to $4.146 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,579 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 1, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 11 to 891. A new study released by EIA estimated technically recoverable shale

117

Technical Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TECHNICAL INFORMATION. ... Technical comments: nsrl@nist.gov. Website comments: web897@nist.gov. Technical Papers. ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

118

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

119

Evaluation and Prediction of Unconventional Gas Resources in Underexplored Basins Worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As gas production from conventional gas reservoirs in the United States decreases, industry is turning more attention to the exploration and development of unconventional gas resources (UGR). This trend is expanding quickly worldwide. Unlike North America where development of UGRs and technology is now mature and routine, many countries are just beginning to develop unconventional gas resources. Rogner (1996) estimated that the unconventional gas in place, including coalbed methane, shale gas and tight-sand gas, exceeds 30,000 Tcf worldwide. As part of a research team, I helped to develop a software package called Unconventional Gas Resource Advisory (UGRA) System which includes the Formation Analog Selection Tool (FAST) and Basin Analog Investigations (BASIN) to objectively and rapidly identify and rank mature North American formations and basins that may be analogous to nascent international target basins. Based on BASIN and FAST results, the relationship between mature and underexplored basins is easily accessed. To quantify the unconventional resource potential in typical gas basins, I revised and used a computer model called the Petroleum Resources Investigation Summary and Evaluation (PRISE) (Old, 2008). This research is based on the resource triangle concept, which implies that all natural resources, including oil and gas, are distributed log-normally. In this work, I describe a methodology to estimate values of technically recoverable resources (TRR) for unconventional gas reservoirs by combining estimates of production, reserves, reserves growth, and undiscovered resources from a variety of sources into a logical distribution. I have also investigated mature North American unconventional gas resources, and predict unconventional resources in underexplored basins worldwide for case study. Based on the results of testing BASIN and PRISE, we conclude that our evaluation of 24 North American basins supports the premise that basins analysis can be used to estimate UGRs.

Cheng, Kun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Appendix C National Type Evaluation Technical Committee ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sus Fert Suspension Fertilizers Cryo LNG Cryogenic Liquids and Liquefied Natural Gas Water Water Mr. Buttler, NIST Technical ...

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

122

Russian gas resource base large, overstated, costly to maintain  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas resources of the Former Soviet Union are immense, with an officially estimated initial recoverable endowment of 250.7 trillion cu m (8,852 trillion cu ft). Of this volume, 85% is located in the Russian Federation, which will be the dominant world supplier of gas through 2015. Although Russia possesses an amazing gas resource base, official figures overstate both the recovery factor for gas in place and appear to systematically overestimate volumes of recoverable gas in undiscovered fields. Production and transportation of gas from the Yamal peninsula and the new discoveries in the Kara and Barents seas will cost many times the current average cost of gas production in Russian. The paper discusses resources and reserves and examines the reliability of Soviet-vintage data.

Grace, J.D. (Troika Energy Services, Dallas, TX (United States))

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of the 90 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company-owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing State and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico. 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Combustion of Illinois coals and chars with natural gas. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined combustion of coal and natural gas offers advantages compared to burning coal or natural gas alone. For example, low volatile coals or low volatile chars derived from treatment or gasification processes can be of limited use due to their poor flammability characteristics. However, the use of natural gas in conjunction with the solid fuel can provide the necessary ``volatiles`` to enhance the combustion. Additionally, natural gas provides a clean cofiring fuel source which can enhance the usefulness of coals with high sulfur content. Addition of natural gas may reduce SO{sub x} emissions through increased sulfur retention in the ash and reduce NO{sub x} emissions by varying local stoichiometry and temperature levels. This research program seeks to clarify the contributions and to identify the controlling mechanisms of coining natural gas with Illinois coal through studies of particle ignition, burning rates and ash characterization. The first two quarters focused on the ignition delay measurements and their analysis, along with the incorporation of particle porosity into the burning rate model. The emphasis of the third quarter was on a more detailed understanding of the burning rate process, as well as understanding of cofiring`s effects on sulfur retention. The contributions of particle burning area to the quantification of the particle burning mechanisms have been shown to be important and continue to be investigated. Ash samples for various methane concentrations under similar other conditions have shown positive trends in reducing S0{sub 2} emission through increased sulfur capture in the ash.

Buckius, R.O.; Peters, J.E.; Krier, H.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane and other higher order hydrocarbons, through C4, with interest in further developing reactions important to methane- and ethane-related chemistry. With the increased demand for energy and the declining conventional hydrocarbons worldwide, energy companies, both majors and independents, are turning to unconventional resources to produce the hydrocarbons required to meet market demand. From coalbed methane to low permeability (tight) gas reservoirs and gas shales, energy companies are making substantial progress in developing the technologies required to bring these unconventional reserves to the market. A common misconception is that there are not enough domestic oil and gas reserves to fuel our economy. The United States imports most of the oil used for transportation fuel and several TCF of natural gas annually. However, there is a very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of gas in place in just the gas shale formations that have been identified in the energy arena (Navigant Study 2008). There are still major gas shale plays and basins that have not been explored and are waiting to be evaluated and developed. The natural gas in shales and other unconventional reservoirs can be used to generate electricity, or it can be turned into liquids and used by the transportation industry. It is also misconstrued that gas shales are relatively new in our industry and something of the future. The first commercially viable gas shale well was drilled in the early 1920s in Pennsylvania, before the famous oil well drilled by Colonel Drake. The objectives of this study are to (1) complete literature review to establish which geologic parameters affect completion techniques in five emerging gas shales: the Antrium, the Barnett, the Haynesville, the Marcellus, and the Woodford; (2) identify the different completion methods; (3) create an economic model for the completion techniques discussed; (4) develop a sensitivity analysis on various economic parameters to determine optimal completion strategy; and (5) create completion flowcharts. Based on the literature review I have done for several gas shale basins, I have identified seven pertinent geologic parameters that influence completion practices. These are depositional environment, total organic content (TOC), average gas content, shale mineralogy, shale thickness, and reservoir pressure. Next, I identified different completion and simulation trends in the industry for the different shale plays. The results from this study show that although there are some stark differences between depths (i.e. the Antrim Shale and the Haynesville Shale), shale plays are very similar in all other geologic properties. Interestingly, even with a large range for the different geological parameters, the completion methods did not drastically differ indicating that even if the properties do not fall within the range presented in this paper does not automatically rule them out for further evaluation in other plays. In addition to the evaluation of geologic properties, this study looked at drilling cost and the production profile for each play. Due to the volatility of the energy industry, economic sensitivity was completed on the price, capital, and operating cost to see what affect it would have on the play. From the analysis done, it is concluded that horizontal drilling in almost any economic environment is economic except for one scenario for the Woodford Shale. Therefore, gas shales plays should still be invested in even in lower price environments and companies should try to take advantage of the lower cost environments that occur during these times. With continual development of new drilling and completion techniques, these plays will become more competitive and can light the path for exploration of new shale plays worldwide.

Agrawal, Archna

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing. Second semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this proposed program is to evaluate the potential of rotating gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing by expanding the currently available database. This expansion will focus on application of this technology to environments representative of those typically encountered in natural gas processing plants. Operational and reliability concerns will be addressed while generating pertinent engineering data relating to the mass-transfer process. Work to be performed this reporting period are: complete all negotiations and processing of agreements; complete assembly, modifications, shakedown, and conduct fluid dynamic studies using the plastic rotary contactor unit; confirmation of project test matrix; and locate, and transport an amine plant and dehydration plant. Accomplishment for this period are presented.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

A STUDY OF GAS-SOLID SUSPENSIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES AND EFFECT OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS. Technical Report IIL-7-P  

SciTech Connect

The equilibrium between thermionic emission from solid particles and space charges of the phases in a gas-solid suspension (thermal electrification) was previously studied. Some further considerations are examined. Investigation of the effects of the properties of the solid phase on thermal electrification indicates that solid particies in a gassolid system could be much hotter than the gas phase since thermal electrification depends mainly on solid particle temperature. Control of thermal electrification by the initial charge of solid particles, particularly removal of electrons by positively charged particles, is considered. The rate of solid particle dispersion is found to be the main factor in deionization of hot gases by charged solid particles. Investigation of the electrical conductivity of a mixture of electrons, charged solid particles, and the gas atoms of the suspending gas reveals that thermal electrification is not the only contributor to high electrical conductivity. Use of a gas-solid system for magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion is also examined. Solid particles of controlled size contribute favorably to MHD generation, but in plasma MHD accelerators would reduce performance. (D.C.W.)

Soo, S.L.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` program is one of the largest programs ever undertaken by the Mining Engineering Department of Southern Illinois university, both in terms of complexity and in terms of funding. Total funding over the expected four-year extent of the program, including both Department of Energy, matching Southern Illinois University funds, and contributed funds, this program exceeds three million dollars. The number of cooperating organizations adds to the management complexity of the program. It was believed, therefore, that sound management plan and management base is essential for the efficient and effective conduct of the program. This first quarter period (i.e., October 1--December 31, 1993) was developed to establishing the management base, developing a sound management plan, developing a test plan, and developing sound fiscal management and control. Actual technical operations, such as residue sample acquisition, residue analyses, groundwater sample acquisition and analyses, and material handling studies will get underway early in the next quarter (i.e., January 1--March 31, 1994). Some early results of residue analyses and groundwater analyses should be available by the end of the second quarter. These results will be reported in the next Technical Progress Report.

Thomasson, E.M.; Chugh, Y.P.; Esling, S.; Honaker, R.; Paul, B.; Sevin, H.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

On-Road Development of John Deere 6081 Natural Gas Engine: Final Technical Report, July 1999 - January 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report that discusses John Deere's field development of a heavy-duty natural gas engine. As part of the field development project, Waste Management of Orange County, California refitted four existing trash packers with John Deere's prototype spark ignited 280-hp 8.1 L CNG engines. This report describes the project and also contains information about engine performance, emissions, and driveability.

McCaw, D. L.; Horrell, W. A. (Deere and Company)

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Bioconversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of coal-derived synthesis gas as an industrial feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals has become an increasingly attractive alternative to present petroleum-based chemicals production. However, one of the major limitations in developing such a process is the required removal of catalyst poisons such as hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and other trace contaminants from the synthesis gas. Purification steps necessary to remove these are energy intensive and add significantly to the production cost, particularly for coals having a high sulfur content such as Illinois coal. A two-stage, anaerobic bioconversion process requiring little or no sulfur removal is proposed, where in the first stage the carbon monoxide (CO) gas is converted to butyric and acetic acids by the CO strain of Butyribacterium methylotrophicum. In the second stage, these acids along with the hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas are converted to butanol, ethanol, and acetone by an acid utilizing mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum. 18 figs., 18 tabs.

Jain, M.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project. Technical progress report No. 15, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to demonstrate that, by combining state-of-the-art technology, highly efficient plant operation and maintenance capabilities and by-product gypsum sales, significant reductions of SO{sub 2} emissions can be achieved at approximately one-half the life cycle cost of a conventional Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Further, this emission reduction is achieved without generating solid waste and while minimizing liquid wastewater effluent. Basically, this project entails the design, construction and operation of a nominal 600 MWe AFGD facility to remove SO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Corrosion in Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems: Technical Root Cause Analysis of Internal Corrosion on Wet FGD Alloy Absorbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been or are being installed on most large coal-fired electric generating units in response to new regulatory emission requirements. Aggressive corrosion has been noted in some of these systems, presumably from the low pH, high chloride environments created in the FGD process. There exists a plethora of material systems (metallic, organic, plastics, coating, and so forth) available to construct these systems, but, because of cost, fabricabi...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the work performed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) during the second program quarter from October 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993, under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92114. This program has co-ordinated funding for Task 1 from IGT`s Sustaining Membership Program (SMP), while DOE is funding Tasks 2--8. Progress in all tasks are reported. The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. An existing unit at IGT was modified to accommodate the sulfur feedstocks and the higher temperatures (>1300{degree}K) required for studying the reactions of hydrogen sulfide and methane as proposed in Tasks 2--5. An HP 5890 gas chromatograph with a TCD (thermal conductivity detector) for detecting fixed gases including hydrogen and an FPD (flame photometric detector) for detecting sulfur compounds was purchased using SMP funds and has been installed and calibrated. A total of seventy runs on MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, ZrS{sub 2} catalysts as well as quartz wool were performed. As high as 61% H{sub 2}S conversion was observed.

Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Preparation and characterization of composite membrane for high temperature gas separation. Quarterly technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To develop a new class of permselective inorganic membranes, the authors have identified electroless plating as a potential route to deposit a thin metal film on a porous substrate. Electroless plating is a controlled autocatalytic deposition of continuous film on the surface of a substrate by the interactions of a metal salt and a chemical reducing agent. This method can give thin films of metals, alloys and composites on both conducting and nonconducting surfaces. The objective of this project is to develop thin film palladium membranes for separation of hydrogen in high temperature applications. The authors plan to use electroless plating to deposit thin palladium films on microporous ceramic and silver substrates. They plan to characterize the membrane in terms of permeability and selectivity for gas separation. To accomplish the research objective, the project requires three tasks: Development of a process for composite membrane formation; Characterization of fabricated composite membrane; and Development of theoretical model for hydrogen gas separation. During this quarter, the authors attempted to measure the diffusivity and permeability of hydrogen gas through the palladium composite membrane. While running the diffusion measurements at elevated temperature and pressure, leakage of hydrogen was observed. This is a serious problem and it needs to be resolved. Currently, they are working on this problem. During this quarter, they also designed a diffusion cell to test thin-film palladium membrane in tubular structure. The diffusion cell is being fabricated and assembled by a local machine shop.

Ilias, S.; King, F.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Comments on new technical and economic data available for EPA`s proposed offshore oil and gas discharge guidelines and standards  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to provide comments on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Notice in the Federal Register entitled, ``Oil and Gas Extraction Point Source Category, Offshore Subcategory; Effluent Limitations Guidelines and New Source Performance Standards; New Information and Request or Comments`` (53 FR 41356; October 21, 1988). This Notice announces the availability of new technical, economic and environmental assessment information relating to the development of Best Available Technology economically achievable (BAT and New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) regulations under the Clean Water Act governing the discharge of drilling fluids (muds) and drill cuttings from offshore oil and gas facilities. The Notice is part of a rulemaking process which formally began with the initial release of rules in August 1985 and which incorporates numerous comments and additional data received subsequent to the release of the 1985 rules. The comments in this paper will concentrate on the following five issues: Estimated project impacts are misrepresented by assuming weighted-average incremental costs of regulation. Economic impacts are inaccurate, since annual compliance costs will likely affect the number of wells drilled, by the effect of compliance costs on project economics and the reduction in industry cash flows on capital available for drilling. Initial well productivity assumptions for various scenarios do not vary with field size. The assumed lease costs, which are based on historical data, do not accurately reflect the future value of leases. The experimental decline rates assumed for the Pacific are too high.

1989-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

EIA - AEO2010 - Naturall gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks. In 2008, U.S. freight trucks used more than 2 million barrels of petroleum-based diesel fuel per day. In the AEO2010 Reference case, they are projected to use 2.7 million barrels per day in 2035. Petroleum-based diesel use by freight trucks in 2008 accounted for 15 percent of total petroleum consumption (excluding biofuels and other non-petroleum-based products) in the transportation sector (13.2 million barrels per day) and 12 percent of the U.S. total for all sectors (18.7 million barrels per day). In the Reference case, oil use by freight trucks grows to 20 percent of total transportation use (13.7 million barrels per day) and 14 percent of the U.S. total (19.0 million barrels per day) by 2035. The following analysis examines the potential impacts of policies aimed at increasing sales of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles (HDNGVs) and the use of natural gas fuels, and key factors that lead to uncertainty in these estimates.

138

Technical comparison between Hythane, GNG and gasoline fueled vehicles. [Hythane = 85 vol% natural gas, 15 vol% H[sub 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This interim report documents progress on this 2-year Alternative Fuel project, scheduled to end early 1993. Hythane is 85 vol% compressed natural gas (CNG) and 15 vol% hydrogen; it has the potential to meet or exceed the California Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle (ULEV) standard. Three USA trucks (3/4 ton pickup) were operated on single fuel (unleaded gasoline, CNG, Hythane) in Denver. The report includes emission testing, fueling facility, hazard and operability study, and a framework for a national hythane strategy.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Final technical progress report, September 12, 1991--December 11, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to investigate sulfur-resistant catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas having H{sub 2}/CO {le} 1 into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols, especially ethanol, by a highly selective and efficient pathway, while also promoting the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). The catalysts chosen are bifunctional, base-hydrogenation, sulfur-tolerant transition metal sulfides with heavy alkali, e.g. Cs{sup +}, promoter dispersed on their surfaces. The modes of activation of H{sub 2} and CO on MoS{sub 2} and alkali-doped MoS{sub 2} were considered, and computational analyses of the thermodynamic stability of transition metal sulfides and of the electronic structure of these sulfide catalysts were carried out. In the preparation of the cesium-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts, a variety of preparation methods using CsOOCH were examined. In all cases, doping with CsOOCH led to a lost of surface area. The undoped molybdenum disulfide catalyst only produced hydrocarbons. Cs-doped MoS{sub 2} catalysts all produced linear alcohols, along with smaller amounts of hydrocarbons. With a 20 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, temperature, pressure, and flow rate dependences of the synthesis reactions were investigated in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}/CO = 1/1 synthesis gas during short term testing experiments. It was shown that with a carefully prepared 10 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, reproducible and high alcohol synthesis activity could be obtained. For example, at 295 C with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.3 MPa and with GHSV = 7,760 l/kg cat/hr, the total alcohol space time yield was ca 300 g/kg cat/hr (accompanied with a hydrocarbon space time yield of ca 60 g/kg cat/hr). Over a testing period of ca 130 hr, no net deactivation of the catalyst was observed. 90 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Richards-Babb, M.; Carr, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A TECHNICAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF AMINE-BASED CO2 CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY FOR POWER PLANT GREENHOUSE GAS CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel power plants is gaining widespread interest as a potential method of controlling greenhouse gas emissions. Performance and cost models of an amine (MEA)-based CO{sub 2} absorption system for post-combustion flue gas applications have been developed, and integrated with an existing power plant modeling framework that includes multi-pollutant control technologies for other regulated emissions. The integrated model has been applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing coal-burning power plants. The cost of carbon avoidance was shown to depend strongly on assumptions about the reference plant design, details of the CO{sub 2} capture system design, interactions with other pollution control systems, and method of CO{sub 2} storage. The CO{sub 2} avoidance cost for retrofit systems was found to be generally higher than for new plants, mainly because of the higher energy penalty resulting from less efficient heat integration, as well as site-specific difficulties typically encountered in retrofit applications. For all cases, a small reduction in CO{sub 2} capture cost was afforded by the SO{sub 2} emission trading credits generated by amine-based capture systems. Efforts are underway to model a broader suite of carbon capture and sequestration technologies for more comprehensive assessments in the context of multi-pollutant environmental management.

Edward S. Rubin; Anand B. Rao

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program]. Quarterly technical progress narrative No. 21, December 1, 1987--February 29, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm{sup 2}; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate, Total Technically Dry Natural Gas, Total Technically Recoverable Resources Recoverable Resources Crude Oil and Lease Condensate by Type Dry Natural Gas by Type 88 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 58% 25% 18% 48 StatesÂč Onshore 48 StatesÂč Offshore Alaska 20% 13% 13% 54% 48 StatesÂč Onshore 48 StatesÂč Offshore Gas Alaska Tight Gas, Shale Gas, and Coalbed Methane Total 220 billion barrels Reserves Resources Technically Recoverable Resources Total 2,203 trillion cubic feet 22 198 220 Proved Unproved Total 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Barrels 273 1,931 2,203 Proved Unproved Total 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Trillion Cubic Feet Reserves Technically Recoverable Resources

143

Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Technical progress report, June 1993--August 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various preparation methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide and various alkali doping procedures were studied to determine if various preparation paramenters affected catalyst activity. Testing was performed on an undoped molybdenum disulfide sample with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.1 MPa and at temperatures of 245, 255, 265, 275, 280, 300, 320, and 295C, and only hydrocarbons were formed. A methanol injection experiment with undoped catalyst showed that homologation of methanol did not occur over the undoped MOS{sub 2}. Catalytic testing on a cesium formate doped molybdenum disulfide catalyst corresponding to 9 wt% Cs/MoS{sub 2} at 8.1 MPa and temperatures of 245, 255, 265, 275, 285, and 295C, mostly linear alcohols. The CS/MOS{sub 2} sample was protected from air exposure during preparation and testiag. As with the other recently tested alkali-promoted MOS{sub 2} catalysts, this cataylst was not as active as previous CS/MOS{sub 2} catalysts [1], and some deactivation during these systematic studies was observed. X-Ray powder diffraction and BET surface area measurements are being used to characterize the catalysts, and electron microscopy analyses are being carried out.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Carr, T.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1993--March 24, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report, adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland (LW) was shown to be weak. On the other hand, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters (4), onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and CR(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Studies on the dynamics of uptake of phenol and NA by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were initiated and preliminary results indicated that both phenol and NA were sorbed onto components of LWs. A mass balance model has been developed to quantify the fate of phenol in LWs. The model is based on the postulate that the fate of phenol in LWs can be attributed to a combination of (1) evaporation of solute and solvent, (2) adsorption of phenol onto various components of LW and (3) its biodegradation, both in solution and at solid-liquid interface. As an initial approximation, the latter two processes have been lumped together and incorporated into the model as an unit operation. Both zero order and first order kinetics for the disappearance of phenol have been considered. Evaporative losses of water and phenol have also been taken into account and this model is presented and discussed in this quarterly report.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, May 25, 1993-August 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland was shown to be weak. Secondly, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and Cr(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Uptake of NA by the soil component of the laboratory-type wetland was monitored as a function of pH. This quarterly report presents results from studies on the uptake of phenol and {beta}-naphthoic acid by laboratory-type wetlands designed and built during the earlier phases of this study. The uptake of phenol by the wetlands is quite rapid, and nearly complete in 50 hours, but it was also found that evaporative losses of phenol from the supernatant water during the same time period was considerable. On the other hand, {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) is sorbed quite slowly and there was no indication of evaporative losses in the case on NA.

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1992--February 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

During the first quarter of the above contract, all the elements of Task 1 were completed. The first quarterly report presented an overview of a wetland and its increasing use in industrial wastewater treatment. An idealized, reaction engineering description of wetlands was presented to demonstrate how the various processes that occur in a wetland can be modeled. Previous work on the use of wetlands to remove BOD, TSS, Phosphorus and Nitrogen was reviewed. Recent literature on the application of wetland technology to the treatment of petroleum-related wastewater was critically evaluated and an outline of the research plans for the first year was delineated. Further, our literature search (nominally completed under Task 1) unearthed more recent studies (some unpublished) and a summary was included in the second quarterly report. In the second quarterly report, results of our efforts on the construction of a laboratory-type wetland were also reported. Initial studies on the use of wetland amendments such as modified-clays and algae cells were presented and discussed. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+} and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland built as a part of this contract has been undertaken and these results are presented and discussed in this quarterly report. A number of studies on the design and preparation of modified-clays for the adsorption of Cr(VI) and {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) has been carried out during this quarter and these are also described and discussed in this report. The choice of {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) as an ionogenic organic compound was made on the basis of a recent personal communication to the Project Director that NA is a major contaminant in many oil and gas well wastewaters.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

147

Greenhouse gas reduction by recovery and utilization of landfill methane and CO{sub 2} technical and market feasibility study, Boului Landfill, Bucharest, Romania. Final report, September 30, 1997--September 19, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The project is a landfill gas to energy project rated at about 4 megawatts (electric) at startup, increasing to 8 megawatts over time. The project site is Boului Landfill, near Bucharest, Romania. The project improves regional air quality, reduces emission of greenhouse gases, controls and utilizes landfill methane, and supplies electric power to the local grid. The technical and economic feasibility of pre-treating Boului landfill gas with Acrion`s new landfill gas cleanup technology prior to combustion for power production us attractive. Acrion`s gas treatment provides several benefits to the currently structured electric generation project: (1) increase energy density of landfill gas from about 500 Btu/ft{sup 3} to about 750 Btu/ft{sup 3}; (2) remove contaminants from landfill gas to prolong engine life and reduce maintenance;; (3) recover carbon dioxide from landfill gas for Romanian markets; and (4) reduce emission of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions reduction attributable to successful implementation of the landfill gas to electric project, with commercial liquid CO{sub 2} recovery, is estimated to be 53 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent of its 15 year life.

Cook, W.J.; Brown, W.R.; Siwajek, L. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanders, W.I. [Power Management Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States); Botgros, I. [Petrodesign, SA, Bucharest (Romania)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

None

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NETL Researcher Receives Outstanding Technical Achievement Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

qualities sought for such awards. She currently serves as the technical coordinator for shale gas research, managing multiple projects within NETL's Office of Research and...

150

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and risks,...

151

Recoverable Robust Knapsacks: ?-Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

width capacity to be partitioned among the users in the area covered by the antenna. ..... instances were generated for 51 antennas with 15 to 221 traffic nodes ( ...

152

NEHRP - Technical Briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Library. Design & Construction Technical Briefs. Technical Briefs. Also ... Clearinghouse. NEHRP Seismic Design Technical Brief No. ...

153

Technical Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Resource Directory helps members maintain technical excellence in their professions. Technical Resources Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDifferential scanning calorimetry chemi

154

Technical Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Technical Guidance, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops and issues Government-wide and Department-wide technical guidance to ensure that classified nuclear...

155

Forecast Technical Document Technical Glossary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Technical Glossary A document defining some of the terms used in the 2011 Production Forecast technical documentation. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley in the Forecast documentation. In some cases, the terms and the descriptions are "industry standard", in others

156

A technical and economic analysis of a natural gas combined cycle power plant with carbon dioxide capture using membrane separation technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the potential effects of climate… (more)

Ducker, Michael Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

High-pressure coal-fired ceramic air heater for gas turbine applications. Technical quarterly progress report, May 1994--July 1994  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the development of a coal-fired ceramic air heater for gas turbine applications. This report describes component development.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powdered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PER) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PER burners for satisfactory performance. During this past quarter, a porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Various gas mixtures were tested. Results indicated that the stability limits of the burner and emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. However, the maximum radiant efficiency of the burner remained constant. Results obtained from this study can be useful to develop optimum design guidelines for PER burner manufacturers.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies 1985  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of the 91 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing state and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico and LNG from Algeria. 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1986-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1984  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of 89 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company-owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing state and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico and LNG from Algeria. 8 figs., 18 tabs.

Price, R.

1985-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... technically recoverable resources and economically recoverable resources that has been already discussed at some length, ... economic to transport ...

162

Nuclear stimulation of gas fields  

SciTech Connect

From National Technical Canadian Gas Association; Calgary, Alberta, Canada (17 Oct 1973). The technical bases of the emerging technology of nuclear stimulation of natural gas fields, the potential of this method for increasing the gas supply of the US, and public issues related to this technology are discussed. A technical appendix is provided with information on: reservoir producing characteristics; explosive design, availability, and cost; firing and space of explosives; economic parameters; and tabulated statistics on past and current projects on nuclear stimulation. (LCL)

Randolph, P.L.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

TMS Technical Divisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS BOARD OF DIRECTORS · TMS TECHNICAL DIVISIONS · COMMITTEE HOME PAGES. TOOLS AND RESOURCES. TECHNICAL COMMITTEE TOOLKIT.

164

Technical progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978. [Production of polarized hydrogen ions and atoms and their charge exchange reactions on various gas targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Topics covered include: direct production of polarized D/sup -/ (or H/sup -/) ions; the maximum fraction of fast H/sup 0/ (or D/sup 0/) atoms produced when H/sup -/ (or D/sup -/) is incident on various gas targets; cross sections for charge changing reactions when fast H/sup 0/ atoms and H/sup -/ ions are incident on various gas targets; and the production of H/sup -/ ions in an alkali vapor target. (GHT)

None

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

In this project, simulated gasifier-product streams were contacted with the zinc titanate desulfurization sorbent in a bench-scale atmospheric fluidized-bed reactor at temperatures ranging from 538 to 750 {degree}C (1000 to 1382 {degree}F). The first set of experiments involved treating a medium-Btu fuel gas (simulating that of a ``Texaco`` oxygen-blown, entrained-bed gasifier) containing 1.4 percent H{sub 2}S and HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 1500 ppmv. The second experimental set evaluated hot-gas desulfurization of a low-Btu fuel gas (simulating the product of the ``U-Gas`` air-blown gasifier), with HCl concentrations of 0, 200, and 800 ppmv. These operating conditions were typical of the gas-treatment requirements of gasifiers fueled by Illinois basin coals containing up to 0.6 percent chlorine. The results of the experiments at 538 and 650 {degree}C at all the HCl concentrations revealed no deleterious effects on the capability of the sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S from the fuel gas mixtures. In most cases, the presence of the HCl significantly enhanced the desulfurization reaction rate. Some zinc loss, however, was encountered in certain situations at 750 {degree}C when low-steam operating conditions were present. Also of interest, a portion of the incoming HCl was removed from the gas stream and was retained permanently by the sorbent. This behavior was examined in more detail in a limited set of experiments aimed at identifying ways to modify the sorbents composition so that the sorbent could act as a simultaneous desulfurization and dechlorination agent in the hot-gas cleanup process.

O`Brien, W.S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Gupta, R.P. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Competitive Natural Gas Providers (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Competitive providers and aggregators of natural gas must be certified by the Utilities Board. Applicants must demonstrate the managerial, technical, and financial capability to perform the...

167

Technical Fact Sheets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Fact Sheets Technical Fact Sheets Technical Fact Sheets Technical Fact Sheets (TFS) provide summary-level information on the impact of new, deployed, applied, and/or planned technical approaches supporting EM cleanup projects. The TFS is presented as a two-page document which summarizes the technical challenges, solutions, accomplishments, and impacts of the technical efforts. Additionally, they present the features, vendors, sites, states, national labs and universities that might be involved in developing technical solutions. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) GammaCam Technology Demonstration at ORNL Buildings 3026C and 3026D Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning D&D and Risk Assessment Tools

168

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Preliminary Screening -- Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In principle, syngas (primarily consisting of CO and H2) can be produced from any hydrocarbon feedstock, including: natural gas, naphtha, residual oil, petroleum coke, coal, and biomass. The lowest cost routes for syngas production, however, are based on natural gas, the cheapest option being remote or stranded reserves. Economic considerations dictate that the current production of liquid fuels from syngas translates into the use of natural gas as the hydrocarbon source. Nevertheless, the syngas production operation in a gas-to-liquids plant amounts to greater than half of the capital cost of the plant. The choice of technology for syngas production also depends on the scale of the synthesis operation. Syngas production from solid fuels can require an even greater capital investment with the addition of feedstock handling and more complex syngas purification operations. The greatest impact on improving the economics of gas-to liquids plants is through (1) decreasing capital costs associated with syngas production and (2) improving the thermal efficiency with better heat integration and utilization. Improved thermal efficiency can be obtained by combining the gas-to-liquids plant with a power generation plant to take advantage of the availability of low-pressure steam. The extensive research and development efforts devoted to syngas conversion to fuels and chemicals are documented in a vast amount of literature that tracks the scientific and technological advancements in syngas chemistry. The purpose of this report is to review the many syngas to products processes and summarize the salient points regarding the technology status and description, chemistry, catalysts, reactors, gas cleanliness requirements, process and environmental performances, and economics. Table 1 lists the products examined in this study and gives some facts about the technology as well as advantages and disadvantages. Table 2 summarizes the catalysts, process conditions, conversions, and selectivities for the various syngas to products processes. Table 3 presents catalyst poisons for the various products.

Spath, P. L.; Dayton, D. C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Near and long term efficiency improvements to natural gas heavy duty engines. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trucking Research Institute (TRI) in cooperation with the Department of Energy Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (DOE), South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and Gas Research Institute (GRI), requests proposals designed to support the Natural Gas Engine Enhanced Efficiency Program. This effort, which contains Programs A & B, is designed to fund projects that advance both the part and full load fuel efficiency of heavy-duty (250 hp plus) natural gas engines. Approximately $1.2 million will be available in Program A to fund up to three projects. These projects may target either or both near-term, and longer-term engine efficiency goals in addition, it is possible that one of the projects funded under Program A will be selected for additional funding for up to 42 months under Program B funding amounts are to be determined.

NONE

1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling & production of oil & gas in wetland areas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, incorporating milestone schedule/status, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a progress report on a planned program falling under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During this period, task 5, subscale tests, and task 7, environmental impacts, were completed. Work was continued on task 10, technology transfer, and the preparation of the final report as part of task 11.

Eggington, W.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2008 ... The Effect of DSP Structure on Removal of Impurities from Refinery ..... world's proven oil reserves and approximately 40% of the gas reserves.

174

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2009 ... temperature, time, mixing ratio and flow rate of gas, and the heating rate ...... very low critical cooling rates has been one of the most outstanding ...

175

TECHNICAL PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abatement of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Metallurgical & Materials Process Industry .......... ...... Hollow glass microspheres were produced using natural volcanic ...... Electrochemistry, Ekaterinburg Russia; 3University of Patras and Insti-.

176

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, "Technical Activities 1999" - NISTIR 6438. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999. This report summarizes ...

177

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998 - NISTIR NISTIR 6268. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998. ...

178

RMOTC - Library - Technical Papers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Papers & Presentations Technical Papers & Presentations General presentations What is RMOTC? A general overview of RMOTC's capabilities and facilities including the production, drilling, energy assurance, produced water management, carbon management, enhanced oil recovery, and alternative energy programs. RMOTC's renewable partnerships Renewable projects past, present, and future RMOTC: America's premier field testing facility An overview of RMOTC's unique capabilities History Of Teapot Dome A look back at Teapot Dome's rich history Fossil & renewable energy partnership opportunities Exploring renewable energy use in the oil field GPS & GIS - Managing Spatial Data Risk associated with current practice in managing spatial data RMOTC White Papers Oil & gas reservoirs in U.S. like the producing formations at NPR-3

179

APS Technical Update Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Updates Technical Updates are notices that share beamline technical and operations developments with APS users. For additional information contact the APS User Technical Interface....

180

Office of Technical Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Director's Perspective Welcome to the Office of Technical Guidance Edith A. Chalk, Director Welcome to the Office of Technical Guidance. The Office of Technical Guidance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Final Report. SFAA No. DEFC02-98CH10961. Technical assistance for joint implementation and other supporting mechanisms and measures for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation  

SciTech Connect

IIEC, a division of CERF, has developed an extensive base of experience implementing activities that support climate action by developing USIJI projects in transitional countries within Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and southern Africa. IIEC has been able to provide a range of technical and policy assistance to governments and industry in support of sustainable energy use. IIEC continues to work in key countries with local partners to develop and implement energy efficiency policies and standards, develop site-specific projects, and assist governing bodies to establish national priorities and evaluation criteria for approving GHG-mitigation projects. As part of this project, IIEC focused on promoting a series of activities in Thailand and South Africa in order to identify GHG mitigation projects and work within the national approval process of those countries. The sections of this report outline the activities conducted in each country in order to achieve that goal.

Knight, Denise

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Treatability Test Program Technical Report: Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Walls (PRWs) to Treat Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Impa cted Groundwater Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI contracted URS Corporation (URS) to evaluate the effectiveness of using permeable reactive walls (PRWs) to treat groundwater at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The research focus was to identify an innovative and passive (no operation and maintenance) groundwater remedial approach capable of treating low concentrations (up to 10,000 micrograms per liter) of dissolved phase organic compounds typically associated with MGP sites. Two MGP demonstration sites were selected to determine if implementat...

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

183

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report number 13, October 1--December 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At WVU, Mo{sub 2}S{sub 3} was produced from gas-phase reactions at 1,100 C. The gas-phase reactor was modified to increase product yields and to decrease particle size. Four Chevrel phases were synthesized for catalytic evaluation. In addition, four supported alkali-modified MoS{sub 2} materials were prepared from a single-source precursor, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}S{sub 13}. Screening runs have been carried out on some of these materials and others prepared earlier. At UCC and P, test runs on the reactor system have commenced. Higher alcohols up to butanol were observed and identified at high temperatures. Significant progress has been made on the Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. Frequency distributions have been determined for all of the equipment blocks for the Texaco gasifier cases. For these cases, there is a 10% chance that the actual installed capital cost could exceed the estimated installed capital cost by $40 million dollars. This work will continue with inclusion of variable costs and prediction of the uncertainties in the return on investment. Modifications to the simulated annealing optimization program have been underway in order to increase the level of certainty that the final result is near the global optimum. Alternative design cases have been examined in efforts to enhance the economics of the production of high alcohols. One such process may be the generation of electric power using combustion turbines fueled by synthesis gas.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Test and evaluation of hot-gas cleanup devices, Phase I and II (Task 1). Technical progress report, September 1, 1981 - November 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the status of the work performed on a program for test and evaluation of gas cleanup devices for PFBC combined cycle systems. The work was performed during the period September 1, 1981 through November 30, 1981. This is the second quarterly report since the start of the program. Work has continued to restore the pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) technology plant at Wood-Ridge, N.J. to an operational status. Preliminary designs to incorporate each of three advanced gas cleanup devices following a first stage low pressure drop inertial type separator were previously completed. The advanced devices provided by suppliers under a separate DOE contract include a ceramic bag filter, an electrostatic precipitator and an electrostatically enhanced inertial separator. The final design activity necessary to modify the facility for the test of the ceramic bag filter has been completed. Testing of each hot gas cleanup device concurrently with a DOE supplied advanced concept particle sampling system and an alkali metal content measurement system is planned to start in April 1982.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents (i.e. copper-chromium and copper-cerium) for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650{degrees} to 850{degrees}C. In this program, structural and kinetic studies are conducted on various compositions of the two selected copper-based sorbents to determine the optimum sorbent composition. The effect of operating conditions on the performance of the sorbents alone with the stability and regenerability of the selected sorbents in successive sulfidation/regeneration operation are determined. Parametric multicycle desulfurization tests were conducted this quarter in a bench-scale (5-cm-diameter) quartz reactor at one atmosphere using the CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuO/CeO{sub 2} sorbents. The parameters studied included temperature, space velocity, and feed gas composition. Both sorbents were able to reduce the H{sub 2}S concentration of the reactor feed gas to <10 ppM under all conditions tested. The apparent reactivity of the CuO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent was lower after the first cycle which may be attributed to incomplete regeneration caused by sulfate formation.

Hill, A.H.; Abbasian, J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li, Li [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ii iiiFOREWARD The Depleted Uranium Technical Brief is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this material. It addresses relative questions regarding the chemical and radiological health concerns involved with depleted uranium in the environment. This technical brief was developed to address the common misconception that depleted uranium represents only a radiological health hazard. It provides accepted data and references to additional sources for both the radiological and chemical characteristics, health risk as well as references for both the monitoring and measurement and applicable treatment techniques for depleted uranium. Please Note: This document has been changed from the original publication dated

Depleted Uranium; Brian Littleton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Guide to natural gas cogeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This user-oriented guide contains expert commentary and details on both the engineering and economic aspects of gas-fired cogeneration systems. In this completely undated second edition, is a thorough examination of equipment considerations and applications strategies for gas engines, gas turbines, steam engines, and electrical switch-gear. Clear guidelines show how to select the prime mover which is best suited for a specific type of application. It describes which methods have proven most effective for utilizing recoverable heat, how to determine total installed capacity, and how to calculate the required standby capacity. The second edition provides an assessment of recent technological developments. A variety of case studies guide through all types of natural gas cogeneration applications, including both commercial and industrial, as well as packaged systems for restaurants and hospitals. Drawing upon the expertise of numerous authorities from the American Gas Association, this fully illustrated guide will serve as a valuable reference for planning or implementing a natural gas-fired cogeneration project.

Hay, N.E. (ed.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2010 ... for dislocation hardening and static/dynamic recovery processes. ... Waspaloy for aerospace and oil and gas applications. The achieved results regarding ... to solubility-enhanced formation of interface Mo-rich borides. Both.

189

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report number 12, July 1--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both plug-flow microreactor systems at WVU are now functioning. Screening runs on these systems were started using carbide and nitride catalysts first, to avoid any question of contamination of the system with sulfur. The carbide and nitride catalysts are characterized by high activity but low selectivity towards alcohols. The Chevrel-phase catalysts tested have much lower activities but may be more selective to alcohols. Catalyst synthesis procedures are attempting to offset this tendency, and also to characterize and prepare sulfide catalyst by other approaches. At UCC and P, test runs on the reactor system have commenced. Higher alcohols up to butanol were observed and identified at high temperatures. Modeling studies have concentrated on the catalytic membrane reactor. The topical report, originally submitted last quarter, was revised after some errors were found. This report includes the design and economics for the seven cases discussed in previous quarterly reports. In the topical report, it is shown that a judicious choice of coal:natural gas feed ratio to the alcohol synthesis process allows the Shell Gasifier to be nearly competitive with natural gas priced at of $3.00/MMBtu. The advantage of the Shell Gasifier over the Texaco Gasifier is that the former produces a syngas with a lower H{sub 2}:CO ratio. When the feed to the process is coal only, there is no difference in the projected economics that would favor one gasifier over the other. The potential of co-generation of electric power with high alcohol fuel additives has been investigated. Preliminary results have revealed that a once-through alcohol synthesis process with minimal gas clean-up may provide an attractive alternative to current designs given the prevailing economic status of IGCC units.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report Number 8, 1 July, 1993--30 September, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task 1, the preparation of catalyst materials, is proceeding actively. At WVU, catalysts based on Mo are being prepared using a variety of approaches to alter the oxidation state and environment of the Mo. At UCC and P, copper-based zinc chromite spinel catalysts will be prepared and tested. The modeling of the alcohol-synthesis reaction in a membrane reactor is proceeding actively. Under standard conditions, pressure drop in the membrane reactor has been shown to be negligible. In Task 2, base case designs had previously been completed with a Texaco gasifier. Now, similar designs have been completed using the Shell gasifier. A comparison of the payback periods or production cost of these plants shows significant differences among the base cases. However, a natural gas only design, prepared for comparison purposes, gives a lower payback period or production cost. Since the alcohol synthesis portion of the above processes is the same, the best way to make coal-derived higher alcohols more attractive economically than natural gas-derived higher alcohols is by making coal-derived syngas less expensive than natural gas-derived syngas. The maximum economically feasible capacity for a higher alcohol plant from coal-derived syngas appears to be 32 MM bbl/yr. This is based on consideration of regional coal supply in the eastern US, coal transportation, and regional product demand. The benefits of economics of scale are illustrated for the base case designs. A value for higher alcohol blends has been determined by appropriate combination of RVP, octane number, and oxygen content, using MTBE as a reference. This analysis suggests that the high RVP of methanol in combination with its higher water solubility make higher alcohols more valuable than methanol.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Technical analysis. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the detailed results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report examines the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chapter 5. Technical Notes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF: Finite Element Analysis of Microstructures. Table of Contents, Chapter 5. Technical Notes, OOF home. ... Chapter 5. Technical Notes. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

NCSL International Technical Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NCSL International Technical Exchange. Purpose: The NCSL International ... Charleston, SC 29418. Technical Contact: Val Miller (301) 975-3602.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, Second quarter, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the second quarter of 1993 was focussed on completion of Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. Also during the report period, Task 6, Ground Support, was completed and a report containing the results was submitted to DOE. This task addressed the complete H.1 Cyclocraft system, i.e. it included the need personnel, facilities and equipment to support cyclocraft operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Third quarterly technical progress report, First quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the report period was focussed on Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. The preliminary design work was based on the results of the three preceding tasks. A report was initiated that contains descriptions of the H.1 Cyclocraft and its subsystems; options available for the final aircraft design process; performance, geometry, weights and power data; logistics and considerations relating to cyclocraft operations in wetlands.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. In 1992, Task 1, Environmental Considerations, and Task 2, Transport Requirements, were completed. In the first two quarters of 1993, Task 3, Parametric Analysis, Task 4, Preliminary Design, and Task 6, Ground Support, were completed. Individual reports containing results obtained from each of these tasks were submitted to DOE. In addition, through June 30, 1993, a Subscale Test Plan was prepared under Task 5, Subscale Tests, and work was initiated on Task 7, Environmental Impacts, Task 8, Development Plan, Task 9, Operating Costs, and Task 10, Technology Transfer.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary economic investigations have focused on cost reduction measures in the production of syngas from coal. A spread sheet model has been developed which can determine the cost of syngas production based upon the cost of equipment and raw materials and the market value of energy and by-products. In comparison to natural gas derived syngas, coal derived syngas is much more expensive, suggesting a questionable economic status of coal derived alcohol fuels. While it is possible that use of less expensive coal or significant integration of alcohol production and electricity production may reduce the cost of coal derived syngas, it is unlikely to be less costly to produce than syngas from natural gas. Fuels evaluation is being conducted in three parts. First, standard ASTM tests are being used to analyze the blend characteristics of higher alcohols. Second, the performance characteristics of higher alcohols are being evaluated in a single-cylinder research engine. Third, the emissions characteristics of higher alcohols are being investigated. The equipment is still under construction and the measurement techniques are still being developed. Of particular interest is n-butanol, since the MoS{sub 2} catalyst produces only linear higher alcohols. There is almost no information on the combustion and emission characteristics of n-butanol, hence the importance of gathering this information in this research.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Novel approaches to the production of higher alcohols from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 16, July 1, 1994-- September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments for Task 2, liquid-phase, higher alcohol process with recycle of lower alcohols, are as follows: (1) a new reactor overhead system design has significantly improved retention of slurry oil during reactor operation at high temperature, ca. 375{degrees}C; (2) a series of ``blank`` (without catalyst) runs were made at 375{degrees}C to evaluate thermal stability of three potential slurry liquids, Drakeol{reg_sign}, Ethylflo{reg_sign} 180 and perhydrofluorene; and (3) the rate of methanol formation with the Cu/ZnO BASF S3-86 ``low temperature`` methanol synthesis catalyst was a strong function of stirrer speed at a ``standard`` set of operating conditions. This result suggest that the reaction rate is influenced or controlled by gas/liquid mass transfer, and may explain the previously-observed discrepancy between results from this laboratory and those from Air Products.

Roberts, G.W.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 19, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Task I is to prepare and evaluate catalysts and to develop efficient reactor systems for the selective conversion of hydrogen-lean synthesis gas to alcohol fuel extenders and octane enhancers. In Task 1, during this reporting period, we encountered and solved a problem in the analysis of the reaction products containing a small amount of heavy components. Subsequently, we continued with the major thrusts of the program. We analyzed the results from our preliminary studies on the packed-bed membrane reactor using the BASF methanol synthesis catalyst. We developed a quantitative model to describe the performance of the reactor. The effect of varying permeances and the effect of catalyst aging are being incorporated into the model. Secondly, we resumed our more- detailed parametric studies on selected non-sulfide Mo-based catalysts. Finally, we continue with the analysis of data from the kinetic study of a sulfided carbon-supported potassium-doped molybdenum-cobalt catalyst in the Rotoberty reactor. We have completed catalyst screening at UCC. The complete characterization of selected catalysts has been started. In Task 2, the fuel blends of alcohol and unleaded test gas 96 (UTG 96) have been made and tests have been completed. The testing includes knock resistance tests and emissions tests. Emissions tests were conducted when the engine was optimized for the particular blend being tested (i.e. where the engine produced the most power when running on the blend in question). The data shows that the presence of alcohol in the fuel increases the fuel`s ability to resist knock. Because of this, when the engine was optimized for use with alcohol blends, the engine produced more power and lower emission rates.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report number 17, September 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this reporting period, there were three major thrusts in the WVU portion. First, we started a preliminary investigation on the use of a membrane reactor for HAS. Accordingly, the plug-flow reactor which had been isolated from sulfides was substituted by a membrane reactor. The tubular membrane was first characterized in terms of its permeation properties, i.e., the fluxes, permeances and selectivities of the components. After that, a BASF methanol-synthesis catalyst was tested under different conditions on the membrane reactor. The results will be compared with those from a non-permeable stainless steel tubular reactor under the same conditions. Second, we started a detailed study of one of the catalysts tested during the screening runs. Accordingly, a carbon-supported potassium-doped molybdenum-cobalt catalyst was selected to be run in the Rotoberty reactor. Finally, we have started detailed analyses of reaction products from some earlier screening runs in which non-sulfide molybdenum-based catalysts were employed and much more complicated product distributions were generally observed. These products could not hitherto be analyzed using the gas chromatograph which was then available. A Varian gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) is being used to characterize these liquid products. At UCC, we completed a screening of an Engelhard support impregnated with copper and cesium. We have met or exceeded three of four catalyst development targets. Oxygenate selectivity is our main hurdle. Further, we tested the effect of replacing stainless-steel reactor preheater tubing and fittings with titanium ones. We had hoped to reduce the yield of hydrocarbons which may have been produced at high temperatures due to Fischer-Tropsch catalysis with the iron and nickel in the preheater tube walls. Results showed that total hydrocarbon space time yield was actually increased with the titanium preheater, while total alcohol space time yield was not significantly affected.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} to Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240{degrees}C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H{sub 2}/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220{degrees}C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H{sub 2}/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization.

Satterfield, C.N.; Yates, I.C.; Chanenchuk, C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Novel approaches to the production of higher alcohols from synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 17, October 1, 1994-- December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments in which the stirrer speed was varied during a methanol synthesis run with BASF S3-86 catalyst showed that mass transfer limitations were present at 750 psig reactor pressure and at space velocities of 5000 and 10000 sl/kg(cat.)-hr.. There was no effect of stirrer speed on reaction rate at 2500 psig reactor pressure and 16500 sl/kg(cat.)-hr. space velocity. However, this was probably due to a close approach to equilibrium rather than to the lack of a mass transfer effect. The most plausible explanation for the presence of a mass transfer influence is the position of the gas feed dip tube relative to the agitator impeller. A second set of stirrer speed experiments using the same catalyst showed that feeding into the reactor headspace produced much lower reaction rates, compared with gas feed through a dip tube. The headspace feed also showed a strong dependence on stirrer speed, consistent with the dip tube feed results. In a ``blank` run at 375{degree}C with decahydronaphthalene, about 110 mL of the initial charge of 150 mL remained in the reactor after 73 hours of operation at 375{degree}C and 850 psig of hydrogen. The rate of hydrocarbon evolution was low throughout the run. Decalin is the most stable liquid identified to date. Three stirred autoclave runs with a commercial, high-pressure methanol synthesis catalyst (zinc chromite) slurried in decahydronaphthalene ended son after the initial catalyst reduction due to failures of the liquid return pump in the overhead system. However, the catalyst appeared to be reduced and the liquid appeared to be stable. 4 figs., 1 tab.

1996-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

NIST Physics Laboratory: Technical Activities 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, Technical Activities 2000 - NISTIR 6590. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 2000. ... Most Recent Technical Activities ...

204

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 17, 2001 ... New Hartford, NY 13413-5317 USA; Alec Mitchell, University of ... Uses of Alloy 718 in the Oil and Gas Industry: Rashmi Bhavsar1;. Anthony Collins2 .... 9:50 AM. Production of Large-Scale Microcrystalline Forgings for Roll-.

205

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 16, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Task 1 is to prepare and evaluate catalysts and to develop efficient reactor systems for the selective conversion of hydrogen-lean synthesis gas to alcohol fuel extenders and octane enhancers. Task 1 is subdivided into three separate subtasks: laboratory setup; catalysis research; and reaction engineering and modeling. Research at West Virginia University (WVU) is focused on molybdenum-based catalysts for higher alcohol synthesis (HAS). Parallel research carried out at Union Carbide Chemicals and Plastics (UCC&P) is focused on transition-metal-oxide catalysts. Accomplishments to date are discussed in this report. In Task 2, during the past three months, much has been accomplished in fuel testing. Several tests have been run on pure indolene, and the data have been analyzed from these tests. The two limiting alcohol blends have been made, sent out for analysis and the results obtained. The emissions sampling system is undergoing changes necessary for running alcohol fuels. A cylinder pressure measurement system has been installed.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report, May 10, 1994--December 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report encompasses the first year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on LNG research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (i) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (ii) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. Since this work was for fundamental research in a number of related areas to the use of LNG as a transportation fuel for long haul trucking, many of those results have appeared in numerous refereed journal and conference papers, and significant graduate training experiences (including at least one M.S. thesis and one Ph.D. dissertation) in the first year of this project. In addition, a potential new utilization of LNG fuel has been found, as a part of this work on the fundamental nature of adsorption of LNG vent gases in higher hydrocarbons; follow on research for this and other related applications and transfer of technology are proceeding at this time.

Sutton, W.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} as a means of by-product recovery/disposal from regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. Technical progress report, September 11, 1992--December 11, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the continual increase in the utilization of high sulfur and high nitrogen containing fossil fuels, the release of airborne pollutants into the environment has become a critical problem. The fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 2} during combustion. Fuel nitrogen and a fraction of the nitrogen from the combustion air are converted to nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide, NO{sub x}. For the past five years Combustion Engineering (now Asea Brown Boveri or ABB) and, since 1986, the University of Tulsa (TU) have been investigating the oxidation of H{sub 2}S by the facultatively anaerobic and autotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans and have developed a process, concept for the microbial removal of H{sub 2}S from a gas stream the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO by D. desulfuricans and T. denitrificans co-cultures and cultures-in-series was demonstrated. These systems could not be sustained due to NO inhibition of D. desulfuricans. However, a preliminary economic analysis has shown that microbial reduction of SO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S with subsequent conversion to elemental sulfur by the Claus process is both technically and economically feasible if a less expensive carbon and/or energy source can be found. It has also been demonstrated that T. denitrificans can be grown anaerobically on NO(g) as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen. Microbial reduction of NO{sub x} is a viable process concept for the disposal of concentrated streams of NO{sub x} as may be produced by certain regenerable processes for the removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gas.

Sublette, K.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Argonne TDC: Technical Services Agreemens  

Technical Services Agreements with Industrial Partners . Argonne researchers provide short-term technical assistance to companies with technical problems requiring ...

209

EIA'S Natural Gas Residential Programs by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Summary. Marketer ... is the division of those services required to supply natural gas to consumers ... Specialized Services from NEIC: For Technical ...

210

FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion America’s technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

EMC 2007: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Program Overview. Technical sessions commence with the plenary session on Wednesday, June 20 at 8:20 a.m., in the Leighton Concert Hall of the  ...

213

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

89 89 Table 4.1 Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Region Proved Reserves 1 Unproved Resources Total Technically Recoverable Resources 2 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate (billion barrels) 48 States 3 Onshore ........................................................................... 14.2 112.6 126.7 48 States 3 Offshore ........................................................................... 4.6 50.3 54.8 Alaska ................................................................................................. 3.6 35.0 38.6 Total U.S. ........................................................................................... 22.3 197.9 220.2

214

THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Basis of the Gas Centrifuge", Adv. in Nucl. Sci.D.R. , (1978) "The Gas Centrifuge", Scientific American,Fluid Dynamics of a Gas Centrifuge", J. Fluid Mech. , 101,

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

FRVT 2002: Technical Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Technical Appendices Sponsors and Supporters: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Department of ...

216

Business and Technical Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Business and Technical Resources. Small Business Administration. The SBA provides information on programs for starting ...

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

Technical Guidelines Development Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TECHNICAL GUIDELINES DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (TGDC). The TGDC has been chartered by the US Election Assistance ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

FAR Card: Technical specifiers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

specifiers specifiers Technical specifiers You've been told: You've been told: "I can't get you that product." "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers Technical specifiers You've been told: You've been told: "I can't get you that product." "I can't get you that product."

219

Senior Technical Safety Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Program Technical Program Manager Qualification Standard DOE-STD-1178-2004 May 2013 Reference Guide The Functional Area Qualification Standard References Guides are developed to assist operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff in the acquisition of technical competence and qualification within the Technical Qualification Program. Please direct your questions or comments related to this document to the Office of Leadership and Career Manager, Technical Qualification Program (TQP), Albuquerque Complex. This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ....................................................................................................................................... ii TABLES ......................................................................................................................................... ii

220

Technical Information Officers | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Information Officers Technical Information Officers Print page Print page Email page Email page Technical Information Officers (TIO) serve as the principal DOE or NNSA office point of contact and assistant to, and liaison with, the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) that serves as the Department's office charged with the Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP). The TIOs are to be familiar with the STI Programs within their Office they represent (given they have contracting financial assistance and/or acquisition activities) and for their major site/facility management contractor(s) STI Program to discern compliance with the DOE O 241.1B. They must maintain an up-to-date knowledge-base of the STI Program activities and provide timely feedback on issues as they emerge. While

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SCICHEM Version 1.2: Technical Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SCIPUFF (Second-Order Closure Integrated PUFF), a Lagrangian transport and diffusion model for atmospheric dispersion applications, has been expanded to include treatment of gas and aqueous-phase reactions and aerosol thermodynamics. SCIPUFF with chemistry is now referred to as SCICHEM. This document describes the technical basis of SCICHEM.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Technical Value Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identifies opportunities to increase awareness and utilization of AOCS Technical Services activities and products. Technical Value Center AOCS History and Governance about us aocs committees contact us division council fats governing board history

223

FAR Card: Technical specifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

specifiers Technical specifiers You've been told: You've been told: "I can't get you that product." "I can't get you that product." Technical specifiers You've been told: "I can't...

224

NBS TECHNICAL NOTE 674  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NBS TECHNICAL NOTE 674 Page 2. NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS The National Bureau of Standards ...

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

225

NIST Technical Note XXXX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Technical Note 1621 Optical Radiation Measurements Based on Detector Standards George P. Eppeldauer, Editor Page 2. ...

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Technical Committee Member - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. Technical Committee Member. Online Training Module.

227

Legend Technical Services, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Legend Technical Services, Inc. NVLAP Lab Code: 102081-0. Address and Contact Information: 88 Empire Drive St. Paul ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Johns Manville Technical Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Johns Manville Technical Center. NVLAP Lab Code: 100425-0. Address and Contact Information: 10100 West Ute Avenue ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Technical Information Officers | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Information Officers Technical Information Officers Print page Print page Email page Email page Technical Information Officers: Serve as the DOE element representatives to STIP and ensure that STI objectives and requirements are incorporated into strategic planning, management information plans, life-cycle procedures from project initiation to close-out, and contract language as appropriate. Coordinate with contractor STI managers and have adequate familiarity with STI activities to discern contractor compliance with the CRD portion of this directive. Coordinate the implementation of appropriate review and release procedures by DOE elements, DOE contractors, and financial assistance recipients as appropriate. Serve as Releasing Officials or coordinate designation and official

231

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank...

232

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Education and Training Energy Resource Library Funding Opportunities Military Initiative Newsletter Roundtables START Program...

233

LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

VANDOR,D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop  

SciTech Connect

The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose in providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The following topics were discussed, groundwater protection; temporarily abandoned and idle wells; effluent discharges; storm water runoff; monitoring and compliance; wetlands; naturally occurring radioactive materials; RCRA reauthorization and oil pollution prevention regulation. At the conclusion, all of the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire which critiqued the day activities. A discussion of each of the issues is made a part of this report as is a summary of the critique questionnaire which were received.

Not Available

1991-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

235

NETL: Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting. Preliminary Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Topical Report PDF-381KB (October 2012) Development of a Novel Gas...

236

Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE) provides incentives for technical assistance, retrofitting inefficient equipment, starting a new construction project, launching a major renovation, purchasing new...

237

Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative Inc RGGI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and technical services in support of the RGGI participating states(tm) CO2 Budget Trading Programs. References Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, Inc (RGGI)1...

238

Alaska Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Alaska...

239

Demo Projects Introduce New Class of Natural Gas Vehicles (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

address technical and marketplace barriers. With the United States' wealth of natural gas reserves, vehicles powered using this plentiful domestic resource are important...

240

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects 00516 North Dakota Refining Capacity Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota Refining Capacity Study North Dakota Refining Capacity Study DE-FE0000516 Goal The objective of the North Dakota Refining Capacity study is to assess the feasibility of increasing the oil refinery capacity in North Dakota, and, if possible, determine the scale of such an expansion, the slate of refined product(s) that would produce the most economic benefit, and the preferred ownership model, i.e., private, public or private-public. Performer North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives (NDAREC) Corval Group, partnered with Purvin & Gertz and Mustang Engineering Background The genesis of this study came from an April 2008 report issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) asserting that North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. This assessment shows a 25-fold increase in the amount of recoverable oil compared to the USGS 1995 estimate of 151 million barrels of oil. The Bakken Formation estimate is larger than all other current USGS oil assessments of the lower 48 states and is the largest "continuous" oil accumulation ever assessed by the USGS. The new report points out that the new geologic models applied to the Bakken Formation, advances in drilling and production technologies, and recent oil discoveries have resulted in these substantially larger technically recoverable oil volumes. About 105 million barrels of oil were produced from the Bakken Formation by the end of 2007. In 2008, the formation produced another 27.2 million barrels of oil, which represented 43% of the state’s annual oil production of some 62.3 million barrels. Even though oil prices have dropped significantly in recent months, it appears that oil production from this formation will continue strong for decades to come. Most recently, a major production find has occurred in the Three Forks formation underlying the Bakken. This find is still undergoing significant testing, but early evidence suggests it represents another significant recoverable pool of oil in western North Dakota.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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241

U. S. landfill gas research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper surveys US landfill gas RandD programs and presents some technical details of work being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois) through the support of the US Department of Energy. The two projects at Argonne include (1) a study of bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials and (2) development of standardized techniques to assay gas production from landfilled refuse (including qualitative microbiology of refuse assays).

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.; Rose, C.; Hsu, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming is one of the most active areas of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in the western United States. This resource provides clean energy but raises environmental concerns. Primary among these is the disposal of water that is co-produced with the gas during depressurization of the coal seam. Beginning with a few producing wells in Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) in 1987, CBNG well numbers in this area increased to over 13,600 in 2004, with projected growth to 20,900 producing wells in the PRB by 2010. CBNG development is continuing apace since 2004, and CBNG is now being produced or evaluated in four other Wyoming coal basins in addition to the PRB, with roughly 3500-4000 new CBNG wells permitted statewide each year since 2004. This is clearly a very valuable source of clean fuel for the nation, and for Wyoming the economic benefits are substantial. For instance, in 2003 alone the total value of Wyoming CBNG production was about $1.5 billion, with tax and royalty income of about $90 million to counties, $140 million to the state, and $27 million to the federal government. In Wyoming, cumulative CBNG water production from 1987 through December 2004 was just over 380,000 acre-feet (2.9 billion barrels), while producing almost 1.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of CBNG gas statewide. Annual Wyoming CBNG water production in 2003 was 74,457 acre-feet (577 million barrels). Total production of CBNG water across all Wyoming coal fields could total roughly 7 million acre-feet (55.5 billion barrels), if all of the recoverable CBNG in the projected reserves of 31.7 tcf were produced over the coming decades. Pumping water from coals to produce CBNG has been designated a beneficial water use by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office (SEO), though recently the SEO has limited this beneficial use designation by requiring a certain gas/water production ratio. In the eastern part of the PRB where CBNG water is generally of good quality, most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination of trace elements from CBNG disposal ponds; (4) use of environmental tracers in assessing wate

William Ruckelshaus

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technical Review Panel Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Evaluation and Identification of future R&D on eight Advanced Reactor Concepts, conducted April - September 2012 December 2012 Public release version 2 Public release version 3 Table of Contents Summary ................................................................................................................................... 4 1. Overview of the Technical Review Panel Process ............................................................... 5 2. Technical Review Panel Criteria ......................................................................................... 6 3. Concept Summaries ........................................................................................................... 8

245

EMC 2011 Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each technical area is being organized by a committee. Visit the organizers page for a list of the organizers' names. Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

246

Web Survey Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glisson,W.B. Welland,R.C. DCS Technical Report Series pp 27 Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

Glisson, W.B.; Welland, R.C.

247

EMC 2010 Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical program commences with the plenary session on Wednesday, June 23 at 8:30 a.m. The plenary session will be held in Jordan Auditorium, ...

248

TMS 2011: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS 2011: Technical Program: Materials and Society: Energy and ... by utilizing all available energy sources including solar and stored energy in the form of ...

249

Superalloys 2012: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr. 2012: Authors Notified of Oral/Interactive Status ... on Sunday evening, followed by technical sessions and presentations of both oral and interactive posters ...

250

TECHNICAL NOTE A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNICAL NOTE A novel FRET approach for in situ investigation of cellulase-cellulose interaction Liqun Wang & Yiqing Wang & Arthur J. Ragauskas Received: 15 May 2010 Revised: 9...

251

ICME 2011: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ICME 2011: Technical Program July 10-14, 2011 • Seven Springs Mountain Resort • Seven Springs, PA. All presentations will be held in the Exhibit Hall.

252

TMS 2012: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS 2012: Technical Program: High Performance Materials March 11-15, 2012 • Orlando, FL. Among the myriad challenges to be explored in this track of the ...

253

NETL: News Release - DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today Washington, DC - A $92 million research investment in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is today being credited with technological contributions that have stimulated development of domestic natural gas from shales. The result: more U.S. jobs, increased energy security, and higher revenues for states and the Federal Government. Spurred by the technological advancements resulting from this investment, U.S. shale gas production continues to grow, amounting to more than 8 billion cubic feet per day, or about 14 percent of the total volume of dry natural gas produced in the United States. DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that the shale gas share of U.S. natural gas production will reach 45 percent by 2035. The EIA also projects that 827 trillion cubic feet of natural gas is now recoverable from U.S. shales using currently available technology-an increase of nearly 500 trillion cubic feet over earlier estimates.

254

Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options  

SciTech Connect

The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Workshop Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Possible Topics of Discussion: • Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Measurements • Airborne Particulate Measurements • Biofuels Standards/Biorefineries ...

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Safety and Technical Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Technical Services Safety and Technical Services Minimize The Safety and Technical Services (STS) organization is a component of the Office of Science's (SC's) Oak Ridge Integrated Support Center. The mission of STS is to provide excellent environmental, safety, health, quality, and engineering support to SC laboratories and other U.S. Department of Energy program offices. STS maintains a full range of technically qualified Subject Matter Experts, all of whom are associated with the Technical Qualifications Program. Examples of the services that we provide include: Integrated Safety Management Quality Assurance Planning and Metrics Document Review Tracking and trending analysis and reporting Assessments, Reviews, Surveillances and Inspections Safety Basis Support SharePoint/Dashboard Development for Safety Programs

257

SEMI-ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach Final Scientific/ Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: 8/21/2006 Reporting Period End Date: 3/30/2011 Principal Author: Amy M. Childers July 25, 2011 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42937 Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission P.O. Box 53127 Oklahoma City, OK 53127-3127 This page left blank intentionally 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an accounting of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

258

Past DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Technical Standards Procedures Past DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures Past DOE Technical Standards Program...

259

Approved DOE Technical Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical Standards Approved DOE Technical Standards DOE Technical Standards Program August 16, 2013 Technical Standards, DOE-HDBK-1108-2002 Change Notice 2 (July 2013)...

260

DOE Technical Standards Program: Recently Approved DOE Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recently Approved DOE Technical Standards Office of Nuclear Safety This page lists DOE technical standards that have been approved and added to the distribution. If they are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

Freeway, Katy (PB-KBB Inc.) [PB-KBB Inc.; Rogers, R.E. (Mississippi State University) [Mississippi State University; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D. (RESPEC) [RESPEC

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

DOE Technical Standards Program: Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Technical Standards Archives Office of Nuclear Safety Number Title Status TSPP-00 Technical Standards Program Topical Committees (TSPP-00) PDF TSPP-00 TSPP-01...

263

OpenEI - Technical Reference  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm8710 en Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode927...

264

OpenEI - Technical Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm8720 en Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode927...

265

Ocean Technical | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Technical Community of Practice Through a variety of...

266

WebMetrics: Technical Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VUG Home Page NIST Web Metrics Technical Overview. Technical Overview. NIST Logo. Good usability is critical to the success of a website. ...

267

Argonne TDC: Technical Services Agreemens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Agreements with Industrial Partners Argonne researchers provide short-term technical assistance to companies with technical problems requiring expertise that is not...

268

Tiger Teams Provide Coalitions Technical and Market Assistance. Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Information Series, Tiger Teams Technical Assistance Fact Sheet.  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Cities Technical Assistance Teams (Tiger Teams) Clean Cities Technical Assistance Teams (Tiger Teams) were formed in 2001 to work directly with Clean Cities coordinators, stakeholders, and partners to tackle difficult technical and market challenges that might otherwise stall alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) implementation projects. The Tiger Team project, managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide technical expertise to the 80 Clean Cities coalitions operating across the country. The Tiger Teams provide assistance when coalitions encounter barriers that challenge local resources. Tiger Team specialists contracted by NREL have expertise in compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station design and implementation; natural gas, propane, and biofuel

269

External Technical Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

External Technical Review Report External Technical Review Report March 2010 U U . . S S . . D D e e p p a a r r t t m m e e n n t t o o f f E E n n e e r r g g y y O O f f f f i i c c e e o o f f E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t External Technical Review (ETR) Process Guide September 2008 U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management September 2008 External Technical Review Process Guide Page 2 of 37 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 Purpose of Process ............................................................................................................ 3 1.2 Background .........................................................................................................................

270

EV Technical Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 2001 AQMD CONTRACT 00192 Project Number: TC-00-0101 Report Number: TC-00-0101-TR03 Electric Vehicle Technical Center Prepared by: Michel Wehrey Juan C. Argueta Julie M....

271

Technical Report Technologically Enhanced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's National Hard Rock Mining Team and Abandoned Mine Lands Team, who are employees of the following EPA ..............................................................................1-16 Uranium Associations with Other Metal MiningTechnical Report on Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials from Uranium

272

External Technical Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document has been developed to guide individuals and teams who will be involved in External Technical Reviews (ETR) of U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM)...

273

technical committee toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 12, 2013 ... A resource which includes information guidelines and templates for committee meetings and other ... Committee Bylaws & Policies. ? Technical ... The following documents outline the procedure for proposing and selecting a ...

274

NFRC Technical Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

importance of NFRCs rating systems to DOEs energy efficiency goals, LBNL provides technical support to the NFRC in a number of ways as outlined below. As unbiased sources of...

275

Technical Talks Timing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Talks Timing The technical talks should last a maximum of 15 minutes with 5 minutes for set-up and 5 minutes for Q&A. No teamgroup presentations are allowed. The objective of...

276

EMC 2008: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical program begins at 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, June 25. All sessions are held on the campus of the University of California, Santa Barbara.

277

Technical Reference OVERVIEW  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and the ENERGY STAR Score in the United States and Canada Page 1 Parking and the ENERGY STAR Score in the United States and Canada Technical Reference OVERVIEW The ENERGY STAR...

278

Transportation Rule Technical Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI initiated this project as part of an industry effort to seek regulatory relief for two low-level waste (LLW) transportation container rules that the industry perceived as overly conservative. This report presents the technical arguments for regulatory change developed by the EPRI project team. EPRI, through the cooperation of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), is in the process of bringing these two technical arguments forward to the various regulatory agencies.

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Superalloys 2008: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... behavior and integration of superalloys, and related high temperature materials, into gas turbines for aircraft, power generation and other applications.

280

Pakistan-Technical Assistance to PDMA Punjab in Incorporating Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pakistan-Technical Assistance to PDMA Punjab in Incorporating Climate Pakistan-Technical Assistance to PDMA Punjab in Incorporating Climate Compatibility Considerations into Reconstruction and Village Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Name Technical Assistance to PDMA Punjab in Incorporating Climate Compatibility Considerations into Reconstruction and Village Development Planning Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Provincial Disaster Management Authority (PDMA), Government of Pakistan Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use Topics Adaptation, Finance, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cdkn.org/project/planni

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Technical Working Group on Biological Evidence Preservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Working Group on Biological Evidence Preservation. ... Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Technical Assistance, National Protocol; ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

c. TECHNICAL DIVISIONS FUNDING POLICY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PROMOTING THE GLOBAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROFESSIONS CONCERNED WITH MINERALS,METALS,AND MATERIALS. TECHNICAL ...

283

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 18022 Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL 18022 The U.S. Department of Energy offers technical assistance supporting energy efficiency and renewable energy. This technical assistance can include direct advice on issues or goals, tools and maps, and training. Some select technical assistance offerings are listed below. For States and Communities The State and Local Solution Center provides states and communities with resources addressing strategic energy planning, policy, financing, data management, and technologies to help them implement successful energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center provides

284

Building America Standing Technical Committee - Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan, v2012a Revised: January 2012 Committee Chair: 2011, 2012 Marc Hoeschele mhoesch@davisenergy.com 530-753-1100 x23 ARBI Page 2 Background on Residential Water Heating According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), annual residential water heating totals 2.11 quads of energy annually, or 20% of the energy delivered to residential buildings 1 . Over the past 70 years, gas and electric storage water heaters have been the predominant water heater type in the United States 2 . Recently, gas tankless water heaters have made inroads in market share with current industry projected gas tankless sales estimated at 400,000+ annually, and an

285

Annual resources report. [Glossary on technical terms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is separated into the following sections: acknowledgments; a table of contents; a list of tables and figures; a glossary; an introduction; an overview of the role of energy resources in New Mexico; separate sections on oil and gas, coal, electrical generation, uranium, and geothermal energy; a section on the geologic setting of oil and gas, coal, and uranium; an appendix of additional tables pertaining to oil and gas development; and a listing of selected references. The glossary is a brief listing of technical terms used in the report with simplified definitions for the reader's use. The overview contains highlights of data found in the report as well as comparisons of New Mexico's resources with those of other states and the nation. In general, each section covering a resource area describes reserves, production, prices, consumption, transportation, employment, and revenue statistics over the past ten or more years and projections to the year 2000.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Technical Assistance to Developers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

Federal Technical Capability Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Home About the FTCP FTCP Topics FTCP Meetings Performance Indicator Reports Guiding Documents Qualifying Official Training Approaches FTCP Plans, Reports & Issue Papers Workforce Analysis & Staffing Site Specific Information Nuclear Executive Leadership Training General Information 2004-1 FTCP Commitments FTCP Correspondence Site Map Contact Us Quick Reference Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Facility Representative Safety System Oversight DOE Integrated Safety Management National Training Center DOE Directives Program DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Phone Book HSS Logo FTCP FTCP Topics DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2006 - 2011) New Directions in Learning: Building a DOE University System May 4, 2007, the Deputy Secretary memorandum designating Karen Boardman the FTCP Chairperson.

288

Derived Concentration Technical Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

196-2011 196-2011 April 2011 DOE STANDARD DERIVED CONCENTRATION TECHNICAL STANDARD U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/standard/standard.html DOE-STD-1196-2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Derived Concentration Technical Standard was a collaborative effort sponsored by the DOE Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, with support from Department subject matter experts (SMEs) in the field of radiation protection. This standard, which complements DOE Order (O) 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, was developed taking

289

DOE Technical Standards Program: Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures Office of Nuclear Safety The following procedures should be used to write, revise, or maintain a DOE technical standard. They are also used to convert a DOE technical standard to a non-government standard or to form a topical committee. Table of Contents (TSPP-00) Program Overview and Responsibilities (TSPP-01) Initiating DOE Technical Standards (TSPP-02) Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interaction with Standards Development Organizations (TSPP-03) Developing DOE Technical Standard (TSPP-04) Coordination of Technical Standards (TSPP-05) - Draft In Concurrence Resolution - TSPP-06-2009 is the currently approved TSPP that addresses coordination of DOE Technical Standards. Approving and Issuing DOE Technical Standards (TSPP-06)

290

Approved DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

approved-doe-technical-standards Forrestal Building approved-doe-technical-standards Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 205851.800.dial.DOE en DOE-STD-1150-2013 http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/doe-std-1150-2013 DOE-STD-1150-2013

291

Proposed Technical Specification Amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter provides the final revised Technical Specification (TS) pages for the subject proposed TS amendment. In Reference 1 Duke Energy requested an amendment to the Catawba Nuclear Station Facility Operating Licenses and Technical Specifications (TS). The proposed amendment revises various TS that are affected by the revised heatup, cooldown, critically, and inservice test pressure and temperature (P/T) limits for the reactor coolant system (RCS) of each unit. The proposed amendment also revised the TS requirements for the low temperature overpressure protection (LTOP) system for each unit. www. duke-energy. corn

D. M. Jamil; Duke Power

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DOE Technical Assistance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Collection of Customer Data for Better Buildings Guidelines For Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utility Keith Freischlag and Curtis Framel Southwest Energy Efficiency Project DOE Technical Assistance Program Team 4 - Program & Project Development & Implementation December 16, 2010 Guidelines for Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities Webinar Overview * Technical Assistance Program (TAP) * Discussion of Identifying Utility Stakeholders * Discussion of Procuring Customer Usage Data * Suggestions to Streamline Data Collection Processes * Overview of Data Reporting Requirements * Q&A Guidelines for Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities * Questions and discussion after presentation

293

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mixtures using “real” fuels, eg, JP-8 turbine fuel. ... to be the main challenge for gas sensing using ... sensing of molecules and mixtures of gases that do ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Measurements of coefficients of discharge for concentric flange-tapped square-edged orifice meters in natural gas over the Reynolds Number range 25,000 to 16,000,000. Technical note (Final)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes the data acquisition systems and procedures used in the American Petroleum Institute (API)-sponsored orifice discharge coefficient project performed in natural gas flows and conducted at the test loop of the Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America (NGPL) in Joliet, Illinois. Measurements of orifice discharge coefficients for 6- and 10-inch diameter orifice meter runs were made using critical venturis for mass flowrate measurement with associated measurement of pressures and temperatures. Eleven venturis were calibrated at the Colorado Engineering Experiment Station, Inc. (CEESI). Measurements of absolute and differential pressure and temperature for venturi and orifice meter conditions were made using an automated data acquisition system. Temperature and pressure measurements were directly related to U.S. national measurement standards. Daily calibration of absolute and differential pressure transducers using pressure working standards was designed into the measurement procedures. Collected over a 2-year period, the database contains tests on 44 orifice plates in 8 beta ratios for two meter sizes (6- and 10-inches). The database contains 1,345 valid test points.

Whetstone, J.R.; Cleveland, W.G.; Bateman, B.R.; Sindt, C.F.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases 5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases Reference Resource Average Range Low Oil and Gas Resource High Oil and Gas Resource Shale gas, tight gas, and tight oil Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) Shale gas (billion cubic feet per well) 1.04 0.01-11.32 50% lower 100% higher Tight gas (billion cubic feet per well) 0.5 0.01-11.02 50% lower 100% higher Tight oil (thousand barrels per well) 135 1-778 50% lower 100% higher Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- (522) 1,044 Crude oil (billion barrels) -- -- (29) 58 Well spacing (acres) 100 20-406 No change 20-40 Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- No change 3,601

296

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases 5. Differences in crude oil and natural gas assumptions across three cases Reference Resource Average Range Low Oil and Gas Resource High Oil and Gas Resource Shale gas, tight gas, and tight oil Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) Shale gas (billion cubic feet per well) 1.04 0.01-11.32 50% lower 100% higher Tight gas (billion cubic feet per well) 0.5 0.01-11.02 50% lower 100% higher Tight oil (thousand barrels per well) 135 1-778 50% lower 100% higher Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- (522) 1,044 Crude oil (billion barrels) -- -- (29) 58 Well spacing (acres) 100 20-406 No change 20-40 Incremental technically recoverable resource Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) -- -- No change 3,601

297

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Technical Assistance The Technical Assistance program is managed through the Center for Sustainable Soil and Groundwater Solutions at SRNL. The Technical Assistance program provides teams of nationally recognized experts from across the complex to support both DOE's smaller sites, such as Paducah, Portsmouth, Pinellas, Ashtabula, Fernald, Mound and Kansas City Plant, and larger sites such as Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore and Savannah River. Solutions that reduce technical risk and uncertainty Focus on science and engineering issues and strategic implementation of remedial systems Independent reviews facilitate regulatory and stakeholder acceptance of solutions. Contacts Karen Skubal karen.skubal@em.doe.gov (301) 903-6524 Justin Marble

298

Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work Technical Report Confirms Reliability of Yucca Mountain Technical Work February 17, 2006 - 11:59am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) today released a report confirming the technical soundness of infiltration modeling work performed by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees. "The report makes clear that the technical basis developed by the USGS has a strong conceptual foundation and is corroborated by independently-derived scientific conclusions, and provides a solid underpinning for the 2002 site recommendation," said OCRWM's Acting Director Paul Golan. "We are committed to opening Yucca Mountain based only on sound science. The work

299

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This Technical Brief specifically addresses DU in an environmental contamination setting and specifically does.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other govern ment sources. DU occurs in a number of different compounds airborne releases of uranium at one DOE facility amounted to 310,000 kg between 1951 and 1988, which

300

The Antrim shale, fractured gas reservoirs with immense potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antrim shale gas production has grown from 0.4 Bcf of gas in 1987 to 127 Bcf in 1994, causing record gas production in Michigan. Recent industry activity suggests the play will continue to expand. The GRI Hydrocarbon Model's Antrim resource base description was developed in 1991 based on industry activity through 1990. The 1991 description estimated 32 Tcf of recoverable resource, and was limited to northern Michigan which represents only part of the Antrim's total potential. This description indicated production could increase manyfold, even with low prices. However, its well recovery rate is less than current industry results and projected near term production lags actual production by 1 to 2 years. GRI is updating its description to better reflect current industry results and incorporate all prospective areas. The description in northern Michigan is updated using production and well data through 1994 and results from GRI's research program. The description is then expanded to the entire basin. Results indicate the northern resource is somewhat larger than the previous estimate and the wells perform better. Extrapolation to the entire basin using a geologic analog model approximately doubles the 1991 estimate. The model considers depositional, structural, and tectonic influences; fracturing; organic content; thermal history; and hydrocarbon generation, migration and storage. Pleistocene glaciation and biogenic gas are also included for areas near the Antrim subcrop.

Manger, K.C. (DynCorp., Alexandria, VA (United States)); Woods, T.J. (Gas Research Institute., Washington, DC (United States)) Curtis, J.B. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Recoverable Robust Knapsack: the Discrete Scenario Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 24, 2011... different customers according to their demands maximizing the profit of ... In this paper, we show that for a fixed number of discrete scenarios ...

302

The recoverable robust tail assignment problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using column generation in the master and subproblems of the Benders ...... described by (36)-(41) is a network flow problem with one source and multiple sink.

303

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998  

SciTech Connect

This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.

None

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures DOE Technical Standards Program The following procedures should be used to...

306

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE * OSTI * Go Mobile Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget...

307

Clean Cities: Clean Cities Technical Support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Support to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Clean Cities Technical Support on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Clean Cities Technical Support on Twitter Bookmark...

308

Sandia National Laboratories: Employee & Retiree Resources: Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Library Search Sandia Publications Remote Access Technical Library The Sandia National Laboratories Technical Library provides quality information products and services...

309

Technical Plan --Safety 3.8. Hydrogen Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Technical Plan -- Safety 3.8. Hydrogen Safety Safe practices in the production, storage buoyancy of the gas, hydrogen requires different storage, handling and use techniques. The Safety, develop and promote the practices that will ensure the safe handling, storage and use of hydrogen

310

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and Controversies Kyle J Ferrar;UNITED STATES SHALE BASINS Modern Shale Gas Development in the U.S.: A Primer, (2009) U.S. Dept of Energy Development http://www.secinfo.com/DB/SEC/2007 #12;Where to Drill? Harper, John A. (2008). The Marcellus Shale

Sibille, Etienne

311

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

2013 AOCS Technical Services Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Technical Services workshop includes educational sessions designed for lab technicians. 2013 AOCS Technical Services Workshop Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control

314

Maintenance of DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL STANDARDS TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM PROCEDURES DOE-TSPP-9 Revision: 5 Date: August 1, 2000 MAINTENANCE OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-9 Maintenance Revision: 5 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1

315

Kinetic Model of Gas Bubble Dissolution in Groundwater and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appear to be more important for the composition of the gas excess than the differences between molecular in both natural and technical gas exchange processes. In chemical engineering systems, the dissolution that the composition of the excess gas does not correspond to atmospheric air (8). Excess air and its fractionation

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

316

High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

Madden, M.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electromagnetic (EM) Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications Electromagnetic (EM) Telemetry Tool for Deep Well Drilling Applications DE-FC26-02NT41656 Goal: To develop a wireless, electromagnetic (EM) based telemetry system to facilitate efficient deep natural gas drilling at depths beyond 20,000 feet and up to 392˚F (200˚C) Background: The wireless, EM telemetry system will be designed to facilitate measurement-while-drilling (MWD) operations within a high temperature, deep drilling environment. The key components that will be developed and tested include a new high efficiency power amplifier (PA) and advanced signal processing algorithms. The novel PA architecture will provide greater and more efficient power delivery from the subterranean transmitter through the transmission media. Maximum energy transfer is especially critical downhole, where the transmitter’s principal power source is typically a battery. Increased energy at the receiver antenna equates to increased recoverable signal amplitude; thus, the overall receiver signal-to-noise ratio is improved resulting in deeper operational depth capability.

318

Technical Highlights - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Highlights for November 2013 Technical Highlights for November 2013 The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) cited in Article Published in Inside Science ORNL's recent achievement in ionic liquid (IL) additives for engine lubrication is featured in an article "Molten Salts Could Improve Fuel Economy," published in Inside Science, http://www.insidescience.org/content/molten-salts-could-improve-fuel-economy/1492. The article is syndicated to subscribers at FOXnews.com, NBCnews.com, LiveScience, and others. Dual-Fuel Combustion with Additives Capability A new capability was added to the multi-cylinder advanced combustion research engine at ORNL allowing dual fuel combustion with gasoline and gasoline doped with additives to increase the reactivity. The new configuration allows precise control over fuel temperature to allow for

319

Spring 2009 Technical Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spring 2009 Technical Workshop Spring 2009 Technical Workshop in Support of U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Congestion Study Webcast, transcript, and presentations available at: http://www.congestion09.anl.gov/ Crowne Plaza Chicago O'Hare Hotel & Conference Center March 25-26, 2009 Agenda Day 1 - Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:00 a.m. Registration Check-In & Continental Breakfast 10:00 a.m. DOE Welcome/Purpose of Workshop David Meyer, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-OE) 10:15 a.m. Session 1 - Historic Congestion in the Western Interconnection The Western Electric Coordinating Council Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee has conducted an analysis of historic congestion in the Western

320

Active DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active DOE Technical Standards Active DOE Technical Standards Document Number Document Title Responsible SLM DOE-HDBK-1001-96 DOE-HDBK-1002-96 DOE-HDBK-1003-96 DOE-HDBK-1010-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/4-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1015/1-93

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

WHOLE FROG TECHNICAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHOLE FROG TECHNICAL REPORT WHOLE FROG TECHNICAL REPORT WING NIP, CRAIG LOGAN Imaging and Distributed Computing Group Information and Computing Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Publication number: LBL-35331 Credits CONTENT INTRODUCTION MRI DATA PHOTOGRAPH DATA (CRYOTOME) SEGMENTATION VISUALIZATION IN 3D PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED Photographing Lighting Misalignment Digitizing Lighting Segmentation Inconsistent Data Higher Resolution Desire IMPROVEMENT INTRODUCTION The goal of the Whole Frog Project is to be able to represent the anatomy of a frog in a computer in 3D space in such a way that a high school student will find it useful in learning physiology, hopefully developing a sense of interest in using computers at the same time. MRI DATA The original plan is to make use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to

322

Independent technical review, handbook  

SciTech Connect

Purpose Provide an independent engineering review of the major projects being funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The independent engineering review will address questions of whether the engineering practice is sufficiently developed to a point where a major project can be executed without significant technical problems. The independent review will focus on questions related to: (1) Adequacy of development of the technical base of understanding; (2) Status of development and availability of technology among the various alternatives; (3) Status and availability of the industrial infrastructure to support project design, equipment fabrication, facility construction, and process and program/project operation; (4) Adequacy of the design effort to provide a sound foundation to support execution of project; (5) Ability of the organization to fully integrate the system, and direct, manage, and control the execution of a complex major project.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

NETL Publications - Technical Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons (March 2002) PDF-2504KB Life-Cycle Greenhouse-Gas Emissions Inventory For Fischer-Tropsch Fuels PDF-702KB (June 2001) by John J. Marano and Jared P. Ciferno This...

325

final technical program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 17, 2000 ... application in rotating components of gas turbine engines. While the .... son, WI 53706-1595 USA; 2National Natural Science Foundation,. Beijing 100083 PRC ...... sity, Gen. Phys. Dept., Lenin st. 46, Barnaul 656099 Russia.

326

Technical Program: Tuesday  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 27, 2007 ... Materials for Clean Coal Power Generation and Gas Separation . ...... from cast and annealed Mo-Re and Mo-Re-Hf was only a few percent, but ...... Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences.

327

Federal Technical Capability Program - Quarterly Performance Indicator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 16, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability June 5, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 20, 2013 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 20, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 8, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 30, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability March 6, 2012 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 10, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 24, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 18, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 23, 2011

328

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Technical Assistance The DOE Office of Indian Energy and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program provide federally recognized Indian Tribes, bands, nations, tribal energy resource development organizations, and other organized groups and communities-including Alaska Native villages or regional and village corporations-with technical assistance designed to advance renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. Technical assistance is typically limited to 40 hours and may include, but is not limited to, the following priority areas: Strategic energy planning Grantee support Transmission/interconnection Project development Finance Lease agreements DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Sandia National

329

Model Based Enterprise / Technical Data Package Summit ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Technical Note 1753 Model Based Enterprise / Technical Data Package Summit Report Joshua Lubell Kenway ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

330

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2008 Special Libraries Association Annual Conference Founding Alliance Members * Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) - Canada * VTT Technical...

331

Troubleshooting natural gas processing: Wellhead to transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book describes practical, day-to-day problems of natural gas handling. This book combines field experience with technical principles on natural gas production treating and transmission. This volume is dominated by illustrative case histories and rules of thumb. The book also provides a checklist of distillation problems which is a summary of causes and cures of the problems encountered in the fractionation of propane, butane and natural gasoline. A glossary of terms used in natural gas transmission is another good part of this book. The author has avoided complex mechanical details in favor of simple line drawings. Among the topics discussed are; wellhead pressure and gas flow, vapor-liquid separation at the wellhead, wellhead compression, corrosion in gathering systems, gas sweetening using amines, sulfur recovery, dehydration, centrifugal gas compression, reciprocal gas compression, hydrates, gas cooling and condensate recovery.

Lieberman, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Issues in Focus - Lower 48  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lower 48 Natural Gas Supply Lower 48 Natural Gas Supply Issues in Focus Lower 48 Natural Gas Supply Production from domestic natural gas resources is projected to increase as demand grows. Much of the increase is expected to be met from unconventional resources, changing the overall mix of domestic natural gas supply. Of the 18.6 trillion cubic feet of lower 48 natural gas production in 2002, 42 percent was from conventional onshore resources, 32 percent was from unconventional resources, and 26 percent was from offshore resources. By 2025, 43 percent of total lower 48 natural gas production (21.3 trillion cubic feet) is projected to be met by unconventional resources (Figure 9). The volume of estimated technically recoverable resources is sufficient to support increased reliance on unconventional natural gas sources. Lower 48 remaining technically recoverable resources are identified in five categories (Figure 10):

333

IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop  

SciTech Connect

The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose of providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The IOGCC and DOE staff worked with key state and industry representatives to develop a list of appropriate regulatory and industry representatives to be invited to participate. These same industry and regulatory representatives also provided a prioritized list of topics to be discussed at this workshop. After the topic leader set out the issue, views of those present were solicited. In almost every case, both the industry representatives and the regulatory personnel spoke with candor in discussing the problems. Common points of discussion for each topic were: (1) conflicting state and federal regulations; (2) conflicting regulations or permit requirements established by different state agencies; (3) increasing compliance costs; and (4) regulatory constraints that will result in ``no net growth`` in California oil and gas production and more likely a net decrease. This report contains a copy of the written presentation for each topic as well as a summary of the participants discussion.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Technical Assistance on AddThis.com... Quick Links Solution Center Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center

335

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM C C A A L L E E N N D D A A R R Y Y E E A A R R S S 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 - - 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 B B I I E E N N N N I I A A L L R R E E P P O O R R T T UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK FTCP 2011-2012 Biennial Report ~ 2 ~ Table of Contents Section Title Page 1.0 Purpose and Scope .......................................................................................... 3 2.0 2011/2012 Accomplishments.......................................................................... 3

336

Technical Approach: DHS needs to establish M&S technical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Liquids such as liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and others are routinely stored at low temperatures and on their release ...

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

340

Natural Gas Storage in Basalt Aquifers of the Columbia Basin, Pacific Northwest USA: A Guide to Site Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the technical background and a guide to characterizing a site for storing natural gas in the Columbia River Basalt

Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-10 Conversion Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1 2. CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS.................................................................... 1

342

Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to inform readers of various technical activities within the Department, promote exchange of ideas, and give credit to personnel who are achieving the results. The report is presented in two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into seven sections, each of which reports on an engineering division and its specific activities related to nuclear tests, nuclear explosives, weapons, energy systems, engineering sciences, magnetic fusion, and materials fabrication.

Carr, R.B.; Denney, R.M. (eds.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mechanical Engineering Department. Technical review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to (1) inform the readers of various technical activities within the Department, (2) promote exchange of ideas, and (3) give credit to the personnel who are achieving the results. The report is formatted into two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into eight sections, one for each Division in the Department providing the reader with the names of the personnel and the Division accomplishing the work.

Simecka, W.B.; Condouris, R.A.; Talaber, C. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 APPROVING AND ISSUING DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-8 Approval Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1 2. APPROVING AND ISSUING DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS .................................................... 1

345

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project, ?Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange? served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

Gilbert, Chris [Altamont Environmental, Inc.] [Altamont Environmental, Inc.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Advanced Distribution Automation Technical Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2008 progress report on advanced distribution technical assessments focused on the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) TC-57 body of standards.

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

DOE Technical Standards Program: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety Vision The culture of the DOE community will be based on standards. Technical standards will formally integrate part of all DOE facility, program and...

351

Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Assistance Technical Assistance Best practice-based technical assistance is provided through a combination of OE staff, and nationally-recognized experts at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Regulatory Assistance Project, the National Council on Electricity Policy, the National Council of State Legislatures, and the National Governors Association, and others. With these entities, the expert technical assistance is provided on an as-requested basis to State public utility commissions, State legislatures, regional State associations, regional transmission organizations/independent system operators, Federal officials, Governors' offices, State energy offices, and sometimes individual electric utilities. Technical Assistance on EPA Rules Implementation to States and the Utility

352

Technical Services | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

noteworthy for their unique technical capabilities: Central Shops facility performs welding and brazing for high-vacuum applications, machining of radioactive materials, and a...

353

Additional Technical Information on Cermets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cermets Info Additional Technical Information on Cermets PDF Cermet Waste Packages Using Depleted Uranium Dioxide and Steel (160 KB) Cermet waste package description C. W....

354

2007 Solar Decathlon Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 Solar Decathlon Citations from Select Technical Publications Changing Behaviors: Market Transformation Web Sites as Online Narrative Hicks, D. Panel 6 - Market Transformation:...

355

TECHNICAL QUESTIONS What Every Parent ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

open your Windows Control Panel, select Internet Options, and click the Privacy tab. TECHNICAL QUESTIONS What Every Parent Must Do to Keep Children Safe Online 10 10 This...

356

APS Technical Update - No. 30  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1995 (updated May 18, 2011) APS TECHNICAL UPDATE - 30 Policy for Radiological Surveys on Tools, Materials & Equipment to be Released from Controlled Areas to Uncontrolled Areas at...

357

Technical Reports | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) technical report collections at the Research Library include ORNL authored reports as well as those from many other institutions. Most ORNL...

358

APS Technical Update - No. 21  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1997 APS TECHNICAL UPDATE - No. 21 Subject: Shielding Configuration Control Policy and Procedure Attached is a policy and procedure regarding APS Beamline Shielding Configuration...

359

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... Home; Browse by Tag; Most Popular Tags. ... Geology and technology drive estimates of technically recoverable resources.

360

Table 4. Crude oil production and resources (million barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved shale oil technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved oil TRR, including reserve growth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Industrial Assessment Center program at North Carolina State University has conducted one hundred industrial assessments of small and medium sized manufacturers in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. Reports were submitted to each facility that included a brief description of the plant, historical energy use, and a technical analysis of potential energy efficiency savings, waste reduction, and productivity savings. Seven hundred thirty eight conservation measures were recommended with total annual cost savings in excess of $18 million. The NCSU IAC has worked with other government and private entities to deliver energy efficiency and conservation services. We have worked closely with the NCSU Industrial Extension Service, the Manufacturer’s Extension Partnership (MEP), and the North Carolina State Energy Office to provide follow-up technical help and financial assistance in implementing conservation recommendations. In addition to these organizations, the NCSU IAC has also worked with the NC Department of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance, the NC Solar Center, Advanced Energy Corporation, Duke Power, Progress Energy, Dominion Power, and the City of Danville, Virginia. Eighteen undergraduate and twenty graduate students were exposed to a variety of manufacturing processes, trained on plant safety, and taught the use of various types of data collection equipment. The students performed technical analyses of each recommendation, computed the potential savings from engineering relations and collected data, estimated the cost from vendor information, and communicated the findings in a compact, well written report to the client. The students have also been exposed to a variety of business personnel, including corporate presidents, engineering managers, plant managers, plant engineers, facility maintenance staff, and production workers – each with a unique perspective on the challenges faced in a modern manufacturing facility. The program has exposed hundreds more students to the importance of energy efficiency / conservation through the incorporation of IAC experiences into the undergraduate curriculum. Both the Director and the Assistant Director teach junior and senior level classes in the thermal sciences curriculum of Mechanical Engineering. These classes have enrollments exceeding 100 students per year, or half of the graduating class. IAC experiences provide real-world examples and topics for discussion to further out student’s engineering education.

Eckerlin, H, M, PhD PE; Leach, J, W, PhD PE; Terry, S, D, PhD PE

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

ASSESSMENT OF TECHNICAL QUALIFICATION AND FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAMS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

And TQP Assessment Crads 11 2012 Smooth (2) 1 11/29/12 And TQP Assessment Crads 11 2012 Smooth (2) 1 11/29/12 ASSESSMENT OF TECHNICAL QUALIFICATION AND FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAMS This document provides guidance and objectives and criteria to support assessments required by DOE O 426.1 Federal Technical Capability (FTC), Section 4. REQUIREMENTS, paragraph b. FTC Program Implementation, subparagraph (7) Self- Assessment. This FTC Order paragraph requires self-assessment of TQP and FTC Program implementation within one's organization. To ensure effective implementation of the Technical Qualification Programs (TQP), Headquarters and field elements conduct self-assessments of these programs. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) also reviews the results of the TQP self-assessments and determines if further action is

363

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

364

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

365

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

366

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

367

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

368

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

369

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

370

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

371

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

372

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

373

Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279738 Varnish cache server Technical Reference and Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Dataset Summary Description Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of MaterialsGuidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures.To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting an extensive review of reports and journal publications to gather existing materials data for inclusion in the Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials. Additionally, Sandia is working internationally with collaborators to acquire newly generated data for inclusion in the Technical Reference. SAND2012-7321 is an archival report issued by Sandia National Laboratories representing the reference information compiled as of September 2012. Updates and additions of individual sections of this report are available at http://www.sandia.gov/matlsTechRef.Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of MaterialsThe Technical Database for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials is intended to be a complement to the Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials. Although still in the development stage, the Technical Database will provide a repository of technical data measured in hydrogen and is meant to be an engineering tool to aid the selection of materials for use in hydrogen.

374

Technical Reference OVERVIEW  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parking and the ENERGY STAR Score in the United States and Canada Page 1 Parking and the ENERGY STAR Score in the United States and Canada Page 1 Parking and the ENERGY STAR Score in the United States and Canada Technical Reference OVERVIEW The ENERGY STAR score provides a fair assessment of the energy performance of a property relative to its peers, taking into account the climate, weather, and business activities at the property. Parking areas are not eligible to earn the ENERGY STAR score. However, because parking is a common amenity at other commercial building types (i.e., office and hotels), the ENERGY STAR score does make adjustments to accommodate for the presence of parking.

375

EV Technical Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carrier Route Vehicles Carrier Route Vehicles Quarterly Report, June 2001 AQMD CONTRACT #00192 Project Number: TC-00-0101 Report Number: TC-00-0101-TR04 Electric Vehicle Technical Center An ISO 9001 Certified Facility Prepared by: Michel Wehrey Juan C. Argueta Julie M. Phung Southern California Edison June 15, 2001 Page i DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES This report was prepared by the Electric Transportation Division of Southern California Edison, a subsidiary of Edison International. Neither the Electric Transportation Division of Southern California Edison, Southern California Edison, Edison International, nor any person working for or on behalf of any of them makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, (i) with respect to the

376

EV Technical Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 2000 December 2000 AQMD CONTRACT #00192 Project Number: TC-00-0101 Report Number: TC-00-0101-TR02 Electric Vehicle Technical Center Prepared by: Ricardo Solares Juan C. Argueta Southern California Edison December 20, 2000 Page i DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES This report was prepared by the Electric Transportation Division of Southern California Edison, a subsidiary of Edison International. Neither the Electric Transportation Division of Southern California Edison, Southern California Edison, Edison International, nor any person working for or on behalf of any of them makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, (i) with respect to the use of any information, product, process or procedure discussed in this report, including

377

Technical Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Requirements Safety Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Contractor has developed, maintained, and received DOE Field Office Approval for the necessary operating conditions of a facility. The facility has also maintained an inventory of safety class and safety significant systems and components. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.205, Nuclear Safety Rule.  DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses.  DOE-STD-1186-2004, Specific Administrative Controls. Guidance:  DOE G 423.1-1, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements.  NSTP 2003-1, Use of Administrative Controls for Specific Safety Functions. Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation

378

Technical applications of aerogels  

SciTech Connect

Aerogel materials posses such a wide variety of exceptional properties that a striking number of applications have developed for them. Many of the commercial applications of aerogels such as catalysts, thermal insulation, windows, and particle detectors are still under development and new application as have been publicized since the ISA4 Conference in 1994: e.g.; supercapacitors, insulation for heat storage in automobiles, electrodes for capacitive deionization, etc. More applications are evolving as the scientific and engineering community becomes familiar with the unusual and exceptional physical properties of aerogels, there are also scientific and technical application, as well. This paper discusses a variety of applications under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for which several types of aerogels are formed in custom sizes and shapes. Particular discussions will focus on the uses of aerogels for physics experiments which rely on the exceptional, sometimes unique, properties of aerogels.

Hrubesh, L.W.

1997-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

LLNL 1981: technical horizons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs at LLNL for 1981 are described in broad terms. In his annual State of the Laboratory address, Director Roger Batzel projected a $481 million operating budget for fiscal year 1982, up nearly 13% from last year. In projects for the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, the Laboratory applies its technical facilities and capabilities to nuclear weapons design and development and other areas of defense research that include inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnances, and particle-beam technology. LLNL is also applying its unique experience and capabilities to a variety of projects that will help the nation meet its energy needs in an environmentally acceptable manner. A sampling of recent achievements by LLNL support organizations indicates their diversity. (GHT)

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Technical Report - FINAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improve understanding of the earthquake hazard in the Las Vegas Valley and to assess the state of preparedness of the area's population and structures for the next big earthquake. 1. Enhance the seismic monitoring network in the Las Vegas Valley 2. Improve understanding of deep basin structure through active-source seismic refraction and reflection testing 3. Improve understanding of dynamic response of shallow sediments through seismic testing and correlations with lithology 4. Develop credible earthquake scenarios by laboratory and field studies, literature review and analyses 5. Refine ground motion expectations around the Las Vegas Valley through simulations 6. Assess current building standards in light of improved understanding of hazards 7. Perform risk assessment for structures and infrastructures, with emphasis on lifelines and critical structures 8. Encourage and facilitate broad and open technical interchange regarding earthquake safety in southern Nevada and efforts to inform citizens of earthquake hazards and mitigation opportunities

Barbara Luke, Director, UNLV Engineering Geophysics Laboratory

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technical Report - Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project was a collaborative effort between Dr Teresa Burns and Dr John Larese to study the physisorption of polar molecules on ionic substrates. The work will be completed at both Coastal Carolina University and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The goals of the research are: 1) to provide detailed thermodynamic information about dipolar molecules adsorbed on ionic substrates, critical to accurately modeling the systems of interest using a spin-1 Ising model; 2) to study the structure of the adsorbed layer from the gas phase, experimentally verifying the application of the model to these systems; 3) to extend the modeling studies and structural measurements to systems adsorbed from the liquid phase. The systems will be studied using thermodynamic techniques, e.g., adsorption isotherm both from the gas and liquid phase, and x-ray structural measurements. This project will strengthen the physical science research efforts at CCU, and hence in South Carolina.

Teresa Burns

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-1 Responsibilities Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1 2. PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................................................... 1

383

Technical education and brainstorming technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The brainstorming technique used for software projects development is presented as a powerful solution for teaching and research activity in the technical domain. Brainstorming was introduced in the technical domain as an efficient method that was developed ... Keywords: alternative education, brainstorming, design patterns, enneagram, resonance, software engineering

Mircea-Florin Vaida

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

NIST Physics Laboratory: Technical Activities 2005 and 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, "NIST Physics Laboratory" - NIST SP 1033. Technical Activities 2005-2007. ... Most Recent Technical Activities. ...

385

Hydrogen energy systems studies. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The results of previous studies suggest that the use of hydrogen from natural gas might be an important first step toward a hydrogen economy based on renewables. Because of infrastructure considerations (the difficulty and cost of storing, transmitting and distributing hydrogen), hydrogen produced from natural gas at the end-user`s site could be a key feature in the early development of hydrogen energy systems. In the first chapter of this report, the authors assess the technical and economic prospects for small scale technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas (steam reformers, autothermal reformers and partial oxidation systems), addressing the following questions: (1) What are the performance, cost and emissions of small scale steam reformer technology now on the market? How does this compare to partial oxidation and autothermal systems? (2) How do the performance and cost of reformer technologies depend on scale? What critical technologies limit cost and performance of small scale hydrogen production systems? What are the prospects for potential cost reductions and performance improvements as these technologies advance? (3) How would reductions in the reformer capital cost impact the delivered cost of hydrogen transportation fuel? In the second chapter of this report the authors estimate the potential demand for hydrogen transportation fuel in Southern California.

Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.; Kartha, S.; Iwan, L.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

386

LOW NOx EMISSIONS IN A FUEL FLEXIBLE GAS TURBINE  

SciTech Connect

In alignment with Vision 21 goals, a study is presented here on the technical and economic potential for developing a gas turbine combustor that is capable of generating less that 2 ppm NOx emissions, firing on either coal synthesis gas or natural gas, and being implemented on new and existing systems. The proposed solution involves controlling the quantity of H2 contained in the fuel. The presence of H2 leads to increased flame stability such that the combustor can be operated at lower temperatures and produce less thermal NOx. Coal gas composition would be modified using a water gas shift converter, and natural gas units would implement a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) reactor to convert part of the natural gas feed to a syngas before fed back into the combustor. While both systems demonstrated technical merit, the economics involved in implementing such a system are marginal at best. Therefore, Praxair has decided not to pursue the technology any further at this time.

Raymond Drnevich; James Meagher; Vasilis Papavassiliou; Troy Raybold; Peter Stuttaford; Leonard Switzer; Lee Rosen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

FUELS NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Dirk Link Name Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Dirk Link NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Dirk Link Name Title Affiliation Dogan, Omer N Materials Research Eng NETL Haynes, Daniel ST (Chem Eng) NETL How ard, Bret H Research Chemist NETL Link, Dirk D Research Chemist NETL Morreale, Bryan D General Engineer NETL Poston, James A Physicist NETL Shekhaw at, Dushyant General Engineer NETL Smith, David K Physical Science Tech NETL Sorescu, Dan C Research Physicist NETL Ciocco, Mike Project Lead URS Smith, Mark Project Lead URS Abdelsayed, Victor Research Scientist URS Floyd, Donald Scientist URS Smith, Mark Research Engineer URS Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Veser, Goetz PI Pitt Task 221 Development of Catalysts for Coal-gas Component Conversion Enick, Robert M PI Pitt Task 331 Membrane Reaction Process for Conversion of Coal-Gas Components

388

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This information product provides the interested reader with a broad and non-technical overview of how the U.S. natural gas pipeline network operates, along with some insights into the many individual pipeline systems that make up the network. While the focus of the presentation is the transportation of natural gas over the interstate and intrastate pipeline systems, information on subjects related to pipeline development, such as system design and pipeline expansion, are also included.

Information Center

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Gas Turbine Component Repair Shop Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aftermarket repair services for gas turbine OM has been undergoing continual transformation beginning with the emergence of independent shops in the 1980s. The original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in the late 1990s began to aggressively pursue repair services. Gas turbine hot section component repair/replacement coupled with inspection/overhaul technical support has come to be offered as long-term service agreements (LTSAs). These agreements often extend from 6 to 18 years. The repair business continu...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

390

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

391

DOE Technical Standards Archived Collection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical Standards Archived Collection DOE Technical Standards Archived Collection DOE Technical Standards Program July 30, 2013 Technical Standards, DOE-STD-1024-92 - March...

392

Drilling through gas hydrates formations: possible problems and suggested solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate research in the last two decades has taken various directions ranging from ways to understand the safe and economical production of this enormous resource to drilling problems. as more rigs and production platforms move into deeper waters to its environmental impact on global warming and cooling. Gas hydrates are ice-like structures of a water lattice with cavities, which contain guest gases. Gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and high pressures. The amount of energy trapped in gas hydrates all over the world is about twice the amount found in all recoverable fossil fuels today. This research identifies the problems facing the oil and gas industry as it drills in deeper waters where gas hydrates are present and suggests solutions to some of the problems. The problems considered in this research have been approached from a drilling point of view. Hence, the parameters investigated and discussed are drilling controlled parameters. They include rate of penetration, circulation rate and drilling fluid density. The rate of penetration in offshore wells contributes largely to the final cost of the drilling process. These 3 parameters have been linked in the course of this research in order to suggest an optimum rate of penetration. The results show the rate of penetration is directly proportional to the amount of gas released when drilling through gas hydrate. As the volume of gas released increases, the problems facing the drilling rigs, drilling crew and environment is seen to increase. The results also show the extent of risk to be expected while drilling through gas hydrate formations. A chart relating the rate of penetration, circulation rate and effective mud weight was used to select the optimum drilling rate within the drilling safety window. Finally, future considerations and recommendations in order to improve the analyses presented in this work are presented. Other drilling parameters proposed for future analysis include drill bit analysis with respect to heat transfer and the impact of dissociation of gas hydrate around the wellbore and seafloor stability.

Amodu, Afolabi Ayoola

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Technical Guidelines for Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

data collected in the Carbon Sequestration Rural Appraisal (CSRA) about rotations and other management practices. Estimated present and future soil carbon

394

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the published presentations, Joe Darling of NYSDOT commented on the status of LNG in New York, where use of LNG for vehicles is currently banned. An LNG Steering...

395

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of General Electric Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines: Pedigree Matrices, Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advanced technology heavy-frame gas turbines being introduced into the market today carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies incorporated into their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific General Electric (GE) industrial gas turbines in a standard format, which allows an assessment of the technical risks involved in operating these high-technology gas turbines. The report also establishes a pedigree matrix for standard production heavy-frame gas ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest/storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery.

Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The Industrial Assessment Center at Iowa State University provided 93 companies in 5 states with Industrial Assessments. The total potential energy cost savings is approximately $11.43 million. The savings includes approximately 38.6 million kWh of electrical energy, 65 MW of electrical demand, and 426,000 MMBtu of natural gas. The center employed and trained 43 engineering students and involved 4 engineering faculty from both the Industrial and Mechanical Engineering Departments. Benefits to the public include increased productivity of manufacturing plants, training of engineering students in the area of industrial energy efficiency and reduced energy consumption.

Maxwell, Gregory M.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

399

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of Alstom Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines: Pedigree Matrices, Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced technology heavy-duty gas turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies used in their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Alstom (formerly ABB) industrial gas turbines in a standard format, which allows a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the technical risks involved in their operation. The report establishes a pedigree matrix, or qualitative analysis, for standard production and newly introduced heavy-duty gas turbines, including ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Department of Energy Technical Standards Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Technical Standards Program promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards at DOE, manages and facilitates DOE's efforts to develop and maintain necessary technical standards, and...

402

Technical Standards, Program Project Justification Statement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Justification Statement - August 29, 2012 Technical Standards, Program Project Justification Statement - August 29, 2012 August 29, 2012 DOE Technical Standards Program...

403

Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability and Other Issues with ZigBee SEP Title Technical Options to Address Cyber Security, Interoperability and Other Issues...

404

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards

405

Technical Community of Practice | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Community of Practice Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Through a variety of Web...

406

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Update Meeting - Summer 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting in Denver,...

407

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(TID) U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) U.S. President Manager Name 1948 Truman Boardman Technical Information Division (TID) 1951 Truman BoardmanAbdian Technical...

408

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sources for Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Reports You can find full-text scientific and technical reports produced since 1991 online at Information Bridge. If you...

409

WHO Technical Manual on Tobacco Tax Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WHO Technical Manual on Tobacco Tax Administration WHOData WHO technical manual on tobacco tax administration. 1.ack now l edgemen ts This manual has been produced with a

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Founding Alliance Members. Link to larger image. Slide 22: Founding Alliance Members Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) - Canada VTT Technical...

411

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

412

GEM Technical Design Report  

SciTech Connect

The GEM collaboration was formed in June 1991 to develop a major detector for the SSC. The primary physics objectives of GEM are those central to the motivation for the SSC, to study high p{sub T} physics - exemplified by the search for Higgs bosons - and to search for new physics beyond the standard model. The authors present in this Technical Design Report (TDR) a detector with broad capabilities for the discovery and subsequent study of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass and flavor, and other physics requiring precise measurements of gammas, electrons, and muons - hence the name, GEM. In addition, as a design goal, they have taken care to provide the robustness needed to do the physics that requires high luminosity. Finally, good coverage and hermeticity allow the detection of missing transverse energy, E{sub T}. The GEM design emphasizes clean identification and high resolution measurement of the primary physics signatures for high p{sub T} physics. The approach is to make precise energy measurements that maximize the sensitivity to rare narrow resonances, to detect the elementary interaction products (quarks, leptons, and photons), and to build in the features required to reduce backgrounds.

1993-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the contract period noted above, the Syracuse University Industrial Assessment Center conducted 97.5 assessment days for 98 different industrial clients. These assessments developed 818 assessment recommendations with an overall implementation rate of 51 % (AR’s). Total recommended dollar savings for the period was $17,386,758.00, with $8,893,212.00 actually implemented, for a dollar implementation rate of 57%. The Center employed a total of sixteen undergraduate interns throughout the contract period. Nine of these students stayed on at Syracuse University for graduate study with Center support; five students pursued graduate study at other universities. Ten of these students have, or will, accept professional positions in the energy consulting field. The Center has successfully engaged with a wide variety of professional and development organizations, including the Manufacturers Association of Central New York, The Central New York Technical Development Organization, (the local MEP), the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, The New York Power Authority, the Onondaga County Citizens Energy Committee, and the New York State Center of Excellence on Indoor Environmental Systems.

Frederick J. Carranti, P.E.

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Independent Technical Analysis Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical analytical support for system-wide fish passage information (BPA Project No. 2006-010-00). The goal of this project was to produce rigorous technical analysis products using independent analysts and anonymous peer reviewers. In the past, regional parties have interacted with a single entity, the Fish Passage Center to access the data, analyses, and coordination related to fish passage. This project provided an independent technical source for non-routine fish passage analyses while allowing routine support functions to be performed by other well-qualified entities.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Johnson, Gary E.

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

Strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. It defines the key elements required for the following: Closing the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ); Providing the administrative basis for resolving the safety issue; Defining the data needed to support these activities; and Providing the technical and administrative path for removing tanks from the Watch List.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

417

Technical and economic feasibility analysis of the no-fuel compressed air energy storage concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal goal of this study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of no-fuel compressed air energy storage (CAES) concepts for utility peaking applications. The analysis uncovered no insurmountable problems to preclude the technical feasibility of the no-fuel CAES concept. The results of the economic analysis are sufficiently unfavorable to conclude that no-fuel CAES technology could not compete with conventional CAES or standard gas turbine peaking facilities for conditions foreseeable at this time.

Kreid, D.K.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

419

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

420

Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise and systems engineering, gas turbine transmission systems and gas turbine noise. The UTC in gas turbine noise to generation and propagation of noise from gas turbine engines. Aircraft noise is a critical technical issue

SĂłbester, AndrĂĄs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES: * Convene industry and other stakeholders to share current status/state-of-the art for natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure. * Identify key challenges (both technical and non-technical, such as permitting, installation, codes and standards) preventing or delaying the widespread deployment of natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure. Identify synergies between natural gas and hydrogen fuels. * Identify and prioritize opportunities to address the challenges reported above, and determine roles and opportunities for both government and industry stakeholders. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011 9:00-10:00 AM Registration and Continental Breakfast 10:00-10:15 AM Welcome nïź Dr. Peter Littlewood, Argonne Associate Laboratory Director for

422

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest/storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery.

Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Technical Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Reports Technical Reports Technical Reports November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A wide range of resources addressing the many benefits of combined heat and power (CHP) is available, including the technical reports below. For example, Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power (CHP) During the August 14, 2003, Blackout highlights facilities that were able to remain operational during the 2003 blackout due to backup generators or distributed generation (DG) resources, including CHP. Assessing the Benefits of On-Site CHP During the August 14, 2003, Blackout, 29 pp, June 2004 Characterization of the U.S. Industrial/Commercial Boiler Population, 65 pp, May 2005 CHP: Connecting the Gap Between Markets and Utility Interconnection and Tariff Practices Part I, 34 pp, Mar. 2006 and Part II, 64 pp, Aug. 2006

424

DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A TECHNICAL STANDARD U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-2 Need Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE...

425

DOE Technical Standards Program: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

e-mail: jeffrey.feit@hq.doe.gov burgundy dot image To register a new project or Technical Standards Manager, or for information on topical committees: Kathy Knight phone:...

426

Technical Database | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

56 56 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281756 Varnish cache server Technical Database Dataset Summary Description Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Source Sandia National Laboratories Date Released June 03rd, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated September 27th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords Compatibility of Materials hydrogen NREL Sandia Technical Database Technical Reference Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 1100_cia85_ten_fra_fat.xlsx (xlsx, 60.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 1100_san10_fra_fat.xlsx (xlsx, 58.5 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 1100_san10b_fra_fat.xlsx (xlsx, 59.4 KiB)

427

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1986 the Oregon State University Industrial Assessment Center (OSU IAC) has worked to increase the energy efficiency, productivity, sustainability, and competitiveness of US manufacturers; provide engineering students an education not available in the classroom; keep engineering faculty in contact with technology and challenges in Northwest industry; and reduce dependence on nonrenewable energy resources, both imported and domestic. Project Objective: Over the duration of this project (2002-2006), the OSU IAC worked to directly support and influence industrial decisions primarily regarding energy but also regarding sustainability and profitability through: Assessments & Follow-up: The OSU IAC performed 111 Industrial Assessments in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Nevada to help industry identify and implement opportunities to increase energy efficiency, productivity, sustainability, and competitiveness Workshops Seminars Forums Etc: OSU IAC staff worked with regional peers to offer appropriate workshops and trainings as opportunities availed themselves. Graduating Excellent Energy Aware Professional Alumni: As technically capable, skilled written and verbal communicators, our alumni contributed to OSU IAC influence from their positions within industry, consulting organizations, utilities, and governmental and non governmental agencies. Tool Development: Analysis tools and guides originated at the OSU IAC extended our reach. The center continually worked to develop computer based analysis tools, evaluation checklists, analysis guide sheets for internal use and general sharing with industry, energy, and other professionals to assist them in efforts to improve US Industry. Impact: Over 20 years of activity the OSU IAC has typically performed 25 Industrial Assessments a year. On average, each year of 25 assessments has resulted in implemented projects that saved industry a total of: 25.3 TBTU in annual energy and $4.5 Million annually, with an average investment payback of one year. Over the duration of this project, while a number of recommendations are still under consideration for implementation, those already implemented have resulted in over $11 million in annual savings.

Joseph Junker; Greg Wheeler

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

428

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New and novel material and process technologies applied in wind blade designs and production are critical to increasing the competitiveness of wind power generation against traditional sources of energy. In this project, through collaboration between PPG Industries and MAG Industrial Automation Systems, the potential of using automated manufacturing for the production of fiber glass composite wind blades was evaluated from both technical and economic points of view. Further, it was demonstrated that by modifying the standard blade raw material forms through the use of cost effective pre-impregnated rovings coupled with using an automated fiber placement machine to lay up the parts, it is possible to produce state of the art composite laminates with significantly improved mechanical performance and with higher processing rates than standard blade production technology allows for today, thereby lowering the cost of energy over turbine blades made using traditional processes and materials. In conformity with the scope of work of the submitted proposal, the project team completed each task and documented and reported its findings on the appropriate quarterly report submitted to the DOE project team. The activities and this report are divided into 5 subtasks: (1) Material Investigation - Reviews traditional materials and key specifications and testing methods; (2) Manufacturing and Automation - Identifies new candidate material forms and automated layup processes; (3) Process Development - Performs trials of candidate materials and processes; (4) Predictive Analysis - Assesses impact of new material forms and automated processes on a model blade design; and (5) Feasibility Assessment - Compares traditional manufacturing processes and materials to new candidate material forms and automated processes.

Juan Camilo Serrano

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

429

CTBT technical issues handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to give the nonspecialist in nuclear explosion physics and nuclear test monitoring an introduction to the topic as it pertains to a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The authors have tried to make the handbook visually oriented, with figures paired to short discussions. As such, the handbook may be read straight through or in sections. The handbook covers four main areas and ends with a glossary, which includes both scientific terms and acronyms likely to be encountered during CTBT negotiations. The following topics are covered: (1) Physics of nuclear explosion experiments. This is a description of basic nuclear physics and elementary nuclear weapon design. Also discussed are testing practices. (2) Other nuclear experiments. This section discusses experiments that produce small amounts of nuclear energy but differ from explosion experiments discussed in the first chapter. This includes the type of activities, such as laser fusion, that would continue after a CTBT is in force. (3) Monitoring tests in various environments. This section describes the different physical environments in which a test could be conducted (underground, in the atmosphere, in space, underwater, and in the laboratory); the sources of non-nuclear events (such as earthquakes and mining operations); and the opportunities for evasion. (4) On-site inspections. A CTBT is likely to include these inspections as an element of the verification provisions, in order to resolve the nature of ambiguous events. This chapter describes some technical considerations and technologies that are likely to be useful. (5) Selecting verification measures. This chapter discusses the uncertain nature of the evidence from monitoring systems and how compliance judgments could be made, taking the uncertainties into account. It also discusses how to allocate monitoring resources, given the likelihood of testing by various countries in various environments.

Zucca, J.J. [ed.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the contract period, our experimental activities concentrated on ion-surface collision studies, gas phase collisions, the effects of adsorbates on field emission, and the origin of H3O+ in mass spectroscopy. In the area of ion-surface collisions we have measured sputtering yields for negative ions and electrons arising from collisions of ions and photons with a variety of metallic substrates upon which is known amount of adsorbate, which drastically alters the emission characteristics. Kinetic energy distributions of the ejected anions and electrons have also been determined. We have developed a theoretical model which, to a large degree, describes the process and elucidates the role of the adsorbate in the emission processes. In the category of gas-phase collisions, we reported work on proton transfer and ion-molecule reactions for reactants involving H3+ and D3+, measured absolute cross sections for a variety inelastic channels for reactants involving CH4+ and CF4, and measured electron detachment and decomposition cross sections for collisions of SF6- with N2. Additionally, we reported absolute cross sections for various reactive collisions involving collisional decomposition of SF6- and the reactants CF3+ and CHF3. The idea here was to use these measured cross sections to model and understand the salient features of the popular gaseous dielectric, SF6 , and the etching discharge which utilizes CHF3. A somewhat different set of experiments explored the role of adsorbates on the process of electron field emission and the nature and origin of the anomalous cation signal often seen at mass 19 amu in mass spectroscopy. The laboratory collision energies for these experiments ranged from a few electron volts up to 500 eV. The goal of all the studies was to develop an understanding of the collisional dynamics and pathways for systems which are both intellectually interesting and of some potential importance to various areas of applied physics.

R. L. Champion

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

431

DOE Technical Standards Program Procedures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 TECHNICAL STANDARDS COMMENT RESOLUTION U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE-TSPP-7 Comment Resolution Revision: 4 Date: August 1, 2000 DOE Technical Standards Program i CONTENTS Paragraph Page 1. SCOPE........................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Applicability.............................................................................................................. 1 2. COMMENT RESOLUTION ............................................................................................................ 1

432

Guam Initial Technical Assessment Report  

SciTech Connect

Under an interagency agreement, funded by the Department of Interior's (DOI) Office of Insular Affairs (OIA), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked to deliver technical assistance to the island of Guam by conducting an island initial technical assessment that would lay out energy consumption and production data and establish a baseline. This assessment will be used to conduct future analysis and studies by NREL that will estimate energy efficiency and renewable energy potential for the island of Guam.

Baring-Gould, I.; Conrad, M.; Haase, S.; Hotchkiss, E.; McNutt, P.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

Refueling stations for natural gas vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unavailability of natural gas vehicle (NGV) refueling stations constitutes one of the major barriers to the wide spread utilization of natural gas in the transportation market. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the current technical and economic status of compressed natural gas vehicle refueling stations and to identify the components or design features that offer the greatest potential for performance improvements and/or cost reductions. Both fast-fill- and slow-fill-type refueling systems will be discussed. 4 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Biederman, R.T.; Jasionowski, W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Usability in Health IT: Technical Strategy, Research, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usability in Health IT: Technical Strategy, Research, and Implementation. Purpose: To promote ... reservation. Technical Contact: Lana ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development January 10, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What is RPSEA? The Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America - or RPSEA -

437

Department of Energy Technical Standards Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Technical Standards Program promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards at DOE, manages and facilitates DOE's efforts to develop and maintain necessary technical standards, and communicates information on technical standards activities to people who develop or use technical standards in DOE.

438

Technical Consumer Products - Compliance Test Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Consumer Products - Compliance Test Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200571-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Technical Advisory Committee to Develop a Federal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Advisory Committee to Develop a Federal Information Processing Standard for the Federal Key Management Infrastructure. ...

440

Oil and gas field code master list, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains data collected through October 1993 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service.

Not Available

1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas technically recoverable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks and accomplishments. During the award period, Assistant Director Rudy Marloth became a DOE Qualified Specialist in PHAST, a DOE Qualified Specialist in Compressed Air, and a Certified Energy Manager, and earned a MS degree in Environmental Science.

Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

442

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State. Volume III. Experience of drilling five shale-gas wells in New York State  

SciTech Connect

Five shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the South-Central areas of New York State as part of this program. The program was undertaken by Arlington Exploration Company (AEC) during 1981 and 1982. The wells were drilled on educational properties in an attempt to demonstrate the economic prospect of natural gas for institutional and small commercial consumers to develop their own source of energy. All five wells were completed in the Marcellus section of the Devonian shale. Each of the five wells was connected to an appropriate heat load for the purpose of production testing. The project supports the theory that a well drilled anywhere in South-Central New York and completed in the Marcellus Shale using modern fracturing techniques (i.e. nitrogen foam) is likely to produce some gas. Important factors not yet predictable are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the volume of recoverable reserves. Depths to the Marcellus Shale generally increase from north (i.e. Houghton College) to south (i.e. Portville Central School).

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Department of Energy Technical Standards Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback HSS Logo Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Office of Nuclear Safety Technical Standards Logo - Globe The DOE Technical Standards Program promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards at DOE, manages and facilitates DOE's efforts to develop and maintain necessary technical standards, and communicates information on technical standards activities to people who develop or use technical standards in DOE. Online Standards Approved DOE Technical Standards Recently approved DOE Technical Standards Monthly Status Reports DOE Technical Standards Archive

444

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Final Technical Report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER55005 Nonlinear FLR Effects in Reduced Fluid Models Alain J. Brizard, Saint MichaelĂ?Â?s College The above-mentioned DoE grant was used to support research activities by the PI during a sabbatical leave from Saint MichaelĂ?Â?s College in 2009. The major focus of the work was the role played by guiding-center and gyrocenter (linear and nonlinear) polarization and magnetization effects in understanding transport processes in turbulent magnetized plasmas. The theoretical tools used for this work include Lie-transform perturbation methods and Lagrangian (variational) methods developed by the PI in previous work. The present final technical report lists (I) the peer-reviewed publications that were written based on work funded by the Grant; (II) invited and contributed conference presentations during the period funded by the Grant; and (III) seminars presented during the period funded by the Grant. I. Peer-reviewed Publications A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, 2011, Exact momentum conservation for the gyrokinetic Vlasov- Poisson equations, Physics of Plasmas 18 , 082307:1-14 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3625554 ]. J. Decker, Y. Peysson, A.J. Brizard, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2010, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112513:1-12 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3519514]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Noether derivation of exact conservation laws for dissipationless reduced fluid models, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112503:1-8 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3515303]. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, 2010, Perturbation analysis of trapped particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, Physics of Plasmas 17, 102903:1-9 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3486554]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Exact energy conservation laws for full and truncated nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, Physics of Plasmas 17, 042303:1-11 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3374428]. A.J. Brizard, J. Decker, Y. Peysson, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2009, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator, Physics of Plasmas 16, 102304:1-9[http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3249627]. A.J. Brizard, 2009, Variational Principles for Reduced Plasma Physics, Journal of Physics: Conference Series 169, 012003 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/169/1/012003]. II. Invited and Contributed Conference Presentations A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, Momentum conservation law for the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations, 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Salt Lake City (Utah), November 14-18, 2011. A.J. Brizard, P.J. Morrison, C. Chandre, and E. Tassi, On the road to the Hamiltonian formulation of gyrokinetic theory, 52nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Chicago (Illinois), November 8-12, 2010. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, Lie-transform perturbation analysis of trapped-particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, 2010 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, Seattle (Washington), April 19-21, 2010. N. Tronko and A.J. Brizard, Gyrokinetic momentum conservation law, 2010 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, Seattle (Washington), April 19-21, 2010. C. Chandre and A.J. Brizard, Hamiltonian formulation of reduced Vlasov-Maxwell equations, 50th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Dallas (Texas), November 17-21, 2008. A.J. Brizard, Nonlinear FLR effects in reduced fluid models, Invited Presentation at 11th Easter Plasma Meeting, Torino (Italy), April 15-17, 2009. III. Seminars Reduced Fokker-Planck operators for advanced plasma simulations, seminar given at CEA Cadarache (France), May 25, 2009. Ray phase-space methods in linear mode conversion, seminar given at CPT Luminy (France), April 1, 2009. Old and new methods in gyrokinetic theory, seminar given at CEA Cadarache (France), March 20, 2009. Hamiltonian theory of adiabatic motion of relativistic charged particles, seminar given at CPT Luminy (France), March 11, 2009. Noether method for fluids a

Alain J. Brizard

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

Alexander Pigarov

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The City of Albuquerque Aviation Department began planning for an alternative fuels facility in 1999 and began actively pursuing funding for the project in 2000. The original project scope was intended to provide a fueling station that provided unleaded gasoline, E-85, diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG) and propane. When the tragedy of 9/11 occurred, all capital projects were put on hold and then reassessed to validate needs and priorities. The alternative fuels station was scaled back to a CNG facility to: (1) Provide fuel for the common shuttle that served the rental car facilities at the airport; (2) Provide a CNG fuel center for use by all levels of government for vehicle fueling; (3) Provide another CNG facility near the interstate to improve the State network for CNG fueling; (4) Provide a backup fueling facility for the University of New Mexico and the City of Albuquerque Transit Department who were also using CNG vehicles; and (5) Provide another fueling facility accessible to the general public.

Jim Hinde

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

447

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

448

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

449

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

450

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

451

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

452

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

453

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

454

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

456

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

457

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

458

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (millio