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1

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.5 hours" "NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY" "FORM EIA-757" "Schedule A: Baseline Report " "This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public...

2

Ben Kaun  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ben Kaun Ben Kaun Senior Project Engineer Power Delivery & Utilization Energy Storage Program Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) (650) 855-2208 bkaun@epri.com This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Ben Kaun is a Senior Project Engineer for the Energy Storage Program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), managing projects related to analysis of value and grid impacts of energy storage and distributed energy resources. His current focus is to provide tools and methods to support availability and use of energy storage as a tool to solve problems and

3

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile for employee commuting, data on behavior and attitudes are best collected through an agency-wide survey.

4

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:47pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile for employee commuting, data on behavior and attitudes are best collected through an agency-wide survey. The default survey methodology in the Federal GHG Accounting Guidance is designed to collect the minimum data for emissions calculations. Additional information may be necessary to determine which trip reduction strategies are best suited for specific employee populations. The optional questions in the advanced survey methodology or data gathered through an agency-defined employee commute survey can provide this understanding.

5

Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ben Dotson | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ben Dotson Ben Dotson About Us Ben Dotson - Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs Ben Dotson A Tennessean by way of Michigan, Ben Dotson joined the Office of Digital Strategy and Communications in October 2011. As the Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Ben serves as the project manager for the Energy.gov Renewal Project, the Department's effort to centralize and improve its digital communications infrastructure. Prior to joining the Energy Department, Ben worked and volunteered for a variety of political campaigns and advocacy organizations in Michigan. He is an alumnus of the New Organizing Institute's New Media Bootcamp, an intensive training program for tech savvy engagement organizers, and Central Michigan University, where he studied political science and music.

7

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS, AND NGL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AM-i Chapter AM U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of the oil, gas, and natural-gas liquids (NGL) resources by the USGS in1998 for undiscovered oil, gas, and NGL resources that reside in conventional accumulations

Laughlin, Robert B.

8

US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Ben Squires | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ben Squires Ben Squires About Us Ben Squires - Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Ben Squires has been supporting the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as an Analyst since June 2010. Originally from Summit, New Jersey, Ben found himself drawn south, attending the University of Virginia and making his home in Washington D.C. shortly after graduating. His passion for energy issues began when he worked at a global strategy firm. It is matched only by his love of cooking, hiking, and spending time with family and friends on Cape Cod. Most Recent Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21 Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential for Clean Energy Applications June 10 Russian Scientists Team with NREL on Innovative Weathering System

10

Energy Information Administration survey of national oil and gas reserves  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the reserves estimation program of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA sends survey forms to the top 500 operators in the United States and to about 750 small operators who account for significant amounts of production within selected states. An 8% random sample is taken of the remaining small operators. Data are presented which compare the findings of EIA with those of the American Petroleum Institute and the American Gas Association for 1977, 1978, and 1979. 21 figures. (JMT)

Boyd, E.R.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Soil Gas Survey Over Rotorua Geothermal Field, Rotorua, New Zealand Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Soil gases have been used as an exploration tool for minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy, through the detection of anomalous gas levels. This paper describes a soil gas survey conducted over a large part of the Rotorua geothermal field to supplement the sparse gas data from drillhole samples and to determine gas distribution patterns over the field. Data collected from a reference hole were used to observe the effect changing meteorological conditions had on soil gas levels. The results were

12

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.5 hours" 1.5 hours" "NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY" "FORM EIA-757" "Schedule B: Emergency Status Report" "This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction."

13

Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Political Scuffle by Ben Levine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (This really starts to get confusing.) 18. Sugar (e) likes everything that's the same shape as she something to shoot at, and a reason to live. 23. The crazy guy (a) and the Unabomber (f) both hate the White House. 24. Everyone but Ben (b) is adjacent to something. 25. Ross and his running mate (n9

Bringsjord, Selmer

16

CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool Focus Area: Geothermal Power Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/PubDetails.aspx?Action=View& Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carben-version-3-multisector-carbon-d Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance The CarBen model enables users to conduct wedge anlayses of scenarios for mitigating U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. The spreadsheet-based tool relies upon expert opinion for scenario formulation and is not intended to be used

17

THE EGNoG SURVEY: MOLECULAR GAS IN INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.05 to z = 0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and star formation rates of 4-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 {+-} 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 Gyr for starburst galaxies. We calculate an average molecular gas fraction of 7%-20% at the intermediate redshifts probed by the EGNoG survey. By expressing the molecular gas fraction in terms of the specific star formation rate and molecular gas depletion time (using typical values), we also calculate the expected evolution of the molecular gas fraction with redshift. The predicted behavior agrees well with the significant evolution observed from z {approx} 2.5 to today.

Bauermeister, A.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M. [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A.; Teuben, P. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bureau, M. [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Leroy, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ostriker, E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wong, T., E-mail: amberb@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

INSTRUMENTATION FOR SURVEYING ACOUSTIC SIGNALS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION LINES  

SciTech Connect

In the U.S. natural gas is distributed through more than one million miles of high-pressure transmission pipelines. If all leaks and infringements could be detected quickly, it would enhance safety and U.S. energy security. Only low frequency acoustic waves appear to be detectable over distances up to 60 km where pipeline shut-off valves provide access to the inside of the pipeline. This paper describes a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) developed to record and identify acoustic signals characteristic of: leaks, pump noise, valve and flow metering noise, third party infringement, manual pipeline water and gas blow-off, etc. This PAMP consists of a stainless steel 1/2 inch NPT plumbing tree rated for use on 1000 psi pipelines. Its instrumentation is designed to measure acoustic waves over the entire frequency range from zero to 16,000 Hz by means of four instruments: (1) microphone, (2) 3-inch water full range differential pressure transducer with 0.1% of range sensitivity, (3) a novel 3 inch to 100 inch water range amplifier, using an accumulator with needle valve and (4) a line-pressure transducer. The weight of the PAMP complete with all accessories is 36 pounds. This includes a remote control battery/switch box assembly on a 25-foot extension chord, a laptop data acquisition computer on a field table and a sun shield.

John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Weather on Ben Nevis and Snowdon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... much interested with the account of a visit paid to the Ben Nevis Observatory on December 26, 1883, described in NATURE of January 3 (p. 219), more particularly as ...

T. SINGTON

1884-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Usage Form Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may choose to mark

22

ALLSMOG: an APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. I - molecular gas scaling relations, and the effect of the CO/H2 conversion factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ALLSMOG, the APEX Low-redshift Legacy Survey for MOlecular Gas. ALLSMOG is a survey designed to observe the CO(2-1) emission line with the APEX telescope, in a sample of local galaxies (0.01 conversion factor. We find an increase in the H2/HI mass ratio with stellar mass which closely matches semi-analytic predictions. We find a mean molecular gas fraction for ALLSMOG galaxies of MH2/M* = (0.09 - 0.13),...

Bothwell, M S; Cicone, C; Maiolino, R; Mller, P; Aravena, M; De Breuck, C; Peng, Y; Espada, D; Hodge, J A; Impellizzeri, C M V; Martn, S; Riechers, D; Walter, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Schools Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Grant Program Provider Department of Community and Economic Development The Ben Franklin Technology Partner's Challenge Grant and Alternative Energy Development Program (AEDP) provides funds to businesses through the four Ben Franklin Technology Partners for access to capital, business expertise, technology commercialization services to advance the development of new technologies and for the generation, conservation, and

24

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010  

SciTech Connect

This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

INTERNAL REPAIR OF GAS PIPLINES SURVEY OF OPERATOR EXPERIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEEDS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

A repair method that can be applied from the inside of a gas transmission pipeline (i.e., a trenchless repair) is an attractive alternative to conventional repair methods since the need to excavate the pipeline is precluded. This is particularly true for pipelines in environmentally sensitive and highly populated areas. The objectives of the project are to evaluate, develop, demonstrate, and validate internal repair methods for pipelines; develop a functional specification for an internal pipeline repair system; and prepare a recommended practice for internal repair of pipelines. The purpose of this survey is to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. A total of fifty-six surveys were sent to pipeline operators. A total of twenty completed surveys were returned, representing a 36% response rate, which is considered very good given the fact that tailored surveys are known in the marketing industry to seldom attract more than a 10% response rate. The twenty survey responses produced the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water (e.g., lakes and swamps) in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. All these areas tend to be very difficult and very costly if, and where, conventional excavated repairs may be currently used. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem in a water/river crossing. (3) The typical travel distances required can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). In concept, these groups require pig-based systems; despooled umbilical systems could be considered for the first two groups. For the last group a self-propelled system with an onboard self-contained power and welding system is required. (4) Pipe size range requirements range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.) in diameter. The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.) diameter, with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe.

Ian D. Harris

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

BEN R. OPPENHEIMER ASSOCIATE CURATOR AND PROFESSOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 BEN R. OPPENHEIMER ASSOCIATE CURATOR AND PROFESSOR CURATOR-IN-CHARGE DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICS. Oppenheimer 2 REFEREED PUBLICATIONS Refereed Journal Articles: 1. "Spatially Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of the Z Canis Majoris System During Quiescence and Eruption" by S. Hinkley, B. R. Oppenheimer, Roberts, L

Oppenheimer, Ben R.

27

A Christmas Visit to Ben Nevis Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the mist into the brightest of daylight. Overhead the sky was blue, a fresh light breeze was blowing, and the reflected sunlight was shining in silvery masses on the ... watching the observers at work, in dining (which we did very comfortably off the Christmas cheer, viz. roast turkey and plum pudding, provided for the inhabitants of Ben ...

G. CHRYSTAL

1884-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Ben Gurion National Solar Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ben Gurion National Solar Energy Center Ben Gurion National Solar Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name The Ben-Gurion National Solar Energy Center Place Sede-Boqer Campus, Israel Zip 84990 Sector Solar Product Houses 6 Laboratories, each of which is used for the study of one or more aspect of solar energy conversion. References The Ben-Gurion National Solar Energy Center[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Ben-Gurion National Solar Energy Center is a company located in Sede-Boqer Campus, Israel . References ↑ "The Ben-Gurion National Solar Energy Center" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_Ben_Gurion_National_Solar_Energy_Center&oldid=352167"

29

Form W-8BEN (Rev. February 2006)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Form Form W-8BEN (Rev. February 2006) Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service Certificate of Foreign Status of Beneficial Owner for United States Tax Withholding ᮣ See separate instructions. ᮣ Give this form to the withholding agent or payer. Do not send to the IRS. OMB No. 1545-1621 Do not use this form for: Instead, use Form: ● A foreign partnership, a foreign simple trust, or a foreign grantor trust (see instructions for exceptions) W-8ECI or W-8IMY ● A foreign government, international organization, foreign central bank of issue, foreign tax-exempt organization, foreign private foundation, or government of a U.S. possession that received effectively connected income or that is claiming the applicability of section(s) 115(2), 501(c), 892, 895, or 1443(b) (see instructions)

30

A Survey of Inputs to the North Sea Resulting from Oil and Gas Developments [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...annual inputs from the offshore oil and gas exploration and...of fresh, unweathered oil rapidly enters otherwise uncontaminated offshore sediments, producing...remain little affected by offshore oil and gas developments...

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

THE EGNoG SURVEY: GAS EXCITATION IN NORMAL GALAXIES AT z Almost-Equal-To 0.3  

SciTech Connect

As observations of molecular gas in galaxies are pushed to lower star formation rate (SFR) galaxies at higher redshifts, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the conditions of the gas in these systems to properly infer their molecular gas content. The rotational transitions of the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule provide an excellent probe of the gas excitation conditions in these galaxies. In this paper, we present the results from the gas excitation sample of the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey at the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). This subset of the full EGNoG sample consists of four galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 0.3 with SFRs of 40-65 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and stellar masses of Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }. Using the 3 mm and 1 mm bands at CARMA, we observe both the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) transitions in these four galaxies in order to probe the excitation of the molecular gas. We report robust detections of both lines in three galaxies (and an upper limit on the fourth), with an average line ratio, r {sub 31} = L'{sub CO(3-2)}/L'{sub CO(1-0)}, of 0.46 {+-} 0.07 (with systematic errors {approx}< 40%), which implies sub-thermal excitation of the CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) line. We conclude that the excitation of the gas in these massive, highly star-forming galaxies is consistent with normal star-forming galaxies such as local spirals, not starbursting systems like local ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Since the EGNoG gas excitation sample galaxies are selected from the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, we suggest that this result is applicable to studies of MS galaxies at intermediate and high redshifts, supporting the assumptions made in studies that find molecular gas fractions in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1-2 to be an order of magnitude larger than what is observed locally.

Bauermeister, A.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A.; Teuben, P. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bureau, M. [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)] [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Wong, T., E-mail: amberb@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Free Extreme Values Gerard Ben Arous and Dan Virgil Voiculescu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Extreme Values Gerard Ben Arous and Dan Virgil Voiculescu New York University and University at Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720-3840 E-mail:dvv@math.berkeley.edu Abstract: Free probability analogues- sification of freely max-stable laws and their domains of attraction, using "free extremal convolutions

Ben Arous, Gérard

33

Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services May 2004 Introduction Land in the subbasin plan development process. During discussions of the Subbasin Planning Team and at public workshops taxpayer pockets"), and require no specific economic return to justify the expenditure. · There is also

34

Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services May 2004 Introduction Land in the subbasin plan development process. When the Washington portion of the draft Walla Walla Subbasin plan taxpayer pockets"), and require no specific economic return to justify the expenditure. · There is also

35

Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast Principal Author: Ben Arikawa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast March 1998 Principal Author: Ben Arikawa Electricity 1997 FORE08.DOC Page 1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE REVISED 1997 RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICE FORECAST Introduction The Electricity Analysis Office of the California Energy Commission

36

Extremal Properties of Random Structures E. Ben-Naim1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extremal Properties of Random Structures E. Ben-Naim1 , P. L. Krapivsky2 , and S. Redner2 1. The extremal characteristics of random structures, including trees, graphs, and networks, are discussed. A statistical physics approach is employed in which extremal properties are obtained through suitably defined

Redner, Sidney

37

A CO survey in planet-forming disks: characterizing the gas content in the epoch of planet formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We carried out a 12CO(3-2) survey of 52 southern stars with a wide range of IR excesses (LIR/L*) using the single dish telescopes APEX and ASTE. The main aims were (1) to characterize the evolution of molecular gas in circumstellar disks using LIR/L* values as a proxy of disk dust evolution, and (2) to identify new gas-rich disk systems suitable for detailed study with ALMA. About 60% of the sample (31 systems) have LIR/L* > 0.01 typical of T-Tauri or Herbig AeBe stars, and the rest (21 systems) have LIR/L* 0.01. However, the spectra of only four of the newly detected systems appear free of contamination from background or foreground emission from molecular clouds. These include the early-type stars HD 104237 (A4/5V, 116 pc) and HD 98922 (A2 III, 507 pc, as determined in this work), where our observations reveal the presence of CO-rich circumstellar disks for the first time. Of the other detected sources, many could harbor gaseous circumstellar disks, but our data are inconclusive. For these two newly discov...

Hales, A S; Montesinos, B; Casassus, S; Dent, W F R; Dougados, C; Eiroa, C; Hughes, A M; Garay, G; Mardones, D; Mnard, F; Palau, Aina; Prez, S; Phillips, N; Torrelles, J M; Wilner, D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S. Department of Energy" ,"enter an ""X"" in the box:",,,"Oil & Gas Survey" ,,,"Ben Franklin Station" "Company...

39

Exxon Mobil QuestAir Plug Power Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exxon Mobil QuestAir Plug Power Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV Exxon Mobil QuestAir Plug Power Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Exxon Mobil, QuestAir, Plug Power , & Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV Place New York Zip 12110 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Plug Power has entered a JV with Exxon Mobil Corporation, QuestAir Technologies and Ben Gurion University. It plans to commercialize an on-vehicle hydrogen production system for use in a fuel cell-powered lift truck application. References Exxon Mobil, QuestAir, Plug Power , & Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Exxon Mobil, QuestAir, Plug Power , & Ben Gurion University Hydrogen JV is

40

COLD GASS, an IRAM legacy survey of molecular gas in massive galaxies: I. Relations between H2, HI, stellar content and structural properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are conducting COLD GASS, a legacy survey for molecular gas in nearby galaxies. Using the IRAM 30m telescope, we measure the CO(1-0) line in a sample of ~350 nearby (D=100-200 Mpc), massive galaxies (log(M*/Msun)>10.0). The sample is selected purely according to stellar mass, and therefore provides an unbiased view of molecular gas in these systems. By combining the IRAM data with SDSS photometry and spectroscopy, GALEX imaging and high-quality Arecibo HI data, we investigate the partition of condensed baryons between stars, atomic gas and molecular gas in 0.1-10L* galaxies. In this paper, we present CO luminosities and molecular hydrogen masses for the first 222 galaxies. The overall CO detection rate is 54%, but our survey also uncovers the existence of sharp thresholds in galaxy structural parameters such as stellar mass surface density and concentration index, below which all galaxies have a measurable cold gas component but above which the detection rate of the CO line drops suddenly. The mean molecul...

Saintonge, Amelie; Kramer, Carsten; Tacconi, Linda J; Buchbender, Christof; Catinella, Barbara; Fabello, Silvia; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Wang, Jing; Cortese, Luca; Fu, Jian; Genzel, Reinhard; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Guo, Qi; Haynes, Martha P; Heckman, Timothy M; Krumholz, Mark R; Lemonias, Jenna; Li, Cheng; Moran, Sean; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; Schiminovich, David; Schuster, Karl; Sievers, Albrecht

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Survey and Down-Selection of Acid Gas Removal Systems for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol with a Detailed Analysis of an MDEA System  

SciTech Connect

The first section (Task 1) of this report by Nexant includes a survey and screening of various acid gas removal processes in order to evaluate their capability to meet the specific design requirements for thermochemical ethanol synthesis in NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007, NREL/TP-510-41168). MDEA and selexol were short-listed as the most promising acid-gas removal agents based on work described in Task 1. The second report section (Task 2) describes a detailed design of an MDEA (methyl diethanol amine) based acid gas removal system for removing CO2 and H2S from biomass-derived syngas. Only MDEA was chosen for detailed study because of the available resources.

Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, California

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Structure of Dark Molecular Gas in the Galaxy - I: A Pilot Survey for 18-cm OH Emission Towards $l \\approx 105^{\\deg}, b \\approx +1^{\\deg}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first results from a survey for 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH emission over a small region of the Outer Galaxy centered at $l \\approx 105.0\\deg , b \\approx +1.0\\deg$ . This sparse, high-sensitivity survey ($\\Delta Ta \\approx \\Delta Tmb \\approx 3.0 - 3.5$ mK rms in 0.55 km/s channels), was carried out as a pilot project with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT, FWHM $\\approx 7.6'$) on a 3 X 9 grid at $0.5\\deg$ spacing. The pointings chosen correspond with those of the existing $^{12}$CO(1-0) CfA survey of the Galaxy (FWHM $\\approx 8.4'$). With 2-hr integrations, 1667 MHz OH emission was detected with the GBT at $\\gtrsim 21$ of the 27 survey positions ($\\geq 78\\%$ ), confirming the ubiquity of molecular gas in the ISM as traced by this spectral line. With few exceptions, the main OH lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz appear in the ratio of 5:9 characteristic of LTE at our sensitivity levels. No OH absorption features are recorded in the area of the present survey, in agreement with the low levels of continuum bac...

Allen, Ronald J; Engelke, Philip D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

24 METRO Monday, March 10, 2014 METROCOSM SCIENCE & DISCOVERY by BEN GILLILAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the greatest mysteries in science ­ what is dark matter and dark energy made of? #12;Monday, March 10, 2014 (levels) Neutron at lowest energy state 22 33 44 5511 METROCOSMSCIENCE & DISCOVERY by BEN GILLILAND24 METRO Monday, March 10, 2014 METROCOSM SCIENCE & DISCOVERY by BEN GILLILAND Follow @Gilli

Rotter, Stefan

44

Civil society research and Marcellus Shale natural gas development: results of a survey of volunteer water monitoring organizations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of a survey of civil society organizations that are monitoring surface water for impacts of Marcellus Shale development in Pennsylvania and New York. We ... of surface water quali...

Kirk Jalbert; Abby J. Kinchy

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Galaxy-cluster gas-density distributions of the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of the structural and scaling properties of the gas distributions in the intracluster medium (ICM) of 31 nearby (z 3 keV scale self-similarly, with no temperature dependence of gas-density normalisation. We find some evidence of a correlation between dynamical state and outer gas density slope, and between dynamical state and both central gas normalisation and cooling time. We find no evidence of a significant bimodality in the distributions of central density, density gradient, or cooling time. Finally, we present the gas mass-temperature relation for the REXCESS sample, which is consistent with the expectation of self-similar scaling modified by the presence of an entropy excess in the inner regions of the cluster, and has a logarithmic intrinsic scatter of ~10%.

J. H. Croston; G. W. Pratt; H. Boehringer; M. Arnaud; E. Pointecouteau; T. J. Ponman; A. J. R. Sanderson; R. F. Temple; R. G. Bower; M. Donahue

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

MICROBOONE PHYSICS Ben Carls Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PHYSICS Ben Carls Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics Outline * The detector and beam - MicroBooNE TPC - Booster and NuMI beams at Fermilab * Oscillation physics - Shed light on the...

47

Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants A Literature Survey and Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING): MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW IN NGC 4254  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the effects of different assumptions and systematics on the determination of the local, spatially resolved star formation law. Using four star formation rate (SFR) tracers (H{alpha} with azimuthally averaged extinction correction, mid-infrared 24 {mu}m, combined H{alpha} and mid-infrared 24 {mu}m, and combined far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared 24 {mu}m), several fitting procedures, and different sampling strategies, we probe the relation between SFR and molecular gas at various spatial resolutions (500 pc and larger) and surface densities ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}})approx. 10-245 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}) within the central {approx}6.5 kpc in the disk of NGC 4254. We explore the effect of diffuse emission using an unsharp masking technique with varying kernel size. The fraction of diffuse emission, f{sub DE}, thus determined is a strong inverse function of the size of the filtering kernel. We find that in the high surface brightness regions of NGC 4254 the form of the molecular gas star formation law is robustly determined and approximately linear ({approx}0.8-1.1) and independent of the assumed fraction of diffuse emission and the SFR tracer employed. When the low surface brightness regions are included, the slope of the star formation law depends primarily on the assumed fraction of diffuse emission. In such a case, results range from linear when the fraction of diffuse emission in the SFR tracer is f{sub DE} {approx}< 30% (or when diffuse emission is removed in both the star formation and the molecular gas tracer) to super-linear ({approx}1.4) when f{sub DE} {approx}> 50%. We find that the tightness of the correlation between gas and star formation varies with the choice of star formation tracer. The 24 {mu}m SFR tracer by itself shows the tightest correlation with the molecular gas surface density, whereas the H{alpha} corrected for extinction using an azimuthally averaged correction shows the highest dispersion. We find that for R < 0.5R{sub 25} the local star formation efficiency is constant and similar to that observed in other large spirals, with a molecular gas depletion time {tau}{sub dep} {approx} 2 Gyr.

Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Jameson, Katherine; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wong, Tony; Xue Rui [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, Erik [I. K. Barber School of the Arts and Science, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC V1V1V7 (Canada); West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Bigiel, Frank; Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ott, Juergen, E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

(Digital) Revolution Girl Style Now!: Subcultures, Social Media, Subjectivity and the Videos of Sadie Benning and Thirza Cuthand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Riot Grrrl Manifesto, in Bikini Kill #2, 1992 In theBenning ends with a song by Bikini Killarguably the most

Royer, Alice

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cross-correlation of the cosmic microwave background with the 2MASS galaxy survey: Signatures of dark energy, hot gas, and point sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We cross-correlate the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) with the projected distribution of extended sources in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). By modeling the theoretical expectation for this signal, we extract the signatures of dark energy [integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW)], hot gas [thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect], and microwave point sources in the cross-correlation. Our strongest signal is the thermal SZ, at the 3.13.7? level, which is consistent with the theoretical prediction based on observations of x-ray clusters. We also see the ISW signal at the 2.5? level, which is consistent with the expected value for the concordance ?CDM cosmology, and is an independent signature of the presence of dark energy in the Universe. Finally, we see the signature of microwave point sources at the 2.7? level.

Niayesh Afshordi; Yeong-Shang Loh; Michael A. Strauss

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey  

SciTech Connect

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

FAINT GALAXIES IN DEEP ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS OBSERVATIONS N. BenItez,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The raw ACS data were processed through the standard CALACS pipeline (Hack 1999) at STScI. This included

54

Understanding and Control of Combustion Dynamics in Gas Turbine Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control of Combustion Understanding and Control of Combustion Control of Combustion Understanding and Control of Combustion Dynamics in Gas Turbine Combustors Dynamics in Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Ben T. Zinn, Tim Lieuwen, Yedidia Neumeier, and Ben Bellows SCIES Project 02-01-SR095 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/2002, 36 Month Duration) $452,695 Total Contract Value CLEMSONPRES.PPT, 10/28/2003, B.T. ZINN, T. LIEUWEN, Y. NEUMEIER Gas Turbine Need Gas Turbine Need * Need: Gas turbine reliability and availability is important factor affecting power plant economics - Problem: Combustion driven oscillations severely reduce part life, requiring substantially more frequent outages

55

The Herschel Comprehensive (U)LIRG Emission Survey (HerCULES): CO Ladders, fine structure lines, and neutral gas cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 $\\mu$m) luminosities ($L_{LIRG}>10^{11} $L$_\\odot$ and $L_{ULIRG}>10^{12}$ L$_\\odot$). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (HerCULES; PI van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (10$^{11}\\leq L_\\odot \\geq10^{13}$). With the \\emph{Herschel Space Observatory}, we observe [CII] 157 $\\mu$m, [OI] 63 $\\mu$m, and [OI] 145 $\\mu$m line emission with PACS, CO J=4-3 through J=13-12, [CI] 370 $\\mu$m, and [CI] 609 $\\mu$m with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [OI] 63 $\\mu$m emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the IRAS 60/100 $\\mu$m ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors....

Rosenberg, M J F; Aalto, S; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Daz-Santos, T; Evans, A S; Fischer, J; Gao, Y; Gonzlez-Alfonso, E; Greve, T R; Harris, A I; Henkel, C; Israel, F P; Isaak, K G; Kramer, C; Meijerink, R; Naylor, D A; Sanders, D B; Smith, H A; Spaans, M; Spinoglio, L; Stacey, G J; Veenendaal, I; Veilleux, S; Walter, F; Wei, A; Wiedner, M C; van der Wiel, M H D; Xilouris, E M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS): Multi-phase cold gas kinematic of M51  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinematic complexity and the favorable position of M51 on the sky make this galaxy an ideal target to test different theories of spiral arm dynamics. Taking advantage of the new high resolution PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS) data, we undertake a detailed kinematic study of M51 to characterize and quantify the origin and nature of the non-circular motions. Using a tilted-ring analysis supported by several other archival datasets we update the estimation of M51's position angle (PA=(173 +/- 3) deg) and inclination (i=(22 +/- 5) deg). Harmonic decomposition of the high resolution (40 pc) CO velocity field shows the first kinematic evidence of an m=3 wave in the inner disk of M51 with a corotation at R(CR,m=3)=1.1 +/- 0.1 kpc and a pattern speed of Omega_p(m=3) = 140 km/(s kpc). This mode seems to be excited by the nuclear bar, while the beat frequencies generated by the coupling between the m=3 mode and the main spiral structure confirm its density-wave nature. We observe also a signature of an m=1 m...

Colombo, Dario; Schinnerer, Eva; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Hughes, Annie; Pety, Jerome; Leroy, Adam K; Dobbs, Clare L; Dumas, Gaelle; Thompson, Todd A; Schuster, Karl F; Kramer, Carsten

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/air/benmap/ Cost: Free Related Tools Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A Windows-based program that uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to

58

INTRODUCTION TO SCINTILLATION LIGHT IN LIQUID ARGON Ben Jones...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Large quantity required at low cost * Raw gas : air * Produced by industrial distillation and then purification with molecular sieves and filters * Contaminants include...

59

CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). III. THE DEPENDENCE OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR GAS SURFACE DENSITIES ON GALAXY PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the correlation between CO and H I emission in 18 nearby galaxies from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) at sub-kpc and kpc scales. Our sample, spanning a wide range in stellar mass and metallicity, reveals evidence for a metallicity dependence of the H I column density measured in regions exhibiting CO emission. Such a dependence is predicted by the equilibrium model of McKee and Krumholz, which balances H{sub 2} formation and dissociation. The observed H I column density is often smaller than predicted by the model, an effect we attribute to unresolved clumping, although values close to the model prediction are also seen. We do not observe H I column densities much larger than predicted, as might be expected were there a diffuse H I component that did not contribute to H{sub 2} shielding. We also find that the H{sub 2} column density inferred from CO correlates strongly with the stellar surface density, suggesting that the local supply of molecular gas is tightly regulated by the stellar disk.

Wong, Tony; Xue, Rui [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bigiel, Frank [Institut fr theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fr Astronomie der Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institut fr theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fr Astronomie der Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ott, Jrgen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rahman, Nurur [Department of Physics, C1 Lab 140, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa)] [Department of Physics, C1 Lab 140, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Millennium Gas project aims to undertake smoothed-particle hydrodynamic resimulations of the Millennium Simulation, providing many hundred massive galaxy clusters for comparison with X-ray surveys (170 clusters with kTsl > 3 keV). This paper looks at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Abstract The Millennium Gas project aims to undertake smoothed-particle hydrodynamic-ray surveys (170 clusters with kTsl > 3 keV). This paper looks at the hot gas and stellar fractions-core systems but are successful in matching the hot gas profiles of non-cool-core clusters. Although

Thomas, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Scheduling ON-OFF home control devices Catherine Plaisant & Ben Shneiderman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheduling ON-OFF home control devices Catherine Plaisant & Ben Shneiderman Human: the control of the scheduler is through a touchscreen interface. The Microtouch or Elographic touchscreens given a variety of home control scheduling tasks and encouraged to comment on the interfaces [2

Shneiderman, Ben

62

Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides Assaf Zemel,* Avinoam Ben-Shaul,* and Sylvio Mayy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides Assaf Zemel,* Avinoam Ben between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) a-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell

Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

63

Mathematical models of magnetic insulation Naoufel BEN ABDALLAH 1 , Pierre DEGOND 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical models of magnetic insulation Naoufel BEN ABDALLAH 1 , Pierre DEGOND 1 and Florian M Palaiseau Cedex, France Abstract The problem of magnetic insulation in a plane diode is discussed. Starting We study the stationary self­consistent problem of magnetic insulation under space­charge lim

Méhats, Florian

64

Modelling spikes and pricing swing options in electricity Ben Hambly Sam Howison Tino Kluge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling spikes and pricing swing options in electricity markets Ben Hambly Sam Howison Tino Kluge of electricity markets is the formation of price spikes which are caused when the maximum supply and current April 24, 2007 Abstract Most electricity markets exhibit high volatilities and occasional distinctive

Howison, Sam

65

Optical Label Switching Technology and Energy-Efficient Future Networks S. J. Ben Yoo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical Label Switching Technology and Energy-Efficient Future Networks S. J. Ben Yoo Department traffic with extremely low energy consumption and high goodput. Keywords: Optical packet switching, optical label switching, energy efficient networks. 1. Introduction The future Internet is rapidly

Kolner, Brian H.

66

Optical Signal Processing in All-Optical Packet Routing Systems S. J. Ben Yoo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical Signal Processing in All-Optical Packet Routing Systems S. J. Ben Yoo Department@ece.ucdavis.edu, Abstract: This paper discusses important signal processing functions in all-optical packet routing systems. We will pay special attention to all-optical time-to-live, optical performance monitoring, optical

Kolner, Brian H.

67

Muon Life*me Study Ben Fox-Shapiro and Chase Cummings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muon Life*me Study Ben Fox-Shapiro and Chase Cummings #12;Research Ques*ons What is the average life*me of a muon? Is the measured life*me the same for all filler materials and detector configura*ons? #12;Experiment · The average life*me of a muon

California at Santa Cruz, University of

68

Power-Saving Approaches and Tradeoffs for Storage Systems BEN BUZBEE, Florida State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the legacy storage stack, exploring tradeoffs made by a representative set of energy-efficient storage to a fixed power infrastructure, limited battery density, etc.), has created a need for more energy-efficientPower-Saving Approaches and Tradeoffs for Storage Systems BEN BUZBEE, Florida State University

Wang, Andy

69

White matter pathways in reading Michal Ben-Shachar, Robert F Dougherty and Brian A Wandell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White matter pathways in reading Michal Ben-Shachar, Robert F Dougherty and Brian A Wandell Skilled tensor imaging has been used to identify correlations between white matter properties and reading skills in adults and children. White matter differences have been found in left temporo-parietal areas

Wandell, Brian A.

70

NEWSLETTER OF BEN-GURION UNIVERSITY OF THE NEGEV Learn more about Green Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Green Campus standards and incorporate energy saving technologies. See architectural renderings below - NEWSLETTER OF BEN-GURION UNIVERSITY OF THE NEGEV Learn more about Green Campus /http://cmsprod.bgu.ac.il/Eng/Units/green became an extremely successful business, manufacturing plastics and vinyl products for the flooring

Yekutieli, Amnon

71

The Turtles Project: Design and Implementation of Nested Virtualization Muli Ben-Yehuda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Turtles Project: Design and Implementation of Nested Virtualization Muli Ben-Yehuda Michael D-performance nested virtualization on Intel x86-based systems. The Turtles project, which is part of the Linux is the tortoise standing on?" "You're very clever, young man, very clever", said the old lady. "But it's turtles

Yang, Junfeng

72

A Quantitative Comparison of Parallel Computation Models Ben H,H. Juurlink Harry A.G. Wijshoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Quantitative Comparison of Parallel Computation Models Ben H,H. Juurlink Harry A.G. Wijshoff High, requires specific permission sad/or fee. SPM96, Padua, Italy Q 199(j ACM ().89791+@-&96j~ ..$3

Moreno Maza, Marc

73

Report on the Discrete Analysis Programme at INI. Keith Ball, Franck Barthe, Ben Green and Assaf Naor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report on the Discrete Analysis Programme at INI. Keith Ball, Franck Barthe, Ben Green and Assaf. The INI decided to experiment with streaming the lectures of the first INI workshop to Paris so

74

Electrobiosynthesis for CO2 Ben Frigo-Vaz, Shunxiang Xia, Bo Tang, Xueyan Zhao and Ping Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formic acid as an energy carrier provides advantage over other means of providing electrical energyElectrobiosynthesis for CO2 Conversion Ben Frigo-Vaz, Shunxiang Xia, Bo Tang, Xueyan Zhao and PingM) Conversation efficiency (%) Carbon paper

Weiblen, George D

75

TY RPRT T1 Exploring California PV Home Premiums A1 Ben Hoen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TY RPRT TY RPRT T1 Wind Technologies Market Report A1 Ryan H Wiser A1 Mark Bolinger ED Galen L Barbose ED Na m Darghouth ED Ben Hoen ED Andrew D Mills ED Samantha Weaver ED Kevin Porter ED Michael Buckley ED Sari Fink ED Frank Oteri ED Suzanne Tegen U2 LBNL E TY RPRT T1 A Spatial Hedonic Analysis of the Effects of Wind Energy Facilities on Surrounding Property Values in the United States A1 Ben Hoen A1 Jason P Brown A1 Thomas Jackson A1 Ryan H Wiser A1 Mark Thayer A1 Peter Cappers AB p Previous research on the effects of wind energy facilities on surrounding home values has been limited by small samples of relevant home sale data and the inability to account adequately for confounding home value factors and spatial dependence in the data This study helps

76

Deriving the Young-Ben Jelloul model of near-inertial waves by Whitham averaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanic near-inertial waves - internal waves with frequencies close to the local Coriolis frequency $f_0$ - are strongly influenced by the presence of mean currents. To study this influence, Young and Ben Jelloul (1997) derived an asymptotic model that describes the slow modulation of the amplitude of these waves about their rapid oscillation at frequency $f_0$. Here we show that this model can be obtained within a variational framework, by (Whitham) averaging the Lagrangian of the hydrostatic-Boussinesq equations over the wave period $2\\pi/f_0$. The derivation leads to a variational formulation of the Young-Ben Jelloul model from which its conservation laws can be obtained systematically.

Vanneste, Jacques

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DAVID BEN-ZVI Once we know that QC is compactly generated, it becomes easy to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

step up, for gerbes need to go to steps up. Consider a map X Y . Then we have a Cech simplicial objectTRIAGE DAVID BEN-ZVI Once we know that QC is compactly generated, it becomes easy to prove that QC-compact separated schemes QC(X) is compactly generated by perfect objects. Let U = Ui Z an open cover. A functor

Proudfoot, Nicholas

78

Fast Temperature-Programmed Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry for Food Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......lard, beef, and mutton tallow and palm oil) were analyzed in order to study linearity...per run. This ben- efit comes at the price of decreased resolution. The calculated...programming in gas chromatography using resistive heating. J. High Resol. Chromatogr. 22(8......

Steven W. Lloyd; Casey C. Grimm

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Large eddy simulation applications in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exhaust plume development. The application...modelling in the gas turbine combustor...modelling strategies for the complex...flows in the gas turbine, as surveyed...of typical gas turbine parts necessitates...made in the development and application...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Gas flux and carbonate occurrence at a shallow seep of thermogenic natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

010-0184-0 ORIGINAL Gas flux and carbonate occurrence atof thermogenic natural gas Franklin S. Kinnaman & Justine B.comprehensive survey of gas flux at Brian Seep yielded a

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Effective mineral exploration programs maximize the ben-efit of appropriate technologies in order to increase cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to help in the exploration process and to test the effectiveness of dif- ferent methods overEffective mineral exploration programs maximize the ben- efit of appropriate technologies in order of discovery. In other words, correct use of available tools can allow exploration programs to find more ore

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

82

Data Flow Fusion with Series Expressions in Haskell Ben Lippmeier Manuel M. T. Chakravarty Gabriele Keller Amos Robinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures; Control structures; Abstract data types Keywords Arrays; Fusion; Haskell 1. Introduction Consider counters that are common to stream fusion (§4). · We show how to use rank-2 quantified rate type variablesData Flow Fusion with Series Expressions in Haskell Ben Lippmeier Manuel M. T. Chakravarty Gabriele

Keller, Gabriele "Gabi"

83

The Rate-and State-Dependence of Sea Ice Friction Ben Lishman, Peter Sammonds, Daniel Feltham, and Alex Wilchinsky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for further work. 2. Experimental programme To produce a quantitative constitutive description of ice frictionPOAC09-66 The Rate- and State- Dependence of Sea Ice Friction Ben Lishman, Peter Sammonds, Daniel Feltham, and Alex Wilchinsky Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, and Centre for Polar Observation

Feltham, Daniel

84

Hybrid Indoor and Outdoor Tracking for Mobile 3D Mixed Reality Wayne Piekarski, Ben Avery, Bruce H. Thomas, Pierre Malbezin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid Indoor and Outdoor Tracking for Mobile 3D Mixed Reality Wayne Piekarski, Ben Avery, Bruce H@tinmith.net, bruce.thomas@unisa.edu.au, pierre@tinmith.net Abstract This paper describes a new hybrid tracking system, in most cases an arrow navigation cue and a hand held World-in-Miniature model are used to provide

Thomas, Bruce

85

Systematic design methodology and construction of UAV helicopters q Guowei Cai, Lin Feng, Ben M. Chen *, Tong H. Lee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic design methodology and construction of UAV helicopters q Guowei Cai, Lin Feng, Ben M 2008 Keywords: UAV helicopters Virtual design environment Anti-vibration Hardware construction a b-scale UAV helicop- ters. The systematic design procedure, which includes hardware component selection

Benmei, Chen

86

CURRENT SOURCING ISOLATED GRID CONNECTED INVERTER Ilya Zeltser, Student Member, IEEE and Sam Ben-Yaakov, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CURRENT SOURCING ISOLATED GRID CONNECTED INVERTER Ilya Zeltser, Student Member, IEEE and Sam Ben proposes a soft switched Output Current Sourcing (OCS) grid connected inverter that applies a high inverters where the small disturbance at the line voltage may lead to current run away and consequently

87

Design Methodology for a SEAREV Wave Energy Marie Ruellan, Hamid BenAhmed, Bernard Multon, Christophe Josset, Aurelien Babarit,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Design Methodology for a SEAREV Wave Energy Converter Marie Ruellan, Hamid BenAhmed, Bernard by presenting two power take-off (PTO) technologies for the SEAREV wave energy converter (WEC) followed technologies in- tended to transform wave energy into electricity. The types of systems are twofold

Boyer, Edmond

88

Simulation of the RPL Routing Protocol for IPv6 Sensor Networks: two cases studies Leila Ben Saad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by our own RPL module. We then focus on the performance comparison of simulated sensor networks and real global lifetime. Keywords-Network Simulation, RPL, PLC, IPv6, Mobile Sinks, Energy Optimization, WSN, 802Simulation of the RPL Routing Protocol for IPv6 Sensor Networks: two cases studies Leila Ben Saad

Boyer, Edmond

89

A Unified Multiple-Level Cache for High Performance Storage Systems Li Ou, Xubin (Ben) He, Martha J. Kosa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Unified Multiple-Level Cache for High Performance Storage Systems Li Ou, Xubin (Ben) He, Martha in high- performance storage systems to improve I/O performance. However, traditional cache management a unified cache (uCache) which uses both ex- clusive caching in L2 storage caches and cooperative client

He, Xubin "Ben"

90

BETTI TABLES OF REDUCIBLE ALGEBRAIC CURVES DAVID J. BRUCE, PIN-HUNG KAO, EVAN D. NASH, BEN PEREZ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BETTI TABLES OF REDUCIBLE ALGEBRAIC CURVES DAVID J. BRUCE, PIN-HUNG KAO, EVAN D. NASH, BEN PEREZ, AND PETER VERMEIRE Abstract. We study the Betti tables of reducible algebraic curves with a focus on connected line arrangements and provide a general formula for computing the quadratic strand of the Betti

Vermeire, Peter

91

A RESONANT INVERTER AS A CONTROLLED REACTANCE Yefim Berkovich1, Gregory Ivensky2, and Sam Ben-Yaakov2*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A RESONANT INVERTER AS A CONTROLLED REACTANCE Yefim Berkovich1, Gregory Ivensky2, and Sam Ben: +972-3-5026643, Email: lili_g@barley.cteh.ac.il 2 Power Electronics Laboratory, Dept. of Electrical-7-6461561, Fax: +972-7-6472949, Email: sby@bguee.ee.bgu.ac.il, Web: http:/www.ee.bgu.ac.il/~pel. Abstract - A new

92

Theoretical prediction of fast 3D AC electro-osmotic pumps Martin Z. Bazant* and Yuxing Ben  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical prediction of fast 3D AC electro-osmotic pumps Martin Z. Bazant* and Yuxing Ben September 2006 DOI: 10.1039/b608092h AC electro-osmotic (ACEO) pumps in microfluidics currently involve. In this paper, we present some new design principles for periodic 3D ACEO pumps, such as the ``fluid conveyor

Bazant, Martin Z.

93

Satellite data for high resolution offshore wind resource mapping: A data fusion approach M.B. Ben Ticha a,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite data for high resolution offshore wind resource mapping: A data fusion approach M.B. Ben accurate high spatial and temporal resolutions wind measurements. Offshore, satellite data are an accurate radar, scatterometer, data fusion, offshore wind energy resource assessment. 1. INTRODUCTION Since

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Full-Length Structures of BenM and Two Variants Reveal Different Oligomerization Schemes for LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulators  

SciTech Connect

BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) from the bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi, responds synergistically to benzoate and cis,cis-muconate. With these effectors, BenM activates gene expression during benzoate consumption. Without effectors, BenM represses transcription. Here, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the full-length structures of BenM and two variants that activate transcription without benzoate or cis,cis-muconate: BenM(R156H) and BenM(E226K). Previous studies indicate that these regulators function as tetramers. Here, interconnections between subunits in the crystals prevented the formation of a closed oligomer and highlighted the inherent flexibility of this multidomain regulator. Nevertheless, analysis of subunit interfaces suggested the functional significance of key interactions. The structures of BenM and its variants were nearly identical, implying that transcriptional differences rely on factors beyond major conformational changes defined solely by sequence. Comparisons of BenM with other LTTRs, including unpublished structures in the Protein Data Bank, revealed extensive variation in the relative orientations of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector-binding domains (EBDs). To form dimers, different LTTRs used similar interfaces between two EBDs, each containing two subdomains: EBD-I and EBD-II. Surprisingly, the dimers used three substantially different schemes to form higher-order oligomers. In one scheme used by BenM, oligomer assembly involved contacts between the EBD-II regions and the DBD regions of adjacent subunits. In another scheme, there were no contacts between the EBDs; only the DBDs were involved in tetramer formation. In the third scheme, the oligomer interface involved DBD and EBD-I/EBD-II contacts. These diverse schemes demonstrate novel variation in the oligomeric structures of individual LTTRs within this large and important family.

Ruangprasert, Ajchareeya; Craven, Sarah H.; Neidle, Ellen L.; Momany, Cory (Georgia)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Natural Gas - Pub - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Natural Gas Markets Workshop International Natural Gas Markets Workshop EIA's Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Biofuels Analysis has scheduled an International Natural Gas Markets Workshop on Thursday, August 23, 2012, in our EIA offices. The workshop will focus on the international natural gas market as it exists today (with an emphasis on the European and Asian markets), and the outlook for the international natural gas market in the future. Confirmed expert speakers include: Jim Jensen, Jensen Associates; Ben Schlesinger, Benjamin Schlesinger and Associates; Thierry Bros, Societe Generale; Rob Smith, Facts Global Energy; Howard Rogers, Oxford Institute of Energy Studies, Edward Chow, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS); Ken Medlock, Rice University; and Frank Graves or Phil Hanser, The Brattle Group.

96

Survey Statisticians  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Statisticians Survey Statisticians The U.S.Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Survey Statistician, who measures the amounts of energy produced and consumed in the United States. Responsibilities: Survey Statisticians perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design energy surveys by writing questions, creating layouts and testing questions for clarity and accuracy. * Conduct energy surveys to include sending out and tracking survey responses, editing and analyzing data submis- sions and communicating with respondents to verify data.

97

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying Specialists Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Citation Directional Surveying Specialists. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/08]. Available from: http://www.digitalsurveying.co.za/services/geophysical-borehole-surveying/overview/optical-televiewer/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_Surveying_Directional_Surveying_Specialists&oldid=690244"

98

U.S. Department of Energy Mr. Ben McRae Office of General Counsel, GC-52  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mr. Ben McRae Mr. Ben McRae Office of General Counsel, GC-52 1000 Independence Ave. S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Price-Anderson Act Dear Mr. McRae; In response to the Federal Register notice date December 31, 1997 requesting public comment on possible revisions to the Price-Anderson Act (PAA), Churchill County, Nevada is submitting these comments. Churchill County is one of ten affected units of local government designated as such by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The Nevada Test Site has become one of the largest low level radioactive waste storage sites in the United States. Significant quantities of wastes from sites across the country are designated for shipment to the Nevada Test Site. In addition, over 70,000 metric tons of high level radioactive waste are bound for Yucca Mountain, Nevada if and when a repository

99

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

100

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

2008 National dry mill corn ethanol survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emerging regulations require an examination of corn ethanols greenhouse gas emissions on a life cycle basis, including emissions from energy consumed at the plant level. However, ... data, we conducted a survey ...

Steffen Mueller

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Lattice Boltzmann implementation of the three-dimensional Ben-Naim potential for water-like fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model accounting for directional interactions between water-like molecules based on the so-called Ben-Naim (BN) potential [A. Ben-Naim Molecular Theory of Water and Aqueous Solutions: Part I: Understanding Water (World Scientific Publishing Company Year: 2010); A. Ben-Naim Statistical mechanics of waterlike particles in two dimensions. I. Physical model and application of the Percus-Yevick equation J. Chem. Phys.54 3682 (Year: 1971)]10.1063/1.1675414. The water-like molecules are represented by rigid tetrahedra with two donors and two acceptors at the corners and interacting with neighboring tetrahedra sitting on the nodes of a regular lattice. The tetrahedra are free to rotate about their centers under the drive of the torque arising from the interparticle potential. The orientations of the water molecules are evolved in time via an overdamped Langevin dynamics for the torque which is solved by means of a quaternion technique. The resulting advection-diffusion-reaction equation for the quaternion components is solved by a LB method acting as a dynamic minimizer for the global energy of the fluid. By adding thermal fluctuations to the torque equation the model is shown to reproduce some microscopic features of real water such as an average number of hydrogen bonds per molecules (HBs) between 3 and 4 in a qualitative agreement with microscopic water models. Albeit slower than a standard LB solver for ordinary fluids the present scheme opens up potentially far-reaching scenarios for multiscale applications based on a coarse-grained representation of the water solvent.

Nasrollah Moradi; Andreas Greiner; Francesco Rao; Sauro Succi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

LBNL-6484E Exploring California PV Home Premiums Ben Hoen, Geoffrey T. Klise, Joshua Graff-Zivin, Mark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

484E 484E Exploring California PV Home Premiums Ben Hoen, Geoffrey T. Klise, Joshua Graff-Zivin, Mark Thayer, Joachim Seel and Ryan Wiser Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2013 Download from: http://emp.lbl.gov/publications/exploring-california-pv-home-premiums This research builds on work published in 2011 entitled "An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California," LBNL- 4476E, which can be downloaded here: http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/lbnl-

104

Natural Gas Storage Report, Weekly EIA-AGA Comparison  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report is intended to aid data users by examining differences between the Energy Information Administration and American Gas Association weekly surveys and comparing the results of the two surveys for the brief period of time in which they overlapped.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

EIA-757 Instructions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

operators may submit their responses via mail to: U.S. Department of Energy Oil & Gas Survey, EIA-757 Ben Franklin Station P.O. Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 COPIES OF...

106

eia-910.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 calendar days following the end of the report period. U. S. Department of Energy Oil & Gas Survey Ben Franklin Station P.O. Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Email: Year: If...

107

How to Submit Forms: Exclusionary List:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RR) Number of States for which you are reporting: Mailing Address: City: Mail to: Oil & Gas Survey U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC...

108

Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the geothermal area. Ultimately for potential development of EGS. Notes A CO2 soil gas flux survey was conducted in areas recognized as geothermal upflow zones...

109

Characterization of Van Well Sweet Cherry Self-Incompatibility (S) Alleles Sequoia Leuba1, Ben Kilian2 and Amit Dhingra2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization of Van Well Sweet Cherry Self-Incompatibility (S) Alleles Sequoia Leuba1, Ben, WA The multi-allelic self-incompatibility (S) locus controls self-incompatibility and incompatibility between cultivars of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) through a gametophytic self-incompatibility system

Collins, Gary S.

110

Ben Ticha M. B., Ranchin T., Wald L., Using several data sources for offshore wind resource assessment, 2005, Copenhagen Offshore Wind conference 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ben Ticha M. B., Ranchin T., Wald L., Using several data sources for offshore wind resource assessment, 2005, Copenhagen Offshore Wind conference 2005 1 Using several data sources for offshore wind of production. Nowadays, the resource is evaluated by interpolation of discrete measurements but offshore

Boyer, Edmond

111

Combustion Instability and Blowout Characteristics of Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Instability and Blowout Combustion Instability and Blowout Characteristics of Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Characteristics of Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustors Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Tim Lieuwen, Ben Zinn Bobby Noble, Qingguo Zhang DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES SCIES Project 03-01-SR111 Project Awarded (07/01/03, 36 Month Duration) Total Contract Value $376,722 . CLEMSON presentation, T.L., B.Z., B.N., Q.Z. Gas Turbine Need Gas Turbine Need * Need: Gas turbines with sufficient flexibility to cleanly and efficiently combust a wide range of fuels, particularly coal-derived gases - Problem: Inherent variability in composition and heating

112

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

114

EIA - Natural Gas Publications & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Publications & Analysis Publications & Analysis Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S. Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot. Natural Gas Monthly U.S. production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices. Natural Gas Annual Provides comprehensive information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the U.S. ... see complete list of Natural Gas Publications Basics All Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports & Pipelines Storage Consumption Natural Gas Survey Forms Natural Gas Section from International Energy Annual Forecasts & Analysis Includes petroleum and natural gas forecasts and analysis for consumption, production, prices, and sales.

115

Oil and gas journal databook, 1987 edition  

SciTech Connect

This book is an annual compendium of surveys and special reports reviewed by experts. The 1987 edition opens with a forward by Gene Kinney, co-publisher of the Oil and Gas Journal and includes the OGJ 400 Report, Crude Oil Assays, Worldwide Petrochemical Survey, the Midyear Forecast and Reviews, the Worldwide Gas Processing Report, the Ethylene Report, Sulfur Survey, the International Refining, Catalyst Compilation, Annual Refining Survey, Worldwide Construction Report, Pipeline Economics Report, Worldwide Production and Refining Report, the Morgan Pipeline Cost Index for Oil and Gas, the Nelson Cost Index, the Hughes Rig Count, the Smith Rig Count, the OGJ Production Report, the API Refinery Report, API Crude and Product Stocks, APU Imports of Crude and Products, and the complete Oil and Gas Journal 1986 Index of articles.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality

117

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Natural Gas Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions. Use the enclosed self-addressed envelope and return the completed form to:

118

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

119

Natural gas monthly, October 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

120

2014 NERSC User Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 NERSC User Survey 2014 NERSC User Survey December 17, 2014 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) Please take a few minutes to fill out NERSC's annual user survey. Your feedback is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Robotic Surveying  

SciTech Connect

ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

STEP Participant Survey Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

126

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

127

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

128

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

129

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

130

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

131

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

132

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

133

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

134

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

135

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

136

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

137

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

138

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

139

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

140

Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation Timothy A. Davis Survey 2. The ATLAS3D CARMA Survey 3. Kinematic Misalignments 4. Origin of the molecular gas The ATLAS3D is to determine how (major and minor) mergers, gas, star formation and feedback affect the transformation

Bureau, Martin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

User_LaunchSurvey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Completing Assigned Survey and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Launching and Completing Assigned Survey Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of launching and completing assigned surveys. Task A. Launch and Complete Assigned Survey From the Home page, filter the To-Do List to show only Surveys. Hover over the course evaluation title. Click Open. 1 2 3 3 2 1 Launch and Complete Assigned Survey 6 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Launching and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 2 - SuccessFactors Learning Complete the survey by selecting the radio button for the appropriate rating

142

Molecular Gas Reservoir in low-z Powerful Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a survey for molecular gas in 3C radio galaxies at redshifts z gas masses in the range 10^7--10^9 Msun. The remainder had typical upper limits in molecular gas masses of ~10^8 Msun.

Jeremy Lim; Stephane Leon; Francoise Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

143

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization surveys Characterization surveys An ORISE technicians performs a characterization survey The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of ensuring a site meets preliminary regulatory standards. ORISE designs characterization surveys using the data quality objectives process. This approach focuses on the particular objective of characterization, and ensures that only the data needed to address the characterization decisions are collected. Data collection efforts are

144

Natural Gas Applications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications What's New Publications Applications Survey Forms Sign Up for Email Updates Contact Experts Applications EIA-176 Query System The EIA-176 Query system is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer.

145

Surveying and Cartography Packages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In attempting to meet the need for the very large number of different calculations that surveyors have to perform, surveying packages become collections of many diverse computation routines. For example, Survey S...

Howard Falk

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

AASG State Geological Survey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

147

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

148

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

149

Surveying the dark side  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......next generation of imaging surveys driven by dark-energy science typically feature...specifications for both the Dark Energy Survey (DES, see Abbott et al...References Abbott T et al. 2005 Dark Energy Survey Collaboration arXiv:astro-ph......

Roberto Trotta; Richard Bower

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Oil and Gas Journal databook, 1986 edition  

SciTech Connect

This annual contains the following: Foreword by Gene Kinney; OGJ 400; Crude Oil Assays; Worldwide Petrochemical Survey; Midyear Forecast and Review; Worldwide Gas Processing Report; Ethylene Report; Sulfur Survey; International Refining; Catalyst Compilation; Pipeline Economics Report; Worldwide Production and Refining Report; Annual Refining Survey; Morgan Pipeline Cost Index, Oil and Gas; Nelson Cost Index; Hughes Rig Count; Smith Rig Count; OGJ Production Report and the API Refinery Reports. Also featured is the Oil and Gas Journal Index, which lists every article published in the Journal in 1985, referenced by article title or subject.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The oil and gas journal databook, 1991 edition  

SciTech Connect

This book provides the statistical year in review plus selected articles that cover significant events of the past year. In addition, the Data Book features the popular surveys and special reports that quantify industry activity throughout the year. This book contains information on Midyear forecast and review; Worldwide gas processing report; Ethylene report; Sulfur survey; International refining survey; Nelson cost index; Smith rig count; API refinery report; API imports of crude and products; The catalyst compilation; Annual refining survey; Worldwide construction report; Pipeline economics report; Worldwide production and refining report; Morgan pipeline cost index for oil and gas; Hughes rig count; OBJ production report.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

153

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

About the MECS About the MECS Survey forms Maps MECS Terminology Archives Features First 2010 Data Press Release 2010 Data Brief Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Residential - RECS Transportation DOE Uses MECS Data Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Associated Analysis Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen MECS 2010 - Release date: September 6, 2013 Natural gas has been an important exception to the trend of rising prices for energy sources used by manufacturers. Production of natural gas in the United States increased rapidly beginning in 2007 as a result of resources found in shale formations. That increase in supply has in turn lowered the price of natural gas to manufacturers as well as other consumers. The 36% decrease in the average natural gas price paid by manufacturers

154

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

155

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

156

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

157

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

158

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

159

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

160

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

162

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

163

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

164

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

165

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

166

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

167

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

168

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

169

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

171

Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

gas rates | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas rates gas rates Home > Groups > Utility Rate Are there Gas Utility Rates available in OpenEI? Submitted by Nlong on 11 July, 2012 - 11:41 1 answer Points: 1 Hi, OpenEI doesn't have NG utility rates as far as I'm aware. That may be a dataset that is added in the future. You can access natural gas prices by utility and sector by downloading the EIA-176 form from the Energy Information Administration. I've included some links to help you find your way. http://205.254.135.7/survey/form/eia_176/efs176.cfm http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/applications/eia176query_historical.html -Sfomail Sfomail on 12 July, 2012 - 12:04 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content There is currently no way to s... ranking of utilities by demand charge?

173

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

174

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

175

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

Cesar Briceno

2003-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

176

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

177

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

178

#953Object Discrimination in the Flying Bat, Eptesicus fuscus Ben Falk1, Tameeka Williams2, Murat Aytekin1,4, Kaushik Ghose1,4, Cynthia Moss1,3,4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#953Object Discrimination in the Flying Bat, Eptesicus fuscus Ben Falk1, Tameeka Williams2, Murat projected disks and mealworms (Griffin 1967) ·Plates with different hole depths (Simmons et al 1974 requires the flying bat to perform a two alternative forced choice discrimination task with two inedible

Moss, Cynthia

179

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

Andreas, Ronald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Heck, G. Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Watts, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

1982-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

Walter, M.Todd

182

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

186

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

187

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

188

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

189

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

190

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

191

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

192

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

193

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

194

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

195

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

196

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

197

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

200

BEN SENAUER Short Biography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marketing, microeconomic theory, and world food problems. He worked in the Economic Research Service for International Food and Agricultural Policy at the University from 1993-1999 and as Co-Director of The Food University. His primary areas of expertise are food policy, food marketing and prices, consumer behavior

Levinson, David M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NASA Customer Satisfaction Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Satisfaction Survey Customer Satisfaction Survey NASA's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) would like to encourage you to participate in the NASA ESDIS 2013 American Customer Satisfaction Survey. The ORNL DAAC is one of twelve data centers sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. The ESDIS project uses the results of this survey to evaluate our success and to determine where improvements are needed. Invitations will be sent to you, our users, from CFI Group [CFI Group on behalf of NASA (NASA@jangomail.com)] during the week of August 20, 2013. Each invitation will reference us as "ORNL DAAC / FLUXNET", and contain a unique secure link to this Web-based anonymous survey. We encourage you to participate!

202

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

National Seafood Consumption Survey: Overview of Survey Methodology & Implementation Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Seafood Consumption Survey: Overview of Survey Methodology & Implementation Strategy Methodology The primary objective of NOAA Fisheries National Seafood Consumption Survey was to gather information about people's purchase and consumption behaviors of various seafood products. These behavioral

204

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

205

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Natural Gas Data Collection and Estimation This presentation to the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association gives an overview of the EIA natural gas data collection system, Oklahoma natural gas statistics, recent changes in monthly natural gas production statistics, and the May 2010 short-term natural gas forecast. The presentation focuses on the EIA-914, the "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report," and recent changes to this survey's estimation methodology. Categories: Production (Released, 6/9/2010, ppt format)

206

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

207

HOMOGENEOUS MODELS IN GENERAL RELATIVITY AND GAS DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOMOGENEOUS MODELS IN GENERAL RELATIVITY AND GAS DYNAMICS O. I. BOGOYAVLENSKII AND S. P. NOVIKOV analytically) in general relativity and gas dynamics. The investigation of these models is carried out begins with a short survey of results on non-trivial models (that is, those that are not integrable

Novikov, Sergei Petrovich

208

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

209

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

210

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

211

Water Surveys Relinquishment Act Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patented Minerals Free Surface Oil & Gas Leases RAL Oil & Gas Leases SPN Oil & Gas Free Surface Oil & Gas Andrews Martin Howard Mitchell Nolan Taylor Gaines Dawson Borden Scurry Fisher Jones Bailey Lamb Hale

Texas at Austin, University of

212

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

213

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report Data Files Methodology and Analysis Form and Instructions Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report with data for September 2013 Released: December 6, 2013 Next Release: January 7, 2014 The two graphs below show total U.S. and Lower 48 natural gas production on one and the individual State production on the other. U.S. and Lower 48 States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data State Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data In September, Lower 48 States production decreased 0.8 percent or 0.58 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). Louisiana had the largest volumetric decrease at 5.3 percent or 0.34 Bcf/d as many surveyed operators reported various maintenance issues and normal well decline. Wyoming also dropped

216

Natural gas monthly, September 1991. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production distribution consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

f8J 0 Hazardous A. ir Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 f8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 1111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

218

Dark Energy Survey  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

219

Dark Energy Survey  

SciTech Connect

Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Operations Improvement Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1981 timeframe. The first 20% of energy savings, versus the 1972 reference, had already been captured or was in progress via conventional energy conservation methods. The site energy surveys identified attractive investments to save a second 20% of energy use...

Guide, J. J.; O'Brien, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates Latest Update: November 25, 2008 This report consists of the following sections: Survey and Survey Processing - a description of the survey and an overview of the program Sampling - a description of the selection process used to identify companies in the survey Estimation - how the regional estimates are prepared from the collected data Computing the 5-year Averages, Maxima, Minima, and Year-Ago Values for the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - the method used to prepare weekly data to compute the 5-year averages, maxima, minima, and year-ago values for the weekly report Derivation of the Weekly Historical Estimates Database - a description of the process used to generate the historical database for the

222

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Incentive for New Construction: 50% up to $250,000 Incentive for Existing Buildings: 50% up to $100,000 Custom Projects including Combined Heat and Power: 50% up to $100,000 Steam Trap Survey or Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Trap Survey and Replacement: 100 units Insulation: $10,000/account Programmable Thermostats: $125

223

Molecular Gas in nearby Early-Type Powerful Classical Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a survey for molecular gas in nearby powerful radio galaxies. Eight of the eighteen radio galaxies observed were detected with molecular masses in the range 10^7--10^9 Msun, similar to the same survey we performed towards 3C radio galaxies. The upper limits of molecular gas in the remainder are typically of 10^8 Msun, indicating that very few radiogalaxies have molecular gas reservoir with more than 10^9 Msun.

Stephane Leon; Jeremy Lim; Francoise Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

224

Benchmarking survey for recycling.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

BASF's Energy Survey Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BASF?s Energy Survey Methodology Thomas R. Theising BASF Corporation operates several dozen manufacturing Sites within NAFTA and periodically conducts Energy Surveys at each Site. Although these manufacturing sites represent a variety.... Brainstorming activities always follow the walk-through time to capture as many findings as possible. A ranking process is then applied to extract those 20% of the ideas worth the bulk of the savings. A methodology of developing quick economics is applied...

Theising, T. R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

228

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology: A Case Study in Reaching Hard, Maryland preece@umbc.edu 2002 © Andrews, Nonnecke and Preece #12;Electronic Survey Methodology Page 2 Conducting Research on the Internet: Electronic survey Design, Development and Implementation Guidelines

Nonnecke, Blair

229

MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN 4.1 Introduction Once a decision rule has been developed, a disposition survey can be designed for the impacted materials and equipment (M costly and time-consuming development of redundant survey designs. The evaluation of existing SOPs

230

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

233

STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

234

Utility FGD survey, Janurary--December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)) [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)) [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989  

SciTech Connect

The FGD survey report is prepared annually by International Technology (IT) Corporation (formerly PEI Associates, Inc.) for the US Department of Energy. The current issue (and preceding issues from 1974 to 1981 and October 1984 to the present) of the utility FGD survey are available only through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). Preceding issues covering January 1982 through September 1984 may be purchased from the Research Reports Center of the Electric Power Research institute (EPRI). The information in this report is generated by a computerized data base system known as the Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS). The design information contained in the FGDIS encompasses the entire emission control system and the power generating unit to which it is applied. Performance data for operational FGD systems include monthly dependability parameters, service time, and descriptions of operational problems and solutions.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) 1998-2010, September 6, 2013. New 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Data Released › Graph showing total U.S. manufacturing energy consumption for all purposes has declined 17 percent from 2002 to 2010. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Data Show Large Reductions in Both Manufacturing Energy Use and the Energy Intensity of Manufacturing Activity between 2002 and 2010, March 19, 2013. First Estimates from 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Released ›

238

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Manufacturing - MECS Transportation About the RECS EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage

239

Saving Money with Air and Gas Leak Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employees o Yearly Basic Plus Safety classes ? Houston Area Safety Council ? Texas City Safety Council ? Tennessee Valley Training Center o Site specific safety classes ? Petro Chemical Energy employees receive site specific training at over 50 plant... ? Ciba Specialty Chemicals ?Celanese Chemicals ? Columbian Chemicals ? Citgo ?ConocoPhillips, Inc. ? Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. ? Dow Chemical Company ?Daikin America ? Exxon Mobil ? EKA ?Frontier Refining Inc ?GEO Specialty Chemicals ?G E...

Woodruff, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

FAQs for Survey Forms 800, 810, and 820  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 810, and 820 0, 810, and 820 Is natural gas feedstock for hydrogen production included when reporting natural gas quantity used as fuel (EIA product Code 105) on the EIA 820? Exclude natural gas feedstock for hydrogen production under Code 105 on EIA 820. Report only the quantity of natural gas consumed as fuel at the refinery. Report natural gas used for hydrogen production under Code 107. On the EIA-810 survey, where is hydrogen reported? Report receipts and inputs of hydrogen as "Hydrogen" (line 091). Quantities reported by refiners on line 091 include hydrogen produced from hydrogen plants located at refineries and hydrogen purchased from third-party suppliers. Reformers also provide hydrogen to refineries, but hydrogen produced from reformers must be excluded from line 091 in order to avoid double counting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure 39 4.9 Water based activities 42 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 44 5.1 Terrestrial survey area.1 Direct radiation survey area 50 6.2 Residential activities 51 6.3 Leisure activities 51 6.4 Commercial 12 2. THE SURVEY 14 2.1 Site activity 14 2.2 Survey objectives 15 2.3 Survey areas 16 2.4 Conduct

242

Office of Survey Development and Statistical Integration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Steve Harvey Steve Harvey April 27, 2011 | Washington, D.C. Tough Choices in U.S. EIA's Data Programs Agenda * Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics * Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics * Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics * Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Statistics * Office of Survey Development and Statistical Integration 2 Presenter name, Presentation location, Presentation date Coal Data Collection Program 3 James Kendell Washington, DC, April 27, 2011 Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal Users EIA-3 Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants EIA-5 Coal Production and Preparation

243

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Management Survey Date: Range Management Survey Date: 12/6/10 DOE Code: 6730.020.0000 Contractor 8067-788 Code: Project Lead: I Anthony Bowler Project Overview We will use a backhoe to get samples for our range management survey. At each site. one or 1. Brief project descnptlon [include anything that two holes will be excavated, and the samples will be taken from 0-1' and 1-2' deep. After could 1mpad the environment] excavating and the samples taken. the remaining soli Will be replaced and tamped back into 2. Legal location place. 3. Duratfon of tile project See attached NPR-3 Maps for preliminary locations : N~ area well 6-A-2\ NVV SW Section 21 . 4. Major equipment to be used f Township 39N, Range 78E) Middle area well 48-1 -Sh (SE SW 34 Township 39N, Range 4 WU-LSIT£5

244

The Dark Energy Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the Dark Energy Survey (DES), a proposed optical-near infrared survey of 5000 sq. deg of the South Galactic Cap to ~24th magnitude in SDSS griz, that would use a new 3 sq. deg CCD camera to be mounted on the Blanco 4-m telescope at Cerro Telolo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The survey data will allow us to measure the dark energy and dark matter densities and the dark energy equation of state through four independent methods: galaxy clusters, weak gravitational lensing tomography, galaxy angular clustering, and supernova distances. These methods are doubly complementary: they constrain different combinations of cosmological model parameters and are subject to different systematic errors. By deriving the four sets of measurements from the same data set with a common analysis framework, we will obtain important cross checks of the systematic errors and thereby make a substantial and robust advance in the precision of dark energy measurements.

The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- ANC Gas Hills Site - 040  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ANC Gas Hills Site (040) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The ANC Gas Hills site is a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title II site located in Gas Hills, Wyoming. UMTRA Title II sites are privately owned and operated sites that were active when the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act was passed in 1978. The majority of the milling conducted at these sites was for private sale, but a portion was sold to the U.S. Government. After the owner completes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license termination, the Department of Energy¿s

247

Literature survey results: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews mild gasification processes with respect to processing conditions and configurations. Special emphasis was placed on processes which could be commercialized within five years. Detailed market information was provided by J.E. Sinor concerning markets and economic considerations of the various processing steps. Processing areas studied include coal cleaning; mild gasification; and upgrading of the char, condensables, and hydrocarbon gases. Pros and cons in the different processing areas as well as ''gaps'' in pertinent data were identified and integrated into a detailed process development program. The report begins with a summary of the market assessment and an evaluation of the co-product. The impacts of feed materials and operating parameters--including coal rank, heating rate, pressure, agglomeration, temperature, and feed gas composition--on the co- products and processes were evaluated through a literature survey. Recommendations were made as to the preferred product specifications and operating parameters for a commercial plant. A literature review of mild gasification processes was conducted and evaluated with regard to product specification and operating parameters. Two candidate processes were chosen and discussed in detail with respect to scale-up feasibility. Recommendations were then made to process development needs to further consideration of the two processes. 129 refs., 33 figs., 16 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Ness, R.O.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Entzminger, J.A.; Jha, M.; Sinor, J.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ambient intelligence: A survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article we survey ambient intelligence (AmI), including its applications, some of the technologies it uses, and its social and ethical implications. The applications include AmI at home, care of the elderly, healthcare, commerce, and business, ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, agents, assisted living, multiagent systems, social and ethical issues

Fariba Sadri

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Geological Survey of Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...forms publication No. 679 of the Catalogue of volumes published by the Canadian Survey. It is addressed to the Hon. Clifford Sifton, M.P., Minister of the Interior, and contains many valuable reports of exploratory and geo-266 SCTENCE. FEBRUARY 16...

H. M. AMI.

1900-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solar Site Survey Toolkit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

251

2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Page 1 of 20 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Department of Energy 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey: Trend Report (2006 and 2008 results have been recalculated to exclude Do Not Know/No Basis to Judge responses) Response Summary Surveys Completed 2010 Governmentwide 263,475 2010 Department of Energy 6,648 2008 Department of Energy 6,093 2006 Department of Energy 7,742 This 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Report provides summary results for your department or agency. The results include Positive, Neutral, and Negative response percentages for each survey item. For each of the

252

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for natural gas › image chart of U.S. Natural Gas Production and Imports projections as described in linked Short-Term Energy Outlook Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Natural gas price volatility and uncertainty › Natural gas historical and implied volatility Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, Market Prices and Uncertainty Report. Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) 1998-2010, September 6, 2013. North America leads the world in production of shale gas

253

FACILITY SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SURVEY & TRANSFER SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview Transfer Activities Checklist Pre-Survey Information Request Survey Report Content Detailed Walkdown Checklist Walkdown Checklist Clipboard Aids S & M Checklist Survey Report Example - Hot Storage Garden Survey Report Example - Tritium System Test Assembly Survey Report Example - Calutron Overview As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning. Requirements and guidance for such transfers are contained in:  DOE Order 430.1B Chg. 2, REAL PROPERTY & ASSET MANAGEMENT  DOE Guide 430.1-5, TRANSITION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE The transfer process is illustrated in the Transfer Process figure. The purpose here is to provide examples of methods and

254

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

257

Survey records largest power generation order level in 20 year history  

SciTech Connect

With the rapid changes that are underway in the electric power generation business around the world, we expect that the diesel and gas turbine industry should anticipate continued strength and growth in the power generation markets for the rest of the 199Os and into the early part of the next century. This 20th year of the survey shows a total output level of 30000 MW for gas turbine generators for the first time. For reciprocating engine generators, this year`s survey shows orders of nearly 5000 units and a total output of almost 10000 MW, which are also record highs for the survey. Turning to the marine auxiliary generating unit survey and the newly separated diesel-electric marine propulsion data, we see an excellent growth pattern as well. This article briefly discusses the results of the survey.

Wadman, B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

2006 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 User Survey Results 6 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 15 | Next » 2006 User Survey Results Table of Contents Survey Results Users are invited to provide overall comments about NERSC: Here are the survey results: Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings All Usefulness Topics Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Survey Results Many thanks to the 256 users who responded to this year's User Survey. This represents a response rate of about 13 percent of the active NERSC users. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's

259

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

260

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

262

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

263

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

264

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

265

Chinese Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Place: China Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Chinese body which is involved in surveys of geothermal sites. References: Chinese Geological Survey1 This...

266

Cosmology with weak lensing surveys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g...Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major...and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

ARM User Survey Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

Roeder, LR

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey - User Needs Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey View current results. We need your help in designing the next “ Energy Consumption Survey” (MECS)! As our valued customer, you are in an important position to tell us what kinds of data are most useful in helping you understand energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector. Below is a short electronic survey with just a few questions. We will stop collecting responses for user feedback on May 17, 2002. This deadline serves to meet our intended release date of April/May 2003 for fielding MECS2002. The MECS is designed to produce estimates of energy consumption and other energy-related activities in manufacturing. The survey also collects information on energy expenditures, average prices, onsite generation of

269

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Profile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Profile Establish Employee Commuting Behavior Baseline for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, once employee commuting survey data are collected and priority worksites have been identified, the survey responses should be analyzed for each major worksite to establish a behavior baseline. Depending on the agency's size and where it places accountability for GHG commuting emissions reduction goals, it may be to most appropriate to have individual programs or operating units assess their own employee commute data. Exceptions should be made when programs share facilities. For example, at a headquarters office building, a single program may take

271

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

273

Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

SciTech Connect

The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 'f>lf,M/9-~ ~of- Project lnfq,gnation Project Title: WhisperGenARelocation from 58-MX-10 ~o 65-S-10 ·~ I Date: 3/16/2010 DOE Code: -#Z'l?. Contractor Code: Project Lead: Everett Walker /41f-t#J ST _,J.tl Project Overview The Environmental Specialist and the Field Coordinator visited location and discussed the plan to remove 1. What are the environmental impacts? the WhisperGen unit, concrete pad, gas supply umbilical, and power conduit from the current location and move to higher visibility area with dry gas supply to supply power to 65-S-1 0. an existing well. There were 2 previous NEPAs # 211 on 5/27/09 and #240 on 10/01/09 2. What is the legal location? 58-MX-10 3. What is the duration of the project? Construction Two days/ Project Duration 6 months

276

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

277

Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans Jordan Wilkerson a,n , Peter Larsen a,b , Galen Barbose b a Management Science and Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States b Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-4000, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States H I G H L I G H T S  Anticipated power plant retirements are split between coal and natural gas.  By 2030, natural gas-fired generation represents 60% of new capacity followed by wind (15%), solar (7%) and hydropower (7%).  Utilities anticipate most new solar capacity to come online before 2020 with significant growth in wind capacity after 2020.  Utilities focus their uncertainty analyses on future demand, fuel prices,

278

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales data on the different fuels are compiled in individual fuel reports. Annual electricity sales data are currently collected on Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report," which is sent to all electric utilities in the United States. Supply data for natural gas are collected on Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas

279

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Project Information Project Title: Survey Centralizer Design Date: 2-10-2010 DOE Code: 6730.020.71091 Contractor Code: 8067-762 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview 1. What are the environmental No environmental impacts. impacts? Run a logging tool through existing wells at : 2. What is the /ega/location? 67-LBT-3, SW SE sec 3, T38N , R78W 86-1 -X-10 , NE SE Sec 10, T38N , R78W 3. What is the duration of the project? 22-2-X-10H , NW NW Sec 10, T38N , R78W 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig, 4 Days etc.)? Stinger truck or crane . The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 350 8 Revised 8/2/10 mjt Attachment 1 Written by Dan Smallwood Production Enhancement Project-5 T-2-34 to T-1-33 MIT all wells in this area to determine which are producing wells. There are 15 wells shut in this area because of no tank or shipping line. According to the old test sheet these wells make 24bbls oil and 120bbls of water. Two of these wells have leaks in the flow lines that will be fixed. One is 33-S-34 which could be run to 34-AX-34, about 400' .6 bbl/pd and the other is 35 shx 34 which could be run to 35-AX-34 which is about 200'.5bbl/pd. 42-AX-34 could be ran to 32-AX-34 and then to 33-SX-34 to 34-AX-34. There are two manifolds at T-2-34, one with 10 wells and the other with 12. None of the flow lines have valves or checks in the lines. I propose we flush, disconnect, and plug all wells that

282

Camp Century survey 1986  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directional surveys of the bore-hole at Camp Century, Greenland were made in 1966, 1967 and 1969. From these surveys a surface velocity of 5.5 m/yr 3 m/yr in the direction 240 was computed. The position of the 60 metre meteorological tower near the bore-hole was measured in 1977 and 1986 with satellite navigation equipment. These measurements show a surface velocity of 3.5 m/yr 0.2 m/yr in the direction 235 2. Measurement of the surface topography in 1986 shows the bore-hole is situated on a local sloping ice divide. A differential magnetometer was used to locate the drill tower. Hand augering verified the location and showed the drill tower was buried 6.5 to 7 m beneath the 1986 snow surface, as expected from the depth-age relation. The casing was not identified. Extension of the casing to the snow surface and resurvey of the borehole will provide urgently needed information on the variation of ice flow with depth.

N.S. Gundestrup; H.B. Clausen; B.L. Hansen; J. Rand

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

284

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

285

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

286

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

287

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

288

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

289

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

290

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

291

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

292

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

293

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

294

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

295

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

296

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

297

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

298

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

299

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

300

A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

Mark Zumberge

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2005 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 User Survey Results 5 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2005 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 201 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The survey results are listed below.

302

2000 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 User Survey Results 0 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2000 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1999 to FY 2000 Changes Consulting and Account Support Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Resources Training User Comments Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. Every year we institute changes based on the survey; the FY 1999 survey resulted in the following changes: We created a long-running queue (12 hours maximum) for jobs using up

303

2002 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 User Survey Results 2 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2002 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years Visualization and Grid Computing Web, NIM, and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 300 users who responded to this year's User Survey -- this represents the highest response level in the five years we have conducted the survey. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. You can see the FY 2002 User Survey text, in which users rated us on a 7-point satisfaction scale. Some areas were also rated on a 3-point

304

Geophysical Surveys and Data Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This model represents the consequence of a brine-saturated sand layer, which is sandwiched between the overlying gas hydrate bearing sediments and underlain by the sediments containing free gas (Fig. 7.37). This ...

Dr. Naresh Kumar Thakur; Dr. Sanjeev Rajput

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Surveys of the Great Pyramid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN an article in NATURE of December 26, 1925, Sir W. M. Flinders Petrie compares unfavourably the recent survey of the ...

F. S. RICHARDS

1926-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013). UF 6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF 6 and enriched...

308

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

309

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

SURVEY LEADERSHIP The Manager's Guide to Survey Feedback & Action Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning Tools from Morehead A Word about Morehead's Workforce Commitment Model Technical Support Section 2 Activities Appendices Appendix 1 ­ Workforce Commitment Domains Summary Appendix 2 ­ Action Plan Form #12SURVEY LEADERSHIP The Manager's Guide to Survey Feedback & Action Planning A guide designed to help

Squire, Larry R.

311

SurveyMan: programming and automatically debugging surveys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surveys can be viewed as programs, complete with logic, control flow, and bugs. Word choice or the order in which questions are asked can unintentionally bias responses. Vague, confusing, or intrusive questions can cause respondents to abandon a survey. ... Keywords: domain specific languages, social science, statistical debugging

Emma Tosch, Emery D. Berger

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

1Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amplitude · Mid-point binning OR · 3D pre-stack Kirchhoff migration · Move reflection energy to correct location · Output to regular grid #12;11Shallow Survey 2005 Plymouth Engineering case studyBerth 204 Port of Southampton cofferdam · Survey for Associated British Ports (ABP) · Buried cofferdam ­ sheet steel

Southampton, University of

313

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Change out down guy on power pole Date: 2-8-10 DOE Code : Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mike Preston Project Overview 1 What are the environmental No impact to the environment impacts? Power pole east of B-1 -33 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 3Hr 4. What major equipment will be used if any (worl< over rig, drilling rig, Backhoe and operator for equ1 pment etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE; If ChiingSurvey alld contact Ut TlrCh.,lcal Assunlnce DepartmenL Impacts If YES, then complete below

314

Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crack the Quadrat* Code! Crack the Quadrat* Code! compass plasnt * What is a Quadrat? It's a one-meter square plot. Plants in the quadrat are identified and counted. Fermilab quadrat specialists can! Attention Citizen Scientists Are you a prairie enthusiast? Learn scientific plant monitoring techniques while enjoying our beautiful prairie. Join a unique science program open to the public, adult groups, families, scouts and more …. Become a prairie quadrat specialist and do real science at Fermilab! In the Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey you will learn how to identify prairie plants, map a prairie plot and track restoration progress along with our experts. Use our Website to contribute data you collect. Come once or come back two or three times to see how the prairie changes. Keep an eye on this prairie for years to come!

315

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: New Drilling Location in Section 29 Date: 12-10-2009 DOE Code: 6730.020.78002 Contractor Code: 8067-371 Project Lead: Mark Duletsky Project Overview The project will involve excavating 3-4 backhoe pits to a depth of about 8 feet to observe soil characteristics 1. What are the environmental impacts? in the vicinity of our planned reserve pit excavation area. 2. What is the legal location? NE 1/4, SE 1/4, Sec. 29. T39N. R78W. Natrona County, Wyoming 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used 1 day if any (work over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? Backhoe The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

316

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Project l nfonnation Project Title: Reclamation ofT-2-14 Date: 11/2412009 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be removing old piping from the treater@ T-2-14. We will also remove the berm and grade and 1. What are the environmental impacts? reclamate location. The duration of this project will be approx. 2 days. Equipment that will be used is as follows backhoe. dumptruck, blade,and a tiller so we can seed with native grasses. 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used if any (woO< over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? The table below Is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

317

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Replace electrical line from well to power pole Date: 3/10/2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mike Preston Project Overview No impact to the environment. 1. What are the environmental impacts? Dig up old electrical line from pumping unit on 61-S-34 to power pole east of well , {approximately 75 feet 2. What is the legal location? from unit) and replace with new line. 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used 1 day if any (work over rig , drilling rig , etc.)? Electrician, ditch witch and operator for equipment The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

318

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Project lnfonnation Project Title: C-EAG. Maintenance I grading of existing roads Date: 8/4/2011 and road drainages (barrow ditches): ex 81.3 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview 1. Brief project description [include C-EA 6. Maintenance I grading of existing roads and road drai nages anything that could impact the (barrow ditches) : ex 81.3 environment] Existing roads defined as per May 2010 Aerial Photos. (Changing out culverts, grading I modifying embankments, etc., that has potential to impact wetlands, requires a NCS.) The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

319

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Restoration of 77 -13-SX-3 Date: 2-8-1 0 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring 77-SX-3 per procedure. 1. What are the environmental impacts? The duration of this project will be 3-4 days. 2. What is the leg al location? 3. What is the duration of the project? The equipment to be used will be Backhoe, welder, tiller dump truck. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig , We will take oil contaminated dirt to the Eastside landfarm and backfill with d ean fill dirt from sec. 20. etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

320

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Project lnfonnation Project Title: e-EA5. Reclamation of well sites Date: 8/4/2011 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview e-EA 5. Reclamation of wellsites : ex 81.3 and ex 86.1 1. Brief project description [include anything that could impact the Small-scale, short-term cleanup actions including excavation and environment] consolidation of contaminated soils, removal of underground piping, removal of rig anchors or T-bars, drainage control , transport and backfilling of clean soil I fill dirt, and reseeding . The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: $100,000 Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Trap Survey: $2500 (+$2500 if complete recommended repairs) ENERGY STAR Programmable Thermostats: 5 units Boiler Reset Controls: 2 unit max Pipe Insulation: 500 ln. ft. Building Insulation: $10,000/account for roof, attic and wall insulation

322

Gas-storage calculations yield accurate cavern, inventory data  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how determining gas-storage cavern size and inventory variance is now possible with calculations based on shut-in cavern surveys. The method is the least expensive of three major methods and is quite accurate when recorded over a period of time.

Mason, R.G. (Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Corp., Houston, TX (US))

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

324

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

325

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

326

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

332

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

333

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

335

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999 Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA tlorenson@usgs.gov Timothy S. Collett U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center Box 25046, MS-939 Denver CO, 80225, USA Robert B. Hunter ASRC Energy Services, 3900 C St., Suite 702 Anchorage, Alaska, 99503 USA ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon gases were collected from well cuttings and core at the MtElbert-01 gas hydrate stratigraphic test well, drilled within the Milne Point field on the Alaska North Slope. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate deposits overlie the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and are

338

OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre´,1,2 C. M. Oliveira,2 J. C. Howk,2 R. Ferlet,1 J gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines toward 19 early-type Galactic stars at an average mag?1 with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance

Howk, Jay Christopher

339

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

340

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

342

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Natural Gas Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

345

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

347

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

348

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Patent Policy to Be Surveyed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Patent Policy to Be Surveyed ... INCREASED interest in scientific research, especially sponsored research, and the wide diversity of practices among educational institutions and research organizations in their methods of dealing with inventions and discoveries growing out of scientific research have prompted the National Research Council to undertake a survey of policies in patent administration by nonprofit research organizations. ...

1947-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

352

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

353

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

354

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

355

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

356

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

357

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

358

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

359

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

360

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

362

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

363

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

364

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

365

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

366

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

367

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

368

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

369

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

370

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

371

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

372

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

373

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

374

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

375

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

376

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

377

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

378

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

BOREAS Survey On-Line  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FF33"> FF33"> BOREAS Survey On-Line To improve the BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On data sets and to meet users' needs, we are conducting a survey. The BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On data sets continue to be important products at the ORNL DAAC. To date we have provided over 8,000 data products from these projects to nearly 1,500 users. We invite you to fill out this survey, identifying any problems you had with the data and documentation or any difficulties you experienced in finding and acquiring the data sets. Information you provide will enable us to address problems that need attention. It will also help us determine which aspects of the BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On information need to be expanded. You can complete the survey at the BOREAS Home Page. After you complete the on-line survey, submit your answers to the ORNL

380

2004 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 User Survey Results 4 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 13 | Next » 2004 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Security and One Time Passwords Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 209 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

1999 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 User Survey Results 9 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 1999 User Survey Results Table of Contents Respondent Summary Overall Satisfaction User Information Visualization Consulting and Account Support Information Technology and Communication Hardware Resources Software Training Comments about NERSC All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1998 to FY 1999 Changes Respondent Summary NERSC would like to thank all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, point us to areas we can improve, and show how we compare to similar facilities. This year 177 users responded to our survey, compared with 138 last year.

382

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 13.0 11.7 10.8 8.0 5.9 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant Report"; Form EIA- 923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; Form EIA-886, "Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles"; state agencies; and EIA estimates based on historical data.

383

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Project Information Project Title: WhisperGen Relocation to 65-S-1 0 j.,.. I~ 6 T -9-?t. / I f I ii?J { Date: 3116/2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Everett Walker r - - Project Overview ~ E £ N c. 5 ,;;g: z II(_ 5/ Z?fo 9 )cl- I'J c. '5 :::JT Z""'O ( ID 1 1 1 tJ 'I)! Jo~ What are the environmental The Environmental Specialist and the Field Coordinator visited location and discussed the o owing activity. 1. The unit will be within 120' radius of65-S10 wellhead location. The WhisperGen unit gas supply and power impacts? line to 65-S-1 0 will be buried. A six foot by six foot concrete pad. moved from the test's previous location, will be placed on the ground as a base for the unit. 2. What is the legal location? 65-S-10

384

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 81 Project lnfonnation Project Title: CBM Gas Separator Date: 2-23-2010 DOE Code: 6720-020-51131 Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mark Duletsky Project Overview None anticipated, uses producing well on pre-existing location. 1. What are the environmental impacts? 48-2-X-28 Location, 447' FSL. 2495 FWL, SE, SW, Sec. 28, T39N, R78W, Natrona County. Wyoming USA 2. Wnat is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 5days 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, Forkfift. winch truck. water truck etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Special ist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NO'TE: H Change of Scope occurs, Proj ect Lead m u st $ubmlt a new NEPA Compllance Suntey and

385

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

386

ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program (New York) ConEd (Gas and Electric) - Small Business Direct Install Program (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Survey: Free Programmable Thermostat: Free Equipment Upgrades Identified in Energy Survey: Con Edison will pay up to 70% of the remaining cost directly to the contractor ConEd is providing free energy surveys to its small business customers. The survey will take 30 to 90 minutes and efficiency opportunities and associated costs will be presented on the spot. If the customer agrees to

387

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

388

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

390

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

391

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Gas Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Authors: T.Collett (USGS), R. Boswell (DOE), K. Rose (DOE), W. Agena (USGS), and R. Baker (DOE) Venue: American Chemical Society Meeting, March 22-26, 2009, Salt Lake City, Utah http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_MEETINGS&node_id=86&use_sec=false&__uuid=614acbfd-ce1c-4a0b-98de-348a14738f4e [external site] Abstract: In 1982, scientists onboard the Research Vessel Glomar Challenger retrieved a meter-long sample of massive gas hydrate off the coast of Guatemala. This sample became the impetus for the first United States national research and development program dedicated to gas hydrates. By the mid 1990s, it was widely accepted that gas hydrates represented a vast storehouse of gas. Recognizing the importance of gas hydrate research and the need for coordinated efforts, Congress and the President of the United States enacted Public Law 106-193, the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. Authorization for this program was extended to 2010 as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Many of the current gas hydrate projects in the United States are conducted within this program, which is administered by the U. S. Department of Energy in collaboration with six other U.S. federal agencies, and conducted in partnership with private industry, academic institutions, and DOE’s National Laboratories. In addition, other U.S. federal agencies conduct significant self-directed gas hydrate research; most notably the gas hydrate resource assessment activities conducted by U.S. Department of Interior agencies (the U.S. Geological Survey and the Minerals Management Service).

393

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

394

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project lnfonnation Project Title: Reclamation of Pits and Boxes Date: Nov. 3, 2010 DOE Code: 6740.010.00000 Contractor Code: 8067-451 Project Lead: Anthony Bowler Project Overview Reclamation of QD.]y the following Pits and Boxes : 1. Brief project description [include 1. B-2-1 0 Skim Box anything that could impact the 2. B-1-14 Skim Box environment 3. Near66-1-STX-14 Pit 2. Legal location 4. T-5-10 Skim Box 3. Duration of the project 5. WDFUpperPit 6. WDFLowerPit 4. Major equipment to be used 7. WDFSkimBox 8. B-1-3 Pit 9. B-1 -3 Skim Box 10. T-2-34 Pit 11 . B-1-10 Pit 12. B-1 -10 Skim Box 13. SE of SG3 & Welding Shop Skim Box 14. 58.Q4-1-SX-3 Skim Box 15. Near Tank 126 Skim Box 16. 77-1-SX-3 NW of Well Pit 17. T-5-3 Pit

395

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ground radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Ground radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii Abstract Rates of ground radon emanation, inthe Puna geothermal area on the lower east riftof Kilauea volcano, were measured by alpha particle sensitive cellulose nitrate films. The survey successfully defined an area of thermal significance associated with the rift structure,and suggests that a thermally driven ground gas convection system exists within, and peripheralto, the rift. This type of survey was found suitable for the basaltic island environment characteristic of Hawaii and is now used in Hawaii as a routine geothermal exploration technique. Author Malcolm E. Cox Published Journal

397

User Survey | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey User Survey Results The ALCF conducts yearly surveys to gain a better understanding of how we can improve the user experience at ALCF. Below are the numeric results of these...

398

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Gas Buggy Site - NM 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Gas Buggy Site - NM 14 Gas Buggy Site - NM 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Project Gas Buggy Site (NM.14 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site Nevada Test Site History Documents Related to Project Gas Buggy Site Fact Sheet Gasbuggy, New Mexico The Gasbuggy Site is located in northwestern New Mexico in Rio Arriba County approximately 55 miles east of the city of Farmington and approximately 12 miles southwest of Dulce, New Mexico, in the Carson National Forest. Floodplains and Wetlands Survey Results for the Gasbuggy and Gnome-Coach Sites, New Mexico, December 1993.

399

Building Energy Codes Survey Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Program Codes Program Building Energy Codes Survey Tool The following surveys are available: No available surveys Please contact ( webmaster@energycode.pnl.gov ) for further assistance. English Albanian Arabic Basque Belarusian Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional; Hong Kong) Chinese (Traditional; Taiwan) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch Dutch Informal English Estonian Finnish French Galician German German informal Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Italian (formal) Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian (Bokmal) Norwegian (Nynorsk) Persian Polish Portuguese Portuguese (Brazilian) Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Spanish Spanish (Mexico) Swedish Thai Turkish Urdu Vietnamese Welsh

400

Telluric Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Telluric Survey Telluric Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Telluric Survey Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 522.2252,222 centUSD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Geophex airborne unmanned survey system  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected.

Won, I.J.; Taylor, D.W.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

403

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

404

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

405

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

406

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

407

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

408

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

409

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

410

"Speak Up" Survey Results - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the survey. The goal is to use the results to continuously improve Hanford's safety culture and work environment. Results for the "Speak Up" Survey An Organizational...

411

Aftertreatment Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey Aftertreatment Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency &...

412

Category:Telluric Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pages in category "Telluric Survey" This category contains only the following page. T Telluric Survey Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:Telluric...

413

Category:Geodetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

only the following page. G Geodetic Survey Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:GeodeticSurvey&oldid794159" Categories: Geothermal Passive Sensors...

414

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Abstract INPUT airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were conducted during 1979 in five...

415

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey > Overview Survey > Overview Overview Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line Highlights on Federal Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the Government. Extensive analysis of the data was not conducted because this report represents the 881 responding buildings (buildings for which interviews were completed) and cannot be used to generalize about Federal buildings in each region. Crosstabulations of the data from the 881 buildings are provided in the Detailed Tables section.

416

2001 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 User Survey Results 1 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2001 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years NERSC Information Management (NIM) System Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to the 237 users who participated in this year's survey; this compares with 134 respondents last year. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well

417

Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

418

Appalachian Studies Student Survey Items  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about Appalachian culture/history Historical Survey Data (Prior to 2006) ACT Appalachian Region Alumni selected Berea College. Major Reason Minor Reason Not a Reason Cost of attendance/affordable price Close

Baltisberger, Jay H.

419

A survey of moving frames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper surveys the new, algorithmic theory of moving frames developed by the author and M. Fels. Applications in geometry, computer vision, classical invariant theory, the calculus of variations, and numerical analysis are indicated.

Peter J. Olver

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

422

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Gas shielding apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

Brandt, D.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of this project is to overcome existing water-related environmental barriers to possible oil shale development in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Data collected from this study will help alleviate problems associated with disposal of produced saline water, which is a by-product of methods used to facilitate conventional hydrocarbon production. Performers Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84114 Collaborators Uinta Basin Petroleum Companies: Questar, Anadarko, Newfield, Enduring Resources, Bill Barrett, Berry Petroleum, EOG Resources, FIML, Wind River Resources, Devon, Rosewood, Flying J, Gasco, Mustang Fuel,

425

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System  

SciTech Connect

Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ik ben geen alwetende huisarts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Door informatie op internet worden patinten slimmer. Dat is precies wat huisarts en twitterdokter Erik Jansen (37) graag ziet. De patint is ... minder afhankelijk maken van de dokter. Erik Jansen was de eerste...

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ben Maples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G.; Maples, B.; Meadows, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.; Elkington, C.; Clayton, J. (2012). Offshore Wind Plant Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster). NREL...

429

Fort Benning Indianhead Townhome Renovations  

SciTech Connect

The NAHB Research Center partnered with production builder Winchester/Camberley Homes to build a DOE Building America New Construction Test House (NCTH). This single family, detached house, located in the mixed-humid climate zone of Silver Spring, MD, was completed in June 2011. The primary goal for this house was to improve energy efficiency by 30% over the Building America B10 benchmark by developing and implementing an optimized energy solutions package design that could be cost effectively and reliably constructed on a production basis using quality management practices. The intent of this report is to outline the features of this house, discuss the implementation of the energy efficient design, and report on short-term testing results. During the interactive design process of this project, numerous iterations of the framing, air sealing, insulation, and space conditioning systems were evaluated for energy performance, cost, and practical implementation. The final design featured numerous advanced framing techniques, high levels of insulation, and the HVAC system entirely within conditioned space. Short-term testing confirmed a very tight thermal envelope and efficient and effective heating and cooling. In addition, relevant heating, cooling, humidity, energy, and wall cavity moisture data will be collected and presented in a future long-term report.

Stephenson, R.; Roberts, S.; Butler, T.; Kim, E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Gas Filter Testing Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas filtration of air in the cleanroom is carried out with HEPA (high- ... filter. The ambient air filters for the cleanroom are relatively fragile and require great care...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

432

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

433

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

434

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

435

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

436

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

437

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",1,"Annual",2013,"6302012" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

438

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

439

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

440

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

442

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

443

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

444

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

445

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

446

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

447

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

448

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

449

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

450

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

451

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2013,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

452

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

453

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

454

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

455

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

456

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

457

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

458

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) Anthony Zammerilli General Engineer Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Robert C. Murray, Thomas Davis, and James...

459

Oil and Gas Outlook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Outlook For Independent Petroleum Association of America November 13, 2014 | Palm Beach, FL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Recent...

460

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ammonia synthesis gas purification  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes the purification of a reformed gas mixture following water gas shift conversion to produce a purified ammonia synthesis gas stream. The improved processing sequence consisting essentially of: (A) Selectively catalytically oxidizing the residual carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to carbon dioxide so as to reduce the carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to less than about 20 ppm, the selective catalytic oxidation being carried out with an excess of air, with the excess oxygen being catalytically reacted with a small amount of hydrogen so that the residual oxygen level is reduced to less than about 3 ppm; (B) removing the bulk of the carbon dioxide content of the gas mixture by liquid absorption; (C) Removing residual amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water by selective adsorption on the fixed beds of a thermal swing adsorption system, a dry, purified ammonia ammonia synthesis gas stream containing less than a total of 10 ppm of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide being recovered from the thermal swing adsorption system; (D) Passing the resulting dry, purified ammonia synthesis gas stream having a low content of methane to an ammonia production operation without intermediate passage of the ammonia synthesis gas stream to a methanation unit or to a cryogenic unit for removal of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide therefrom; whereby the efficiency of the overall purification operation and the effective utilization of hydrogen are enhanced.

Fuderer, A.

1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

462

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312014"...

463

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data collected on Form EIA-914 (Monthly Natural Gas Production Report) for Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Other States...

464

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

465

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

466

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

force majeure declared December 17 at its Totem storage field, Colorado Interstate Gas Pipeline (CIG) reported that it anticipates repair work to be complete around February 12,...

467

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

imbalances. Northern Natural Gas Company declared a force majeure after an unplanned repair issue at the Spearman Compressor Station in Ochiltree County, Texas, on Friday,...

468

String Gas Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

G. L. Alberghi

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

469

Home Safety: Radon Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Interstate Gas Company (CIG) declared force majeure as a result of an unforeseen mechanical outage at the Morton compressor station in Colorado on pipeline segment 118....

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Columbia Gas Transmission, LLC on March 16 began planned maintenance on its pipeline in Green County, Pennsylvania. The maintenance will reduce capacity at an interconnect...

472

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

NETL: Oil & Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources...

475

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

476

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

477

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

478

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

479

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

480

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas survey ben" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

482

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

483

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

484

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

485

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

486

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

487

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

488

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

489

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

490

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

491

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

492

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

493

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

494

Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research  

SciTech Connect

This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (Replacement): $200 Dryer (Replacement): $100 Natural Gas Range/Cooktop (Replacement): $100 Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Tankless Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Provider Alabama Gas Corporation Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment. All equipment

496

Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico May 14, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis USGS technicians Eric Moore and Jenny White deploy instruments at the start of a seismic survey to explore gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico from April to May 2013 | Photo courtesy of USGS USGS technicians Eric Moore and Jenny White deploy instruments at the start of a seismic survey to explore gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico from April to May 2013 | Photo courtesy of USGS Washington, DC - A joint-federal-agency 15-day research expedition in the northern Gulf of Mexico yielded innovative high-resolution seismic data and imagery that will help refine characterizations of large methane

497

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

498

GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 GasTIPS 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 · GasTIPS 5 T he prediction of reservoir parameters such as gas or oil, but is particularly challenging in the case of gas exploration. Current seismic imaging technol- ogy cannot accurately discriminate between economic and non-eco- nomic concentrations of gas. This is primarily because

Rubin, Yoram

499

The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Features The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey Chris Blake and the WiggleZ...redshift surveys The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey at the Anglo-Australian Telescope...5). The aim of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey is to extend this delineation......

Chris Blake; Sarah Brough; Warrick Couch; Karl Glazebrook; Greg Poole; Tamara Davis; Michael Drinkwater; Russell Jurek; Kevin Pimbblet; Matthew Colless; Rob Sharp; Scott Croom; Michael Pracy; David Woods; Barry Madore; Chris Martin; Ted Wyder

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Surveys Background  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Surveys Background The EIA-782 surveys were implemented in 1983 to fulfill the data requirements necessary to meet En- ergy Information Administration (EIA) legislative mandates and user community data needs. The re- quirements include petroleum product price, market distribution, demand (or sales), and product supply data, which are needed for a complete evaluation of petroleum market performance. The EIA-782 series includes the Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Re- port"; Form EIA-782B, "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report"; and Form EIA- 782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption."