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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

2

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

3

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

4

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

5

Supplemental Gas Supplies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 18 0 0 0 18 Colorado...................... 0 344 0 0 a 6,443 6,787 Connecticut ................. 0 48 0 0 0 48 Delaware ..................... 0 1 0 0 0 1 Georgia........................ 0 94 0 0 0 94 Hawaii.......................... 2,761 0 0 0 0 2,761 Illinois .......................... 0 488 3,423 0 0 3,912 Indiana......................... 0 539 0 0 b 2,655 3,194 Iowa............................. 0 301 0 0 0 301 Kentucky...................... 0 45 0 0 0 45 Maine........................... 0 61 0 0 0 61 Maryland...................... 0 882 0 0 0 882 Massachusetts ............ 0 426 0 0 0 426 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 21,848 21,848 Minnesota.................... 0 709 0 0 0 709 Missouri

6

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

7

Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report addresses the potential impact of rotating electrical outages on petroleum product and natural gas supply in California.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

9

,"New York Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas",5,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10...

10

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

11

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply? August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C - A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms. In the article, Is Gas Hydrate Energy Within Reach?, Dr. Ray Boswell, technology manager for the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory methane hydrates program, discusses recent findings and new research approaches that are clarifying gas hydrates energy potential. Driving the current interest in gas hydrate resource appraisal is the focus

12

Gas supplies of interstate/natural gas pipeline companies 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication provides information on the interstate pipeline companies' supply of natural gas during calendar year 1989, for use by the FERC for regulatory purposes. It also provides information to other Government agencies, the natural gas industry, as well as policy makers, analysts, and consumers interested in current levels of interstate supplies of natural gas and trends over recent years. 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

natural gas supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas supply natural gas supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 13, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA natural gas supply prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices - Reference Case (xls, 91.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

14

Optimization Online - Consideration of Gas Supply Contracts with ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 18, 2008 ... ... natural gas (NG) providers, who supply gas for electric energy generators. In order to achieve more regularity for NG providers cash flows, ...

Leonardo A. M. Moraes

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Shale-gas scheduling for natural-gas supply in electric power production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes a novel integration of shale-gas supply in geographical proximity to natural-gas power production. Shale-gas reservoirs hold special properties that make them particularly suited for intermittent shut-in based production schemes. The proposed scheme argues that shale-gas reservoirs can be used to shift storage of gas used for meeting varying demands, from separate underground storage units operated by local distribution companies to the gas producers themselves. Based on this property, we present an economical attractive option for generating companies to increase their use of firm gas–supply contracts to the natural-gas power plants in order to secure a sufficient gas supply. The shale-well scheduling is formulated as profit-maximization model for well operators, in which we seek to include their main operational challenges, while preserving an economic incentive for the operators to adopt the proposed scheme. The resulting large-scale mixed integer linear program is solved by a Lagrangian relaxation scheme, with a receding horizon strategy implemented to handle operational uncertainties. We present the proposed optimization framework by illustrative case studies. The numerical results show a significant economic potential for the shale-well operators, and a viable approach for generating companies to secure a firm gas supply for meeting varying seasonal electricity demands.

Brage Rugstad Knudsen; Curtis H. Whitson; Bjarne Foss

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Restoration islands supplied by gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes how gas turbine based plants (open cycle and combined cycle) can be profitably used in power system restoration for supplying restoration areas. In recent times, in fact, several gas turbine sections entered the power system due to the improved efficiency of gas turbines and to the development of high efficiency combined-cycle plants. These units can be easily improved to provide black-start capability and can therefore largely increase the black-start capacity of the entire system. Restoration islands to be used for minimizing the time to supply critical areas, such as urban and industrial zones, can support the usual restoration paths designed to provide cranking power to large steam units. The paper presents the defining criteria for the procedures to be followed during restoration. An example referred to as an urban area is reported with simulation results. The Italian System Operator recently carried out some tests on an open cycle gas turbine aimed at checking the island operation of the unit. Some results are described.

S. Barsali; D. Poli; A. Praticò; R. Salvati; M. Sforna; R. Zaottini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Restricted Natural Gas Supply Case (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The restricted natural gas supply case provides an analysis of the energy-economic implications of a scenario in which future gas supply is significantly more constrained than assumed in the reference case. Future natural gas supply conditions could be constrained because of problems with the construction and operation of large new energy projects, and because the future rate of technological progress could be significantly lower than the historical rate. Although the restricted natural gas supply case represents a plausible set of constraints on future natural gas supply, it is not intended to represent what is likely to happen in the future.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Documentation of the oil and gas supply module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSK, to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2). OGSM is a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply potential and related issues. Its primary function is to produce forecast of crude oil, natural gas production, and natural gas imports and exports in response to price data received endogenously (within NEMS) from the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) and the Petroleum Market Model (PMM). To accomplish this task, OGSM does not provide production forecasts per se, but rather parameteres for short-term domestic oil and gas production functions and natural gas import functions that reside in PMM and NGTDM.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Middle East fuel supply & gas exports for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle East countries that border on, or are near, the Persian Gulf hold over 65% of the world`s estimated proven crude oil reserves and 32% of the world`s estimated proven natural gas reserves. In fact, approximately 5% of the world`s total proven gas reserves are located in Qatar`s offshore North Field. This large natural gas/condensate field is currently under development to supply three LNG export projects, as well as a sub-sea pipeline proposal to export gas to Pakistan. The Middle East will continue to be a major source of crude oil and oil products to world petroleum markets, including fuel for existing and future base load, intermediate cycling and peaking electric generation plants. In addition, as the Persian Gulf countries turn their attention to exploiting their natural gas resources, the fast-growing need for electricity in the Asia-Pacific and east Africa areas offers a potential market for both pipeline and LNG export opportunities to fuel high efficiency, gas-fired combustion turbine power plants. Mr. Mitchell`s portion of this paper will discuss the background, status and timing of several Middle Eastern gas export projects that have been proposed. These large gas export projects are difficult and costly to develop and finance. Consequently, any IPP developers that are considering gas-fired projects which require Mid-East LNG as a fuel source, should understand the numerous sources and timing to securing project debt, loan terms and conditions, and, restrictions/credit rating issues associated with securing financing for these gas export projects. Mr. Newendorp`s section of the paper will cover the financing aspects of these projects, providing IPP developers with additional considerations in selecting the primary fuel supply for an Asian-Pacific or east African electric generation project.

Mitchell, G.K. [Merrimack Energy Co., LTD, Lowell, MA (United States); Newendorp, T. [Taylor-DeJongh, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Multi-Echelon Supply Chain Design in Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: In this paper, a framework is proposed for integrating of the operational parts of Natural Gas Transmission Systems (NGTSs) through pipelines and better coordination for the flow of natural gas and information in the system. The objective functions of this study are to provide a brief review of literature in natural gas supply chain modeling and to design a multi-echelon Supply Chain for the Natural Gas Transmission Systems (NSTSC). To achieve this, extensive and detailed studies in this field of research have been done. Subsequently, a complete study on the transmission of natural gas through pipelines, as well as the supply chain and its application, has been made in gas industry. Next, based on the operational systems in the natural gas industry, the supply chain levels are developed. These designs are very effective for modeling and optimization of the gas networks. In addition, the developed supply chain helps to reduce the costs of the NGTSs and increase customer satisfaction.

Mehrdad Nikbakht; N. Zulkifli; N. Ismail; S. Sulaiman; Abdolhossein Sadrnia; M. Suleiman

22

Natural Gas Supply Vulnerability in Europe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Demand for natural gas has been increasing steadily the past few years. Most European countries depend heavily on natural gas imports due to insufficient gas… (more)

Gungor, Bekir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

24

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) study. The report, Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Power Technology Assessment, was prepared by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Analysts focused on seven criteria to evaluate the role of natural gas in the U.S. energy supply

25

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Investigating the natural gas supply security: A new perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper assesses the natural gas supply security of 23 importing countries from divergent regions of the world for the period between 2001 and 2013. The indicators used for the study are the volume of imported natural gas, the number of natural gas suppliers, the level of dependency on one country, import dependency, the fragility of supplier countries, and the share of natural gas in primary energy consumption. The method used to establish the supply security index is the PCA (principal component analysis) over the indicators in the model for each country on a yearly basis for the period 2001 to 2013. The dispersed country sample enables the established index to measure the sensitivity of specific natural gas importer countries using a uniform framework. According to the results, the most effective indicators for the measurement of supply security are the number of supplier countries, supplier fragility, and the overall volume of imported gas.

Mehmet Efe Biresselioglu; Tezer Yelkenci; Ibrahim Onur Oz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Short-term supply chain management in upstream natural gas systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas supply chain planning and optimization is important to ensure security and reliability of natural gas supply. However, it is challenging due to the distinctive features of natural gas supply chains. These ...

Selot, Ajay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Chapter 10 - The Transformation of the German Gas Supply Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Natural gas is the second largest energy source in Germany, and its market share will continue to increase. This chapter describes the historical development of the German gas industry, discusses current issues of importance in German gas policy, and outlines the industrial organization and profiles of the major gas utilities. Today, the German gas industry can be divided into two groups: the gas supply industry and the rest of the gas industry. The gas market in Germany has developed on three levels: natural gas production and import, pipeline business and distribution, and end user supply. Germany's energy policy, as a part of economic policy, is oriented to free market principles. The future of the German gas market is very promising. The share of natural gas is growing as a part of primary energy supply, as well as in power generation, substituting coal and oil, and electricity in the heat market. With regard to the effects of liberalization, it can be said that a one-to-one transposition of international experience to the German gas industry will not be possible, due to the different historical, economical, and political factors at work.

Lutz Mez

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future the consumption of natural gas for heat and power generation is emphasized. General results and threeNatural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market

30

Illinois Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15 20 17 1 1 * 1967-2013 Synthetic 0 0 1980-2013 Propane-Air 15 20 17 1 1 * 1980-2013 Refinery Gas 1980-2005 Biomass 0 0 1999-2013 Other 0 0 2005...

31

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 8. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model Regions. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 7). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2010), (Washington, DC, 2010). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural

32

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is increasingly supplemented by supplies from coal gasification, Alaska, unconventional sources, LNG, Canada, and Mexico. At the same time, however, gas demand is characterized by price-induced conservation in all markets, together with continuing gas demand...

Schlesinger, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

New Jersey Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

489 454 457 392 139 255 1967-2013 Synthetic 0 0 0 1980-2013 Propane-Air 0 0 1980-2013 Refinery Gas 1980-2005 Biomass 0 0 1993-2013 Other 489 454 457 392 139 255 1980-2013...

35

California's LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LNG Terminals: The LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies November 28, 2007 © 2005 San Diego Gas and Electric and Southern California Gas Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved What is LNG? LNG is natural gas that has been liquefied, by cooling it to a temperature of -260°F, so it can be shipped across oceans. The gas is then re-vaporized and delivered to customers. 2 Why Do We Need LNG? California Energy Commission * 2007 Integrated Energy Policy Report -North American gas demand to increase at annual rate of 2.1% over next decade -Domestic production expected to remain flat -LNG imports to US expected to increase 14% annually by 2017 3 4 Benefits of LNG * Reduced energy costs for customers * Increased competition between gas suppliers * Improved reliability for customers

36

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global...

37

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2001), (Washington, DC, January 2001). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both

38

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2002), (Washington, DC, January 2002). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both

39

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

40

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Module. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2007), (Washington, DC, 2007). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential July 18, 2012 - 3:52pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy Corp. in Houston, Texas. Proinlosa is a company in the wind turbine manufacturing supply chain that develops tower parts and has benefitted from the Production Tax Credit (PTC). | Photo courtesy of Keri Fulton. Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy Corp. in Houston, Texas. Proinlosa is a company in the wind turbine manufacturing supply chain that develops tower parts and has benefitted from the Production Tax Credit (PTC). | Photo courtesy of Keri Fulton. Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy What does this project do? Builds on President Obama's call for a new era for American energy

42

Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network Diego C. Cafaro1-term planning of the shale gas supply chain is a relevant problem that has not been addressed before Shale gas, supply chain, strategic planning, MINLP, solution algorithm * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

43

Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Shortage in Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply 1. Summary 2. Electricity Reliability Issues in California 3. Petroleum Refineries 4. Constraints Outside the Refinery Gate 5. Petroleum Product Prices and Supply Disruptions 6. Natural Gas 7. End Notes 8. Contacts 1. Summary Industry electric reliability organizations, the California Energy Commission, and the California Independent System Operator, expect California to be subject to rotating electricity outages in the summer of 2001 during the peak afternoon demand hours. These outages are expected to affect almost all sectors of the State's economy, including crude oil and natural gas producers, petroleum refineries, and pipelines. This report addresses the potential impact of rotating electrical

44

AEO2011: Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 14, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA gas oil Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

45

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE OIL AND GAS SUPPLY MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Lower 48 Onshore and Shallow Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Deep Water Offshore Supply Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Alaska Oil and Gas Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Enhanced Oil Recovery Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Foreign Natural Gas Supply Submodule The oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. The driving assumption of the OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the

46

Russia’s Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds the world largest natural gas reserves and it is the world’s largest exporter of natural gas. Energy was one of the driving forces of Russia’s recent economic recovery from the economic collapse of 1990s. These prospects have changed drastically with a global recession and the collapse of oil and gas prices from their peaks of 2008. An additional factor is an ongoing surge in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) capacity and a development of Central Asia’s and the Middle East gas supplies that can compete with Russian gas in its traditional (European) and potential (Asian) markets. To study the long-term prospects for Russian natural gas, we employ the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. While we consider the updated reserve estimates for all world regions, in this paper we focus on the results for Russian natural gas trade. The role of natural gas is explored in the context of several policy assumptions: with no greenhouse gas mitigation policy and scenarios of emissions targets in developed countries. Scenarios where Europe takes on an even more restrictive target of 80

Sergey Paltsev; Sergey Paltsev

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- for a total of 30 million - that will pursue innovations in natural gas storage tanks and fueling stations, helping to harness our abundant supplies of domestic natural gas...

48

Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas Industry Mulan Xiaofeng Wang Submitted to the Tepper School of Business in Partial Fulfillment options in the natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry, including gas pipeline transportation

Sadeh, Norman M.

49

Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

299 Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Abstract The objective of this study was to get more information about the root zone, mainly the gas and ethylene, a gas sampling system was used to get gas samples from the root zone. CO2 gas samples of 20 ml

Lieth, J. Heinrich

50

Assessment of Supply Chain Energy Efficiency Potentials: A U.S. Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a variety of goodsto the supply chain energy and GHG “footprints” of goods andto estimate achievable household GHG footprint reductions

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

Singh, P.; George, R.A.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4836 bytes) oil.gif (4836 bytes) The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(99), (Washington, DC, January 1999). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery and unconventional gas recovery from tight gas formations, gas shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

54

EIA Data: 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Supply Oil and Gas Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011 United States Oil and Gas Supply, part of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. Source EIA Date Released December 16th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA energy gas oil Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Oil and Gas Supply (xls, 32.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

55

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.1. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the Naitonal Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.2. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 9.2. Continued printer-friendly version Table 9.3. Assumed Size and Initial Production year of Major Announced Deepwater Discoveries. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 9.4. Assumed Annual Rates of Technological Progress for Conventional Crude Oil and Natural Gas Sources. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

56

DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation October 1, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An agreement aimed at improving cooperation and collaboration in the areas of oil and natural gas supply, delivery, and climate change mitigation, has been signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC). The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) provides a framework for states and DOE to work more closely on "responsible domestic production of oil and natural gas; carbon capture, transport and geologic storage; and other topics of mutual interest." The document was signed by DOE's Assistant

57

The effect of natural gas supply on US renewable energy and CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas has been promoted as a means of decarbonizing the US power sector, because of superior generator efficiency and lower CO2 emissions per unit of electricity than coal. We model the effect of different gas supplies on the US power sector and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Across a range of climate policies, we find that abundant natural gas decreases use of both coal and renewable energy technologies in the future. Without a climate policy, overall electricity use also increases as the gas supply increases. With reduced deployment of lower-carbon renewable energies and increased electricity consumption, the effect of higher gas supplies on GHG emissions is small: cumulative emissions 2013–55 in our high gas supply scenario are 2% less than in our low gas supply scenario, when there are no new climate policies and a methane leakage rate of 1.5% is assumed. Assuming leakage rates of 0 or 3% does not substantially alter this finding. In our results, only climate policies bring about a significant reduction in future CO2 emissions within the US electricity sector. Our results suggest that without strong limits on GHG emissions or policies that explicitly encourage renewable electricity, abundant natural gas may actually slow the process of decarbonization, primarily by delaying deployment of renewable energy technologies.

Christine Shearer; John Bistline; Mason Inman; Steven J Davis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

59

Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

60

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Oil and Gas Supply Module Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Table 50. Crude Oil Technically Recoverable Resources (Billion barrels) Printer Friendly Version Crude Oil Resource Category As of January 1, 2002 Undiscovered 56.02 Onshore 19.33 Northeast 1.47 Gulf Coast 4.76 Midcontinent 1.12 Southwest 3.25 Rocky Moutain 5.73 West Coast 3.00 Offshore 36.69 Deep (>200 meter W.D.) 35.01 Shallow (0-200 meter W.D.) 1.69 Inferred Reserves 49.14 Onshore 37.78 Northeast 0.79 Gulf Coast 0.80 Midcontinent 3.73 Southwest 14.61 Rocky Mountain 9.91 West Coast 7.94

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Supplying CO2 to photosynthetic algal cultures by diffusion through gas-permeable membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of supplying CO2 to photosynthetic algal cultures by diffusion through a gas-permeable membrane was developed. The diffusion of CO2 across a silicone membrane could be described by Fick's Laws of Diffusi...

Yuan-Kun Lee; Huey-Kwan Hing

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Coke battery with 51-m{sup 3} furnace chambers and lateral supply of mixed gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic approaches employed in the construction of coke battery 11A at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat are outlined. This battery includes 51.0-m{sup 3} furnaces and a dust-free coke-supply system designed by Giprokoks with lateral gas supply; it is heated exclusively by low-calorific mixed gas consisting of blast-furnace gas with added coke-oven gas. The 82 furnaces in the coke battery are divided into two blocks of 41. The gross coke output of the battery (6% moisture content) is 1140000 t/yr.

V.I. Rudyka; N.Y. Chebotarev; O.N. Surenskii; V.V. Derevich [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Staff Listing - Office for Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (Vacant) Natural Gas Regulatory Activities Division John A. Anderson, Director Room 3E-042 Lisa Craig Room 3E-042 Telephone (202)586-9484 FAX (202) 586-6050 Case Management Beverly Howard Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9387 FAX (202) 586-6050 Lisa Tracy Room 3E-052 Telephone (202) 586-4523 FAX (202) 586-6050 Marc Talbert Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-7991 FAX (202) 586-6050 Office of Natural Gas Docket Room Larine Moore Docket Room Manager Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9478 FAX (202) 586-6050 International Activities Division Sally Kornfeld, Director Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-3814

64

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Oil and Gas Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline-quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. The OGSM regions are shown in Figure 12. Figure 12. Oil and Gas Supply Module Regions The driving assumption of OGSM is that domestic oil and gas exploration and development are undertaken if the discounted present value of the recovered resources at least covers the present value of taxes and the cost of capital, exploration, development, and production. In contrast, international gas trade is determined in part by scenario-dependent, noneconomic factors. Crude oil is transported to refineries, which are simulated in the petroleum market module, for conversion and blending into refined petroleum products. The individual submodules of the oil and gas supply module are solved independently, with feedbacks achieved through NEMS solution iterations (Figure 13).

65

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012 (trillion cubic feet) Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 29.5 0.8 0.2 3.3 2.963 0.112 0.620 0.971 0.014 24.1 1.3 2.9 2.8 2.5 2.9 7.2 0.03 9.1 0.003 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and

66

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation.

McElroy, James F. (Hamilton, MA); Chludzinski, Paul J. (Swampscott, MA); Dantowitz, Philip (Peabody, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation. 2 figs.

McElroy, J.F.; Chludzinski, P.J.; Dantowitz, P.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

feet per day 2,100 1,050 210 <100 Shale plays This page intentionally blank. 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 197 Appendix B Metric and Thermal...

69

The Potential of Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines The Potential of Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

70

AEO2011: Lower 48 Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 133, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Production, lower 48 onshore and lower 48 offshore. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural Gas Wellhead prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Lower 48 Natural Gas Production and Wellhead Prices by Supply Region- Reference Case (xls, 59.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

71

Assessment of potential ORNL contributions to supply of molybdenum-99  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most widely used, and probably the most important, single radioisotope in commerce is {sup 99}Mo. Although the present supply is adequate, there are many vulnerabilities in the supply picture. Resources available at ORNL could be applied to help ensure the continued availability of this critically needed radioisotope. This assessment considers the ways in which ORNL might participate in DOE efforts to develop and maintain a domestic source of {sup 99}Mo for medical needs. The primary recommendation presented here is that ORNL obtain DOE support for development of an improved method for providing {sup 99}Mo to the user community. Specifically, development and demonstration of a system based on irradiation of enriched stable {sup 98}Mo, as opposed to fission of {sup 235}U, is recommended. Such a system would (1) alleviate the need for using highly enriched uranium as target material (nonproliferation and criticality safety concerns); (2) alleviate the need to produce a large volume of unwanted fission product wastes (safety and cost concerns); (3) promote the need for enriched {sup 98}Mo, which can be produced in the ORNL calutrons or plasma separation equipment; and (4) promote the need for a high-flux reactor, such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

Ottinger, C.L.; Collins, E.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

U.S. Natural Gas Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Monthly Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gross Withdrawals 2,473 2,541 2,444 2,550 2,540 2,465 1973-2013 Marketed Production 2,086 2,166 2,097 2,188 2,188 2,105 1973-2013 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent 107 110 107 113 117 116 1973-2013 Dry Production 1,979 2,056 1,990 2,076 2,071 1,989 1973-2013 Supplemental Gaseous Fuels 5 5 3 3 5 5 1973-2013 Net Imports 95 92 103 108 106 123 1973-2013 Net Storage Withdrawals -136 -418 -372 -275 -270 -355 1973-2013 Balancing Item 14 12 9 7 6 -5 2001-2013

73

Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuels -- particularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

AEO2011: Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply, Disposition, and Prices Supply, Disposition, and Prices Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 13, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA natural gas supply prices Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices - Reference Case (xls, 91.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

75

Evaluation of supply potential of energy crops in Japan considering cases of improvement of crop productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy crops are not presently major energy resources as energy crops are more expensive than fossil fuels at present. However, energy crops may become important energy resources in the future. In this study, the authors discuss the availability of energy crops in Japan. The supply potential of energy crops produced on unused arable land is estimated at 0.12 EJ yr?1 and that of secondary crops for bioenergy is estimated at 0.12 EJ yr?1 in Japan. However, it is difficult to utilize the supply potential considering the low food-self-sufficiency ratio and the high costs of crops in Japan. In addition, the authors analyze the supply potential of energy crops produced on surplus arable land in Japan in cases of biomass productivity increment. The supply potential of energy crops is formulated into 0.12A (EJ yr?1), where A means the index of productivity increment ( A = 1.0 at present). On the other hand, in the case of every crop productivity increment, the supply potential of energy crops is formulated into 1.44A–1.32 (EJ yr?1). When it is assumed that the ratio is 2.0, the supply potential in the latter case is 1.44 EJ yr?1, which is equivalent to about 7% of the total primary energy supply in Japan. When it is assumed that the ratio is 2.0 in the latter case in the world, the supply potential of energy crops is 435 EJ yr?1, which exceeds the total primary energy supply in the world. It is difficult to improve the productivity of every crop. However, if the improvement is realized, energy crops will become one of the major energy resources in Japan and in the world.

Hiromi Yamamoto; Yukihiko Matsumura; Shigeki Sawayama

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

77

,"U.S. Natural Gas Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance" Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_sndm_s1_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_sndm_s1_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

78

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

79

Simultaneous production and distribution of industrial gas supply-chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we propose a multi-period mixed-integer linear programming model for optimal enterprise-level planning of industrial gas operations. The objective is to minimize the total cost of production and distribution of liquid products by coordinating production decisions at multiple plants and distribution decisions at multiple depots. Production decisions include production modes and rates that determine power consumption. Distribution decisions involve source, destination, quantity, route, and time of each truck delivery. The selection of routes is a critical factor of the distribution cost. The main goal of this contribution is to assess the benefits of optimal coordination of production and distribution. The proposed methodology has been tested on small, medium, and large size examples. The results show that significant benefits can be obtained with higher coordination among plants/depots in order to fulfill a common set of shared customer demands. The application to real industrial size test cases is also discussed.

Pablo A. Marchetti; Vijay Gupta; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Lauren Cook; Pierre-Marie Valton; Tejinder Singh; Tong Li; Jean André

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The economics of oil and gas supply in the Former Soviet Union  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supply costs curves for the Former Soviet Union (FSU) are constructed for conventional petroleum, which is defined as conventional oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids (NGL). The supply figures show how petroleum quantities vary with production costs over time. Five resource quality categories, distinguishable according to production costs, are used in the estimation. The quantities are allocated across the five categories in a fixed proportion in order to generate the supply cost curves. The role of annual productivity gains, i.e., technological progress, to the year 2030 is also included. Results indicate that petroleum in the FSU is abundant and can be produced economically. In addition, production costs are found to decrease further over time as technology advances. With appropriate energy policy, FSU petroleum resources should assist in meeting domestic and international energy demand.

Roberto F. Aguilera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessment of Supply Chain Energy Efficiency Potentials: A U.S. Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to the supply chain energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of a variety of goods and services purchased by U.S. consumers. The framework couples an input-output supply chain modeling approach with"bottom-up" fuel end use models for individual IO sectors. This fuel end use modeling detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the supply chain energy and GHG"footprints" of goods and services. To illustrate the policy-relevance of thisapproach, a case study was conducted to estimate achievable household GHG footprint reductions associated with the adoption of best practice energy-efficient supply chain technologies.

Masanet, Eric; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A comparative analysis of the technical and economic indicators characterizing independent small-capacity power installations for supplying power to trunk gas lines and gas distribution stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results obtained from a feasibility study of different independent sources of energy are presented, using which one can select them on a sound basis for supplying heat and power for trunk gas lines and gas distri...

G. A. Fokin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Potential feedstock supply and costs for biodiesel production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Without considering technology constraints, tallows and waste greases have definite potential as feedstocks for the production of biodiesel in the United States. These materials are less expensive than most oils produced from oilseed crops such as soybeans, sunflowers, canola and rapeseed. At current crude petroleum prices, biodiesel derived from any of these materials will be more expensive than diesel derived from petroleum. However, when compared to other clean burning alternate fuels, recent data suggest biodiesel blends produced from any of these feedstocks may be the lowest total cost alternative fuel in certain areas of the United States. Economic feasibility analyses were performed to investigate the cost of producing biodiesel ($/gallon) subject to variances in feedstock cost, by-product credit (glycerol and meal) and capital costs. Cost of production per gallon of esterified biodiesel from soybean, sunflower, tallow and yellow grease ranged from $0.96 to $3.39 subject to feedstock and chemical costs, by-product credit and system capital cost.

Nelson, R.G. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Howell, S.A. [MARC-IV, Bucyrus, KS (United States); Weber, J.A. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Current and potential U.S. Corn Stover Supplies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues such as corn (Zea mays L.) stover are a potential feedstock for bioenergy and bio-based products that could reduceU.S. dependence on foreign oil. Collection of such residues must take into account concerns that residue removal could increase erosion, reduce crop productivity, and deplete soil carbon and nutrients. This article estimates where and how much corn stover can be collected sustainably in the USA using existing commercial equipment and estimates costs of that collection. Erosion constraints to collection were considered explicitly, and crop productivity and soil nutrient constraints were considered implicitly, by recognizing the value of residues for maintaining soil moisture and including the cost of fertilizer to replace nutrients removed. Possible soil carbon loss was not considered in the analysis. With an annual production of 196 million Mg of corn grain (about9.2 billion bushels), the USA produces 196 million Mg of stover. Under current rotation and tillage practices, about 30% of this stover could be collected for less than $33 per Mg, taking into consideration erosion and soil moisture concerns and nutrient replacement costs. Wind erosion is a major constraint to stover collection. Analysis suggests three regions of the country (central Illinois, northern Iowa/southern Minnesota, and along the Platte River in Nebraska) produce sufficient stover to support large biorefineries with one million Mg per year feedstock demands and that if farmers converted to universal no-till production of corn, then over 100 million Mg of stover could be collected annually without causing erosion to exceed the tolerable soil loss.

Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Nelson, R [Kansas State University; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Sheehan, J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wright, Lynn L [subcontractor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country Mexico Central America References Greenhouse Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials for Buildings[1] Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report represents the first comprehensive description of the factors that determine the present and future impacts of residential and commercial

86

Industrial Potential for Substitution of Electricity for Oil and Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prospect of natural gas decontrol as well as uncertainties of gas and other fuel supplies have aroused interest in electric processes among industrial officials. Where there is ample electric power supply at reasonable cost, an opportunity...

Reynolds, S. D.; Gardner, J. R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Potential for Supply-Following Loads to Enable Deep Renewables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential for Supply-Following Loads to Enable Deep Renewables Potential for Supply-Following Loads to Enable Deep Renewables Penetration in Electricity Grids Speaker(s): Jay Taneja Date: February 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Rich Brown Driven by renewables portfolio standards and other high-level policy directives, renewable electricity generation is being phased in to the electrical grid at an unprecedented rate, and primarily displacing traditional fossil fuel-powered sources. Most electricity generation by renewables is non-dispatchable, meaning that it often fluctuates unpredictably and cannot be scheduled or shifted. This makes matching supply and demand to ensure electrical reliability a fundamentally new challenge as the proportion of renewable sources increases. To overcome

89

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

Johansen, Tor Arne

90

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country South Africa UN Region Southern Africa References South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings[1] South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report aims to provide: a summary quantification of the influence of buildings on climate

91

Assessment of potential wood supply for intermediate scale thermoconversion facilities, Tasks I, II, III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program has been concerned with the potential of wood biomass to contribute to the Nation's energy supply. One of the factors inhibiting the selection of wood biomass for energy by non-forest industries, especially by those requiring large quantities (500 to 2000 green tons per day), is concern with adequate fuel supply in terms of both a supply system and an adequate resource base. With respect to the latter, this report looks at the gross resource base as has been historically reported and also examines factors other than traditional product removals that could reduce to some degree the amount of resource that is available. The study also examined the conversion of a New England utility from coal to wood chips.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Studies on Optimal Gas Supply For a Maskless Etching System with Micro- Discharge Plasma Operated at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimal gas supply method for the micro discharge plasma generated along a quartz glass electrode, which was useful for the maskless fabrication of electrode grooves for surface electrodes on solar cells, w...

Toshiyuki Hamada; Takuya Arimura; Tatsuya Sakoda

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some 100 significant cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some.riviere(cb.ineris.fr guy.marlair@iineris.fr alexis. vignestcbjneris.fr Abstract A biofuel is most often defined as a liquid. There are numerous potential supply chains for the production of biofuels, depending on feedstock, conventional

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:58am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 After identifying petroleum reduction strategies, a Federal agency should estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential and cost effectiveness of these strategies for vehicles and mobile equipment. The table below provides steps for identifying optimal vehicle acquisition strategies. Table 1. Framework for Identifying Optimal Vehicle Acquisition Strategies Step Summary Purpose PLAN and COLLECT 1 Determine vehicle acquisition requirements Establish a structured Vehicle Allocation Matrix (VAM) to determine the numbers and types of vehicles required to accomplish your fleet's mission

95

AbstractThe Kern River Gas Transmission pipeline was con-structed in 1991 to supply natural gas to be used in the thermally  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 Abstract­The Kern River Gas Transmission pipeline was con- structed in 1991 to supply natural plants were found in the 11 seeded plots. The Kern River Gas Transmission pipeline (KRGT) was constructed California. The pipeline route extended from a point near Opal, Wyoming, through Utah and Nevada to Daggett

96

The Cost of Improving Gas Supply Security in the Baltic States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to replace a failed compressor station on a transmission pipeline; 12 most disruptions caused by pipeline failures could be repaired in a week or less. A failure of the Latvian underground storage could potentially disrupt supply to Estonia and Latvia... at In?ukalns. Suppliers must store at least 10 days worth of household consumption beginning 1st September 2008, rising by 10 days each year until a 60 day level is reached (REPUBLIC OF LITHUANIA, 2008). The capacity of the pipeline connection between...

Noel, Pierre; Findlater, Sachi; Chyong, Chi Kong

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221 1 Oil and Natural Gas Market Supply and Renewable Portfolio Standard Impacts of Selected Provisions of H.R. 3221 November 2007 This paper responds to an October 31, 2007, request from Representatives Barton, McCrery, and Young. Their letter, a copy of which is provided as Appendix A, asks the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to assess selected provisions of H.R. 3221, the energy bill adopted by the House of Representatives in early August 2007. EIA was asked to focus on Title VII, dealing with energy on Federal lands; Section 9611, which would establish a Federal renewable portfolio standard (RPS) for certain electricity sellers; and Section 13001, which would eliminate the

98

Reserves and potential supply of low-sulfur Appalachian coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has two objectives. The first is to develop and test a methodology for determining economically mineable reserves of low-sulfur Appalachian coal. The second is to appraise the potential supply response to a very large increase in demand for low-sulfur Appalachian coal. The reserve determination procedure developed in the project applies criteria similar to those employed by mining engineers in assessing the commercial feasibility of mining properties. The procedure is relatively easy to apply, could be used to develop reserve estimates for a large sample of mining blocks for under $500,000, and produces reserve estimates very different from those produced from the criteria that have been used by the United States Bureau of Mines: with the more rigorous method developed in this project surface mineable reserves are much larger and deep mineable reserves are less than with the Bureau of Mines method. The appraisal of potential low-sulfur coal supply response assessed excess capacity, coal mining company outlook on reserves, and coal quality requirements. The appraisal concluded that ample coal meeting most buyers' requirements will probably be available in the near or long term at a price under $45 in 1984 dollars. However, coal quality requirements may prove a constraint for some buyers, and an upward surge in prices would probably occur in the event of legislation imposing requirements leading to greatly increased low-sulfur coal demand. 14 refs., 24 figs., 15 tabs.

Hughes, W.R.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

100

Shale Gas R&D  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas from shales has the potential to significantly increase America’s security of energy supply, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and lower prices for consumers. Although shale gas has been...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For a Federal agency, changes in the demand for business travel can be difficult to predict. Changes in the nature of the agency's work may have a substantial impact on the demand for business travel. It is therefore important to account for these changes when planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction. Conditions that may contribute to a significant increase or decrease in the agency's business travel, beyond specific efforts to reduce business travel demand, include: Significant changes in the agency's budget Addition or completion of major program activities that require

102

Experiments and thermal modeling on hybrid energy supply system of gas engine heat pumps and organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a hybrid energy supply system, which is composed of two subsystems (gas engine-driven heat pump system (GEHP) and organic Rankine cycle system (ORC)) and three major thermodynamic cycles (the vapor compression refrigeration cycle, the internal combustion gas engine cycle and ORC). In order to convert the low-grade gas engine waste heat into high-grade electricity, the ORC system is built up using R245fa, \\{R152a\\} and R123 as working fluids, and the ORC thermal model is also developed. Meanwhile, experiments of \\{GHEPs\\} in cooling mode are conducted, and several factors which influence the cooling performance are also discussed. The results indicate that the cooling capacity, gas engine energy consumption, gas engine waste heat increase with increasing of gas engine speed and decrease with decreasing of evaporator water inlet temperature. The waste heat recovered from gas engine is more than 55% of gas engine energy consumption. F6urthermore, R123 in ORC system yields the highest thermal and exergy efficiency of 11.84% and 54.24%, respectively. Although, thermal and exergy efficiency of \\{R245fa\\} is 11.42% and 52.25% lower than that of R123, its environmental performance exhibits favorable utilization for ORC using gas engine waste heat as low-grade heat source.

Huanwei Liu; Qiushu Zhou; Haibo Zhao; Peifeng Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Emissions Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis Federal agencies should establish planned changes in operations that could have a substantial impact on emissions for each greenhouse gas (GHG) emission source: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Such changes could represent either an additional significant hurdle to overcome or a significant reduction in the effort required to drive emissions down-in the absence of any direct GHG mitigation reduction strategies. This will help each organization establish its "business as usual" emission profile in 2020, the year agencies are expected to meet their Scope 1 and 2 and Scope 3 GHG emission-reduction goals.

104

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies January 22, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis...

105

,"U.S. Natural Gas Annual Supply and Disposition Balance"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Supply and Disposition Balance" Annual Supply and Disposition Balance" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Supply",5,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" ,"Data 2","Disposition",5,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1930" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_sum_snd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_sum_snd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

106

Potential solar thermal integration in Spanish combined cycle gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs) are volumetric machines, which means that their net power output decreases at air temperatures above the design point. Such temperatures generally occur during periods of high solar irradiation. Many countries where these conditions occur, including Spain, have installed a significant number of \\{CCGTs\\} in recent years, with the subsequent yield losses in the summer. This implies enormous potential for solar hybridization, increasing production in peak hours and overall efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions. This paper analyzes the overall potential for solar thermal integration in 51 CCGTS (25,340 MW) in mainland Spain under different operating scenarios based on increasing yield, solar fraction and the hourly operational range adapted to the Spanish electricity market, considering actual meteorological conditions. A production model for integrating solar energy into combined cycles is proposed and described and the code in R is freely released so that the assessment can be replicated.

J. Antonanzas; E. Jimenez; J. Blanco; F. Antonanzas-Torres

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Optimization Models for Optimal Investment, Drilling, and Water Management in Shale Gas Supply Chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides an overview of recent optimization models for shale gas production. We first describe a new mixed-integer optimization model for the design of shale gas infrastructures. It is aimed at optimizing the number of wells to drill, size and location of new gas processing plants, section and length of pipelines for gathering raw gas, delivering dry gas and natural gas liquids, power of gas compressors, and planning of freshwater consumption for well drilling and fracturing. We also describe a detailed operational mixed-integer linear model to optimize life cycle water use for well pads. The objective of the model is to determine the fracturing schedule that minimizes costs for freshwater consumption, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Ignacio E. Grossmann; Diego C. Cafaro; Linlin Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Russia’s Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds ...

Paltsev, Sergey

109

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

110

Modelling the demand and supply of natural gas from Cyprus and Israel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The use of natural gas as a primary energy source has increased over time and is expected to increase even further in the near… (more)

Taliotis, Constantinos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...distribution of gas hydrate (Fig. 4). According...sediment) of methane hydrate is 10-fold greater...unconventional sources of gas, such as coal beds, tight sands, black shales...conventional natural gas. Given these attractive...that natural gas hydrate could serve as...

Keith A. Kvenvolden

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Mitigation policies for energy related greenhouse gas emissions in Cyprus: the potential role of natural gas imports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the possibility of introducing mitigation policies for greenhouse gas emissions in isolated areas with limited availability of alternative energy sources. The Cypriot energy system has been considered as a reference case study and it is concluded that even for an isolated economy with very high rates of growth, enough options are available to reduce significantly greenhouse gas emissions and effectively contribute to sustainable environment. The conclusions of the study are based on analysis done with ENPEP, a hybrid model that employs a market-based simulation approach to project future energy supply/demand balances and the associated air emissions, as well as to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The study also shows that one of the best long-term strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Cyprus is the introduction of natural gas via a submerged gas pipeline to Syria.

S Mirasgedis; Y Sarafidis; E Georgopoulou; D.P Lalas; C Papastavros

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy Efficiency Challenges in Heating Supply System of Turkmenistan and Potential Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of priority 1: CODE: B1a Title: Repair leaks in DH network at pumps, pipelines and valves Type: Technical and Non-technical Characteristic: Development of a preventive and emergency repair plan, organization of equipment and material supply. In addition... in transmission pipes, availability of materials CODE: B2c Title: Insulate valves and related pipeline equipment Type: Technical Characteristic: Simple repair with local material Investments: Simple repair, insulation, sealing with local material...

Zomov, A.; Behnke, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Consideration of Gas Supply Contracts with Take-or-pay Clauses in ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 15, 2008 ... is currently forced to dispatch NG-fueled thermal plants in a ... a better application of NG and a smaller expected operation cost for the whole power ...... This constraint exists to simulate the real necessities of natural gas ...

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Food waste within food supply chains: quantification and potential for change to 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...potential for food waste reduction Interviewees...potential for food waste reduction. In developing...skills and knowledge, storage, transport and distribution...Kader 2005). For long-term sustainability...approaches to food waste reduction include...labelling and food storage also have food waste...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Analysis of the potential impacts of shale gas development.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this thesis is to analyze the considerations regarding the environmental impacts of shale gas development by a rational, objective, fact-based assessment. Flowback… (more)

Yi, Hyukjoong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies should establish planned changes in operations that could have a substantial impact on emissions for each greenhouse gas (GHG) emission source.

118

Sustainable Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain and the Optimal Drilling Strategy for Nonconventional Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We present a long-term MINLP planning model for the development of shale gas fields. A key decision is the drilling/fracturing strategy yielding the freshwater consumption profile, which is critical in waterscarce regions with high cumulative demand for water. Results show that the model can help companies to reduce freshwater consumption by optimally planning drilling operations, at the expense of small reductions in the net present value of the projects.

Diego C. Cafaro; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hybrid gas bearings with controlled supply pressure to eliminate rotor vibrations while crossing system critical speeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbomachinery because of their inherent stability characteristics resulting from no generation of cross- coupled stiffness coefficients [7]. Flexure pivot tilting pad bearings, machined as a single piece using wire EDM (Electrical Discharge Machining) shown... conditions [5]. Gas foil bearings are customarily used in air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and commercial MTM because of their distinct advantages including tolerance to shaft misalignment and centrifugal/thermal growth, and large load capacity...

Ryu, Keun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Project Information Form Project Title Potential to Build Current Natural Gas Infrastructure to Accommodate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Information Form Project Title Potential to Build Current Natural Gas Infrastructure Project Natural gas is often touted as a `bridge' to low carbon fuels in the heavy duty transportation sector, and the number of natural gas-fueled medium and heavy-duty fleets is growing rapidly. Research

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Proposal for the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of UHV residual gas analysers for the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document concerns the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of UHV residual gas analysers for the LHC. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract, without competitive tendering, with PFEIFFER INFICON (DE) for the supply of 30 UHV residual gas analysers for a total amount of 1 050 500 Swiss francs, not subject to revision, and an option for up to eight extra units for an amount not exceeding 280 133 Swiss francs, not subject to revision, bringing the total amount to 1 330 633 Swiss francs, not subject to revision.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Evaluation of the Energy Saving Potential from Flue Gas Pressurization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

details the impact of providing a can be recovered at .1 inch wc. The work of com 500 r----------------------, FLUE GAS TEMPERATURES 200 COUNTER FLOW 100 50 _~,,_ CO-FLOW RECUPERATORS 20 10 SPECIFIC ENERGY, Btu/IbM AIR rl'-h~A:--WORK OF 5... consideration for a convective heat flue gas is entrained, the two are mixed in a exchanger is l600?F for the convective portion of the mixing section, and pressure is then recovered in recuperation equipment. It is significant that for a a diffuser...

Stanton, E. H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D P ) inhowever, primary energy supply per GDP decelerated a declineattention to primary energy supply per GDP, per capita GDP

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No.4 Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario towe projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-relatedcrises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primary energy supply growth has gradually slowed down as energy conservation efforts have been enhanced with interest growing in global

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices T A R A W been proposed as viable bioenergy crops because of their potential to yield harvest- able biomass-senescence harvests are a more effective means than maximizing yield potential. Keywords: bioenergy, feedstocks, GHG

DeLucia, Evan H.

128

The oil and gas potential of the South Caspian Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For 150 years, the oil fountains of Baku have fueled the imaginations of oilmen around the world. The phrase {open_quotes}another Baku{close_quotes} often has been used to describe major new discoveries. The production of oil and gas from onshore Azerbaijan and from the shallower waters of the Caspian Sea offers tantalizing evidence for the hydrocarbon yet to be discovered. Today, the Azeri, Guneshli, and Chirag oil fields, with over four billion barrels of recoverable reserves, have refocused the attention of the petroleum industry on Baku. The rapid subsidence of the South Caspian Basin and accumulation of over 20 kilometers of Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments have resulted in that rare combination of conditions ideal for the generation and entrapment of numerous giant oil and gas accumulations. Working with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data, SOCAR geologists, geophysicists, and geochemists have identified numerous structural and stratigraphic prospects which have yet to be tested by drilling. In the South Caspian Basin, undrilled prospects remain in relatively shallow water, 200-300 meters. As these shallow-water prospects are exhausted, exploration will shift farther offshore into deeper water, 300-1000 meters. The deepwater region of the South Caspian is unquestionably prospective. Exploration and development of oil and gas fields in water depths in excess of 300 meters will require the joint efforts of international companies and the Azerbaijan petroleum enterprises. In the near future, water depth and drilling depth will not be limiting factors in the exploration of the Caspian Sea. Much work remains to be done; and much oil and gas remain to be found.

Jusufzade, K.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessment of district energy supply from Schiller Generating Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the feasibility analysis of retrofitting the Public Service of New Hampshire Schiller Generating Station to supply district heating to potential customers. The project involved analysis of power plant retrofit and comparison of district heating cost to the cost of heat supplied with gas boilers for a housing development in close proximity to the Schiller Station.

Hitchko, M. [Public Service Company of New Hampshire, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Major, W. [Joseph Technology Corporation, Inc., Woodcliff Lake, NJ (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Wind power (sails) Aviationand Policies the use of LNG will result in a small 2 percentbe a much greater potential to use LNG aboard most ships if

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After identifying petroleum reduction strategies, a Federal agency should estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential and cost effectiveness of these strategies for vehicles and mobile equipment. The table below provides steps for identifying optimal vehicle acquisition strategies.

132

Energy Conservation Potential in Natural Gas Fueled Reciprocating Engines - A Preliminary Market Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study was undertaken of the usage rates of both fuel and lubricants in reciprocating engines fueled with natural gas. The study was conducted to determine the potential for energy conservation, if use is made of more fuel efficient natural gas...

Johnson, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The shale gas potential of Tournaisian, Visean, and Namurian black shales in North Germany: baseline parameters in a geological context  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carboniferous black mudrocks with known petroleum potential occur throughout Northern Germany. However, despite numerous boreholes exploring for conventional hydrocarbons, the potential for shale gas resources re...

Dorit I. Kerschke; Hans-Martin Schulz

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Arctic Oil and Natural Gas Potential Philip Budzik U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Oil and Gas Division October, 2009 Introduction The Arctic is defined as the Northern hemisphere region located north of the Arctic Circle, the circle of latitude where sunlight is uniquely present or absent for 24 continuous hours on the summer and winter solstices, respectively. The Arctic Circle spans the globe at 66.56° (66°34') north latitude (Figure 1). 1 The Arctic could hold about 22 percent of the world's undiscovered conventional oil and natural gas resources. The prospects for Arctic oil and natural gas production are discussed taking into consideration the nature of the resources, the cost of developing them, and the

135

Organic geochemistry of Mississippian shales (Bowland Shale Formation) in central Britain: Implications for depositional environment, source rock and gas shale potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Marine Carboniferous shales are proven hydrocarbon source rocks in central Britain. In this contribution the depositional environment and shale gas/liquid potential of the lower Namurian part of the Bowland Shale Formation is studied using 77 thermally immature samples from the Duffield borehole. The Bowland Shale Formation comprises mudstone and turibidite lithofacies reflecting a pronounced sea level controlled cyclicity. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the mudstones lithofacies (including marine bands) and of fine-grained rocks within the turibidite lithofacies varies between 1.3 and 9.1%. Hydrogen index (HI) values imply the presence of kerogen type III-II. According to biomarker ratios and bulk geochemical parameters, marine bands (maximum flooding surfaces, mfs) were deposited in deep water with slightly enhanced, normal, or slightly reduced salinity. Mudstones of the highstand systems tract (HST) were deposited in environments with normal to reduced salinity, whereas photic zone anoxia favoured the preservation of marine organic matter during deposition of the mfs and the HST. The supply of landplant debris increased during the HST. Turbidites and their non-calcareous mudstone equivalents represent lowstand systems tracts deposited in low salinity environments. Terrestrial organic matter dominates in turbiditic sediments, marine organisms prevail in time-equivalent mudstones. Mudstone beneath marine bands represents transgressive systems tracts when normal marine conditions and photic zone anoxia were re-established. The mudstone lithofacies exhibits a very good to excellent potential to generate conventional mixed oil and gas. TOC content of fine-grained rocks in the turbidite lithofacies depends on the amount of detrital minerals supplied from the south. Moreover, their organic matter is gas-prone. High TOC contents and large thicknesses of the mudstone lithofacies show that the Bowland Shale Formation holds a significant shale gas/liquid potential in areas with appropriate maturity. A relatively low average HI and high clay contents may have negative effects on the shale gas potential.

D. Gross; R.F. Sachsenhofer; A. Bechtel; L. Pytlak; B. Rupprecht; E. Wegerer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Improvement of LNG production technology in gas-distribution stations with an increased content of carbon dioxide in supply-line gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility is considered of reducing the weight of absorbent in a carbon dioxide gas cleaning system during liquefied natural gas production in gas-distribution stations (due to use of a pressure drop ... is...

S. P. Gorbachev; S. V. Lyugai

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluation of Type B shipping packages used to transport potentially flammable gas mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using Type B shipping packages to transport radioactive materials within a potentially flammable gas mixture is a bold proposal. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has essentially prohibited such shipments. Furthermore, the NRC requires extensive modeling and/or testing of selective contents (e.g., Transuranic Waste) which are prone to generate hydrogen gas to demonstrate that, in general, a flammable mixture inside the containment vessel will not occur during shipment. Contrary to the NRC position, this paper proposes a rigorous containment vessel evaluation methodology to justify shipment of Type B quantities of radioactive materials in the presence of potentially flammable gas mixtures. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing the methodology as applied to the 9975 package for shipment of plutonium oxide which may generate significant quantities of hydrogen gas.

Hensel, S.J.

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gas-surface scattering with multiple collisions in the physisorption potential well Guoqing Fan and J. R. Manson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-surface scattering with multiple collisions in the physisorption potential well Guoqing Fan The problem of gas-surface collisions is developed in terms of a theoretical formalism that allows calcula gas distributions are considered, a monoenergetic incident beam and an equilibrium gas appropriate

Manson, Joseph R.

139

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal for power generation is expected to remain stable due to its stable supply and economiccoal and L N G combustion within Japan. IEEJ Energy Journal Vol.4, No.4 Key Assumptions Economic

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption of coking coal mainly for steelmaking will dropelectricity and town gas. Coking coal consumption mainly for

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Assessing Reliability In Hydrogen Supply Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquefied natural gas (LNG) at a large, central steamthe established, global LNG infrastructure provided moreenergy supply over the vast LNG network. The global supply

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Lattice QCD at non-zero chemical potential and the resonance gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from lattice calculations on the thermodynamics of QCD at non-zero temperature and baryon chemical potential and discuss the role of resonances for the occurrence of the transition to the quark-gluon plasma in hot and dense matter. Properties of a hadronic resonance gas are compared to lattice results on the equation of state at zero as well as non-zero baryon chemical potential. Furthermore, it is shown that the quark mass dependence of the transition temperature can be understood in terms of lines of constant energy density in a resonance gas.

Frithjof Karsch

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of electronics for the temperature control of cavity windows and helium gas return lines for the superconducting cavities of the LEP200 radio frequency system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of electronics for the temperature control of cavity windows and helium gas return lines for the superconducting cavities of the LEP200 radio frequency system

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

61446 61446 GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN OCEANIC SEDIMENTS George J. Moridis Earth Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 E. Dendy Sloan Center for Hydrate Research and Chemical Engineering Department Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 August 2006 This work was partly supported by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory, under the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Gas Production Potential of Disperse Low-Saturation Hydrate Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and E. Dendy Sloan 2 1 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1166

146

Evaluation of high-level nuclear waste tanks having a potential flammable gas hazard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990 the U.S. Department of Energy declared an unreviewed safety question as a result of the behavior of tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gases that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-101 and the other tanks associated with a potential flammable gas hazard. This paper presents an overview of the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release and covers the results of direct sampling of the tanks to determine the gas composition and the amount of stored gas.

Johnson, G.D.; Barton, W.B.; Hill, R.C.; et al, Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Estakhri and Saylak 1 Potential for Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Texas Through the Use of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estakhri and Saylak 1 Potential for Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Texas Through the Use Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77843-3135 Phone (979) 845-9551 FAX (979&M University College Station, TX 77843-3136 Phone (979) 845-9962 FAX (979) 845-0278 d-saylak@tamu.edu #12

148

Gas potential of new Albany shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to update and evaluate publicly available data relating to present and potential gas production from New Albany Shale in the Illinois basin was conducted cooperatively by the Indiana. Illinois, and Kentucky geological surveys (Illinois Basin Consortium), and was partially funded by the Gas Research Institute. Deliverables included a plate of stratigraphic cross sections and six basin-wide maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The New Albany Shale is an organic-rich brownish black shale present throughout the Illinois basin. Gas potential of the New Albany Shale may be great because it contains an estimated 86 tcf of natural gas and has produced modest volumes since 1858 from more than 60 fields, mostly in the southeastern part of the basin. Reservoir beds include organic-rich shales of the Grassy Creek (Shale), Clegg Creek, and Blocher (Shale) members. Limited geologic and carbon isotope data indicate that the gas is indigenous and thermogenic. T[sub max] data suggest that the gas generation begins at R[sub o] values of 0.53% and may begin at R[sub 0] values as low as 0.41% in some beds. New Albany Shale reservoirs contain both free gas in open-pore space and gas adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. Natural fracturing is essential for effective reservoir permeability. Fractures are most common near structures such as faults, flexures, and buried carbonate banks. Based on limited data, fractures and joints have preferred orientations of 45-225[degrees] and 135-315[degrees]. Commercial production requires well stimulation to connect the well bore with the natural fracture system and to prop open pressure-sensitive near-borehole fractures. Current stimulations employ hydraulic fracture treatments using nitrogen and foam, with sand as a propping agent.

Comer, J.B.; Hasenmueller, N.R. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Frankie, W.T. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Infrastructure investments and resource adequacy in the restructured US natural gas market : is supply security at risk?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this paper is to analyze the development of US natural gas infrastructure over the last two decades and to discuss its perspectives. In particular, we focus on the relationship between the regulatory ...

Hirschhausen, Christian von

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nationwide, Regional, and Statewide Energy Supply Chain Optimization for Natural Gas to Liquid Transportation Fuel (GTL) Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When data on the well-specific production are available, the figures are grouped on the basis of the county of the wells. ... The states that have major natural gas productions are Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. ... State of California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources ...

Josephine A. Elia; Richard C. Baliban; Christodoulos A. Floudas

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ventilation) Introducing net zero energy buildings IncreasedPotential for Achieving Net Zero-Energy Buildings in the

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Geologic setting and natural gas potential of Niobrara formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chalk units in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) have potential for generation and accumulation of shallow, biogenic gas in the central and eastern Williston basin. Similar to area of Niobrara gas production in the eastern Denver basin, Niobrara chalks in South and North Dakota were deposited on carbonate ramps sloping westward off the stable eastern platform of the Western Interior seaway. Within the Williston basin, the Niobrara of the western Dakotas, eastern North Dakota, and central South Dakota has different stratigraphic relationships. These three areas can be further subdivided and ranked into six areas that have different exploration potential. The south margin of the Williston basin in central South Dakota is the most attractive exploration area. Niobrara chalk reservoirs, source rocks, and structural traps in the southern Williston basin are similar to those in the eastern Denver basin. Chalk porosities are probably adequate for gas production, although porosity is controlled by burial depth. Organic carbon content of the chalk is high and shows of biogenic gas are reported. Large, low-relief structural features, which could serve as traps, are present.

Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

MDCT Anatomic Assessment of Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Origin Related to Potential Supply to Hepatocellular Carcinoma and its Embolization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To prospectively assess the anatomic variation of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) origin with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans in relation to the technical and angiographic findings during transcatheter arterial embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. Two hundred patients with hepatocellular carcinomas were examined with 16-section CT during the arterial phase. The anatomy of the inferior phrenic arteries was recorded, with particular reference to their origin. All patients with subcapsular HCC located at segments VII and VIII underwent arteriography of the RIPA with subsequent embolization if neoplastic supply was detected. Results. The RIPA origin was detected in all cases (sensitivity 100%), while the left inferior phrenic artery origin was detected in 187 cases (sensitivity 93.5%). RIPAs originated from the aorta (49%), celiac trunk (41%), right renal artery (5.5%), left gastric artery (4%), and proper hepatic artery (0.5%), with 13 types of combinations with the left IPA. Twenty-nine patients showed subcapsular HCCs in segments VII and VIII and all but one underwent RIPA selective angiography, followed by embolization in 7 cases. Conclusion. MDCT assesses well the anatomy of RIPAs, which is fundamental for planning subsequent cannulation and embolization of extrahepatic RIPA supply to HCC.

Basile, Antonio [Ospedale Ferrarotto, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)], E-mail: antodoc@yahoo.com; Tsetis, Dimitrios [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Radiology (Greece); Montineri, Arturo [Ospedale Ferrarotto, Department of Infectious Diseases (Italy); Puleo, Stefano [Ospedale Vittorio Emanuele, Department of General Surgery (Italy); Massa Saluzzo, Cesare [Policlinico S. Matteo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Runza, Giuseppe; Coppolino, Francesco [University Hospital Paolo Giaccone, Department of Radiology (Italy); Ettorre, Giovanni Carlo [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Italy); Patti, Maria Teresa [Ospedale Ferrarotto, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Stellar Gas Flows Into A Dark Cluster Potential At The Galactic Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evidence for the presence of a concentration of dark matter at the Galactic center is now very compelling. There is no question that the stellar and gas kinematics within 0.01 pc is dominated by under-luminous matter in the form of either a massive black hole, a highly condensed distribution of stellar remnants, or a more exotic source of gravity. The unique, compact radio source Sgr A* appears to be coincident with the center of this region, but its size (less than 3x10^14 cm at lambda=1.35cm) is still significantly smaller than the current limiting volume enclosing this mass. Sgr A* may be the black hole, if the dark matter distribution is point-like. If not, we are left with a puzzle regarding its nature, and a question of why this source should be so unique and lie only at the Galactic center. Here, we examine an alternative to the black hole paradigm---that the gravitating matter is a condensed cluster of stellar remnants---and study the properties of the Galactic center wind flowing through this region. Some of this gas is trapped in the cluster potential, and we study in detail whether this hot, magnetized gas is in the proper physical state to produce Sgr A*'s spectrum. We find that at least for the Galactic center environment, the temperature of the trapped gas never attains the value required for significant GHz emission. In addition, continuum (mostly bremsstrahlung) emission at higher frequencies is below the current measurements and upper limits for this source. We conclude that the cluster potential is too shallow for the trapped Galactic center wind to account for Sgr A*'s spectrum, which instead appears to be produced only within an environment that has a steep-gradient potential like that generated by a black hole.

Fulvio Melia; Robert Coker

1998-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

157

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Potential of Wastewater-Treating Anaerobic Granules for Biomethanation of Synthesis Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This includes the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction for increasing the H2/CO ratio followed by nickel-catalyzed methanation of CO and CO2 into methane and water (reactions of Fischer?Tropsch (nCO + (2n+1)H2 ? CnH(2n+2) + nH2O) and Sabatier (CO2 + 4H2 ? CH4 + 2H2O)). ... Such higher specific conversion potential may have allowed for a higher volumetric conversion potential as well, which may have resulted in a faster depletion of the dissolved CO, and in turn improved the gas?liquid mass transfer rate. ... Results are reported of mixed-culture studies employing the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum for converting CO to CO2 and H2 by the water gas shift reaction and 2 methanogens, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanosarcina barkeri, for converting CO2 and H2 to CH4. Results are presented for triculture operation in 2 types of reactors, the packed bubble column and the trickle-bed reactor. ...

Serge R. Guiot; Ruxandra Cimpoia; Gaël Carayon

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

The influence of attached bubbles on potential drop and current distribution at gas-evolving electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical study is presented of the effects of bubbles attached to the surface of a gas-evolving electrode, with emphasis on their influence on the local current distribution and on the potential drop at the electrode. The mathematical model accounts for the combined influence of (i) ohmic obstruction within the electrolyte, (ii) area masking on the electrode surface, which raises surface overpotential by increasing the effective current density, and (iii) decreased local supersaturation, which lowers the concentration overpotential. The electrolytic transport is described by potential theory, and the dissolved gas is assumed to obey steady-state diffusion within a concentration boundary layer. The coupled field equations are solved numerically using the boundary-element method. The model is applied to hydrogen evolution in potassium-hydroxide solution. For gas evolution in the Tafel kinetic regime, the current distribution is nearly uniform over the unmasked electrode area, and the increase in surface overpotential is the dominant voltage effect. However, outside the Tafel regime (e.g. on cathodes of greater catalytic activity) the current density is strongly enhanced near the bubble-contact zone, and the supersaturation-lowering effect is quite strong, largely offsetting the ohmic and surface-overpotential effects. Proceeding from a set of base conditions, the authors perform a systematic examination of attached-bubble effects, their relative importance, and their dependence on system variables.

Dukovic, J.; Tobias, C.W.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Elephant found in Monkman Pass - British Columbia gas play has world class potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the exploration activity of BP Canada in the Monkman Pass area of Canada along with the historical activity that has led to this major natural gas discovery. Estimated reserves in this area, from two producing zones, exceeds six trillion cubic feet. Fewer than 5 percent of fields in North America have that type of potential. The main producing horizons were itentified and the Pardonet and Baldonnel formations which are comprised mainly of dolomites with some interbedded sandstones. Primary porosity in these formations is quite low, but extensive fracture systems in the crestal and forelimb areas of the structures enhance the reservoirs. The paper also discusses the cost and economics of extracting and shipping this natural gas to market and remaining competitive.

Shirley, K.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Early Trends in Landcover Change and Forest Fragmentation Due to Shale-Gas Development in Pennsylvania: A Potential Outcome for the Northcentral Appalachians  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Worldwide shale-gas development has the potential to cause substantial ... , we examine land cover change due to shale-gas exploration, with emphasis on forest fragmentation. Pennsylvania’s shale-gas development ...

P. J. Drohan; M. Brittingham; J. Bishop; K. Yoder

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 393 - - - - 330 -111 -46 4 562 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 406 0 2 15 -333 - - 0 20 9 61 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 58 0 - - - -33 - - 0 6 9 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 348 - - 2 15 -299 - -

167

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,197 - - - - 1,186 - -47 -4 2,340 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 14 4 - - - -60 83 20 43 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 32 0 - - - - - - -1 26 2 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 14 4 - - - -59

168

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 24 - - - - 854 -10 42 -28 935 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 42 0 27 67 119 - - -30 26 1 259 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7 0 - - - - - - 0 - 0 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 35 - - 27 67 119 - - -30 26

169

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 511 - - - - 289 -169 -49 4 579 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 316 0 13 11 -264 - - 2 16 15 44 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 0 - - 0 -38 - - 0 6 13 -7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

170

Critical Temperature of an Interacting Bose Gas in a Generic Power-Law Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the critical temperature of an interacting Bose gas confined in a trap described by a generic isotropic power-law potential. We compare the results with respect to the non-interacting case. In particular, we derive an analytical formula for the shift of the critical temperature holding to first order in the scattering length. We show that this shift scales as $N^{n\\over 3(n+2)}$, where $N$ is the number of Bosons and $n$ is the exponent of the power-law potential. Moreover, the sign of the shift critically depends on the power-law exponent $n$. Finally, we find that the shift of the critical temperature due to finite-size effects vanishes as $N^{-{2n\\over 3(n+2)}}$.

Luca Salasnich

2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Computational and experimental test of self starting regimes for the in-house needs of the PGU-450 steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Power Plant during supply disruptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major stages of a computational test of the self starting regimes for the in-house needs of unit No. 1 of the 450 MW steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Electric Power Plant during supply ...

S. N. Sakharov; V. A. Kuz’michev

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Analysis of Changes in Landfill Gas Output and the Economic Potential for Development of a Landfill Gas Control Prototype.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The relationship between changes in local atmospheric conditions and the performance of the landfill gas collection system installed at the Rockingham County (NC) municipal solid… (more)

Harrill, David Justin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. World crude and natural gas reserves rebound in 2000. Oilto the conventional gas reserve of 0.15x10 15 m 3 methane (

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil… (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The microscopic meaning of grand potential: cluster properties of the one-dimensional lattice gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate, with a concrete example, how the combinatorial approach to a general system of particles, which was introduced in detail in the earlier paper arXiv:1205.4986, works and where it enters to provide a genuine extension of results obtainable by more traditional methods of statistical mechanics. To this end, an effort is made to study cluster properties of the one-dimensional lattice gas with nearest neighbor interactions. Three cases: the infinite temperature limit, the range of finite temperatures, and the zero temperature limit are discussed separately, yielding some new results and providing alternative proofs of known results. In particular, the closed-form expression for the grand partition function in the zero temperature limit is obtained, which results in the non-analytic behavior of the grand potential, in accordance with the Yang-Lee theory.

Agata Fronczak

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

177

Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant, and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.

DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States). Department of Soil Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Surface free-carrier screening effect on the output of a ZnO nanowire nanogenerator and its potential as a self-powered active gas sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential as a self-powered active gas sensor This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please on the output of a ZnO nanowire nanogenerator and its potential as a self-powered active gas sensor Xinyu Xue1 as a power source, but also as a response signal to the gas, demonstrating a possible approach as a self-powered

Wang, Zhong L.

179

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2005 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting and review time passes from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, the EIA is able to produce more accurate petroleum supply data. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents

180

Strong-coupling ansatz for the one-dimensional Fermi gas in a harmonic potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The one-dimensional (1D) Fermi gas with repulsive short-range interactions provides an important model of strong correlations and is often amenable to exact methods. However, in the presence of confinement, no exact solution is known for an arbitrary number of strongly interacting fermions. Here, we propose a novel ansatz for generating the lowest-energy wavefunctions of the repulsive 1D Fermi gas in a harmonic potential near the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) limit of infinite interactions. We specialize to the case of a single impurity interacting with $N$ majority particles, where we may derive analytic forms of the approximate wavefunctions. Comparing with exact numerics, we show that the overlap between the wavefunctions from our ansatz and the exact ones in the ground-state manifold exceeds 0.9997 for $N\\leq8$. Moreover, the overlap for the ground-state wavefunction extrapolates to 0.9999 as $N\\to\\infty$. Thus our ansatz is essentially indistinguishable from numerically exact results in both the few- and many-body limits. In the large $N$ limit, we find that the impurity probability density in the ground state is only slightly perturbed by the infinitely repulsive interactions, while the quasiparticle residue vanishes as the many-body limit is approached, reflecting the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. We derive an effective Heisenberg spin-chain model for the regime near the TG limit, within which our ansatz is exact. Here, we find that the impurity eigenstates in the spin basis correspond to discrete Chebyshev polynomials. The energy of states in excited manifolds is calculated using a dynamical SO(2,1) symmetry, which provides an exact relation between states related by a scaling transformation. We finally show how our results for the wavefunctions and the energy spectrum can be detected in cold atomic gases via collective-mode, tunneling, and radio-frequency experiments.

Jesper Levinsen; Pietro Massignan; Georg M. Bruun; Meera M. Parish

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquefied natural gas (LNG) trading expected to increase insteam reformation production facility using imported LNG.The LNG supplies come primarily from Trinidad and Tobago,

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Assessing reliability in energy supply systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquefied natural gas (LNG) trading expected to increase insteam reformation production facility using imported LNG.The LNG supplies come primarily from Trinidad and Tobago,

McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Potential impacts of federal regulation of greenhouse gas emissions on Wyoming's energy-derived tax revenue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the change in quantity by a firms ability to respond (supply elasticity), as opposed to the more robust factor demand response. The EDM model is incorporated into an isee systems STELLA policy model through including elasticities as converters...

Milton Geiger; Roger Coupal; Donald McLeod

184

Shale Gas Formations and Their Potential for Carbon Storage: Opportunities and Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale gas resources are proving to be globally abundant...2...(carbon dioxide) to mitigate the climate impacts of global carbon emissions from power and industrial sectors. This paper reviews global shale gas res...

Roozbeh Khosrokhavar; Steve Griffiths; Karl-Heinz Wolf

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Sources in Aviation, Imperial College London. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

187

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

188

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

189

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than...

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oil and gas potential of the maritime boundary region in the central Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed study in the first half of 1981 of the oil and gas resource potential in the Maritime Boundary region of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Maritime Boundary region encompasses a part of the Gulf where jurisdiction over natural resources by adjacent coastal countries has not yet been established. The region of investigation is divided into six assessment areas on the basis of their generally distinct geologic characteristics. Individual assessment areas comprise a total area of approximately 58,940 mi/sup 2/ (152,660 km/sup 2/) and contain a total estimated sediment volume of 188,140 mi/sup 3/ (784,170 km/sup 3/). Water depths within the overall study region range from a minimum of 98 ft (30 m) on the continental shelf off the Rio Grande to a maximum of about 12,270 ft (3,740 m) in the deep abyssal plain of the westcentral Gulf; more than 75% of the study region is in water depth exceeding 10,000 ft (3,048 m).

Foote, R.Q.; Martin, R.G.; Powers, R.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effectiveness and potential environmental impacts of biocides and corrosion inhibitors in the natural gas industry. Topical report, December 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness and potential environmental impacts of chemical products used in natural gas industry (NGI) operations. The assessment was focused primarily on biocides and corrosion inhibitors used in storage and transmission applications of the NGI.

Morris, E.A.; Pope, D.H.; Fillo, J.P.; Brandon, D.M.; Fetsko, M.E.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 366,285 - - - - 501,418 159,175 -109,633 -12,929 918,349 11,825 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 122,918 -4,579 37,556 21,926 4,444 - - 15,132 24,244 34,819 108,070 58,830 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

193

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 September 2013 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 1,188,751 - - - - 1,015,091 -112,708 94,064 20,399 2,158,191 6,608 0 882,207 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 440,766 -88 123,986 10,625 46,383 - - 16,960 76,972 72,880 454,860 114,138 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

194

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,003,948 - - - - 2,123,490 65,265 6,899 4,157,486 28,318 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 686,936 -4,909 195,516 47,812 - - 36,219 127,051 118,364 643,721 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 92,842 -4,909 - - 10,243 - -

195

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.PDF 1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 36,593 - - - - 31,429 - 4,534 890 71,666 - 0 55,877 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,154 -11 1,013 192 - - - -786 2,587 629 918 3,544 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,013 -11 - - - - - - -35 842 110 85 36 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

196

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE7.PDF TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 109,919 - - - - 142,073 -20,272 -3,481 6,003 222,236 - 0 858,776 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 43,678 -17 9,648 1,838 7,546 - - -2,299 8,340 4,663 51,989 65,215 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 4,840 -17 - - 1,688 -3,010 - -

197

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 32 - - - - 843 -1 230 8 1,061 35 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 71 0 45 40 77 - - 1 16 10 205 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 12 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 2 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

198

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 5,877 - - - - 8,716 83 -218 14,841 53 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,351 -20 372 252 - - -417 566 206 2,600 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 296 -20 - - 78 - - 37 172 71 75 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,055 - - 372 174 - - -454 394 135 2,525

199

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 300,668 - - - - 297,837 - 31,342 -3,713 633,292 267 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 17,739 -73 18,288 1,401 - - - 3,536 17,170 3,791 12,858 8,270 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7,914

200

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 751 - - - - 26,471 -300 1,308 -869 28,999 100 0 9,902 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,313 -7 839 2,091 3,702 - - -929 816 33 8,018 7,618 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 225 -7 - - - - - - 3 - 11 204 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 8,672 - - - - 230,125 -359 62,824 2,069 289,586 9,606 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 19,329 -83 12,151 10,808 21,118 - - 168 4,287 2,821 56,047 6,541 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

202

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. TABLE1.PDF 1. TABLE1.PDF Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

203

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF 2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,180 - - - - 1,014 - 146 29 2,312 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 33 6 - - - -25 83 20 30 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 33 0 - - - - - - -1 27 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 33 6 - - - -24 56 17 27 Ethane/Ethylene

204

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

205

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 182,188 - - - - 270,188 2,576 -6,767 460,074 1,646 0 1,026,829 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 72,869 -607 11,545 7,801 - - -12,921 17,534 6,391 80,604 128,709 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 9,170 -607 - - 2,421 - - 1,146 5,321 2,200 2,317 17,598 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

206

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,175 - - - - 10,226 -3,426 -1,436 132 17,407 1 0 15,969 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,584 -10 52 460 -10,314 - - -12 611 282 1,891 1,375 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,788 -10 - - - -1,036 - - -15 174 273 310 180 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

207

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 3,327 - - - - 4,646 -720 39 -191 7,482 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,380 -1 304 84 227 - - -113 306 108 1,693 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 155 -1 - - 77 -58 - - 35 106 1 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

208

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,019 - - - - 52,699 26,041 2,973 12 109,175 1,544 0 93,189 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 14,079 -560 812 2,541 -423 - - -6,605 4,051 2,114 16,889 48,197 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,354 -560 - - 21 2,843 - - 110 1,049

209

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,354 - - - - 3,718 -413 345 75 7,905 24 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,615 0 454 39 170 - - 62 282 267 1,666 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 195 0 - - 36 -65 - - 15 113 4 35 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

210

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE9.PDF TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,961 - - - - 10,783 -3,879 896 2,868 17,893 0 0 18,695 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,770 -9 127 502 -11,116 - - -50 621 280 1,423 1,326 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,484 -9 - - - -1,152 - - 7 122 264 -70 187 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

211

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 734 - - - - 26,368 419 -1,209 627 25,554 130 0 10,529 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,314 -6 923 1,606 2,621 - - -1,556 707 53 7,254 6,409 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 213 -6 - - - - - - 3 5 6 193 34 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

212

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE5.PDF TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,902 - - - - 53,695 23,732 5,619 2,406 108,247 2,295 0 95,547 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 13,989 -544 1,333 2,797 949 - - -6,644 3,628 2,687 18,853 41,545 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,274 -544 - - 11 4,162 - - 233 966

213

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 7,340 - - - - 7,778 239 25 15,229 104 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,516 -18 716 175 - - 133 465 434 2,358 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 340 -18 - - 38 - - 20 168 134 38 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,176 - - 716

214

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 139,573 - - - - 79,019 -46,108 -13,333 1,073 158,068 10 0 19,287 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 86,184 -86 3,535 3,052 -71,945 - - 423 4,378 4,054 11,885 1,893 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

215

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 30 September 2013 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,101 - - - - 1,091 - 115 -14 2,320 1 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 65 0 67 5 - - - 13 63 14 47 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 29 0 - - - - - - 1 21 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

216

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 6,133 - - - - 8,527 205 413 14,374 78 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,384 -19 421 224 - - -366 512 268 2,595 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 285 -19 - - 55 - - -26 160 89 98 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,099 - - 421 169 - - -340 353 179 2,497 Ethane/Ethylene

217

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewables, including hydroelectric. For this analysis, itin 2010 and 33% in 2020. Hydroelectric generation follows aGas Cogeneration Hydroelectric New Renewables Existing

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Supplementary Paper SP 3.1: Russia’s Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds the world largest natural gas reserves and it is the world’s largest exporter of natural gas. Energy was one of the driving forces of Russia’s recent economic recovery from the economic collapse of 1990s. The country enjoyed more that 5 percent annual real economic growth for the period of 2000-2008. The robust growth with ever increasing energy prices had contributed to a sense of a long-term economic stability in Russia. These

Sergey Paltsev

220

Natural gas potential of the New Albany shale group (Devonian-Mississippian) in southeastern Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany shale group indicate that a 19-country area of southeastern Illinois is a favorable area to explore for gas in Devonian shale. Although gas shows in the shales have been encountered in several wells drilled in this area, no attempts were made to complete or evaluate a shale gas well until 1979. It is found that conventional rotary drilling with mud base drilling fluids likely causes extensive formation damage and may account for the paucity of gas shows and completion attempts in the Devonian shales; therefore, commercial production of shale gas in Illinois probably will require novel drilling completion techniques not commonly used by local operators. 16 refs.

Cluff, R.M.; Dickerson, D.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Quantification of potential macroseismic effects of the induced seismicity that might result from hydraulic fracturing for shale gas exploitation in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...both the gas turbine and associated steam turbine drive an alternator...generation by wind turbines and CCGT plant...low-carbon energy strategy for the foreseeable...production of shale gas offers the potential...of shale gas development, the interested...

Rob Westaway; Paul L. Younger

222

Integrated Reservoir Characterization and Simulation Studies in Stripper Oil and Gas Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The demand for oil and gas is increasing yearly, whereas proven oil and gas reserves are being depleted. The potential of stripper oil and gas fields to supplement the national energy supply is large. In 2006, stripper wells accounted for 15% and 8...

Wang, Jianwei

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Deep, water-free gas potential is upside to New Albany shale play  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of the Illinois basin contains major accumulations of Devonian shale gas, comparable both to the Antrim shale of the Michigan basin and the Ohio shale of the Appalachian basin. The size of the resource originally assessed at 61 tcf has recently been increased to between 323 tcf and 528 tcf. According to the 1995 US Geological Survey appraisal, New Albany shale gas represents 52% of the undiscovered oil and gas reserves of the Illinois basin, with another 45% attributed to coalbed methane. New Albany shale gas has been developed episodically for over 140 years, resulting in production from some 40 fields in western Kentucky, 20 fields in southern Indiana, and at least 1 field in southern Illinois. The paper describes two different plays identified by a GRI study and prospective areas.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Hamilton-Smith LLC, Lexington, KY (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

A comparative analysis of Shale Gas Extraction Policy : potential lessons for South Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Since its arrival onto the U.S. energy scene in the early 2000s, shale gas has had a significant impact on the global energy… (more)

Roberts, Judith Ashleigh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bound gas in marine sediments: how much is really out there?methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy & Fuels 2005: 19:Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources in North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(USGS) has assessed the amount of unconventional gas resources in North America, and its estimates are used by other government agencies as the basis for their resource estimates. While the USGS employs a probabilistic methodology, it is apparent from...

Salazar Vanegas, Jesus

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaluation of Lower Cambrian Shale in Northern Guizhou Province, South China: Implications for Shale Gas Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The overall minerals are similar to those present in the Ohio and Woodford/Barnett shales (west Texas), which have successfully produced commercial shale gas. ... Adsorption of gases in multimolecular layers ...

Shuangbiao Han; Jinchuan Zhang; Yuxi Li; Brian Horsfield; Xuan Tang; Wenli Jiang; Qian Chen

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Midstream Infrastructure Improvements Key to Realizing Full Potential of Domestic Natural Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas provides numerous benefits to millions of Americans daily, whether it’s being used to heat or air condition homes and businesses, cook meals, or power vehicles. But most people who take advantage of this versatile and important energy resource probably don’t think about the intricate and vital system that exists to bring natural gas from where it is produced to the marketplace where it can be used.

229

Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Exploring the Potential Business Case for Synergies Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas and renewable energy each contribute to economic growth, energy independence, and carbon mitigation, sometimes independently and sometimes collectively. Often, natural gas and renewables are considered competitors in markets, such as those for bulk electricity. This paper attempts to address the question, 'Given near- and long-term needs for abundant, cleaner energy sources and decarbonization, how can more compelling business models be created so that these two domestic forms of energy work in greater concert?' This paper explores revenue opportunities that emerge from systems-level perspectives in 'bulk energy' (large-scale electricity and natural gas production, transmission, and trade) and four 'distribution edge' subsectors: industrial, residential, commercial, and transportation end uses.

Cochran, J.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.; Arent, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

234

Africa: Unrest and restrictive terms limit abundant potential. [Oil and gas exploration and development in Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the drilling and exploration activity of the oil and gas industries of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Cameroon, Gabon, the Congo, Angola, and South Africa. Information is provided on current and predicted trends in well drilling activities (both onshore and offshore), numbers of new wells, footage information, production statistics and what fields accounted for this production, and planned new exploration activities. The paper also describes the current status of government policies and political problems affecting the oil and gas industry.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Propulsion Alternative Fuels and Power Notes MarineMarine diesel oil (MDO), Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Wind power (sails) Aviation Airframe Design and PropulsionMarine Transportation (Based on Authors’ Calculations Using Multiple Sources, see Text and Table 4) Operations Aircraft/Ship and Propulsion

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Significant changes in agency size and operations can impact future energy demand and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at an agency, program, and worksite level. It is recommended that agencies estimate the impact of the following types of changes may have on energy demand.

239

Natural Gas Plays in the Marcellus Shale: Challenges and Potential Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic surveys have been used to produce 3-D images of the subsurface (Figure 2) including images of very productive natural shale gas reservoirs. ... Recently, about 12 ML (3 million gal) of treated AMD was obtained from the Blue Valley Fish Culture Station and used in a Marcellus completion hydrofracture process (29). ...

David M. Kargbo; Ron G. Wilhelm; David J. Campbell

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For a Federal agency, changes in the demand for business travel can be difficult to predict. Changes in the nature of the agency's work may have a substantial impact on the demand for business travel. It is therefore important to account for these changes when planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 2012 January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 65,081 - - 13,044 5,236 - - -10,530 10,937 5,559 77,395 101,248 Ethane/Ethylene

242

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,374,021 - - - - 3,120,755 53,567 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918

243

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limits potential use of waste heat for space conditioning.the attractive uses for waste heat in many circumstancesprovide electricity and use the waste heat for cleaning, the

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nonempirical calculations on potential surfaces for gas-phase SN2 nucleophilic substitution reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method has been derived for the analytic description of potential surfaces in natural reaction coordinates as a preliminary stage in researching the dynamics of SN2-type reactions X?+CH3Y?CH3X+Y?; a potential s...

V. M. Ryaboi

245

The Potential Field in and around a Gas Discharge, and Its Influence on the Discharge Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the first part of the paper, results on the spatial extension of cathode and anode fall regions in carbon arcs are reported. Potential-probe measurements reveal that the potential drop in front of either electrode is confined to less than one tenth of a millimeter. In the second part of the paper, the distortion of the potential field in and around any discharge, as caused by the non-uniform space charge distribution in the discharge, is discussed for the cases of a low current carbon arc and a negative point corona; for the latter case use was made of data by Loeb. The potential field distortions result in radial electric fields which, depending on their polarity, seem to hinder or support the radial expansion of the discharge. Potential-probe measurements in low and high current carbon arcs are in good agreement with this theoretical analysis and prove the transitional region between the distorted potential field in the arc and the undistorted potential field outside of the discharge to be a fairly thin one.

W. Finkelnburg and S. M. Segal

1951-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

247

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and nearby states, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, can now provide petroleum companies and related service providers with the geologic, geographic, and engineering data needed to tap into these resources.

248

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Potential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

254

Long Term World Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: The following pages summarize a recent EIA presentation on estimates of the world conventional oil resource base and the year when production from it will peak and then begin to decline. A version of this presentation was given by former EIA Administrator Jay Hakes to the April 18, 2000 meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in New Orleans, Louisiana. Specific information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long (gary.long@eia.doe.gov) or David Morehouse (david.morehouse@eia.doe.gov). Long Term World Oil Supply http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld001.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:23 PM] Slide 2 of 20 http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld002.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:24 PM]

255

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2006 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that just as there was an improvement in gas mileage over time, there was an improvement in petroleum supply data accuracy with increasing review time. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents have the shortest reporting time, analysts have the shortest review time, and the data are least accurate. For the PSM data, respondents have a longer reporting time than the weekly, analysts have

256

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Collective ferromagnetism in two-component Fermi-degenerate gas trapped in a finite potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spin asymmetry of ground states is studied in trapped spin-degenerate (two-component) gases of fermionic atoms with repulsive interaction between different components; and, for a large particle number, the asymmetric (collective ferromagnetic) states are shown to be stable because it can be energetically favorable to increase the Fermi energy of one component rather than increase the interaction energy between up-down components. We formulate the Thomas-Fermi equations and give algebraic methods to solve them. From the Thomas-Fermi solutions, we find three kinds of ground states in the finite system: (1) paramagnetic (spin-symmetric), (2) ferromagnetic (equilibrium), and (3) ferromagnetic (nonequilibrium) states. We present the density profiles and the critical atom numbers for these states obtained analytically, and, in ferromagnetic states, the spin asymmetries are shown to occur in the central region of the trapped gas, and increase with increasing particle number. Based on the obtained results, we discuss the experimental conditions and current difficulties in realizing the ferromagnetic states of the trapped atom gas, which should be overcome.

T. Sogo and H. Yabu

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Analysing sand-dominated channel systems for potential gas-hydrate-reservoirs using an AVO seismic inversion technique on the Southern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrates have recently been recognised as a class of unconventional petroleum resource and the economic viability of gas production from hydrates is now being viewed as a realistic possibility within the next decade. Therefore, potential offshore hydrate accumulations in the world-class endowed gas hydrate province, the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand, represent a significant medium- to long-term opportunity to meet the country's future energy requirements. In this paper we delineate a potential gas hydrate reservoir in the East Coast Basin, New Zealand and quantitatively estimate its gas hydrate concentrations from 2D seismic data with no well information available. The target is interesting for exploration since it shows evidence for gas-hydrate bearing sands, in particular, buried channel systems. We use a combined analysis of high-resolution velocity analysis, amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute and AVO inversion to investigate whether we can identify regions that are likely to contain highly concentrated gas hydrates and whether they are likely to be sand-dominated. To estimate hydrate concentrations we apply a rock physics model. Our results indicate the presence of several – up to 200 m thick – zones that are likely to host gas hydrates, with one location predicted to consist of high-permeable channel sands and an inferred gas hydrate saturation of ?25%. These findings suggest significant amounts of gas hydrates may be present in high-quality reservoirs on this part of the margin.

M. Fohrmann; I.A. Pecher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The 3He Supply Problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission reduction potentials in sugar production processes in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sugarcane is one of the most promising sources of green energy for a major sugar producing country like Thailand. Any efforts to improve energy efficiency in sugar industry would result for green energy production and more avoided GHG emissions. This paper assesses the potentials for energy saving and GHG emission reduction in sugar production in Thailand. It is found that there is a wide gap between the most efficient mills and the less efficient ones among the country’s 47 mills, with specific steam consumption ranging from 400 to 646 kg steam/ton cane. Thus significant potential exists for energy saving and GHG emission reduction in many mills, using some of the 17 commonly common technologies/measures identified. For the nine mills studied, which could have resulted in a combined saving savings of 23–32% of the total mill energy consumption, further savings of 5–14% could be achieved.

Sumate Sathitbun-anan; Bundit Fungtammasan; Mirko Barz; Boonrod Sajjakulnukit; Suthum Pathumsawad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Double Counting in Supply Chain Carbon Footprinting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon footprinting is a tool for firms to determine the total greenhouse gas GHG emissions associated with their supply chain or with a unit of final product or service. Carbon footprinting typically aims to identify where best to invest in emission ... Keywords: carbon footprint, emissions allocation, supply chain, sustainable operations

Felipe Caro; Charles J. Corbett; Tarkan Tan; Rob Zuidwijk

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research Research Oil & Gas Research Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the ultra-deepwater and unconventional fuels program. Read more DOE Signs MOU with Alaska New accord to help develop Alaska's potentially vast and important unconventional energy resources. Read more Methane Hydrate R&D DOE is conducting groundbreaking research to unlock the energy potential of gas hydrates. Read more LNG Safety Research Report This Report to Congress summarizes the progress of DOE's LNG safety research Read more FE's Office of Oil & Natural Gas supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas. Resource/Safety R&D Hydraulic Fracturing & Shale Gas Research. Natural gas from shales has the

263

Gas Storage Potential of Li-decorated ExBox4+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The newly developed compound ExBox4+ is explored to check whether it is a proficient hydrogen storage material. Both exoherdal and endohedral hydrogen adsorption on ExBox4+ are studied. Endohedral hydrogen molecules interact strongly than exohedral ones. The hydrogen adsorption energy is as good as the recently studied charged fullerenes. The hydrogen storage capacity appears to be ~4.3 wt%. The endohedral CO sorption is also analysed with the help of DFT. The first principle DFT calculation and MD simulation are performed to investigate the effect of lithium doping on the gas adsorbing capacity and adsorption enthalpy as well as adsorption energy of ExBox4+.The metal atom interaction with ExBox4+is found to be pretty strong, and the interaction energy appears to be higher than the metal cohesive energy.The thermodynamic parameters suggest that metal doping method is spontaneous in nature. The analysis of adsorption energy, thermodynamic properties and MD simulation results suggest that Li doped ExBox4+ can b...

Das, Ranjita

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documented Example of Gas Hydrate Saturated Sand in the Gulfthe behavior of gas hydrate bearing sand reservoirs can beof highly-saturated gas-hydrate bearing sand in the Gulf of

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the conventional gas reserve of 1.5x10 14 m 3 ofconventional oil and gas reserves, the assessment of theconventional fossil fuel reserves, gas hydrates are emerging

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modified Bosonic Gas Trapped in a Generic 3-dim Power Law Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the consequences caused by an anomalous single-particle dispersion relation suggested in several quantum-gravity models, upon the thermodynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a generic 3-dimensional power-law potential. We prove that the condensation temperature is shifted as a consequence of such deformation and show that this fact could be used to provide bounds on the deformation parameters. Additionally, we show that the shift in the condensation temperature, described as a non-trivial function of the number of particles and the trap parameters, could be used as a criterion to analyze the effects caused by a deformed dispersion relation in weakly interacting systems and also in finite size systems.

E. Castellanos; C. Laemmerzahl

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ideal-Modified Bosonic Gas Trapped in an Arbitrary Three Dimensional Power-Law Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the effects caused by an anomalous single-particle dispersion relation suggested in several quantum-gravity models, upon the thermodynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a generic 3-dimensional power-law potential. We prove that the shift in the condensation temperature, caused by a deformed dispersion relation, described as a non-trivial function of the number of particles and the shape associated to the corresponding trap, could provide bounds for the parameters associated to such deformation. Additionally, we calculate the fluctuations in the number of particles as a criterium of thermodynamic stability for these systems. We show that the apparent instability caused by the anomalous fluctuations in the thermodynamic limit can be suppressed considering the lowest energy associated to the system in question.

E. Castellanos; C. Laemmerzahl

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. natural gas composition is expected to be more variable in the future. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Unconventional gas supplies, like coal-bed methane, are also expected to grow. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from existing domestic natural gas supplies. To allow the greatest use of gas supplies, end-use equipment should be able to accommodate the widest possible gas composition. For this reason, the effect of gas composition on combustion behavior is of interest. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 589K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx emissions. These results vary from data reported in the literature for some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

D. Straub; D. Ferguson; K. Casleton; G. Richards

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Piceance Basin of Colorado for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented gas/produced water separation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Piceance Basin through literature surveys. Jack McIntyre`s tool separates produced water from gas and disposes of the water downhole into aquifers unused because of poor water quality, uneconomic lifting costs or poor aquifer deliverability. The beneficial aspects of this technology are two fold. The process increases the potential for recovering previously uneconomic gas resources by reducing produced water lifting, treatment and disposal costs. Of greater importance is the advantage of lessening the environmental impact of produced water by downhole disposal. Results from the survey indicate that research in the Piceance Basin includes studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, conventional and unconventional recovery oil and gas technologies. Available information is mostly found centered upon the geology and hydrology for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Lesser information is available on production technology because of the limited number of wells currently producing in the basin. Limited information is available on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand formation waters and that of the potential disposal zones. No determination was made of the compatibility of these waters. The study also indicates that water is often produced in variable quantities with gas from several gas productive formations which would indicate that there are potential applications for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool in the Piceance Basin.

Kieffer, F.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Assessing Reliability in Transportation Energy Supply Pathways: A Hydrogen Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asia Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports are projected tosector, but increasing LNG imports worldwide add relevanceliquefied natural gas (LNG). The LNG supplies were specified

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

On the potential of the EChO mission to characterise gas giant atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space telescopes such as EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) and JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) will be important for the future study of extrasolar planet atmospheres. Both of these missions are capable of performing high sensitivity spectroscopic measurements at moderate resolutions in the visible and infrared, which will allow the characterisation of atmospheric properties using primary and secondary transit spectroscopy. We use the NEMESIS radiative transfer and retrieval tool (Irwin et al. 2008, Lee et al. 2012) to explore the potential of the proposed EChO mission to solve the retrieval problem for a range of H2-He planets orbiting different stars. We find that EChO should be capable of retrieving temperature structure to ~200 K precision and detecting H2O, CO2 and CH4 from a single eclipse measurement for a hot Jupiter orbiting a Sun-like star and a hot Neptune orbiting an M star, also providing upper limits on CO and NH3. We provide a table of retrieval precisions for these quantities in ...

Barstow, Joanna K; Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil; Fletcher, Leigh N; Lee, Jae-Min

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

274

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Influence of reservoir heterogeneity on gas resource potential for geologically based infill drilling, Brooks and I-92 reservoirs, Frio Formation, south Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas resource potential for strategic infill drilling or recompletion in a reservoir can be calculated by subtracting gas volumes derived using the material balance (pressure decline) method from volumes derived using a volumetric method. This resource potential represents remaining gas that is not in communication with existing wells. Frio reservoirs in mature, nonassociated gas plays located downdip from the Vicksburg fault zone are characterized by multiple, vertically stacked sandstones. The Brooks reservoir, in La Gloria field, lies in a fluvial-dominated system that contains dip-elongate channel sandstone belts 1-2 mi wide. Within these belts are six or more vertically stacked channel-fill, point-bar and splay deposits. Depositional environments were interpreted from SP logs. Individual sandstones are separated vertically by thin mudstone layers and pinch out laterally into flood-plain deposits.

Jackson, M.L.W.; Ambrose, W.A. (Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, October 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field...

277

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-October 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

278

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, October 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks...

279

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

280

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

282

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

283

Workshop on gas potential of New Albany shale held in conjunction with the 1995 Ioga meeting in Evansville, Indiana on March 1, 1995. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This workshop is intended to provide an overview of the organic lithofacies, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, and gas potential of the Devonian and Mississippian New Albany Shale in the Illinois Basin. In addition, the reservoir characteristics and completion technology for productive organic-rich Devonian shales in the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are also reviewed. Emphasis is being placed on how proven technologies together with appropriate geologic and geochemical information can be used to explore for gas in the New Albany Shale.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Propylene feedstock: supply and demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reasons for the global shortage in propylene in 1981-82 are discussed. The low running rates of ethylene production and refinery operation of which propylene is a byproduct accounts for the reduced propylene supplies. Low prices of the NCL have also shifted incentive from propylene to gas liquids. This situation will continue, with naptha/gas oil becoming the prefered feedstock for ethylene production. The speculative economics for propylene dehydrogenation are not sufficiently attractive for commercialization. But if a country has an internal market for propylene derivatives, production could have a positive influence on the economy. Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Mexico are suggested as examples.

Steinbaum, C.A.; Pickover, B.H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cientA Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission the behavior of the various decision-makers, who operate in a decentralized manner and include power generators

Nagurney, Anna

287

The Potential of Using Natural Gas in HCCI Engines: Results from Zero- and Multi-dimensional Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the depletion of petroleum based fuels and the corresponding concerns of national energy security issues, natural gas as an alternative fuel in IC engine applications has become an attractive option. Natural gas requires minimum mixture...

Zheng, Junnian

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Petroleum supply monthly, October 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1990-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine Hydrate Deposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sands interlayered with silts and clays, a regime that is not conducive to significant free gas and/or hydrate

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol, Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Domestic Natural Gas Shortage in China.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis analyzes the domestic shortage in the Chinese natural gas market. Both the domestic supply and demand of natural gas are growing fast… (more)

Guo, Ting

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2000 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

294

Production Optimization in Shale Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Natural gas from organic rich shales has become an important part of the supply of natural gas in the United States. Modern drilling and… (more)

Knudsen, Brage Rugstad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

NATURAL GAS: Not Enough by 2000  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS: Not Enough by 2000 ... The U.S. isn't about to run out of natural gas next week, or even this century. ... And supply patterns will alter significantly, as gas from coal and imported liquefied natural gas (LNG) assume sizable shares of gas energy supply. ...

1969-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List This list is in no way exhaustive. Rather, it attempts to provide a set of primary references that offer key pieces of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development Impact Assessment of Natural Gas Production in the New York City Water Supply Watershed (2009). NYCDEP http://home2.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/news/natural_gas_drilling.shtml Review of water related and infiltration events Short Scholarly Features Natural Gas Plays in the Marcellus Shale: Challenges & Potential

Wang, Z. Jane

298

Integrated evaluation of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and global warming potential for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) agroecosystems in Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main aim of this study was to determine and discuss the aggregate of energy use and greenhouse gas emission (CO2, N2O, and CH4) for sugar beet agroecosystems in western of Iran. For this propose data was collected by using questionnaires and face to face interview with 50 farmers. Results showed that total inputs and output energy were 49517.2 and 1095360.0 MJ ha?1, respectively. Energy use efficiency was 22.12. Total CO2, N2O and CH4 emissions due to chemical inputs were 2668.35, 22.92 and 3.49 kg, respectively. In sugar beet farms total global warming potential (GWPs) was 9847.77 kg CO2eq ha?1. In terms of CO2 equivalents, 27% of the \\{GWPs\\} come from CO2, 72% from N2O, and 1% from CH4. In this research input and output carbon were 29340.0 and 2678.6 kg C ha?1, respectively. Hence, carbon efficiency ratio was 10.95.

Mohammad Yousefi; Mahmud Khoramivafa; Farzad Mondani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Area Offshore of SW Taiwan: Evidence of Gas Analysis of Water Column Samples Tsanyao Frank Yang 1 areas offshore of SW Taiwan for analysis of dissolved gases. Some these samples show unusually high-shore and offshore of southwestern Taiwan (e.g., Chow et al. 2000; Yang et al. 2004; Chiu et al. 2006). The gases

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Potentials of Silver and Gold Electrodes of ZrO2-Based Cells in N2+ O2+ CO2+ CO Gas Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steady-state electrode potentials in cells with a ZrO2+ 10 mol % Y2O3electrolyte are measured at 400 to 500°C in nonequilibrium N2+ O2+ CO2+ CO gas mixtures containing 0–3 and 0–10 vol % of CO and O2, respectivel...

G. I. Fadeev; I. D. Remez

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Remediation of Risks in Natural Gas Storage Produced Waters: The Potential Use of Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas storage produced waters (NGSPWs) are generated in large volumes, vary in composition, and often contain constituents in concentrations and forms that are toxic… (more)

Johnson, Brenda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

STEO October 2012 - home heating supplies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural gas, propane, and electricity supplies seen plentiful Natural gas, propane, and electricity supplies seen plentiful this winter for U.S. home heating Supplies of the major heating fuels used by most U.S. households are expected to be plentiful this winter, with the possible exception of heating oil, which is consumed mostly by households in the Northeast. Heating oil stocks are expected to be low in the East Coast and Gulf Coast states. And with New York state requiring heating oil with lower sulfur levels for the first time, the heating oil market is expected to be tighter this winter, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new winter fuels forecast. However, U.S. inventories of natural gas, the most common primary heating fuel used by households and a key fuel for electricity generation, is expected to reach 3.9 trillion cubic feet by

305

Supply Systems Analyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this position you will serve as a Supply Systems Analyst for Supply Chain Services. The incumbent is responsible for managing and supporting multiple electronic database systems, including Asset...

306

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

307

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost-effective) techniques to remotely detect hydrate deposits, and to monitor their changes in the course of gas production.production of gas from hydrates occurring in the Gulf of Mexico because, despite of the substantially increased complexity and cost

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is by way of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain where ...

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

LNG links remote supplies and markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has established a niche for itself by matching remote gas supplies to markets that both lacked indigenous gas reserves and felt threatened in the aftermath of the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s. It has provided a cost-effective energy source for these markets, while also offering an environmentally friendly fuel long before that was fashionable. The introduction of natural-gas use via LNG in the early years (mostly into France and Japan) has also allowed LNG to play a major role in developing gas infrastructure. Today, natural gas, often supplied as LNG, is particularly well-suited for use in the combined cycle technology used in independent power generation projects (IPPs). Today, LNG players cannot simply focus on monetizing gas resources. Instead, they must adapt their projects to meet the needs of changing markets. The impact of these changes on the LNG industry has been felt throughout the value chain from finding and producing gas, gas treatment, liquefaction, transport as a liquid, receiving terminals and regasification, and finally, to consumption by power producers, industrial users, and households. These factors have influenced the evolution of the LNG industry and have implications for the future of LNG, particularly in the context of worldwide natural gas.

Avidan, A.A.; Gardner, R.E.; Nelson, D.; Borrelli, E.N. [Mobil LNG Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Rethore, T.J. [Arthur D. Little Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

310

Frey, H.C., and P.Y. Kuo, "Potential Best Practices for Reducing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions in Freight Transportation," Paper No. 2007-AWMA-443, Proceedings, 100th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frey, H.C., and P.Y. Kuo, "Potential Best Practices for Reducing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Gas (GHG) Emissions in Freight Transportation Extended Abstract # 2007-A-443-AWMA H. Christopher Frey for approximately 9% of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States.1-2 The individual contributions

Frey, H. Christopher

311

Petroluem Supply Monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland 2 Analysis of Market Demand and Supply...

315

Supplies of Propane-Air Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,169 670 838 401 299 309 1980-2012 1,169 670 838 401 299 309 1980-2012 Alabama 1980-2003 Arizona 1980-1998 Arkansas 1980-1998 Colorado 3 2 3 4 21 99 1980-2012 Connecticut 0 0 1 1980-2009 Delaware 5 2 2 1 1980-2010 Florida 1980-1998 Georgia 2 0 0 1980-2012 Hawaii 4 5 9 6 25 20 2004-2012 Illinois 11 15 20 17 1 1 1980-2012 Indiana 81 30 1 1 5 1 1980-2012 Iowa 2 24 3 2 1 1980-2011 Kentucky 124 15 18 5 8 1 1980-2012 Maine 1980-2003 Maryland 245 181 170 115 89 116 1980-2012 Massachusetts 15 13 10 0 1980-2010 Michigan 1980-1998 Minnesota 54 46 47 12 20 9 1980-2012 Missouri 60 6 10 18 0 1980-2012 Nebraska 33 28 18 12 9 4 1980-2012 Nevada 1980-1998 New Hampshire 9 1980-2007 New Jersey 0 1980-2012 New Mexico

316

Natural Gas Consumption (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 115,528 102,389 103,976 108,490 101,217 93,985 1999-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012 Arizona 392,954 399,188 369,739 330,914 288,802 332,079 1997-2012 Arkansas 226,439 234,901 244,193 271,515 284,076 295,811 1997-2012 California 2,395,674 2,405,266 2,328,504 2,273,128 2,153,186 2,403,385 1997-2012

317

Colorado Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6,258 7,527 5,148 4,268 4,412 4,112 1967-2013 Propane-Air 2 3 4 21 99 41 1980-2013 Other 6,256 7,525 5,144 4,247 4,313 4,071 1980-2013...

318

Ohio Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

460 522 353 296 366 416 1967-2013 Synthetic 0 0 1980-2013 Propane-Air 81 66 40 27 6 34 1980-2013 Biomass 379 456 313 269 360 383 1993-2013...

319

Georgia Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

* 52 732 701 660 642 1967-2013 Propane-Air 0 0 0 1980-2013 Biomass 52 732 701 660 642 1993-2013 Other 0 0 0 1980...

320

New York Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 6 2 0 0 0 1967-2013 Synthetic 1980-2005 Propane-Air 7 6 2 1980-2010 Biomass 1993-2005 Other 1980-2005...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table A14. Oil and gas supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

price: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Petroleum Marketing Monthly, DOEEIA- 0380(201308) (Washington, DC, August 2013). 2011 and 2012 lower 48 onshore, lower...

322

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

325

Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas plays a vital role in the U.S. energy supply and in achieving the nation's economic and environmental goals. One of several supply options involves increasing imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to ensure that American consumers have adequate supplies of natural gas for the future. Natural gas consumption in the United States is expected to increase slightly from about 24.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2011 to 26.6 Tcf by 2035. Currently, most of the demand for natural gas in the United States is met with domestic production and imports via pipeline from Canada. A small percentage of gas supplies are imported and received as liquefied natural gas. A significant portion of the world's natural gas resources are

326

Engaging Supply Chains in Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Suppliers are increasingly being asked to share information about their vulnerability to climate change and their strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Their responses vary widely. We theorize and empirically identify several factors associated ... Keywords: econometric analysis, empirical research, environmental operations, quality management, risk management, supply chain management, sustainable operations

Chonnikarn Fern Jira; Michael W. Toffel

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Magnets and Power Supplies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

328

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Procurement of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment This Guidance provides a description of the types of requirements to be included in an employer's workplace charging request for...

329

The Supply Chain as a Dynamical System CAPD EWO Seminar, Feb. 28 3, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

balancing and self-optimization 4. The Adaptive Enterprise 5. Current problems Oil and gas field management tank tank mixer reactor column column column product product waste supply supply recycle stream #12

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

330

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

Zhou, Yaoqi

331

Method for recovering power according to a cascaded rankine cycle by gasifying liquefied natural gas and utilizing the cold potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a method for recovering effective energy as power between liquefied natural gas and a high temperature source by cascading two kinds of Rankine cycles when the liquefied natural gas is re-gasified. The method is characterized in that a first medium performs a first Rankine cycle with the liquefied natural gas as a low temperature source, the first medium being mainly a mixture of hydrocarbons having 1-6 carbon atoms or a mixture of halogenated hydrocarbons of boiling points close to those of said hydrocarbons, the first medium having compositions according to which the vapor curve of gasifying the liquefied natural gas substantially corresponds to the low pressure cooling curve of the first medium, the power generated thereby is recovered by a first turbine during the first Rankine cycle, a second medium having a higher boiling point than said first medium performs a second Rankine cycle with part of said first Rankine cycle as the low temperature source, the second medium, being a single hydrocarbon component having 1-6 carbon atoms or a mixture thereof, a single halogenated hydrocarbon whose boiling point is close to that of this hydrocarbon or a mixture thereof, or ammonia, whose low pressure cooling curve substantially corresponds to the vapor curve of the high pressure first medium, said first and second Rankine cycles are cascaded, and a second turbine is disposed to recover power during the second Rankine cycle.

Matsumoto, O.; Aoki, I.

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

332

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

333

NUFinancials Supply Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUFinancials Supply Chain FMS801 & 803 Purchasing Glossary 03/31/2010 © 2010 Northwestern University FMS801 & 803 1 Purchasing Glossary Guide to terms used in iBuyNU and NUFinancials purchasing Term, faculty salary, office supplies. Similar to CUFS Object Code, Revenue Source, and Balance Sheet. Note

Shull, Kenneth R.

334

Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and Gas For Energy Infrastructure Summit September 15, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator 0 20 40 60...

335

Water supply and sludge metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultimate sludge disposal is one of the major tasks facing wastewater treatment facilities today. Where adequate farmland exists in proximity to the treatment facility and where sludge characteristics are suitable, land application is often the most economical method. In some cases, however, metal concentrations in the sludge either limit the site life or the application rate to the point where land application is not economical. When metals are above regulatory limits, land application may become impossible. The origin of the metals has largely been credited to industrial users and stormwater runoff and have, in fact, often represented significant sources of metals. Another potentially significant source of metals that has been frequently overlooked is the water supply system (including the distribution and home piping systems). Data from some treatment facilities suggest that the water supply system is the major source of metals and is the reason that sewage sludge metal levels are above allowable land application limits.

Brown, W.E. (Wright-Pierce Engineers, Topsham, ME (USA))

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Potential for Natural Gas Storage in Deep Basalt Formations at Canoe Ridge, Washington State: A Hydrogeologic Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1999 and 2002, Pacific Gas Transmission Company (PGT) (now TransCanada Pipeline Company) and AVISTA Corporation, together with technical support provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) examined the feasibility of developing a subsurface, natural gas-storage facility in deep, underlying Columbia River basalt in south-central Washington state. As part of this project, the 100 Circles #1 well was drilled and characterized in addition to surface studies. This report provides data and interpretations of the geology and hydrology collected specific to the Canoe Ridge site as part of the U.S. DOE funding to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of this project.

Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

337

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Georgia's Oil and Gas and Deep Drilling Act regulates oil and gas drilling activities to provide protection of underground freshwater supplies and certain "environmentally sensitive" areas. The...

343

Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged practice current flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved.

Pollock, George G. (San Ramon, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

Pollock, G.G.

1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - natural gas section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual time-series and recent statistics on natural gas supply, disposition, and price.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

347

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply...

348

Barloworld Supply Chain Software USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barloworld Supply Chain Software USA Supply Chain Consultant / Inventory Analyst Position November 2011 #12;Barloworld SCS USA ­ Supply Chain / Inventory Analyst Aug 2011 Page 2 of 4 INTRODUCTION Barloworld Supply Chain Software (SCS) USA would like to invite you to apply for a Supply Chain

Heller, Barbara

349

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Power Supply Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Crystal Displays require dedicated power supply circuits to support their specific requirements. Many different display technologies coexist in the market and compete for their market share. While the p...

Oliver Nachbaur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

GSA Wind Supply Opportunity  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wind Supply Opportunity 1 2 3 Proposed Location * Size: 100-210 MegaWatts *Location: Bureau County, IL *Planned COD: December 2014 or 2015 *Site Control: 17,000 acres *Wind...

352

European supply chain study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: Supply chain management has been defined as, "..a set of approaches utilized to efficiently integrate suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and stores, so that merchandise is produced and distributed at the ...

Puri, Mohitkumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Washington's power supply collapse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ON 25 July 1983 the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) defaulted on 2,250 million of municipal revenue bonds. This, ... has been polemical and accusatory in nature, blaming the Washington State Supreme Court, the Bonneville ...

Roger H. Bezdek

1985-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

356

Better Plants Supply Chain Pilot – Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with Better Plants Partners to improve energy efficiency throughout their supply chains. Around 40 to 60 percent of a manufacturing company’s energy and carbon footprint can reside upstream in its supply chain—from raw materials, transport, and packaging to the energy consumed in manufacturing processes—but this number can be as high as 80 percent. Coordinating energy management practices between companies and their supply chains has the potential to significantly improve industrial energy productivity and reduce the amount of energy embedded in manufactured products. Through this Supply Chain Pilot, DOE will work with a select group of Better Plants Partners to extend the benefits of energy efficiency to their suppliers. Partners will leverage existing Better Plants Program resources and encourage suppliers to collectively set, track, and meet energy savings goals.

357

Mobile hydraulic power supply: Liquid piston Stirling engine pump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional mobile hydraulic power supplies involve numerous kinematic connections and are limited by the efficiency, noise, and emissions of internal combustion engines. The Stirling cycle possesses numerous benefits such as the ability to operate from any heat source, quiet operation, and high theoretical efficiency. The Stirling engine has seen limited success due to poor heat transfer in the working chambers, difficulty sealing low-molecular weight gases at high pressure, and non-ideal piston displacement profiles. As a solution to these limitations, a liquid piston Stirling engine pump is proposed. The liquid pistons conform to irregular volumes, allowing increased heat transfer through geometry features on the interior of the working chambers. Creating near-isothermal operation eliminates the costly external heat exchangers and increases the engine efficiency through decreasing the engine dead space. The liquid pistons provide a positive gas seal and thermal transport to the working chambers. Controlling the flow of the liquid pistons with valves enables matching the ideal Stirling cycle and creates a direct hydraulic power supply. Using liquid hydrogen as a fuel source allows cooling the compression side of the engine before expanded the fuel into a gas and combusting it to heat the expansion side of the engine. Cooling the compression side not only increases the engine power, but also significantly increases the potential thermal efficiency of the engine. A high efficiency Stirling engine makes energy regeneration through reversing the Stirling cycle practical. When used for regeneration, the captured energy can be stored in thermal batteries, such as a molten salt. The liquid piston Stirling engine pump requires further research in numerous areas such as understanding the behavior of the liquid pistons, modeling and optimization of a full engine pump, and careful selection of materials for the extreme operating temperatures. Addressing these obtainable research quandaries will enable a transformative Stirling engine pump with the potential to excel in numerous applications.

James D. Van de Ven

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Likewise, it is expected that changes to the domestic gas supply may also introduce changes in natural gas composition. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from conventional domestic natural gas supplies. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 588 K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx or CO emissions. These results are different from data collected on some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences will be described.

Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Oxygen reduction on gas-diffusion electrodes for phosphoric acid fuel cells by a potential decay method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of gaseous oxygen on carbon-supported platinum electrodes has been studied at 150 C with polarization and potential decay measurements. The electrolyte was either 100 weight percent phosphoric acid or that acid with a fluorinated additive, potassium perfluorohexanesulfonate (C{sub 6}F{sub 13}SO{sub 3}K). The pseudo-Tafel curves of the overpotential vs log (ii{sub L}/(i{sub L}{minus}i)) show a two-slope behavior, probably due to different adsorption mechanisms. The potential relaxations as functions of log (t+r) and log({minus}d{eta}/dt) have been plotted. The variations of these slopes and the dependence of the double-layer capacitance on the overpotential depended on the electrode manufacture and the kind of electrolyte (whether containing the fluorinated additive or not).

Li Qingfeng; Xiao Gang; Hjuler, H.A.; Berg, R.W.; Bjerrum, N.J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

VALUING FLARED NATURAL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LAST YEAR , enough natural gas to supply 27% of U.S. needs was burned off as waste around the world, according to a new report by the World Bank. Flared natural gas is a by-product of petroleum production and is not generally considered worth capture and ...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

363

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

364

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

365

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

366

Optimization Online - Solving Power-Constrained Gas ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 24, 2014 ... Solving Power-Constrained Gas Transportation Problems using an ... quantities but further incorporate heat power supplies and demands as ...

Björn Geißler

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

367

Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives With Data for December 2011 | Release Date: February 29, 2012 Changes to Table 26. "Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State": Current State-level data are now included in Table 26, in addition to current U.S. and PAD District sums. State offshore production for Louisiana, Texas, Alaska, and California, which are included in the State totals, are no longer reported separately in a "State Offshore Production" category. Previously, State-level values lagged 2 months behind the U.S. and PAD District values. Beginning with this publication, they will be on the same cycle. Also included in this publication are two additional pages for Table 26 that provide October and November data. With the release of

368

Alternate Water Supply System  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

369

Page 1 of 21 Vertical integration in a growing industry: security of supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to secure supply and mitigate risks of price volatility. Oil and gas firms move upstream to enhance securityPage 1 of 21 Vertical integration in a growing industry: security of supply and market access of the industry boundaries, (ii) security of supply and (iii) access to market. The permeability of industry

Aickelin, Uwe

370

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 30, 2009 July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. July 30, 2009 DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and

371

Selection of potential IAEA inspection strategies involving cascade access at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared as a US contribution to Team 4 of the Hexapartite Safeguards Project. It provides to the Team 4 participants one example of an approach, which has been used in the United States, to developing a range of safeguards strategies involving differing degrees of access to cascade areas of centrifuge enrichment plants. Its purpose is to facilitate the work of other Hexapartite participants in completing Task II of Team 4's terms of reference. The scope of this report is limited to identifying safeguards approaches for the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) which involve differing degrees of access to the cascade area. This report provides a method for selecting cascade access inspection strategies at GCEP which appear promising for more detailed evaluation. It is quite important to note, however, that the effectiveness and practicability of these strategies have not been established at the present. In addition, some strategies have been included on the basis of very preliminary calculations and considerations which have not been validated. Thus, some of these strategies may ultimately be rejected because they prove to be impracticable. Considerations of cost and the possible transfer of information and technology related to the production of enriched uranium will also be pertinent in considering the degrees and frequency of access to the cascade areas of centrifuge enrichment plants. This report describes the process for combining technical measures, implementation approaches and objectives to arrive at the total number of theoretically possible combinations. It then describes how these combinations may be reduced in a series of steps to a number that is more manageable for detailed evaluation. The process is shown schematically.

Not Available

1981-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

372

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.PDF Table 15. Natural Gas Plant Net Production and Stocks of Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Production PAD District 1...

373

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Agency/Company /Organization: Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/20090130_Supply%20Curves_NWPCC_FINAL.pdf Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Screenshot References: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves[1] Background "The ECL supply curve model includes data on potential emission reductions for approximately 60 separate technology options. It allows the examination of multiple scenarios involving the inclusion or exclusion of technology

374

Top Value Added Chemicals From Biomass: I. Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol. In addition to building blocks, the report outlines the central technical barriers that are preventing the widespread use of biomass for products and chemicals.

Werpy, Todd A.; Holladay, John E.; White, James F.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Spatially resolved physical conditions of molecular gas and potential star formation tracers in M83, revealed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory, our understanding about the photo-dissociation regions (PDR) has taken a step forward. In the bandwidth of the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) on board Herschel, ten CO rotational transitions, including J=4-3 to J=13-12, and three fine structure lines, including [CI] 609, [CI] 370, and [NII] 250 micron, are covered. In this paper, I present our findings from the FTS observations at the nuclear region of M83, based on the spatially resolved physical parameters derived from the CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) map and the comparisons with the dust properties and star-formation tracers. I will discuss (1) the potential of using [NII] 250 and [CI] 370 micron as star-formation tracers; (2) the reliability of tracing molecular gas with CO; (3) the excitation mechanisms of warm CO; (4) the possibility of studying stellar feedback by tracing the thermal pressure of molecular gas in the nuclear ...

Wu, Ronin; Galliano, Frédéric; Wilson, Christine D; Kamenetzky, Julia; Lee, Min-Young; Schirm, Maximilien; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Spinoglio, Luigi; Cormier, Diane; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip R; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Baes, Martin; Boselli, Alexandro; Bournaud, Frédéric; De Looze, Ilse; Hughes, Thomas M; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Rangwala, Naseem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cascading of Fluctuations in Interdependent Energy Infrastructures: Gas-Grid Coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The revolution of hydraulic fracturing has dramatically increased the supply and lowered the cost of natural gas in the United States driving an expansion of natural gas-fired generation capacity in many electrical grids. Unrelated to the natural gas expansion, lower capital costs and renewable portfolio standards are driving an expansion of intermittent renewable generation capacity such as wind and photovoltaic generation. These two changes may potentially combine to create new threats to the reliability of these interdependent energy infrastructures. Natural gas-fired generators are often used to balance the fluctuating output of wind generation. However, the time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas burn rates that impact the pressure in interstate transmission pipelines. Fluctuating pressure impacts the reliability of natural gas deliveries to those same generators and the safety of pipeline operations. We adopt a partial differential equation model of natural gas pipeli...

Chertkov, Michael; Backhaus, Scott

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Investigacin Supply chain collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These interactions among firms' decisions ask for alignment and coordination of actions. Therefore, game theory quantities, among others. Nowadays, business decisions are dominated by the globalization of markets, and that the decisions taken by a firm do also affect the performance of the other parties in the supply chain

Boucherie, Richard J.

378

Negotiations Within Supply Chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we consider a negotiation between a supplier and its retailer. Due to the supplier's commitments with other customers the negotiation is about the maximum order quantity the retailer can order at a fixed price. We propose a structuring ... Keywords: capacity, contract, cooperation, negotiations, scenario, supply chain management

Carsten Homburg; Christoph Schneeweiss

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gas Companies Right-of-Way (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Corporations engaged in the business of transmitting or supplying natural gas, artificial gas, or a mixture of natural and artificial gases may acquire by condemnation the rights-of-way or...

380

Natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An efficient method of producing hydrogen by high temperature steam electrolysis that will lower the electricity consumption to an estimated 65 percent lower than has been achievable with previous steam electrolyzer systems. This is accomplished with a natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer, which significantly reduces the electricity consumption. Since this natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer replaces one unit of electrical energy by one unit of energy content in natural gas at one-quarter the cost, the hydrogen production cost will be significantly reduced. Also, it is possible to vary the ratio between the electricity and the natural gas supplied to the system in response to fluctuations in relative prices for these two energy sources. In one approach an appropriate catalyst on the anode side of the electrolyzer will promote the partial oxidation of natural gas to CO and hydrogen, called Syn-Gas, and the CO can also be shifted to CO.sub.2 to give additional hydrogen. In another approach the natural gas is used in the anode side of the electrolyzer to burn out the oxygen resulting from electrolysis, thus reducing or eliminating the potential difference across the electrolyzer membrane.

Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Wallman, P. Henrik (Berkeley, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Supply Stores | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supply Stores Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Paperclips, Etc. and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is tailored to meet the DOE customer's requirements. Office Supply items that are not carried in the store inventory can be special ordered, see the Catalog Order Form section below. The stores are operated for the Department of Energy, Office of Administration, Office of Logistics and Facility Operations, for the Supply

382

EIA - Natural Gas Publications & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Publications & Analysis Publications & Analysis Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S. Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot. Natural Gas Monthly U.S. production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices. Natural Gas Annual Provides comprehensive information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the U.S. ... see complete list of Natural Gas Publications Basics All Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports & Pipelines Storage Consumption Natural Gas Survey Forms Natural Gas Section from International Energy Annual Forecasts & Analysis Includes petroleum and natural gas forecasts and analysis for consumption, production, prices, and sales.

383

Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

384

The world energy supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pattern of the world's energy supply has undergone dramatic changes over the last century, and particularly over the last twenty years. The growth in the world's population and the ever-greater demand for energy will lead to the global environment being subjected to considerable strain. The world will require a new type of energy system, one that is technically feasible, but which will face many difficulties in gaining social and economic acceptance. The world's future energy supply will depend upon the rational exploitation of resources and the development of high technical standards in the fields of reliability and safety. The required social changes will include a change to more energy-conserving life styles and a strengthening of international co-operation in long-term energy and environmental research and development.

L.H.Th. Rietjens

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.PDF 3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 734 29,902 109,919 12,961 36,593 190,109 6,133 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 18,374 593 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - - 171,734 5,540 Imports (PAD District of Entry) ............................. 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Commercial ...................................................... 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) ................. - - - - - - - Net Receipts .........................................................

386

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports by SPR - - 0 - - - - - - Imports into SPR by Others - - 0 - - - - - - Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 45,013 10,597 12,744 - -29,287 17,214 1,700 78,727 117,581 Pentanes...

387

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments… (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We review the size and availability of Canada's energy supply resources, both non-renewable and renewable. Following a brief discussion of the energy fuel-mix in Canada from 1870 to 1984, and the current provincial breakdown of energy production and use, we provide a source-by-source review of energy supply resources, including oil, natural gas, coal, uranium, peat, wood, agricultural and municipal waste, and also hydro-electric, tidal, geothermal, wind and solar energy. An attempt is made to assess these resources in terms of resource base (the physical

389

Natural Gas Exports from Iran  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

392

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

393

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

394

Techno-economic performance and cost reduction potential for the substitute/synthetic natural gas and power cogeneration plant with CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cogeneration of substitute/synthetic natural gas (SNG) and power from coal based plants with CO2 capture is an effective way to improve energy efficiency and to reduce CO2 emissions. In this paper, we evaluate the techno-economic performance of a SNG and power cogeneration technology with CO2 capture. Current localization level (the cost difference of a technology in different nations and districts) of each subunit of this technology is analyzed. The cost reduction potential of this technology is also predicted, and the role of technology localization and efficiency upgrade in cost reduction is investigated based on a range of learning rates and different coal prices from 90$/t to 150$/t. Results show that the unit investment of this cogeneration technology presented in our previous paper is around 1700$/kW currently and the investment of SNG synthesis, coal gasification and combined cycle unit comprises over 60% of the total investment. The equivalent SNG production cost is quite sensitive to coal prices and ranges from 0.15 to 0.50$/Nm3. Through localization, the unit investment of this technology can be decreased by 30% currently. The key technologies including coal gasification, SNG synthesis and high performance gas turbine need further localization because of their relatively low current localization levels and big localization potential. Through cost learning, the future investment of the technology can be decreased to 700–1100$/kW, which may be competitive with the unit investment of IGCC technology with CO2 capture and even may be lower than that of the pulverized coal power plant with CO2 capture. Technology localization and efficiency upgrade will play important roles in cost reduction, which can contribute 300–500$/kW and 125–225$/kW to cost reduction, respectively. The results presented in this paper indicate that the coal to SNG and power technology with CO2 capture is a promising and competitive option for energy saving and CO2 abatement, and can be a support for policy making, technology options etc.

Sheng Li; Hongguang Jin; Lin Gao; Xiaosong Zhang; Xiaozhou Ji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope off Pakistan: constraints from seismic techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2000 research-article Articles Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope...J. Int. (2000) 140, 295310 Natural gas hydrates on the continental slope...adequate gas supplies for hydrate Natural gas hydrates (clathrates) are a crystalline......

Ingo Grevemeyer; Andreas Rosenberger; Heinrich Villinger

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source of low-cost alternatives for greenhouse gas emission mitigation during the next few decades (Mc can also offset greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by increasing production of energy crops, which can cost of individual strategies. Third, efforts to lower net emissions of a particular greenhouse gas can

McCarl, Bruce A.

397

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Exploring the petroleum potential of a frontier province: Cretaceous stratigraphy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Exploring Myanmar. It has been shown that gas and oil exists in the basin and that a considerable unconventional biogenic gas system exists in the deep-waters offshore. The sediments of the Rakhine Basin were deposited

Henderson, Gideon

398

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

399

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 February 2012 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii December 2011 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

400

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

With Data for September 2013 With Data for September 2013 November 2013 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii September 2013 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Decemer 2011 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

402

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 September 2013 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

403

Petroleum supply monthly, October 1991. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in this report describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importer, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics 14 figs., 56 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Petroleum Supply Monthly, September 1990. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data presented in this PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. 12 figs., 46 tabs.

Whited, D.; Jacobus, P. (eds.)

1990-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

406

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Imports by SPR - - 0 - - - - - - Imports into SPR by Others - - 0 - - - - - - Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 44,256 11,778 11,889 - 1,091 13,034 1,436 52,362 156,616 Pentanes Plus...

408

Localization of motor neuron pools supplying identified muscles in normal and supernumerary legs of chick embryo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 Contributed by Viktor...neurons supplying the gas- trocnemius muscle of...with a bright-field oil immersion objective at...or not the transplant gas- trocnemius is innervated...short, the transplant gas- trocnemius is not innervated...

M Hollyday; V Hamburger; J M Farris

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Oil and Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Oil and Gas Supply Module The oil and gas supply module (OGSM) consists of a series of process submodules that project the availability of: Domestic crude oil production and dry natural gas production from onshore, offshore, and Alaskan reservoirs Imported pipeline–quality gas from Mexico and Canada Imported liquefied natural gas. Figure 12. Oil and Gas Supply Module Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-202-586-8800. Figure 13. Oil and Gas Suppply Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Oil and Gas Supply Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

410

Switching power supply  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

Mihalka, A.M.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

Impact of 3D printing on global supply chains by 2020 .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis aims to quantitatively estimate the potential impact of 3D Printing on global supply chains. Industrial adoption of 3D Printing has been increasing gradually… (more)

Bodla, Muhammad Raheel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Assessment of potential life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission effects from using corn-based butanol as a transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since advances in the ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation process in recent years have led to significant increases in its productivity and yields, the production of butanol and its use in motor vehicles have become an option worth evaluating. This study estimates the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. It employs a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis tool: the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The estimates of life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are based on an Aspen Plus(reg. sign) simulation for a corn-to-butanol production process, which describes grain processing, fermentation, and product separation. Bio-butanol-related WTW activities include corn farming, corn transportation, butanol production, butanol transportation, and vehicle operation. In this study, we also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. Our study shows that driving vehicles fueled with corn-based butanol produced by the current ABE fermentation process could result in substantial fossil energy savings (39%-56%) and avoid large percentage of the GHG emission burden, yielding a 32%-48% reduction relative to using conventional gasoline. On energy basis, a bushel of corn produces less liquid fuel from the ABE process than that from the corn ethanol dry mill process. The coproduction of a significant portion of acetone from the current ABE fermentation presents a challenge. A market analysis of acetone, as well as research and development on robust alternative technologies and processes that minimize acetone while increase the butanol yield, should be conducted.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Combined effects of nitrogen fertilization and biochar on the net global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity and net ecosystem economic budget in intensive vegetable agriculture in southeastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Field experiments were conducted to determine the effects of nitrogen (N) fertilization and biochar addition on the net global warming potential (net GWP), greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) and net ecosystem economic budget (NEEB). These experiments were conducted in an intensive vegetable field with 4 consecutive vegetable crops in 2012 and 2013 in southeastern China. The experiment was conducted with a 32 factorial design in triplicate at N fertilizer rates of 0, 1475, 1967 kg N ha?1 and biochar rates of 0, 20, and 40 t ha?1. Although CH4 emissions were not obviously affected by N fertilization, N2O emissions increased by 27.2–116.2% and the net GWP increased by 30.6–307.2%. Consequently, the GHGI increased significantly, but vegetable yield and the NEEB did not improve. Furthermore, biochar amendments did not significantly influence CH4 emissions, but significantly decreased the N2O emissions by 1.7–25.4%, the net GWP by 89.6–700.5%, and the GHGI by 89.5–644.8%. In addition, vegetable yields significantly increased by 2.1–74.1%, which improved the NEEB. Thus, N fertilization did not increase vegetable yields or the NEEB. However, N fertilization did increase the net GWP and GHGI. In contrast, biochar additions resulted in lower N2O emissions and net GWP and GHGI, but increased vegetable yield and the NEEB in the intensive vegetable production system. Therefore, appropriate biochar amendment should be studied to combat changing climate and to improve the economic profits of vegetable production.

B. Li; C.H. Fan; H. Zhang; Z.Z. Chen; L.Y. Sun; Z.Q. Xiong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of... the nation’s power o Currently 1% of national power supply o Carbon neutral? combustion of biomass is part of the natural carbon cycle o Improved crop residue management has potential to benefit environment, producers, and economy Biomass Btu...

Schaetzel, Michael

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein.

Dooley, Kirk J. (Shelley, ID); Barrie, Scott L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Buttner, William J. (White Bear Lake, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Review of the energy supply status for sustainable development in the Organization of Islamic Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review describes the situation and the varying potential of energy supply utilization of countries in the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC). This exercise reveals that the increase in energy consumption is associated with economic growth and population expansion. The interconnectivity between energy use and national level, as well as the connection between energy utilization and gross domestic product (GDP), which is an indicator of economic development, must be explained to determine the significance of national energy utility in these countries. Therefore, alternative energy source utilization is necessary for the provision of an appreciable constituent of imminent energy requirements in sectors that utilize energy. Alternative energy source utilization is a crucial factor in ensuring the total capacity of energy sources in various growing economies of the world where clean energy is unavailable. Furthermore, some of these countries also possess alternative energy sources such as hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, and biomass. This paper provides details on sustainable energy supply developments in OIC countries. These countries must sustainably develop energy despite their sufficient wealth in crude oil and natural gas. The main purpose of this study is to determine economic growth in relation to energy supply to facilitate sustainable development. In addition, this paper suggests necessary requirements to sustain the energy development processes in OIC countries and as well as some stages that must be adopted to enhance development at a sustainable rate.

Mohamed Gabbasa; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Zahira Yaakob; M.Reza Faraji Zonooz; Ahmad Fudholi; Nilofar Asim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume 2 - Final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 2 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National...

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) 14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices decreased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 6-13) as weather-related demand was limited amid close-to-normal temperatures for this time of year. Easing prices also likely resulted in part from reduced supply uncertainty in response to the amount of natural gas in underground storage (mostly for use during the winter heating season but also available for periods of hot weather in the summer). Supplies from international sources have grown considerably this spring, as imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly even as natural gas supplies from Canada (transported by pipeline) likely have decreased. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 23 cents per MMBtu, or 2.9 percent, to $7.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for July delivery decreased 47.2 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.608 yesterday (June 13). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,255 Bcf as of Friday, June 8, reflecting an implied net injection of 92 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 19.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.20 per barrel on the week to $66.17 per barrel, or $11.41 per MMBtu.

420

DOE Updated U.S. Geothermal: Supply Curve (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2009 DOE GEOTHERMAL SUPPLY CURVE UPDATE: Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2009 DOE GEOTHERMAL SUPPLY CURVE UPDATE: Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) DOE Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve Chad Augustine National Renewable Energy Laboratory Strategic Energy Analysis Center Chad.Augustine@nrel.gov February 1, 2010 Chad Augustine (NREL) Katherine R. Young (NREL) Arlene Anderson (DOE-GTP) NREL/PR-6A2-47527 Pacific Gas & Electric/PIX 00059 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 2 | 2009 DOE GEOTHERMAL SUPPLY CURVE UPDATE: Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) eere.energy.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 32. Blender Net Inputs of Petroleum Products by PAD District, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ....................................................... 308 5 313 45 44 345 434 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - - 2 75 77 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 308 5 313 45 42 270 357 Normal Butane .................................................. 308 5 313 45 42 270 357 Isobutane .......................................................... - - - - - - - Other Liquids ..........................................................

422

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF 0.PDF Table 20. Blender Net Inputs of Petroleum Products by PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ....................................................... 158 5 163 47 18 168 233 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 5 - 5 - - 5 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 153 5 158 47 18 163 228 Normal Butane .................................................. 153 5 158 47 18 163 228 Isobutane .......................................................... - - - - - - - Other Liquids ..........................................................

423

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.PDF 5.PDF Table 35. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products by PAD District and State, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene Reformulated Conventional Total Reformulated Conventional Total PAD District 1 ............................................ 244 3,987 4,231 16,344 28,462 44,806 1,585 Connecticut ............................................. - - - 927 - 927 28 Delaware ................................................ - - - 887 652 1,539 148 District of Columbia ................................ - - - - - - - Florida ..................................................... - 978 978 - 5,532 5,532 - Georgia ................................................... - 370 370 - 2,767 2,767 20 Maine ......................................................

424

Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Supply Energy Supply Crude Oil Production (a) (million barrels per day) .............................. 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Dry Natural Gas Production (billion cubic feet per day) ........................... 65.40 65.49 65.76 66.34 65.78 66.50 67.11 67.88 67.99 67.74 67.37 67.70 65.75 66.82 67.70 Coal Production (million short tons) ...................................... 266 241 259 250 245 243 264 256 258 249 265 262 1,016 1,008 1,033 Energy Consumption Liquid Fuels (million barrels per day) .............................. 18.36 18.55 18.59 18.45 18.59 18.61 19.08 18.90 18.69 18.67 18.91 18.82 18.49 18.80 18.77 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet per day) ........................... 81.09 62.38 63.72 71.27 88.05 59.49 60.69 74.92 85.76 59.40 60.87 72.53 69.60 70.72 69.58 Coal (b) (million short tons) ......................................

425

Crude Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Supply Domestic Production (a) .......................................... 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Alaska .................................................................. 0.58 0.53 0.44 0.55 0.54 0.51 0.48 0.52 0.51 0.47 0.42 0.49 0.53 0.51 0.47 Federal Gulf of Mexico (b) .................................... 1.34 1.19 1.18 1.36 1.30 1.22 1.27 1.29 1.34 1.36 1.37 1.45 1.27 1.27 1.38 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ................................ 4.31 4.57 4.80 5.11 5.28 5.56 5.87 6.16 6.41 6.61 6.77 6.91 4.70 5.72 6.68 Crude Oil Net Imports (c) ......................................... 8.55 8.88 8.52 7.89 7.47 7.61 7.94 7.36 6.66 6.78 6.83 6.06 8.46 7.60 6.58 SPR Net Withdrawals ..............................................

426

Natural Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 86. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 13. Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices Table 14. Oil and Gas Supply Table 21. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - New England Table 22. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic Table 23. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 24. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 25. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 26. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 27. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

supply to MRT's East Line or reduce applicable delivery volumes. Colorado Interstate Gas Company announced on December 6 that the Cheyenne Compressor Stations unit that had...

428

DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. Read Dr. Boswell's testimony Dr. Ray Boswell, Senior Management and Technology Advisor at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, testified before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources that the R&D program in gas hydrates is working to integrate and leverage

429

Natural gas, uncertainty, and climate policy in the US electric power sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates how uncertainties related to natural gas prices and potential climate policies may influence capacity investments, utilization, and emissions in US electricity markets. Using a two-stage stochastic programming approach, model results suggest that climate policies are stronger drivers of greenhouse gas emission trajectories than new natural gas supplies. The dynamics of learning and irreversibility may give rise to an investment climate where strategic delay is optimal. Hedging strategies are shown to be sensitive to the specification of probability distributions for climate policy and natural gas prices, highlighting the important role of uncertainty quantification in future research. The paper also illustrates how this stochastic modeling framework could be used to quantify the value of limiting methane emissions from natural gas production.

John E. Bistline

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Natural Gas: From Shortages to Abundance in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent dramatic and largely unanticipated growth in the current and expected future production of shale gas, and the related developments in the production of shale oil, have dramatically changed the energy future of the U.S. and potentially of the world compared to what experts were forecasting only a few years ago. These changes would not have been realized as quickly and efficiently absent deregulation of the wellhead price of natural gas, unbundling of gas supplies from pipeline transportation services, the associated development of efficient liquid markets for natural gas, and reforms to the licensing and regulation of prices for gas pipelines charge to move gas from where it is produced to where it is consumed. This economic platform supported the integration of technological advances in vertical drilling, downhole telemetry, horizontal drilling, monitoring and control of deep drilling equipment, and hydraulic fracturing to exploit economically shale gas deposits that were identified long ago, but considered to be uneconomical until recently. I. Natural Gas Wellhead Price and Pipeline Regulation Federal regulation of the natural gas industry began with the Natural Gas Act of 1938 (NGA). The NGA gave the Federal Power Commission (FPC), later the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the authority to license the construction and expansion of new interstate natural gas pipelines, to ensure that they are operated safely, and to regulate the prices 1

Paul L. Joskow

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Emerging energy security issues: Natural gas in the Gulf Nations, An overview of Middle East resources, export potentials, and markets. Report Series No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proceeds with a presentation of the natural gas resource base of the Gulf nations of the Middle East. The resource base is put in the context of the world natural gas resource and trade flows. This is followed by a discussion of the existing and planned project to move Gulf natural gas to consuming regions. Then a discussion of the source of demand in the likely target markets for the Gulf resource follows. Next, the nature of LNG pricing is discussed. A brief summary concludes the paper.

Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Gas Retention and Accumulation in Stellar Clusters and Galaxies: Implications for Star Formation and Black Hole Accretion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Star formation cannot proceed without the existence of an extensive gas reservoir. In particular, the supply of gas to form stars in dwarf galaxies and… (more)

Naiman, Jill Palmer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Repetitive resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Basic Costs in Electricity Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ONE of the principal problems in the management of public electricity supply companies is how to reconcile the ... supply companies is how to reconcile the costs with the charges not only from year to year but also in their irregular secular ...

1941-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

WATER SUPPLY A Handbook on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER SUPPLY HANDBOOK A Handbook on Water Supply Planning and Resource Management Institute for Water Resources Water Resources Support Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 7701 Telegraph Road Studies Division December 1998 Revised IWR Report 96-PS-4 #12;U.S. Army Institute for Water Resources

US Army Corps of Engineers

436

Developing a strategic roadmap for supply chain process improvement in a regulated utility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis covers work done at Tracks Energy, a regulated utility, to develop a strategic roadmap for supply chain process improvement. The focus of Tracks Energy has always been on keeping the lights on and the gas flowing ...

Yoder, Brent E. (Brent Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

electricity supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

supply supply Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting, among other things, data on the U.S. electricity supply. Source NREL Date Released March 05th, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electricity supply NREL Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Supply (13 worksheets) (xls, 1.2 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment

438

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

439

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Matthew M. Breslin Overview For 2007, 66 petroleum supply data series were analyzed to determine how close the PSM values were to the final PSA values. For these series, 50 out of the 66 PSM values were within 1 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error as compared to 38 out of 66 in 2006. Sixty-two petroleum supply data series were analyzed to see how close the MFW estimates were to the final PSA values. For these 62 series, 22 MFW estimates were within 2 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error and, of those, 9 were within 1 percent, compared to 27 and 10, respectively, for 2006. Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division

440

The Wicked Problem of Oil & Gas Development in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Current Permitting and Evaluation of Marine Spatial Planning as a Potential Management Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changing climatic conditions and shifting global economics have thrust the Arctic into the spotlight for many scientists, academics, and policymakers as well as those in offshore industries, particularly in shipping and oil and gas. This research...

Johannes, Emilie Ann

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Multiscale Strategic Planning Model for the Design of Integrated Ethanol and Gasoline Supply Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Multiscale Strategic Planning Model for the Design of Integrated Ethanol and Gasoline Supply address the design and planning of an integrated ethanol and gasoline supply chain. We assume, distribution centers where blending takes place, and the retail gas stations where different blends of gasoline

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

442

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 September 2013 Table 49. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Crude Oil 1 ............................................................ 94 2,282 598 1 - 2,975 99 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 453 2,129 10,579 380 396 13,937 465 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 300 1,599 652 346 92 2,989 100 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 153 530 9,927 34 304 10,947 365 Ethane/Ethylene ........................................... - - - - - - - Propane/Propylene ....................................... 126 199 9,412 4 299 10,040 335 Normal Butane/Butylene ...............................

443

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.PDF 8.PDF Table 18. Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Crude Oil ................................................................. 22,762 2,792 25,554 70,449 14,098 23,700 108,247 Natural Gas Plant Liquids ...................................... 544 - 544 2,607 144 644 3,395 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - 689 5 267 961 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 544 - 544 1,918 139 377 2,434 Normal Butane ..................................................

444

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.PDF 5.PDF Table 25. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Commodity PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Crude Oil 1,2 ................................................................................. 26,390 54,466 143,796 8,286 31,410 264,348 8,527 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ...... 1,606 2,797 1,838 502 192 6,935 224 Pentanes Plus .......................................................................... - 11 1,688 - - 1,699 55 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...................................................... 1,606 2,786 150 502 192 5,236 169 Ethane .................................................................................. - - - - - - - Ethylene ................................................................................

445

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 September 2013 Table 30. Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Crude Oil ................................................................. 29,611 2,906 32,517 67,983 12,033 22,460 102,476 Natural Gas Plant Liquids ...................................... 485 - 485 1,969 56 687 2,712 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - 777 - 265 1,042 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 485 - 485 1,192 56 422 1,670 Normal Butane ..................................................

446

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 December 2011 Table 50. Year-to-Date Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, January-December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Crude Oil 1 ............................................................ 2,147 13,574 1,237 191 9 17,158 47 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 3,739 15,542 42,403 2,288 6,081 70,053 192 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 2,075 11,913 179 1,415 340 15,922 44 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 1,664 3,628 42,224 873 5,741 54,131 148 Ethane/Ethylene ........................................... - - - - - - - Propane/Propylene ....................................... 401 514 40,084 58 4,187 45,243

447

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 28. Refinery and Blender Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Crude Oil ................................................................. 29,611 2,906 32,517 67,983 12,033 22,460 102,476 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ....................................................... 793 5 798 2,014 100 1,032 3,146 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - 777 2 340 1,119 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 793 5 798 1,237 98 692 2,027

448

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources September 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Ten projects focused on two technical areas aimed at increasing the nation's supply of "unconventional" fossil energy, reducing potential environmental impacts, and expanding carbon dioxide (CO2) storage options have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects include four that would develop advanced computer simulation and visualization capabilities to enhance understanding of ways to improve production and minimize environmental impacts associated with unconventional energy development; and six seeking to further next

449

Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

Not Available

1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

450

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

451

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

452

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

453

Water supply and demand in an energy supply model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

Abbey, D; Loose, V

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Multiple resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

456

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - States Dependent on Interstate  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

States Dependent on Interstate Pipelines States Dependent on Interstate Pipelines About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates States in grey which are at least 85% dependent on the interstate pipeline network for their natural gas supply are: New England - Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont Southeast - Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee Northeast - Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, District of Columbia Midwest - Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin Central - Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota West - Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington Interstate Natural Gas Supply Dependency, 2007 Map: Interstate Natural Gas Supply Dependency

457

Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models...

Song, Bo

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

Methanol production with elemental phosphorus byproduct gas: technical and economic feasibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using a typical, elemental, phosphorus byproduct gas stream in methanol production is assessed. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of a substitute for natural gas. The first part of the study establishes economic tradeoffs between several alternative methods of supplying the hydrogen which is needed in the methanol synthesis process to react with CO from the off gas. The preferred alternative is the Battelle Process, which uses natural gas in combination with the off gas in an economically sized methanol plant. The second part of the study presents a preliminary basic design of a plant to (1) clean and compress the off gas, (2) return recovered phosphorus to the phosphorus plant, and (3) produce methanol by the Battelle Process. Use of elemental phosphorus byproduct gas in methanol production appears to be technically feasible. The Battelle Process shows a definite but relatively small economic advantage over conventional methanol manufacture based on natural gas alone. The process would be economically feasible only where natural gas supply and methanol market conditions at a phosphorus plant are not significantly less favorable than at competing methanol plants. If off-gas streams from two or more phosphorus plants could be combined, production of methanol using only offgas might also be economically feasible. The North American methanol market, however, does not seem likely to require another new methanol project until after 1990. The off-gas cleanup, compression, and phosphorus-recovery system could be used to produce a CO-rich stream that could be economically attractive for production of several other chemicals besides methanol.

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

U.S. Natural Gas -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Working gas in storage is estimated to have been about 2,425 billion cubic feet at the end of November, 14% below the previous 5-year average. The current outlook for winter demand and supply suggests that storage is headed for record lows this winter if weather is normal or colder than normal. In the base case, we project that gas storage will fall to about 640 billion cubic feet at the end of the heating season (March 31, 2001). The previous record low was 758 billion cubic feet at the end of the winter of 1995-1996. If summer gas demand next year is as strong as we currently expect it to be, the low end-winter storage levels will present a strong challenge to the North American gas supply system to maintain flexibility and provide additional gas in preparation for the subsequent winter season.

460

coal supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal supply coal supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 15, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into production, net imports, consumption by sector and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO coal coal supply disposition. prices EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Coal Supply, Disposition, and Prices- Reference Case (xls, 91.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas supply potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

energy supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

supply supply Dataset Summary Description OECD Factbook 2010: Economic, Environmental and Social Statistics - ISBN 92-64-08356-1 - © OECD 2010. Available directly from the OECD Statistics website (beta version). Source OECD Date Released January 01st, 2010 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords energy supply ISBN 92-64-08356-1 OECD renewable energy world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon OECD Factbook 2010: Contribution of Renewables to Energy Supply (xls, 38.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1971 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment the User can upload up to 1,500 words or 2,000 cells (equivalent to 4 tables or graphs) provided that suitable acknowledgement of OECD as source and copyright owner is given. The User must link to the OECD page where the uploaded material was taken from;

462

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

463

Total supply chain cost model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sourcing and outsourcing decisions have taken on increased importance within Teradyne to improve efficiency and competitiveness. This project delivered a conceptual framework and a software tool to analyze supply chain ...

Wu, Claudia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting the Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop on February 3-4, 2015, in Golden, Colorado. The purpose of the workshop is to bring together a...

465

Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Lactose oxidation kinetics with oxygen in catalyst-solution-gas three-phase system with simultaneous electrical potential measurement of supported gold catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lactose oxidation kinetics was studied on an supported gold catalyst with simultaneous control of catalyst potential. The experimental data were described well...

D. Yu. Murzin; E. V. Murzina; A. V. Tokarev…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Natural Gas 2007 Year-In-Review  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7 This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2007 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2007 from the...

468

Natural Gas 2006 Year-In-Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2006 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2006 from the...

469

A Fuel of the Future: Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a brief, up-to-date analysis of the world natural gas market. Along with a sketch of supply, demand, and price, some consideration will be given to the deregulation-privatization controve...

Ferdinand E. Banks

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Internet-Enabled Supply ChainsInternet-Enabled Supply Chains Quan Z. Sheng, University of Adelaide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

89 Internet-Enabled Supply ChainsInternet-Enabled Supply Chains Quan Z. Sheng, University of the Internet-enabled Supply Chain 89 Key Supply Chain Processes and the Internet 89 Impacts of Internet-Enabled Supply Chains 92 Enabling Technologies for Internet-Enabled Supply Chain Management 92 Internet-based EDI

Sheng, Michael

471

NREL: Jobs and Economic Competitiveness - Supply Constraints...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supply Constraints Analysis Some of the materials used in solar PV modules, such as tellurium and indium, are rare materials in limited supply. Solar PV technologies have grown...

472

Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency and thus reduce greenhouse gas emissions, however current market penetration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency that California will not reach the targets for combined heat and power set for it by the Air Resources Board (ARB of combined heat and power into the new ARB Emissions Cap and Trade scheme. This potential failure would

Kammen, Daniel M.

473

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5potentials adjusted to fit observed nucleon-nucleon S1 and D1 phase shifts. In the range of densities 0.5potentials give nearly the same energy/particle (within 0.5 Mev); our values tend to run an Mev below values found by Brueckner et al., for the Gammel-Thaler potential. Wider divergences appear at higher densities. Our values, and Brueckner's are higher than those found by Salpeter by a semiempirical approach. A crude estimate of the second-order energy for our potentials indicates that perturbation theory converges rapidly in the density range considered. Our results suggest that at moderately low densities the energy/particle in a many-body system is insensitive to the shape or nonlocal character of the assumed two-body potential.

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

475

President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply September 26, 2005 - 10:47am Addthis Washington, DC On Monday, President Bush came to the headquarters of the Department of Energy (DOE) to get a briefing on the Nation's energy infrastructure from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Interior Secretary Gale Norton. The briefing, which took place in the DOE Emergency Operations Center, focused on the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on oil and natural gas production, refining, and distribution in the Gulf region. While damages from the hurricanes continue to be assessed, the President asked all Americans to be better conservers of energy and he directed the federal government to lead energy conservation by curtailing

476

President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply September 26, 2005 - 10:47am Addthis Washington, DC On Monday, President Bush came to the headquarters of the Department of Energy (DOE) to get a briefing on the Nation's energy infrastructure from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Interior Secretary Gale Norton. The briefing, which took place in the DOE Emergency Operations Center, focused on the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on oil and natural gas production, refining, and distribution in the Gulf region. While damages from the hurricanes continue to be assessed, the President asked all Americans to be better conservers of energy and he directed the federal government to lead energy conservation by curtailing

477

Natural gas strategic plan and program crosscut plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas strategic plan recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing increased U.S. natural gas use. Focus areas of research include natural gas supply, delivery, and storage, power generation, industrial, residential and commercial, natural gas vehicles, and the environment. Historical aspects, mission, situation analysis, technology trends, strategic issues, performance indicators, technology program overviews, and forecasting in the above areas are described.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) Since Wednesday, July 14, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub remained at $5.91 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.931 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 5 cents or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday (July 14). Natural gas in storage was at 2,227 Bcf as of July 16, which is 2.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 35 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent on the week to $40.63 per barrel or $7.005 per MMBtu. Prices: Strengthening weather fundamentals and increasing power generation loads since Monday, July 19, contributed to rebounding gas prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. The growing potential for a supply-side disturbance also contributed to rising prices on Wednesday, July 21, as the first tropical depression of the Atlantic hurricane season may be gathering south of Hispaniola. The largest gains in spot prices since last Wednesday, July 14, principally occurred west of the Rockies as increases in the California and Rocky Mountains regions averaged 21 and 19 cents per MMBtu, respectively. Prices in the Northeast gained 11 cents per MMBtu on average with prices at the Algonquin and New York City citygates climbing 19 and 17 cents per MMBtu, respectively. Gains elsewhere were less pronounced with prices in the Midcontinent, Midwest, and Texas regions increasing less than a dime on average. In contrast to the general pattern of rising prices in the Lower 48 States, prices in Florida fell on average 8 cents per MMBtu. Prices continue to exceed last year's levels by almost a dollar. As of July 21, 2004, prices at the Henry Hub are 90 cents or 17 percent above last year's level.

479

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 13, 2011) As the story of abundant natural gas supply continued to provide headlines for the market this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 6-13), spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased. Moderate temperatures also likely contributed to the price declines by limiting end-use demand and allowing for replenishment of storage supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, to $4.14 per MMBtu. Other market prices also decreased by up to 10 cents per MMBtu, with a few exceptions in the U.S. Northeast.

480

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Prices headed up the middle of last week despite seasonal or cooler temperatures everywhere but California (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) and the July 4th holiday, regarded as one of the lowest natural gas consumption days. As expected, the resulting 10-cent-per-MMBtu gain at the Henry Hub on Thursday compared with the previous Friday was undone the following day. The futures price for August delivery was able to stay ahead of the previous week by 12.2 cents to settle at $3.218 on Friday. Spot natural gas prices for large packages in southern California increased as much as $2.71 per MMBtu as temperatures soared and gas-fired power plants endeavored to meet air conditioning demand. Prices started to recede as temperatures abated by the end of the week. Strong gas supplies across the country supported another hefty net addition to storage of 105 Bcf.

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481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

482

International LNG trade : the emergence of a short-term market; International liquefied natural gas trade : the emergence of a short-term market.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas is estimated to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain is a way of… (more)

Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

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