Sample records for gas supply basins

  1. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural...

  2. Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kalwant

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue increasing the energy supply to meet global demand in the coming decades, the energy industry needs creative thinking that leads to the development of new energy sources. Unconventional gas resources, especially those in frontier basins...

  3. Natural Gas Supply SBIR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker, H.D.; Gwilliam, W.J.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was created in 1982 by Public Law 97-219 and reauthorized in 1992 until the year 2000 by Public Law 102-564. The purposes of the new law are to (1) expand and improve the SBIR program, 2) emphasize the program`s goal of increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through Federal R&D, (3) increase small business participation in Federal R&D, and (4) improve the Federal Government`s dissemination of information concerning the SBIR program. DOE`s SBIR pro-ram has two features that are unique. In the 1995 DOE SBIR solicitation, the DOE Fossil Energy topics were: environmental technology for natural gas, oil, and coal; advanced recovery of oil; natural gas supply; natural gas utilization; advanced coal-based power systems; and advanced fossil fuels research. The subtopics for this solicitation`s Natural Gas Supply topic are (1) drilling, completion, and stimulation; (2) low-permeability Formations; (3) delivery and storage; and (4) natural gas upgrading.

  4. Gas supplies of interstate/natural gas pipeline companies 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides information on the interstate pipeline companies' supply of natural gas during calendar year 1989, for use by the FERC for regulatory purposes. It also provides information to other Government agencies, the natural gas industry, as well as policy makers, analysts, and consumers interested in current levels of interstate supplies of natural gas and trends over recent years. 5 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. Western Europe's future gas supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardaun, G.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decline in indigenous natural gas production by 2000 will be compensated by imported natural gas and LNG and gas from unconventional sources. Coal gas will furnish about 10 percent of the demand, more natural gas imports will come from North Africa and the USSR and additional LNG will come from West Africa, the Middle East and the Western Hemisphere.

  6. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES ........................................................................................................ 2 2.2 Net Basin Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table lb.--Lag-Zero Cross Covariances and Cross Correlations Among Great Lakes Annual Connecting

  7. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  8. The 'Supply-of-Storage' for Natural Gas in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uria, Rocio; Williams, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Hedging Effectiveness of Natural Gas Futures. ” EnergyCommission. (2002). “Natural Gas Supply and Infrastructureand Price Dynamics in Natural Gas City Gate Markets. ”

  9. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  10. Look at natural gas supplies: room for cautious optimism. [USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teitelbaum, D.F.

    1981-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of natural gas availability made only on a national level tend to mask major changes in regional reserves and production, resulting in overly optimistic estiamtes of future supplies. The Zinder annual gas-supply report - based on regional analyses - projects that conventional production will decline more than 50% below current levels by 2000. The development of alternative sources of natural gas (through unconventional production and importation) could maintain a constant level of total gas supplies despite the falling supply of conventional gas.

  11. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , the BASIN software is combined with PRISE in the UGRA system to estimate unconventional resource potential in frontier basins. The PRISE software contains information about the resources (conventional gas, conventional oil, shale gas, coalbed methane...

  12. Gas energy supply outlook through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalisch, R.B.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1984 the American Gas Association published a study by the Gas Supply Committee titled, ''The Outlook for Gas Energy Through 2010.'' This study was a joint effort by many people of the gas industry including GRI, IGT and AGA. The study observed that come 1646 Tcf of natural gas is judged to be ultimately recoverable in the US. Of this total, 665 Tcf were produced up to year-end 1984. At that time an additional 197 Tcf were categorized as proved reserves, i.e., known to exist with reasonable certainty and producible under current economic and operating conditions. An additional 784 Tcf were classified as potential supply. In short, about 60 % of the nation's ultimately recoverable resource still is available; only 40 % has been produced to data. This is a formidable gas resource for the lower-48; in 1984 the production level was about 17 Tcf; proved reserves were approximately 163 Tcf - more than nine times the 1984 production. 2 references, 2 tables.

  13. QER- Comment of Natural Gas Supply Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TO: Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force In response to the Department of Energy’s August 25, 2014 Federal Register Notice seeking input on the Quadrennial Energy Review, attached are comments from the Natural Gas Supply Association. Thank you for this opportunity to share our views on the important issue of energy infrastructure. If we can be of further assistance, please let me know. Regards,

  14. Enron sees major increases in U. S. gas supply, demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, M.M.; Stram, B. (Enron Corp., Houston, TX (US))

    1991-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Enron Corp., Houston, in an extensive study of U.S. natural-gas supply and demand through the year 2000, has found that the U.S. gas-resource base is 1,200 tcf. Despite current weaknesses in natural-gas prices, demand growth will be strong although affected by oil-price assumptions. This paper reports on highlights in the areas of reserves and production which include gains in both categories in the Rockies/Wyoming, San Juan basin, and Norphlet trends (offshore Alabama). The Midcontinent/Hugoton area exhibits reserve declines in a period of flat production. In the U.S. Gulf Coast (USGC) offshore, both production and reserves decline over the forecast period. These projections are derived from a base-case price of $4.07/MMBTU by 2000. U.S. gas production exhibits a production decline in a low oil-price case from 19 to 16.4 tcf by 2000, if prices are 30% below the base case, that is, $2.93/MMBTU. Gains in commercial gas use are strong under either scenario of a base oil price of $29.80 in 1990 dollars in the year 2000 or a low oil price of $20.50 in 1990 dollars in 2000. Demand for natural gas for power generation grows as much as 1.5 tcf by 2000 in the Enron base case and by 300 bcf by 2000 in the low crude-oil price case.

  15. Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

  16. Oil and gas resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is part of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). This one for the Fergana Basin is an EIA first for republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). This was a trial study of data availability and methodology, resulting in a reservoir-level assessment of ultimate recovery for both oil and gas. Ultimate recovery, as used here, is the sum of cumulative production and remaining Proved plus Probable reserves as of the end of 1987. Reasonable results were obtained when aggregating reservoir-level values to the basin level, and in determining general but important distributions of across-basin reservoir and fluid parameters. Currently, this report represents the most comprehensive assessment publicly available for oil and gas in the Fergana Basin. This full report provides additional descriptions, discussions and analysis illustrations that are beneficial to those considering oil and gas investments in the Fergana Basin. 57 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Restricted Natural Gas Supply Case (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The restricted natural gas supply case provides an analysis of the energy-economic implications of a scenario in which future gas supply is significantly more constrained than assumed in the reference case. Future natural gas supply conditions could be constrained because of problems with the construction and operation of large new energy projects, and because the future rate of technological progress could be significantly lower than the historical rate. Although the restricted natural gas supply case represents a plausible set of constraints on future natural gas supply, it is not intended to represent what is likely to happen in the future.

  18. U.S. Natural Gas Supply to 2030 Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    LNG Total Figure 1: U.S. natural gas supply (reference case) It should be noted that this is the reference case; the "side cases", based upon the volume of projected LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports gas supply projections for 2030 (TCF) Production Low LNG Reference High LNG Dry gas 21.99 20.83 19

  19. Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NANGAS (North American Natural Gas Analysis System), E2020 (Modeling Forum (EMF). 2003. Natural Gas, Fuel Diversity and2003. Increasing U.S. Natural Gas Supplies: A Discussion

  20. Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin Gregory J. Mc (2007), Warming may create substantial water supply shortages in the Colorado River basin, Geophys. Res; published 27 November 2007. [1] The high demand for water, the recent multiyear drought (1999

  1. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  2. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  3. The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanty, Evi

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds...

  4. Oil and gas resources of the Fergana basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Advance summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA), in cooperation with the US Geological Survey (USGS), has assessed 13 major petroleum producing regions outside of the United States. This series of assessments has been performed under EIA`s Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). The basic approach used in these assessments was to combine historical drilling, discovery, and production data with EIA reserve estimates and USGS undiscovered resource estimates. Field-level data for discovered oil were used for these previous assessments. In FESAP, supply projections through depletion were typically formulated for the country or major producing region. Until now, EIA has not prepared an assessment of oil and gas provinces in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Before breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Fergana basin was selected for a trial assessment of its discovered and undiscovered oil and gas. The object was to see if enough data could be collected and estimated to perform reasonable field-level estimates of oil and gas in this basin. If so, then assessments of other basins in the FSU could be considered. The objective was met and assessments of other basins can be considered. Collected data for this assessment cover discoveries through 1987. Compared to most other oil and gas provinces in the FSU, the Fergana basin is relatively small in geographic size, and in number and size of most of its oil and gas fields. However, with recent emphasis given to the central graben as a result of the relatively large Mingbulak field, the basin`s oil and gas potential has significantly increased. At least 7 additional fields to the 53 fields analyzed are known and are assumed to have been discovered after 1987.

  5. Alternative Water Supply Options for Nitrate Contamination in California's Tulare and Salinas Groundwater Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    to harm human health. The Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley were chosen as pilot study areas to studyi Alternative Water Supply Options for Nitrate Contamination in California's Tulare and Salinas Groundwater Basins By KRISTIN LINN HONEYCUTT B.S. (University of California, Davis) 2007 M.S. (University

  6. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

  7. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

  8. Short-term supply chain management in upstream natural gas systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selot, Ajay

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas supply chain planning and optimization is important to ensure security and reliability of natural gas supply. However, it is challenging due to the distinctive features of natural gas supply chains. These ...

  9. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  10. BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

  11. Oil and gas shows in the Salina basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D.; Lambert, M.; Berendsen, P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents data from drillers' records and other information on the Salina basin wells in north-central Kansas. A listing that includes well name, operator, location, completion date, depth intervals, and formation name for each well is included. A map showing oil and gas fields in the surrounding area and wells drilled within the basin is offered.

  12. Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

  13. Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the economic structure of the Danish natural gas market is formulated mathematically giving a descriptionNatural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat

  14. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

  15. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

  16. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

  17. Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Tool ofTopo II: AnPipeline andSupplemental Gas

  18. Florida Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar AprVentedThousand Cubic030

  19. Georgia Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearper Thousand Cubic Feet)2.4 2.5 2.9*

  20. Hawaii Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TOTotalThousand Cubic2,559 2,447

  1. Future natural gas supply and demand balance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the future price and availability of natural gas as a boiler fuel in the United States. Analysis focuses on various forecasts for natural gas production and consumption through the year 2000. The forecasts reviewed predict that conventional lower-48 production will decline through the year 2000, but there is a wide divergence of opinion on the future availability of gas from unconventional sources of supply. Future gas prices are also uncertain, but as deregulation proceeds, the rolling-in of high cost sources of supply will diminish and gas will be priced more competitively with oil. Analysis presented in the report implies that it will be prudent to maintain the planning assumption that gas will be phased out as a boiler fuel. Gas should, however, remain attractive to utilities for a variety of specific uses. Fluctuating fuel prices may make it advantageous to use gas for short periods of time, and gas may also prove to be attractive in less price sensitive applications.

  2. Documentation of the oil and gas supply module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSK, to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2). OGSM is a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply potential and related issues. Its primary function is to produce forecast of crude oil, natural gas production, and natural gas imports and exports in response to price data received endogenously (within NEMS) from the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) and the Petroleum Market Model (PMM). To accomplish this task, OGSM does not provide production forecasts per se, but rather parameteres for short-term domestic oil and gas production functions and natural gas import functions that reside in PMM and NGTDM.

  3. Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and private sources, including the Department of Energy, manufacturers' groups, and the various academic and other research institutes. Although, these generally tend to be increasingly optimistic about the gas supply outlook and the contribution... that gas can make to U.S. energy needs in the future, questions about price deregulation continue to cloud the gas outlook in many minds. Given this, the purposes of this paper are (a) to describe briefly the prospects for natural and supplemental gas...

  4. Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the potential impact of rotating electrical outages on petroleum product and natural gas supply in California.

  5. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

  6. Gas Geochemistry of the Dogger Geothermal Aquifer (Paris Basin, France)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C.; Marty, B.; Brach, M.; Wei, H.F.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The low enthalpy program developed in the Paris Basin provides the opportunity for studying the gas geochemistry of the calcareous aquifer of the Dogger. Hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} are mainly biogenic, He displays high concentrations. He, Ar and N{sub 2} have multiple origins (radioactive decay, atmospheric migration, biochemical processes). The distribution of the gases in the zones of the basin varies in relation to the general chemistry, sedimentology and hydrodynamics. The gas geothermometers do not apply to this environment but useful estimations of the redox potential of the fluid can be derived from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratios. H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are involved in corrosion processes and scaling in the pipes. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. AEO2012 Preliminary Assumptions: Oil and Gas Supply

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I'26,282.1chemical7Host and Presentor3 Oil and Gas Supply

  8. The effect of natural gas supply on US renewable energy and CO2emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shearer, C; Shearer, C; Bistline, J; Inman, M; Davis, SJ; Davis, SJ

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leaks from North American natural gas systems Science 343of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in theThe effect of natural gas supply on US renewable energy and

  9. Niger Delta basin oil and gas prospects evaluated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that an ambitious project to map African oil and gas prospects has produced its first findings in a report on the Niger Delta basin. In Nigeria, 73% of discoveries are smaller than 50 million bbl, with a 42% success rate for wildcats. There are 'out of round prospects off Nigeria, too, with a number of companies currently in discussions. Petroconsultants the there are further opportunities for exploration in the Northern Onshore Fringe Belt, which has an estimated potential of 500 million bbl of reserves. Three OPLs are open.

  10. Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    299 Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Abstract The objective of this study was to get more information about the root zone, mainly the gas and ethylene, a gas sampling system was used to get gas samples from the root zone. CO2 gas samples of 20 ml

  11. Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Supply Chain Management and Economic Valuation of Real Options in the Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas Industry Mulan Xiaofeng Wang Submitted to the Tepper School of Business in Partial Fulfillment options in the natural gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry, including gas pipeline transportation

  12. Pressure seals - Implications for deep gas exploration in Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tigert, V.A.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure seals are economically significant geological phenomena because they play an important role in deep natural gas entrapment. Pressure seals identified in basins worldwide may offer a new frontier for exploring natural gas reservoirs below {minus} 10,000 ft. Pressure seals are low-permeability envelopes that enclose abnormally pressured internal reservoirs. There are three different types of seals: basal, lateral, and top planar. Basal seals define the bottom of abnormal pressure compartments and usually follow a stratigraphic horizon. Lateral seals are usually associated with fault patterns. Top planar seals may cut across time-stratigraphic boundaries, different lithologies, and structures, and are by far the most significant type. The southeastern portion of the Anadarko basin in the Mill Creek graben area displays a layered sequence of abnormally pressured fluid compartments between {minus} 3,000 and {minus} minus 16,000 ft. These compartments are separated from each other as well as from overlying and underlying normal pressure zones by pressure seals. In McClain County, a top planar pressure seal separating two abnormal pressured compartments is located between {minus} 11,000 and {minus} 12,000 ft within the Simpson Group. Diagenetic signatures identified in the seal zone are characterized by carbonate and/or silica cemented intervals alternating with more porous and permeable units generating distinctive banded and/or laminated structures, coined zebra structures. The resulting compositional and textural heterogeneity of the Simpson sandstones may be related to diagenetic modification that occurred during the seal evolution.

  13. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, P.; George, R.A.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

  14. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

  15. Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

  16. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, James Howard

    Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan C) of this area, the presence of gas hydrates. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates consists of a shallow (300, and is interpreted as the top of the gas hydrate layer. Similarly, a high-amplitude Rc

  17. Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

  18. Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

  19. Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yamin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for basinward extension of Travis Peak gas production along the west margin of the East Texas Basin. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, southeast-trending Travis Peak sandstones belts were deposited by the Ancestral Red River fluvial-deltaic system...

  20. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

  1. Cost Curves for Gas Supply Security: The Case of Bulgaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silve, Florent; Noël, Pierre

    . Interconnections: 8.64 7.92 14 - 5 Figure 2. Structure of gas consumption by sector, Bulgaria (2007) Figure 3. Structure of heat generation by fuel type, Bulgaria (2007) Figure 4. Electricity generation mix, Bulgaria (2007) Chemical industry 31... to put the vertical dotted line). The government may want to insure the gas consumption of some specific categories of customers, the interruption of which Cost per unit of peak gas consumption insured (m€/mcm/day) Cumulative level of peak gas...

  2. Coke battery with 51-m{sup 3} furnace chambers and lateral supply of mixed gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.I. Rudyka; N.Y. Chebotarev; O.N. Surenskii; V.V. Derevich [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic approaches employed in the construction of coke battery 11A at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat are outlined. This battery includes 51.0-m{sup 3} furnaces and a dust-free coke-supply system designed by Giprokoks with lateral gas supply; it is heated exclusively by low-calorific mixed gas consisting of blast-furnace gas with added coke-oven gas. The 82 furnaces in the coke battery are divided into two blocks of 41. The gross coke output of the battery (6% moisture content) is 1140000 t/yr.

  3. Water resources: sustainable water supply management and basin wide modelling Internationally it has been recognized that the most important challenge to ensuring sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Water resources: sustainable water supply management and basin wide modelling Internationally it has been recognized that the most important challenge to ensuring sustainable water use is implementing integrated water resources management (IWRM). It provides the best framework for balancing

  4. appalachian basin gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Danis A. Wiloso; Eddy A. Subroto; Eddy Hermanto 2009-01-01 102 Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas Texas...

  5. Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Monthly ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information...

  6. Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

  7. DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An agreement aimed at improving cooperation and collaboration in the areas of oil and natural gas supply, delivery, and climate change mitigation, has been signed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC).

  8. EIA model documentation: Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projects are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region.

  9. Oil and Gas CDT Mesozoic Biosequence Stratigraphy of the Wessex Basin, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Mesozoic Biosequence Stratigraphy of the Wessex Basin, UK University of Birmingham expert academics from across the CDT and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals of a CDT cohort, you will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil

  10. Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElroy, James F. (Hamilton, MA); Chludzinski, Paul J. (Swampscott, MA); Dantowitz, Philip (Peabody, MA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation.

  11. Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElroy, J.F.; Chludzinski, P.J.; Dantowitz, P.

    1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation. 2 figs.

  12. Western Gas Sands Project: production histories of the Piceance and Uinta basins of Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.; Kohout, J. (comp.)

    1980-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Current United States geological tight sand designations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins' Western Gas Sands Project include the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations. Others, such as the Dakota, Cedar Mountain, Morrison and Mancos may eventually be included. Future production from these formations will probably be closely associated with existing trends. Cumulative gas production through December 1979, of the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins is less than 275 billion cubic feet. This contrasts dramatically with potential gas in place estimates of 360 trillion cubic feet. If the geology can be fully understood and engineering problems surmounted, significant potential reserves can be exploited.

  13. Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

  14. The Cost of Improving Gas Supply Security in the Baltic States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Pierre; Findlater, Sachi; Chyong, Chi Kong

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    to replace a failed compressor station on a transmission pipeline; 12 most disruptions caused by pipeline failures could be repaired in a week or less. A failure of the Latvian underground storage could potentially disrupt supply to Estonia and Latvia... it is important to note that both types of disruptions have the same practical consequences. For example in the Baltic States, an accidental pipeline explosion or compressor failure would interrupt gas supply to district heating plants, just as a voluntary...

  15. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and utilization. Water in the three main stream reservoirs is unsuitable for municipal use without costly desalinization processes. The quality of the river improves significantly in the lower basin with dilution from good quality tributaries. Population...

  16. Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuels -- particularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2YonthlyEnergyMapExpansionMajor

  18. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  19. Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Metropolitan area: an additional ecosystem service?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    . We pretreated the basin with a heavy N isotope (15N in NO3 ­ ) to trace the fate of the N added from any process by basin design. Data calculated from gas fluxes in chambers after water, but potentially producing considerable amounts of N2O, a greenhouse gas Incoming data will allow complete

  20. RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

  1. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

  2. Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial fuel and feedstock applications, as well as such new non-traditional uses as cogeneration, natural gas vehicles and select gas use with coal. With regard to impending gas price decontrol, analyses conducted by the American Gas Association (A...

  3. Oil and gas basins in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pripyat basin is a Late Devonian rift characterized by a typical fault-block structure. Two synrift salt formations separate the Devonian stratigraphic succession into the subsalt, intersalt, and postsalt sections. Oil is produced from carbonate reservoirs of the subsalt and intersalt sections. Traps are controlled by crests of tilted fault blocks. We analyzed 276 shale and carbonate-rock samples and 21 oils to determine oil-source bed relationships in the basin. Maturities of the oils are from very immature, heavy (9[degrees] API), to very mature, light (42[degrees] API). All fields are in a narrow band on the north side of the basin, and only shows of immature, heavy oil have been obtained from the rest of the basin. Three genetic oil types are identified. Oil type A has high pristane/phytane ratios (>1.0), high amounts of C[sub 29] 18[alpha] (H) trisnorneohopane, and [delta]13C of hydrocarbons in the range of -31 to -27%. Oil types B and C contain very high amounts of gammacerane, which suggests that the oils were derived from carbonate-evaporite source facies. Type B oils are isotopically similar to type A, whereas type C oils are isotopically light (about -33%). Organic carbon content is as much as 5%, and kerogen types range from I to IV. Our data indicate that rocks within the intersalt carbonate formation are the source of the type B oils of low maturity. Thermally mature rocks that might be the source for the mature oils have not been found. Such rocks may occur in depressions adjacent to tilted fault blocks. Higher levels of thermal maturity on the north part of the basin in the vicinity of the most mature oils may be related to higher heat flow during and soon after rifting or to a suspected recently formed magmatic body in the crust below the northern zone. Present-day high temperatures in parts of the northern zone may support the latter alternative.

  4. 3-DIMENSIONAL GEOMECHANICAL MODELING OF A TIGHT GAS RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-DIMENSIONAL GEOMECHANICAL MODELING OF A TIGHT GAS RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Kurtis R. Wikel #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT An integrated 3-dimensional geomechanical model have used the predictive geomechanical model to compare production and effective stress change

  5. Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

  6. Pathways of migration of oil and gas in south Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Mississippi salt basin is one of three interior basins characterized by structures formed by movement of the Late Jurassic Louann Salt. An analysis of pathways of migration within the basin has revealed that it is possible to explain why hydrocarbons have accumulated in some structures, yet are absent from others that would appear to be favorable. Seventy-four of the more than 840 fields within the basin, including the largest known accumulations, have hydrocarbons in stacked reservoirs belonging in more than one formation. These stacked reservoirs result from vertical migration facilitated by faulting. In more than 750 fields, hydrocarbons are confined to a single formation in traps associated with four distinct trends of production that decrease in age systematically from the margin of the basin into the interior. The hydrocarbons in these trends have accumulated by intrastratal migration (without the agency of faulting) from a nearby source in the same unit as the reservoir. On the northwest side of the basin, migration between units brought into contact along unconformities has resulted in 10 fields. Vertical migration brought about by faulting around shallow salt diapirs has allowed hydrocarbons to escape, so that only 5 of 56 such structures have produced oil or gas. These conclusions, derived from geologic deductions, are supported by preliminary geochemical data; more extensive and detailed geochemical analyses of oils from the various sources are under way.

  7. Air/fuel supply system for use in a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Timothy A; Schilp, Reinhard; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine combustor assembly. The fuel injector includes a main body and a fuel supply structure. The main body has an inlet end and an outlet end and defines a longitudinal axis extending between the outlet and inlet ends. The main body comprises a plurality of air/fuel passages extending therethrough, each air/fuel passage including an inlet that receives air from a source of air and an outlet. The fuel supply structure communicates with and supplies fuel to the air/fuel passages for providing an air/fuel mixture within each air/fuel passage. The air/fuel mixtures exit the main body through respective air/fuel passage outlets.

  8. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  9. Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Evaluating gas content of black warrior basin coalbeds from wireline log data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, J.L. (Schlumberger Well Services (US))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that coalbeds have long been known to contain natural gas in varying amounts. To the mining industry, this is basically a hazard to be controlled and avoided where possible. To the petroleum industry, it is an exploitable resource that holds significant economic potential because of shallow drilling and the promising of long well life. The variability of coal as a gas reservoir raises the need for oil and gas-well explorers to develop the capability of evaluating coalbed gas content to identify and produce coal gas plays. Current petrophysical models for gas reservoir analysis in traditional clastic or carbonate environments are notable inadequate for evaluation of gas content in coal beds. However, numerous physical models exist for coals throughout the country, primarily from the efforts of the mining industry. A theoretical model was chosen and used to establish a method for evaluating gas content of coalbeds in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. Core data in the form of proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, and gas desorption measurements were used, along with wireline data, to build the models. Results of data analysis in wells with coals ranging from low-volatile bituminous to high-volatile B bituminous are compared with core gas desorption measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of the process.

  11. The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

  12. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  13. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. [CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Edwards, E.B. [ Ogle & Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States); Heck, R.G. [Ogle & Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  14. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. (CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Edwards, E.B. ( Ogle Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (Ogle Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  15. KEY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR NUCLEAR HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key requirements that affect the design of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear heat supply system (HTGR-NHSS) as the NGNP Project progresses through the design, licensing, construction and testing of the first of a kind HTGR based plant are summarized. These requirements derive from pre-conceptual design development completed to-date by HTGR Suppliers, collaboration with potential end users of the HTGR technology to identify energy needs, evaluation of integration of the HTGR technology with industrial processes and recommendations of the NGNP Project Senior Advisory Group.

  16. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil and Gas Supply Module

  17. Oil and Gas Supply Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet) Year%Year Jan Feb3 0 1 2 3ProductionOil and Gas Supply

  18. Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R. [Texas A& amp; M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

  19. Energy watchers IV. Energy, economics and environment: Imperatives realities, and balance and Pacific Basin Demand and downstream activities: Is Middle East supply the answer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mallakh, D.H. (ed.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1974, the International Research Center for Energy and Economic Development (ICEED) has been holding annual international energy conferences that seek to bring together the public and private sectors from the United States and overseas in order to facilitate the exchange of views and information. The nineteenth annual international energy sessions on [open quotes]Energy, Economics, and Environment: Imperatives, Realities, and Balance,[close quotes] opened April 21, 1992. The goal was to look at the complex linkage between energy and the environment that cannot be decoupled in the near to medium future. The thirteenth annual international area conference, held from April 23-24, 1992, reflected appreciation and acknowledgement of the primacy of the Arabian/Persian Gulf in international energy trade. The area theme, [open quotes]Pacific Basin Demand and Downstream Activities: Is Middle East Supply the Answer ,[close quotes] was premised on the solidification of trade blocs globally and on these two regions which represent the major areas of growth in energy demand and petroleum supply, respectively. Issues addressed in the papers presented included the impact on the world oil sector of these demand and supply zones in the direction of upstream and downstream investment, the approaches and instruments that may be initiated or honed in terms of joint ventures and supply arrangements in the 1990s, and the possibility that the former USSR will become an energy land bridge between the Pacific Basin and Europe.

  20. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer (''blanket'') on the uranium metal corrosion rates were also evaluated.

  1. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  2. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  3. Geologic assessment of natural gas from coal seams in the Warrior Basin, Alabama. Topical report, September 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFall, K.S.; Wicks, D.E.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a detailed geologic assessment of the coal deposits in the Warrior Basin area that have high potential for natural gas from coal seams. The estimate of the natural gas in place in the four major coal groups is 19.8 trillion cubic feet. Although the bulk of the gas in place is in the deeper areally extensive Black Creek and Mary Lee coal groups, the more shallow Pratt coal group also shows good potential for coal seam gas. The most concentrated areas of methane in place are in the eastern portion of the Warrior Basin. These areas coincide with thick accumulations of high rank coals and their associated higher gas contents. These areas also appear to have been structurally altered, leading to enhanced permeability to gas and water. Thus, the eastern portions of the basin appear more favorable for coalbed methane production due to high gas contents, attractive coal thicknesses, closely-spaced coal cleats and joints, and moderate depths to the coal horizons.

  4. Sampling and Analysis Plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105-KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.A.; Green, M.A.; Makenas, B.J.; Trimble, D.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) details the sampling and analyses to be performed on fuel canisters transferred to the Weasel Pit of the 105-KW fuel storage basin. The radionuclide content of the liquid and gas in the canisters must be evaluated to support the shipment of fuel elements to the 300 Area in support of the fuel characterization studies (Abrefah, et al. 1994, Trimble 1995). The following sections provide background information and a description of the facility under investigation, discuss the existing site conditions, present the constituents of concern, outline the purpose and scope of the investigation, outline the data quality objectives (DQO), provide analytical detection limit, precision, and accuracy requirements, and address other quality assurance (QA) issues.

  5. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling LNG Distribution Figure 1: Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) and San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E) Natural Gas Distribution System

  6. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Industrial Natural Gas Combustion (Unspecified) COlb/MMcf Commercial Natural Gas Combustion - WaterHeating Commercial Natural Gas Combustion - Space Heating NO

  7. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Industrial Natural Gas Combustion (Unspecified) CO lb/MMcf Commercial Natural Gas Combustion - Water HeatingCommercial Natural Gas Combustion - Space Heating NO X CO

  8. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

  9. Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate dissociation scenarios, and ongoing work may help confirm whether climate change is already impacting the stability of the vast oceanic hydrate reservoir.

  10. Shallow gas well drilling with coiled tubing in the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, R.G.; Ovitz, R.W.; Guild, G.J.; Biggs, M.D.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coiled tubing is being utilized to drill new wells, for re-entry drilling to deepen or laterally extend existing wells, and for underbalanced drilling to prevent formation damage. Less than a decade old, coiled tubing drilling technology is still in its inaugral development stage. Initially, utilizing coiled tubing was viewed as a {open_quotes}science project{close_quotes} to determine the validity of performing drilling operations in-lieu of the conventional rotary rig. Like any new technology, the initial attempts were not always successful, but did show promise as an economical alternative if continued efforts were made in the refinement of equipment and operational procedures. A multiwell project has been completed in the San Juan Basin of Northwestern New Mexico which provides documentation indicating that coiled tubing can be an alternative to the conventional rotary rig. A 3-well pilot project, a 6-well project was completed uniquely utilizing the combined resources of a coiled tubing service company, a producing company, and a drilling contractor. This combination of resources aided in the refinement of surface equipment, personnel, mud systems, jointed pipe handling, and mobilization. The results of the project indicate that utilization of coiled tubing for the specific wells drilled was an economical alternative to the conventional rotary rig for drilling shallow gas wells.

  11. REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

  12. Strategic Planning, Design and Development of the Shale Gas Supply Chain Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and fluids from the pure gas (methane) to produce what is known as "pipeline quality" dry natural gas.[2 in wells, providing raw materials for oil refineries or petrochemical plants, and as sources of energy.[3

  13. Study of the Natural Gas Hydrate 'Trap Zone' and the Methane Hydrate Potential in the Sverdrup Basin, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majorowicz, J. A. [Northern Geothermal Consult. (Canada)], E-mail: majorowi@show.ca; Hannigan, P. K.; Osadetz, K. G. [Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary (Canada)

    2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The methane hydrate stability zone beneath Sverdrup Basin has developed to a depth of 2 km underneath the Canadian Arctic Islands and 1 km below sea level under the deepest part of the inter-island sea channels. It is not, however, a continuous zone. Methane hydrates are detected in this zone, but the gas hydrate/free gas contact occurs rarely. Interpretation of well logs indicate that methane hydrate occurs within the methane stability zone in 57 of 150 analyzed wells. Fourteen wells show the methane hydrate/free gas contact. Analysis of the distribution of methane hydrate and hydrate/gas contact occurrences with respect to the present methane hydrate stability zone indicate that, in most instances, the detected methane hydrate occurs well above the base of methane hydrate stability. This relationship suggests that these methane hydrates were formed in shallower strata than expected with respect to the present hydrate stability zone from methane gases which migrated upward into hydrate trap zones. Presently, only a small proportion of gas hydrate occurrences occur in close proximity to the base of predicted methane hydrate stability. The association of the majority of detected hydrates with deeply buried hydrocarbon discoveries, mostly conventional natural gas accumulations, or mapped seismic closures, some of which are dry, located in structures in western and central Sverdrup Basin, indicate the concurring relationship of hydrate occurrence with areas of high heat flow. Either present-day or paleo-high heat flows are relevant. Twenty-three hydrate occurrences coincide directly with underlying conventional hydrocarbon accumulations. Other gas hydrate occurrences are associated with structures filled with water with evidence of precursor hydrocarbons that were lost because of upward leakage.

  14. A comparison of undiscovered oil and gas resource estimates, Los Padres National Forest in the Ventura Basin Province, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, K.J.; Valin, Z.C. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bain, D.M. [Consultant, Daily City, CA (United States); Hopps, T.E. [Consultant, Santa Paula, CA (United States); Friehauf, J.S.F. [Forest Service, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two recent assessments of the undiscovered oil and gas resources of Los Padres National Forest lands in the Ventura Basin Province using different methodologies and personnel show remarkable coincidence of estimated resources. The 1989 U.S. Geological Survey assessment was part of a National appraisal. In the Ventura Basin Province, two separate plays were assessed and a percentage of resources from these plays was allocated to Federal lands. By this allocation, the undiscovered oil and gas resources of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from <10-140 MMBO (means probability 60 MMBO, million barrels of oil) and 10-250 BCFG (mean probability 110 BCFG, billion cubic feet of gas). In 1993, the U.S. Forest Service completed an oil and gas assessment of the entire 1.8 million-acre Los Padres National Forest as part of a Reasonably Foreseeable Oil and Gas Development Scenario. In those areas of the forest considered to have high potential for the occurrence of oil and gas deposits, a deposit simulation model was used. This method is based on a fundamental reservoir engineering formula in the USGS computer program, FASPU (Fast Appraisal System for Petroleum-Universal). By this method, the undiscovered oil and gas resource of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from 0-182 MMBO (mean probability 56 MMBO) and 9-233 BCFG (mean probability 103 BCFG). An additional 6 MMBO (mean probability) is allocated to forest lands with medium potential within this province but not to any specific prospects. The remarkable coincidence of estimate resources resulting from such different assessment methods and personnel is noteworthy and appears to provide an increased measure of confidence in the estimates.

  15. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department of Renewable Resources

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  17. A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited. We can move

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited the dirtiest tar sands and tar shales, hydrofracking for gas, continued mountain-top removal and mechanized to society. We must collect a gradually rising fee from fossil fuel companies at the source, the domestic

  18. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4: Modeling Emissions from Natural Gas-Related Sources 4.1Penetration of Liquefied Natural Gas Table ES2: Impacts ontypical summer demand of natural gas in the South Coast Air

  19. Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moridis GJ. Oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociationKA. Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare, Proc.WS. A review of methane and gas hydrates in the dynamic,

  20. Causes of variable production rates of Pottsville Formation Coalbed Gas Wells, Virginia Mine Field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, W.B. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)); Ferguson, P.A. (Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, 27 coalbed gas wells were drilled, creating Virginia Mines field. In early 1993, average production rate was 55 Mcf/d per well, less than the geometric mean of 63 Mcf/d for wells in this region of the Warrior Basin. To clarify controls on gas production rates, we evaluated the production trends and the geologic setting. Strata on the southeast side of the project dip steeply northwestward off the Birmingham Anticlinorium toward the synclinal axis of the basin, which plunges approximately 2[degrees] southwestward. Northeast-trending normal faults having throws as great as 115 ft divide the project area into horsts and graben. Virginia Mines coalbed gas wells are completed in 13 to 16 ft of coal in 2 coal groups. Closure pressure (minimum stress) varies with structural setting and is 1,500 to 2,300 psi in the Black Creek group and 950 to 1,900 psi in overlying the Mary Lee group. Fracture gradient is greatest (commonly > 1.0 psi/ft) on the southeast of the project, along basin margin, suggesting that induced fractures have complex (T-shaped) geometries. Peak gas production at Virginia Mines occurred within the first 2 months and ranged from 40 to 180 Mcf/d; production rates fell sharply to 30 to 80 Mcf/d in the 18th month. Gas production rates are highest in the northern part of the project and lowest on the southeast side of the project and in one major fault block. Water production rates were 95 to 330 b/d initially but decreased an average of less than 40 b/d by the 18th month. Rapid gas and water decline rates are attributed to ineffective stimulations due to high fracture gradients and to low permeability caused by high in-situ stress. In-situ stress differences, in turn, reflect a highly variable structural setting. To improve production from low-rate wells will require new completion and stimulation techniques. Such techniques could have far-reaching implications, because coal beds in many other areas have high in-situ stresses.

  1. Causes of variable production rates of Pottsville Formation Coalbed Gas Wells, Virginia Mine Field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, W.B. Jr. [S.A. Holditch & Associates, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Ferguson, P.A. [Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, 27 coalbed gas wells were drilled, creating Virginia Mines field. In early 1993, average production rate was 55 Mcf/d per well, less than the geometric mean of 63 Mcf/d for wells in this region of the Warrior Basin. To clarify controls on gas production rates, we evaluated the production trends and the geologic setting. Strata on the southeast side of the project dip steeply northwestward off the Birmingham Anticlinorium toward the synclinal axis of the basin, which plunges approximately 2{degrees} southwestward. Northeast-trending normal faults having throws as great as 115 ft divide the project area into horsts and graben. Virginia Mines coalbed gas wells are completed in 13 to 16 ft of coal in 2 coal groups. Closure pressure (minimum stress) varies with structural setting and is 1,500 to 2,300 psi in the Black Creek group and 950 to 1,900 psi in overlying the Mary Lee group. Fracture gradient is greatest (commonly > 1.0 psi/ft) on the southeast of the project, along basin margin, suggesting that induced fractures have complex (T-shaped) geometries. Peak gas production at Virginia Mines occurred within the first 2 months and ranged from 40 to 180 Mcf/d; production rates fell sharply to 30 to 80 Mcf/d in the 18th month. Gas production rates are highest in the northern part of the project and lowest on the southeast side of the project and in one major fault block. Water production rates were 95 to 330 b/d initially but decreased an average of less than 40 b/d by the 18th month. Rapid gas and water decline rates are attributed to ineffective stimulations due to high fracture gradients and to low permeability caused by high in-situ stress. In-situ stress differences, in turn, reflect a highly variable structural setting. To improve production from low-rate wells will require new completion and stimulation techniques. Such techniques could have far-reaching implications, because coal beds in many other areas have high in-situ stresses.

  2. World gas supply and demand: 1980-2020. Based on a study by the International Gas Union Force II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, L.W.; Kalisch, R.B.; Wingenroth, J.L.; Kirk, S.R.; Meeder, J.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If world oil prices and economic growth rates rise moderately (2%/yr) as assumed by the International Gas Union's Task Force II, world natural gas demand could increase from 1980's level of 52 quadrillion Btu to 74 quads by 1990 and 90 quads by 2000. Gas demand growth rates will peak at 4.5%/yr during 1980-85, then fall to 3.3%/yr in 1985-90, 2%/yr in the 1990s, and 1% after 2000, although the rates will differ substantially for various countries, regions, and sectors. World gas production (53 quads in 1980) could reach 90-120 quads by 2000 and 92-100 by 2020. The North American/European share of world production, however, will decline from 55% in 1980 to 37% by 1990 and to 27% in 2000. Although North America's conventional production in 2020 will be only 60% of its current level, the expected growth in unconventional output should push overall production up 12%. The world reserves/production ratio, now at 45 years, will drop to 31 years by 2000 and 29 by 2020; the respective world reserves estimates are 2621 and 2350 trillion CF.

  3. Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    586-0521 FAX (202) 586-6050 Division of Natural Gas Regulatory Activities Robert J. Smith, Acting Division Director Room 3E-028 Telephone (202) 586-7241 FAX (202) 586-6050...

  4. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

  5. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Piceance Basin of Colorado for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented gas/produced water separation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieffer, F.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Piceance Basin through literature surveys. Jack McIntyre`s tool separates produced water from gas and disposes of the water downhole into aquifers unused because of poor water quality, uneconomic lifting costs or poor aquifer deliverability. The beneficial aspects of this technology are two fold. The process increases the potential for recovering previously uneconomic gas resources by reducing produced water lifting, treatment and disposal costs. Of greater importance is the advantage of lessening the environmental impact of produced water by downhole disposal. Results from the survey indicate that research in the Piceance Basin includes studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, conventional and unconventional recovery oil and gas technologies. Available information is mostly found centered upon the geology and hydrology for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Lesser information is available on production technology because of the limited number of wells currently producing in the basin. Limited information is available on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand formation waters and that of the potential disposal zones. No determination was made of the compatibility of these waters. The study also indicates that water is often produced in variable quantities with gas from several gas productive formations which would indicate that there are potential applications for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool in the Piceance Basin.

  6. Final Report - Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basin Sludge and in Grouted Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Gano, Sue; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being considered for the disposal of K Basin sludge as RH-TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the 55-gallon RH-TRU sealed drums to be transported to WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the uranium metal-water reaction (U + 2 H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}) in combination with the hydrogen generated from water and organic radiolysis. Gas generation testing was conducted with uranium metal particles of known surface area, in simulated K West (KW) Basin canister sludge and immobilized in candidate grout solidification matrices. This study evaluated potential for Portland cement and magnesium phosphate grouts to inhibit the reaction of water with uranium metal in the sludge and thereby permit higher sludge loading to the disposed waste form. The best of the grouted waste forms decreased the uranium metal-water reaction by a factor of four.

  7. Evaluation and Prediction of Unconventional Gas Resources in Underexplored Basins Worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Kun

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    triangle concept, which implies that all natural resources, including oil and gas, are distributed log-normally. In this work, I describe a methodology to estimate values of technically recoverable resources (TRR) for unconventional gas reservoirs...

  8. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Lewan (2002) concluded that much of the thermogenic gas produced in this basin is the result of cracking of oil to gas in deeply buried reservoirs. The efficiency of expulsion, migration and trapping has been estimated to range from 0.5 to 10 percent for certain basins (Schmoker, 1994: Zimmerman, 1999). The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin is 910 billion barrels using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated is 1,540 billion barrels using the Platte River software application. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 3,130 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 4,050 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Claypool and Mancini (1989) report that the conversion of oil to gas in reservoirs is a significant source of thermogenic gas in this basin. The Manila and Conecuh Subbasins are oil-prone. Although these subbasins are thermally mature for oil generation and expulsion, they are not thermally mature for secondary, non-associated gas generation and expulsion. The gas produced from the highly productive gas condensate fields (Big Escambia Creek and Flomaton fields) in these subbasins has been interpreted to be, in part, a product of the cracking of oil to gas and thermochemical reduction of evaporite sulfate in the reservoirs (Claypool and Mancini, 1989). The areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior Salt Basins with high potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs (>15,000 ft) have been identified. In the North Louisiana Salt Basin, these potential reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies, especially the Smackover, Cotton Valley, Hosston, and Sligo units. The estimate of the secondary, non-associated gas generated from cracking of oil in the source rock from depths below 12,000 feet in this basin is 4,800 TCF. Assuming an expul

  9. Cooling supply system for stage 3 bucket of a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin (Saratoga Springs, NY); Burns, James Lee (Schenectady, NY); Palmer, Gene David (Clifton Park, NY); Leone, Sal Albert (Scotia, NY); Drlik, Gary Joseph (Fairfield, OH); Gibler, Edward Eugene (Cincinnati, OH)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a land based gas turbine including a compressor, a combustor and turbine section including at least three stages, an improvement comprising an inlet into a third stage nozzle from the compressor for feeding cooling air from the compressor to the third stage nozzle; at least one passageway running substantially radially through each airfoil of the third stage nozzle and an associated diaphragm, into an annular space between the rotor and the diaphragm; and passageways communicating between the annular space and individual buckets of the third stage.

  10. Natural Gas Receipts Across U.S. Borders (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,9601. Natural Gas4,365,088

  11. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  12. Gas-lift technology applied to dewatering of coalbed methane wells in the black warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.J.; Coats, A. (Otis Engineering Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)); Marinello, S.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) wells are usually dewatered with sucker rod or progressive cavity pumps to reduce wellbore water levels, although not without problems. This paper describes high-volume artificial-lift technology that incorporates specifically designed gas-lift methods to dewater Black Warrior CBM wells. Gas lift provides improved well maintenance and production optimization by the use of conventional wireline service methods.

  13. Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

  14. Coal Supply Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0 Year-1EIA3QCoalReal

  15. Coal Supply Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0

  16. Coal Supply Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0c. Real average

  17. A geologic assessment of natural gas from tight gas sandstones in the San Juan Basin. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, M.R.; Lombardi, T.E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors conducted a detailed geologic appraisal, estimated gas in place and recoverable volumes, and evaluated the impact of technology improvements on potential Cretaceous (Pictured Cliffs, Chacra, Cliff House, Point Lookout and Dakota intervals) tight gas reserves of the San Juan Basin. This report summarizes the results of a disaggregated appraisal of the undeveloped San Juan tight gas resource in the context of current and near-term technology, project economics and market potential. A geologic data base was constructed based on location reservoir properties, and typical well recoveries were modeled on a township-specific basis. Project costing and cash flow economics were analyzed to derive potential reserves for various technology specifications and wellhead prices. These data provide a foundation for operators and pipelines to more closely examine these tight formations for development in the near future. Gas in place for the undeveloped tight portion of the five intervals studied was estimated at 17.2 Tcf, with the Dakota Formation accounting for two thirds of this volume. Using current technology, potential ultimate recovery for all intervals is 7.2 Tcf. Potential reserve additions are 1.1 Tcf at $1.50/Mcf, 2.3 Tcf at $2.00/Mcf, and 5.9 Tcf at $5.00/Mcf. The availability of the Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit for eligible wells drilled in 1991 and 1992 could improve project economics by an after tax equivalent of $0.66/Mcf at the wellhead. Over 300 geophysical logs were evaluated to construct depth, overburden and isopach maps and a location-specific resource database. The database was analyzed using TGAS-PC{reg_sign}, an integrated engineering and economics model for tight sands that has the capability to do rapid sensitivity analysis of geological, technology and economic assumptions.

  18. The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operators believe that low-viscosity, low-proppant concentration fracture stimulation treatments known as ??waterfracs?? produce comparable stimulation results in low-permeability gas sands and are preferred because they are less expensive than gelled...

  19. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

  20. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

  1. Shallow gas in Arkoma basin - Pine Hollow and South Ashland fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woncik, J.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pine Hollow and South Ashland fields located in Pittsburg and Coal Counties, Oklahoma, established a combined reserve exceeding 200 bcf of gas. The Hartshorne Sandstone of early Desmoinesian (Pennsylvanian) age is the producing zone at a depth of 4000 ft (1200 m). Gas, probably of biogenic origin, migrated into the reservoir shortly after deposition. Subsequent folding and faulting of the Ashland anticline resulted in repositioning of the gas in a downthrown fault trap. The upthrown anticline portion of the Hartshorne is water-bearing. Moderate well costs and high individual reserves have resulted in excellent economics. Competitive bidding on federal leases has resulted in a high bid exceeding $1 million for one tract in the South Ashland field.

  2. Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

  3. Hydrodynamic flow in lower Cretaceous Muddy sandstone, Gas Draw Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Joseph Tien-Chin

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control readily available for analysis of rock properties and fluid pressures. The nine-township area surrounding the Gas Draw field is well-suited for study of hydrodynamic effects on oil accumulation. Regional Geology Structure The citations... of southeastern Montana. It is bounded by the Miles City arch and Black Hills uplift on the east, the Hartville uplift on the southeast, and Bighorn Mountains and Casper arch on the west. Muddy stratigraphic oil fields are located on the east flank...

  4. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  5. Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryn, S.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

  6. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

  7. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  8. Assessing the Effect of Timing of Availability for Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Largest Oil and Gas Pools in the Alberta Basin: Description of Data and Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Bachu, Stefan

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide capture from large stationary sources and storage in geological media is a technologically-feasible mitigation measure for the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere in response to climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) can be sequestered underground in oil and gas reservoirs, in deep saline aquifers, in uneconomic coal beds and in salt caverns. The Alberta Basin provides a very large capacity for CO2 storage in oil and gas reservoirs, along with significant capacity in deep saline formations and possible unmineable coal beds. Regional assessments of potential geological CO2 storage capacity have largely focused so far on estimating the total capacity that might be available within each type of reservoir. While deep saline formations are effectively able to accept CO2 immediately, the storage potential of other classes of candidate storage reservoirs, primarily oil and gas fields, is not fully available at present time. Capacity estimates to date have largely overlooked rates of depletion in these types of storage reservoirs and typically report the total estimated storage capacity that will be available upon depletion. However, CO2 storage will not (and cannot economically) begin until the recoverable oil and gas have been produced via traditional means. This report describes a reevaluation of the CO2 storage capacity and an assessment of the timing of availability of the oil and gas pools in the Alberta Basin with very large storage capacity (>5 MtCO2 each) that are being looked at as likely targets for early implementation of CO2 storage in the region. Over 36,000 non-commingled (i.e., single) oil and gas pools were examined with effective CO2 storage capacities being individually estimated. For each pool, the life expectancy was estimated based on a combination of production decline analysis constrained by the remaining recoverable reserves and an assessment of economic viability, yielding an estimated depletion date, or year that it will be available for CO2 storage. The modeling framework and assumptions used to assess the impact of the timing of CO2 storage resource availability on the region’s deployment of CCS technologies is also described. The purpose of this report is to describe the data and methodology for examining the carbon dioxide (CO2) storage capacity resource of a major hydrocarbon province incorporating estimated depletion dates for its oil and gas fields with the largest CO2 storage capacity. This allows the development of a projected timeline for CO2 storage availability across the basin and enables a more realistic examination of potential oil and gas field CO2 storage utilization by the region’s large CO2 point sources. The Alberta Basin of western Canada was selected for this initial examination as a representative mature basin, and the development of capacity and depletion date estimates for the 227 largest oil and gas pools (with a total storage capacity of 4.7 GtCO2) is described, along with the impact on source-reservoir pairing and resulting CO2 transport and storage economics. The analysis indicates that timing of storage resource availability has a significant impact on the mix of storage reservoirs selected for utilization at a given time, and further confirms the value that all available reservoir types offer, providing important insights regarding CO2 storage implementation to this and other major oil and gas basins throughout North America and the rest of the world. For CCS technologies to deploy successfully and offer a meaningful contribution to climate change mitigation, CO2 storage reservoirs must be available not only where needed (preferably co-located with or near large concentrations of CO2 sources or emissions centers) but also when needed. The timing of CO2 storage resource availability is therefore an important factor to consider when assessing the real opportunities for CCS deployment in a given region.

  9. The Geopolitics of Oil, Gas, and Ecology in the Caucasus and Caspian Sea Basin. 1998 Caucasus Conference Report.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcelon, Marc; Walker, Edward W.; Patten-Wood, Alexandra; Radovich, Aleksandra

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Agency, Caspian Oil and Gas. Paris: Energy Charterforecasting studies on oil and gas projects in Kazakhstan33 Map of oil and gas

  10. Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine Hydrate Deposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol, Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    indicators for natural gas hydrates in shallow sediments ofInternational Symposium on Gas Hydrate Technology, Seoul,International Symposium on Gas Hydrate Technology, Seoul,

  11. Subsurface structure of the north Summit gas field, Chestnut Ridge anticline of the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, G.; Shumaker, R.C. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Staub, W.K. [Consolidated Gas Transmission Co., Clarksburg, WV (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chestnut Ridge anticline is the westernmost of the High Plateau folds in southwestern Pennsylvania and north-central West Virginia that are detached primarily in the Marcellus Shale, and the Martinsburg, Salina, and Rome Formations. The primary, basal detachment at the Summit field occurs in the Salina salt. Production from fracture porosity in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone commenced in 1936. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, 14 wells were drilled preparatory to conversion of the reservoir to gas storage. Schlumberger`s Formation MicroScanner (FMS) logs were run in each of these wells to provide information on the structural configuration and fracture patterns of the reservoir. These data indicate that two inward-facing, tight folds at the Oriskany level form the upper flanks and core of the anticline at the northern end of the field, whereas the main part of the field to the south is a comparatively simple, broad closure at the Oriskany level. The structure is a broad, slightly asymmetric open fold in the Mississippian Greenbrier Formation at the surface. Fracture patterns mapped using FMS logs indicate a complex fracture system which varies slightly along the trend of the fold and among the units analyzed, including the Helderberg Formation, Huntersville Chert, Oriskany Sandstone, and Onondaga Formation. An orthogonal joint system strikes toward the northwest and northeast slightly askew to the trend of the fold`s crestal trace. A similar, but more complex fracture pattern is found in an oriented core of these units.

  12. Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

  13. The Geopolitics of Oil, Gas, and Ecology in the Caucasus and Caspian Sea Basin. 1998 Caucasus Conference Report.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcelon, Marc; Walker, Edward W.; Patten-Wood, Alexandra; Radovich, Aleksandra

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Agency, Caspian Oil and Gas. Paris: Energy Charter33 Map of oil and gasstaff of the Office of Oil and Gas in the Department of the

  14. A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

  15. Infrastructure investments and resource adequacy in the restructured US natural gas market : is supply security at risk?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschhausen, Christian von

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the development of US natural gas infrastructure over the last two decades and to discuss its perspectives. In particular, we focus on the relationship between the regulatory ...

  16. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy (EG& G Services) [EG& G Services; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy (Advanced Resources International) [Advanced Resources International

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  17. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  18. Occurrence of Multiple Fluid Phases Across a Basin, in the Same Shale Gas Formation – Eagle Ford Shale Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Yao

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    production data. Well deliverability was modeled to optimize oil production rate by designing appropriate operational parameters. From NW to SE, Eagle Ford fluids evolve from oil, to gas condensate and, finally, to dry gas, reflecting greater depth...

  19. Using Airborne Geophysics to Improve the Management of Produced Water from Coal Bed Natural Gas Extraction in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana has seen a boom in drilling for coalbed natural gas (CBNG), the natural gas contained in coal seams. Large quantities of water are coproduced during the extraction process. The water is currently managed by land application (irrigation), returned to shallow groundwater aquifers via infiltration basins, directly discharged to ephemeral or perennial streams, or injected into the deep subsurface via injection wells. At present, there are over 28,000 CBNG wells permitted or drilled in the PRB and it is estimated that another 50,000 to 100,000 new wells will be drilled in the future. Produced water management is a major challenge to the oil and gas industry as well as federal and state regulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods for the large-scale mapping of vadose zone properties. The base maps derived from the AEM data show the location of conductive anomalies within the vadose zone. These conductive anomalies have been identified as conditions related to soil properties, geologic features, saturated areas, and seepage zones. In the PRB, the data can be used to identify suitable locations for constructing impoundments in areas that avoid highly conductive soils where infiltrating water may leach salts through the vadose zone and into shallow aquifers. Hydrologic changes within the vadose zone were evaluated by completing an AEM survey in 2003 and 2004 over two coincident spatial areas. The data were analyzed to determine statistical relationships between the data sets, in particular data outliers which may represent areas of significant change between each year. Some outliers plot near areas of CBNG development. Ultimately, it is hoped that the information from these surveys will identify cost effective treatment or disposal options for produced water that address both production and environmental issues.

  20. Natural Gas Storage in Basalt Aquifers of the Columbia Basin, Pacific Northwest USA: A Guide to Site Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

    2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical background and a guide to characterizing a site for storing natural gas in the Columbia River Basalt

  1. MTBE/methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, R.E.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. methanol production has become economically competitive with imports due to de-escalation of natural gas price from $3.07 mm Btu in January 1985 to $2.07 mm Btu by December 1985. This has reversed the earlier supply outlook when it appeared that additional methanol plants would shutdown due to low cost imports. Current gas cost in conjunction with projections for continued excess supply prompted DuPont to restart their 250 mm gpy plant at Beaumont, Texas. Other former producers are contemplating restarting idle units.

  2. Occurrence of Multiple Fluid Phases Across a Basin, in the Same Shale Gas Formation – Eagle Ford Shale Example 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Yao

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale gas and oil are playing a significant role in US energy independence by reversing declining production trends. Successful exploration and development of the Eagle Ford Shale Play requires reservoir characterization, recognition of fluid...

  3. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to study two Basins of the Gulf of Guinea (GoG), namely the Dahomey and the Liberian Basins. These Basins are located in the northern part of the GoG, where oil and gas exploration has significantly increased...

  4. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

  5. Increased activity expected in Permian basin, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagar, R.

    1988-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration and development activities in two of the most important petroleum provinces in the U.S. are mixed, but the outlook is bright. There has been a steady increase in drilling in oil plays of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico and in the Permian basin of West Texas and New Mexico. But natural gas drilling has not seen much of an increase, although activity involving Miocne sands in the shallow water portion of the gulf is starting to pick up. Deep gas drilling, stalled by the 1986 spot price collapse, has not yet shown signs of new life, even though production is scheduled to begin this year from the Jurassic Norphlet deep gas play off Alabama. There should be continued increases this year in deepwater and Permian basin drilling if oil prices remain in the $18-20/bbl range. And gas drilling is expected to pick up considerably if spot prices strengthen. An important factor in the drilling outlook is an expectation that major interstate transmission companies this year will resume buying long term gas supplies for resale. Long term contracts reduce producer uncertainty in project economics.

  6. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  7. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  8. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  9. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquefied natural gas (LNG) trading expected to increase insteam reformation production facility using imported LNG.The LNG supplies come primarily from Trinidad and Tobago,

  10. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquefied natural gas (LNG) trading expected to increase insteam reformation production facility using imported LNG.The LNG supplies come primarily from Trinidad and Tobago,

  11. ,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNatural Gas, Wet After Lease

  12. ,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNatural Gas, WetCoalbed

  13. ,"California--Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDry Natural GasCoastal

  14. ,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNatural Gas, WetCoalbed MethaneDry

  15. ,"California--San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDry Natural GasCoastalSan

  16. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and sources. Crude oil recovery includes improved oil recovery processes such as water flooding, infill drilling, and horizontal drilling, as well as enhanced oil recovery...

  17. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and sources. Crude oil recovery includes improved oil recovery processes such as water flooding, infill drilling, and horizontal continuity, as well as enhanced oil recovery...

  18. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  19. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  20. Soil and soil gas sampling in Old Ellenton, the SRL test site, the fire training area and the miscellaneous chemicals basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center, PA (United States)

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil and gas analytical results are presented which were carried out at the SRL site. Gas chromatography was utilized.

  1. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  2. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  3. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    external-power- supplies/meps/ Australia E3. 2012. “EU, Australia and Japan all have maximum power consumptionEU, Australia and Japan all have maximum power consumption

  4. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  5. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  6. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  7. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  8. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

  10. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  11. Geology of Alabama's Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Holmes, J.W.; Shepard, B.K.

    1983-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama continues to be an exciting area for oil and gas exploration. Several potential pay zones and a variety of petroleum traps in the basin resulted in a large number of successful test wells, helping to make the basin one of the more attractive areas for continued exploration in the US. The Upper Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin are the primary exploration targets, with the Carter and Lewis sandstones being the most prolific producers. These sanstones exhibit considerable lateral and vertical variability and no apparent regional trends for porosity and permeability development. Determining the depositional environments of the Carter and Lewis sandstones should enhance petroleum exploration in the basin by helping to identify reservoir geometry, areal extent, and quality. To date, the Carter sandstones has produced more than 700,000 bbl of oil and 100 billion CR of gas; the Lewis sandstone, over 5000 bbl of oil and 12 billion CF of gas.

  12. INTEGRATED BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MARCELLUS FORMATION IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slingerland, Rudy

    . of the Appalachian Basin requires accurate knowledge of their sedimentological, geochemical, and geomechanical performance is to first quantitatively relate gas content and geomechanical and petrophysical rock

  13. Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  14. Natural gas network resiliency to a %22shakeout scenario%22 earthquake.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Corbet, Thomas Frank,; Brooks, Robert E. [RBAC, Inc., Sherman Oaks, CA

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural gas network model was used to assess the likely impact of a scenario San Andreas Fault earthquake on the natural gas network. Two disruption scenarios were examined. The more extensive damage scenario assumes the disruption of all three major corridors bringing gas into southern California. If withdrawals from the Aliso Canyon storage facility are limited to keep the amount of stored gas within historical levels, the disruption reduces Los Angeles Basin gas supplies by 50%. If Aliso Canyon withdrawals are only constrained by the physical capacity of the storage system to withdraw gas, the shortfall is reduced to 25%. This result suggests that it is important for stakeholders to put agreements in place facilitating the withdrawal of Aliso Canyon gas in the event of an emergency.

  15. Geochemical Prospecting of Hydrocarbons in Frontier Basins of India* By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kumar; D. J. Patil; G. Kalpana; C. Vishnu Vardhan

    India has 26 sedimentary basins with a basinal area of approximately 1.8x 10 6 km 2 (excluding deep waters), out of which seven are producing basins and two have proven potential. Exploration efforts in other basins, called “frontier basins ” are in progress. These basins are characterized by varied geology, age, tectonics, and depositional environments. Hydrocarbon shows in many of these basins are known, and in few basins oil and gas have flowed in commercial /non-commercial quantities. Within the framework of India Hydrocarbon Vision – 2025 and New Exploration Licensing Policy, there is a continuous increase in area under active exploration. The asset management concept with multi-disciplinary teams has created a demand for synergic application of risk-reduction technologies, including surface geochemical surveys. National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI), Hyderabad, India has initiated/planned surface geochemical surveys composed of gas chromatographic and carbon isotopic analyses in few of the frontier basins of India. The adsorbed soil gas data in one of the basins (Saurashtra basin, Gujarat) has shown varied concentrations of CH4 to C4H10. The C1 concentration varies between 3 to 766 ppb and ??C2+, 1 to 543 ppb. This basin has thin soil cover and the Mesozoic sediments (probable source rocks) are overlain by thick cover of Deccan Traps. The scope and perspective of geochemical surveys in frontier basins of India are presented here.

  16. Why Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why supply chain explains the importance of supply chains. It includes an introduction to ERP as designed by SAP.

  17. aquifer paris basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a site-specific basis using a static analysis does not account for present and future pumping impacts within the basin and leads to a false sense of water supply security and...

  18. Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

    been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

  19. The 3He Supply Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

  20. Handling Food and Supplies during Power Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists foods that are safe to eat without cooking or refrigeration. There is also a list of supplies you will need when gas and electrical service is unavailable....

  1. Tight gas reservoirs: A visual depiction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future gas supplies in the US will depend on an increasing contribution from unconventional sources such as overpressured and tight gas reservoirs. Exploitation of these resources and their conversion to economically producible gas reserves represents a major challenge. Meeting this challenge will require not only the continuing development and application of new technologies, but also a detailed understanding of the complex nature of the reservoirs themselves. This report seeks to promote understanding of these reservoirs by providing examples. Examples of gas productive overpressured tight reservoirs in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming are presented. These examples show log data (raw and interpreted), well completion and stimulation information, and production decline curves. A sampling of wells from the Lewis and Mesaverde formations are included. Both poor and good wells have been chosen to illustrate the range of productivity that is observed. The second section of this document displays decline curves and completion details for 30 of the best wells in the Greater Green River Basin. These are included to illustrate the potential that is present when wells are fortuitously located with respect to local stratigraphy and natural fracturing, and are successfully hydraulically fractured.

  2. Response surfaces of vulnerability to climate change: the Colorado River Basin, the High Plains, and California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the vulnerability of water supply to shortage for the Colorado River Basin and basins of the High Plains, it becomes ever more important to assess the vulnerability of current and future water supplies to shortage more likely to experience water shortages (Barnett et al. 2004; Barnett and Pierce 2008, 2009; Cayan et

  3. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  4. The Gas Utility View of Industrial Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loberg, T. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supplies and the gas industry mounted a determined engineering and development effort to stretch existing supplies until changes in the legislation could be implemented. These and similar programs are ongoing even now that the outlook for new gas supplies...

  5. Porosity and permeability of eastern Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soeder, D.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight samples of Devonian gas shale from the Appalachian Basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian age Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eighth core sample consists of Middle Devonian age Marcellus Shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, West Virginia. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the results have also shown that there are a number of previously unknown factors which influence or control gas production from organic-rich shales of the Appalachian Basin. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron Shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and permeability of the rock matrix to gas is less than 0.1 microdarcy at reservoir stress. The Marcellus Shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10% under stress with a fairly strong ''adsorption'' component. Permeability to gas (K/sub infinity/ was highly stress-dependent, ranging from about 20 microdarcies at a net stress of 3000 psi down to about 5 microdarcies at a net stress of 6000 psi. The conclusion reached from this study is that Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin is a considerably more complex natural gas resource than previously thought. Production potential varies widely with geographic location and stratigraphy, just as it does with other gas and oil resources. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Investigation of mercury transformation by HBr addition in a slipstream facility with real flue gas atmospheres of bituminous coal and Powder River Basin Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Cao; Quanhai Wang; Chien-wei Chen; Bobby Chen; Martin Cohron; Yi-chuan Tseng; Cheng-chung Chiu; Paul Chu; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of speciated mercury transformation with the addition of hydrogen bromide (HBr) at elevated temperatures was conducted in a slipstream reactor with real flue gas atmospheres. Test results indicated that adding HBr into the flue gas at several parts per million strongly impacted the mercury oxidation and adsorption, which were dependent upon temperature ranges. Higher temperatures (in the range of 300-350 C) promoted mercury oxidation by HBr addition but did not promote mercury adsorption. Lower temperatures (in a range of 150-200 C) enhanced mercury adsorption on the fly ash by adding HBr. Test results also verified effects of flue gas atmospheres on the mercury oxidation by the addition of HBr, which included concentrations of chlorine and sulfur in the flue gas. Chlorine species seemed to be involved in the competition with bromine species in the mercury oxidation process. With the addition of HBr at 3 ppm at a temperature of about 330 C, the additional mercury oxidation could be reached by about 55% in a flue gas atmosphere by burning PRB coal in the flue gas and by about 20% in a flue gas by burning bituminous coal. These are both greater than the maximum gaseous HgBr2 percentage in the flue gas (35% for PRB coal and 5% for bituminous coal) by thermodynamic equilibrium analysis predictions under the same conditions. This disagreement may indicate a greater complexity of mercury oxidation mechanisms by the addition of HBr. It is possible that bromine species promote activated chlorine species generation in the flue gas, where the kinetics of elemental mercury oxidation were enhanced. However, SO{sub 2} in the flue gas may involve the consumption of the available activated chlorine species. Thus, the higher mercury oxidation rate by adding bromine under the flue gas by burning PRB coal may be associated with its lower SO{sub 2} concentration in the flue gas. 39 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  8. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  9. Dr Stephen Dry, Canada Research Chair in Northern Hydrometeorology, discusses research projects on the Quesnel River Basin in British Columbia and wider concerns for freshwater supply in the area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    focuses on the impacts of climate change on Canada's northern and alpine regions.The anthropogenic. In particular, I am attempting to determine what effect climate change will have on the environment in Canada in the oil and gas sectors with subsurface extraction (through fracking) requiring abundant freshwater

  10. Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

  11. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  12. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  13. Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2000 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  14. Supplies of Natural Gas Supplemental Fuels (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 1993Sumary

  15. Genetic classification of petroleum basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demaison, G.; Huizinga, B.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rather than relying on a descriptive geologic approach, this genetic classification is based on the universal laws that control processes of petroleum formation, migration, and entrapment. Petroleum basins or systems are defined as dynamic petroleum-generating and concentrating physico-chemical systems functioning on a geologic space and time scale. A petroleum system results from the combination of a generative subsystem (or hydrocarbon kitchen), essentially controlled by chemical processes, and a migration-entrapment subsystem, controlled by physical processes. The generative subsystem provides a certain supply of petroleum to the basin during a given geologic time span. The migration-entrapment subsystem receives petroleum and distributes it in a manner that can lead either to dispersion and loss or to concentration of the regional charge into economic accumulations. The authors classification scheme for petroleum basins rests on a simple working nomenclature consisting of the following qualifiers: (1) charge factor: undercharged, normally charged, or supercharged, (2) migration drainage factor: vertically drained or laterally drained, and (3) entrapment factor: low impedance or high impedance. Examples chosen from an extensive roster of documented petroleum basins are reviewed to explain the proposed classification.

  16. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  17. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  20. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  1. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  2. Porosity and permeability of Eastern Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soeder, D.J.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight Devonian gas shale samples from the Appalachian basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian Age Huron member of the Ohio shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eight core sample consists of Middle Devonian Age Marcellus shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, WV. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the work has identified a number of geological factors that influence gas production from organic-rich shales. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and gas permeability of the rock matrix is commonly less than 0.1 ..mu..d at reservoir stress. The Marcellus shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10%, and a surprisingly high permeability of 20 ..mu..d. Gas permeability of the Marcellus was highly stress-dependent, however; doubling the net confining stress reduced the permeability by nearly 70%. The conclusion reached from this study is that the gas productivity potential of Devonian shale in the Appalachian basin is influenced by a wide range of geologic factors. Organic content, thermal maturity, natural fracture spacing, and stratigraphic relationships between gray and black shales all affect gas content and mobility. Understanding these factors can improve the exploration and development of Devonian shale gas.

  3. 47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

  4. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  5. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  6. Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connell, Richard Perry

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is by way of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain where ...

  7. Primer on gas integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

  8. ,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNatural Gas, Wet After

  9. ,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNatural Gas, Wet

  10. ,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNatural Gas, WetCoalbedNonassociated

  11. Introduction The Sustainable Supply Chain Taxes Permits Integration Future Research Sustainable Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chains: Multicriteria Decision-Making and Policy Analysis for the Environment Trisha D. Woolley into the atmosphere, through the combustion of fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas), has risen 30% in the 200) with 11 of the 12 warmest years occurring between 1995­2006 (IPCC (2007)). In the US alone, greenhouse gas

  12. Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Forecourt and Gas Infrastructure Optimization Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland 2 Analysis of Market Demand and Supply...

  13. LNG links remote supplies and markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avidan, A.A.; Gardner, R.E.; Nelson, D.; Borrelli, E.N. [Mobil LNG Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Rethore, T.J. [Arthur D. Little Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has established a niche for itself by matching remote gas supplies to markets that both lacked indigenous gas reserves and felt threatened in the aftermath of the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s. It has provided a cost-effective energy source for these markets, while also offering an environmentally friendly fuel long before that was fashionable. The introduction of natural-gas use via LNG in the early years (mostly into France and Japan) has also allowed LNG to play a major role in developing gas infrastructure. Today, natural gas, often supplied as LNG, is particularly well-suited for use in the combined cycle technology used in independent power generation projects (IPPs). Today, LNG players cannot simply focus on monetizing gas resources. Instead, they must adapt their projects to meet the needs of changing markets. The impact of these changes on the LNG industry has been felt throughout the value chain from finding and producing gas, gas treatment, liquefaction, transport as a liquid, receiving terminals and regasification, and finally, to consumption by power producers, industrial users, and households. These factors have influenced the evolution of the LNG industry and have implications for the future of LNG, particularly in the context of worldwide natural gas.

  14. Compressed Air Supply Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, B.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPRESSED AIR SUPPLY EFFICENCY Babu Joseph, Ph.D., P.E. Engineer Southern California Edison Irwindale, CA ABSTRACT This project, under contract from California Energy Commission, developed the CASE (Compressed Air Supply Efficiency...

  15. Petroluem Supply Monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  16. Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  17. Building Energy Supply Infrastructures and Urban Sustained Development of Shenyang 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    store 300-thousand-cubemeter gases. The compressor is designed to distribute 63? 000m3/h gas. At present, in Shenyang there are oil gases, coal seam gases, mine gases, coke oven gases, liquefied petroleum gases with air, liquefied petroleum gases... Supply Selling Supply Selling kJ/Nm3 Oil gas 3507 2793 403 21767 Coke oven gas 5267 5323 4989 5039 5582 18487 Produced gas 857 7470 297 5870 3824 3592 4475 4916 Oil field gas 7986 6899 7249 6268 7008 6048 7758 6679 6938...

  18. Indiana Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0 0.0Decade4Year JanSameThousand3.1

  19. Iowa Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0Base7 3 2 1 0 0 1967-2013

  20. Kentucky Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1 1996-2013 Lease20 55 10 41 3415

  1. Louisiana Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569Decade886,0845,02044(Million0

  2. Maine Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1993-2013

  3. Maryland Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.05.03057,521(Million

  4. Massachusetts Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0Feet)Year Jan Feb Marper2.7 2.83

  5. Michigan Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3Exportsper Thousand Cubic9 6 0 01998

  6. Minnesota Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercialper Thousand Cubic9 2.8 2.6 2.746

  7. Missouri Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)SameThousandYearBaseYear(Million36

  8. Rhode Island Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663(Million24,103Thousand40

  9. South Carolina Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6

  10. South Dakota Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet)3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3

  11. Tennessee Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4.Synthetic 1980-2003 Propane-Air

  12. Arizona Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14DecadeDecade(Million Cubic

  13. Arkansas Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSame Month Previous1 0 11 102008 20097

  14. Colorado Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602 1,622,434 1,634,58723 426,258

  15. Connecticut Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Thousand Cubic- -1

  16. Delaware Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0Cubic Feet)Delaware2 0.2 0.2 0.2

  17. Washington Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810Year Jan Feb MarPropane-Air

  18. Wisconsin Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYearVehicle Fuel2.9 2.8 2.6

  19. Wyoming Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (MillionYearYear Jan Feb162 1440

  20. Texas Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011 20123.9 4.0Propane-Air

  1. Vermont Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers35,9291 2 1 2 3 3

  2. Virginia Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,7170 0 0 201289

  3. Natural Gas Consumption (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of FossilFoot)Feet) Year Jan Monthly

  4. Illinois Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumptionper Thousand Cubic4 15 0 0 09.515

  5. STEO November 2012 - natural gas supply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR E Q U ESTEMDespite

  6. Natural Gas Consumption (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Jan Feb MarDecadeDecade Year-0Decade22,910,078

  7. Nebraska Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYear Jan FebThousand9 0.8

  8. Nevada Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr8 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9

  9. New Hampshire Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1

  10. New Jersey Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1 0.2TotalDecadeper4.5 4.7

  11. Alabama Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Aprper Thousand0 1 2

  12. Alaska Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear JanFeet)529 633 622 566

  13. New Mexico Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand Cubic Feet)Feet)Feet)556,905136 149 1803671

  14. New York Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand CubicSeparation 29 0Year Jan0 0 0 0 0 08.1 8.5 8.27

  15. North Carolina Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand CubicSeparationTotalper Thousand Cubic

  16. North Dakota Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million Cubic Feet)

  17. Ohio Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0Separation3,262,7160 0 0 483

  18. Oregon Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear JanYear0.9 0.9 0.90

  19. Pennsylvania Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand CubicFuelDecade Year-0(Dollars per 0 0 0

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas -- the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

  1. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  2. Petroleum supply monthly, with data from June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Division (PSD) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects and published information on petroleum supply and disposition in the United States. The information is collected through a series of surveys that make up the Petroleum Supply Reporting System (PSRS). The PSRS data are published in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). This report presents information on crude oil production, crude oil imports and exports, refinery operations, natural gas processing, transportation, and oxygenate data.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for powering a gas turbine or to supply industrial processin conjunetion with a gas turbine system providing severalincluding heating a gas to operate a turbine (4), providing

  4. Can Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Put Downward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply Models of Natural Gas. ” The Bell Journal ofCalifornia’s Reliance on Natural Gas. Santa Monica, Calif. :Modeling Forum (EMF). 2003. Natural Gas, Fuel Diversity and

  5. SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two independent high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys flown by Airmag Surveys, Inc. and interpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc were merged, processed and reinterpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc for this study. Derived products included depth filtered and reduced to pole maps of total magnetic intensity, vertical and horizontal gradients, interpreted STARMAG structure, lineament analysis and an overall interpretation. The total magnetic intensity patterns of the combined survey conformed reasonably well to those of coarser grid, non-proprietary regional aeromagnetic surveys reviewed. The merged study also helped illustrate regional basement patterns adjacent to and including the northwest edge of the Rome trough. The tectonic grain interpreted is dominantly southwest-northeast with a secondary northwest-southeast component that is consistent with this portion of the Appalachian basin. Magnetic susceptibility appears to be more important locally than basement structure in contributing to the magnetic intensity recorded, based on seismic to aeromagnetic data comparisons made to date. However, significant basement structures cannot be ruled out for this area, and in fact are strongly suspected to be present. The coincidence of the Henderson Dome with a total magnetic intensity low is an intriguing observation that suggests the possibility that structure in the overlying Lower Paleozoic section may be detached from the basement. Rose diagrams of lineament orientations for 2.5 minute unit areas are more practical to use than the full-quadrangle summaries because they focus on smaller areas and involve less averaging. Many of these illustrate a northeast bias. Where orientations abruptly become scattered, there is an indication of intersecting fractures and possible exploration interest. However, the surface lineament study results are less applicable in a practical sense relative to the seismic, subsurface or aeromagnetic control used. Subjectivity in interpretation and uncertainty regarding the upward propagation of deeper faulting through multiple unconformities, salt-bearing zones and possible detachments are problematic. On the other hand, modern day basement-involved earthquakes like the nearby 1998 Pymatuning event have been noted which influenced near-surface, water-bearing fractures. This suggests there is merit in recognizing surface features as possible indicators of deeper fault systems in the area. Suggested future research includes confirmation of the natural mode-conversion of P-waves to down going S-waves at the level of the Onondaga Limestone, acquisition of 3-C, 2-D seismic as an alternative to more expensive 3-D seismic, and drilling one or two test wells in which to collect a variety of reservoir information. Formation Imaging Logs, a Vertical Seismic Profile and sidewall cores would be run or collected in each well, providing direct evidence of the presence of fractures and the calibration of fractured rocks to the seismic response. If the study of these data had indicated the presence of fractures in the well(s), and efforts to calibrate from well bores to VSPs had been successful, then a new seismic survey would have been designed over each well. This would result in a practical application of the naturally mode-converted, multi-component seismic method over a well bore in which microfractures and production-scale fractures had been demonstrated to exist, and where the well-bore stratigraphy had been correlated from well logs to the seismic response.

  6. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  7. Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia's Oil and Gas and Deep Drilling Act regulates oil and gas drilling activities to provide protection of underground freshwater supplies and certain "environmentally sensitive" areas. The...

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    adjustments, minus stock change, minus refinery and blender net inputs, minus exports. Net receipts are added as a component of supply at the PAD District level. Crude oil...

  9. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - natural gas section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly and latest annual time-series and recent statistics on natural gas supply, disposition, and price.

  10. Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and Gas For Energy Infrastructure Summit September 15, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator 0 20 40 60...

  11. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply...

  12. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  13. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged practice current flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollock, George G. (San Ramon, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved.

  14. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  15. VENTURA BASIN LOS ANGELES BASIN CENTRAL COASTAL BASIN W Y T

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE. Great Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004VENTURA

  16. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    of fuel demands 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply ChainsIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples

  17. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  18. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress in the following five projects: (1) Geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin; (2) Regional stratigraphic studies, Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, southern Piceance Basin, Colorado; (3) Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins--Foundation for a new approach to exploration and resource assessments of continuous type deposits; (4) Delineation of Piceance Basin basement structures using multiple source data--Implications for fractured reservoir exploration; and (5) Gas and water-saturated conditions in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado--Implications for fractured reservoir detection in a gas-centered coal basin.

  19. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  20. Analysis of coal and coal bed methane resources of Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, D.E.; McFall, K.S.; Malone, P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior basin in Alabama is the most active area in the US producing natural gas from coal beds. As of 1986, 300 coal-bed methane wells were producing from eight degasification fields, mainly from the Pennsylvanian coal seams along the eastern margin of the basin. Despite difficult market conditions, drilling and expansion are continuing. A detailed geologic analysis of Warrior basin coal-bed methane targets the areas of the basin that show the most promise for future gas production. The geologic analysis is based on extensive well and core data and basin-wide correlations of the Pennsylvanian coal groups. Four detailed cross sections were constructed, correlating the target coal groups in the basin, namely the Cobb, Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek. They estimate that the Warrior basin contains nearly 20 tcf of in-place coal-bed methane, mainly in three of the target coal groups - the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek coals, with 4, 7, and 8 tcf, respectively. The east-central area of the basin contains the greatest volume of natural gas resource due to its concentration of thicker, higher ranked coals with high gas content. The geologic analysis also provided the underlying framework for the subsequent engineering analysis of economically recoverable gas reserves. For example, analysis of structure and tectonics showed the east-central area to be promising for gas recovery due to its proximity to the Appalachian structural front and consequent structural deformation and permeability enhancement.

  1. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  2. Improving supply chain resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Elsa Hiu Man

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

  3. Compressed Air Supply Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, B.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, under contract from California Energy Commission, developed the CASE (Compressed Air Supply Efficiency) Index as a stand-alone value for compressor central plant efficiency. This Index captures the overall efficiency of a compressed...

  4. Supply chain dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Ricardo Wagner Lopes, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong bargaining power of major retailers and the higher requirements for speed, service excellence and customization have significantly contributed to transform the Supply Chain Management. These increasing challenges ...

  5. European supply chain study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puri, Mohitkumar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Supply chain management has been defined as, "..a set of approaches utilized to efficiently integrate suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and stores, so that merchandise is produced and distributed at the ...

  6. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

  7. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

  8. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

  9. Outline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chains and Fuel Markets In the U.S., electric power generation accounts for 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer), 90% of the coal demand, and over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand, the wholesale electricity price in New England decreased by 38% mainly because the delivered natural gas price

  10. Risk Management in Biopharmaceutical Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply Chain Risk Managementof Recent Work on Supply Chain Risk Management . . . . .M. , Supply chain risk management: Outlining an agenda for

  11. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  12. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  13. CREATING THE NORTHEAST GASOLINE SUPPLY RESERVE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2012, Superstorm Sandy made landfall in the northeastern United States and caused heavy damage to two refineries and left more than 40 terminals in New York Harbor closed due to water damage and loss of power. This left some New York gas stations without fuel for as long as 30 days. As part of the Obama Administration’s ongoing response to the storm, the Department of Energy created the first federal regional refined product reserve, the Northeast Gasoline Supply Reserve.

  14. Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Sally M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin BasinRates in California Oil and Gas District 4 – Update andoccurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the

  15. Gas Companies Right-of-Way (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corporations engaged in the business of transmitting or supplying natural gas, artificial gas, or a mixture of natural and artificial gases may acquire by condemnation the rights-of-way or...

  16. Geostatistical Inversion for the Lateral Delineation of Thin-Layer Hydrocarbon Reservoirs: A Case Study in San Jorge Basin, Argentina.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Study in San Jorge Basin, Argentina. Germán Merletti, and Julio Hlebszevitsch, Repsol-YPF, and Carlos, Argentina, is the Bajo Barreal formation and its equivalents, which to date have supplied more than 90 in La Itala field, San Jorge Basin, Argentina Statistically, hydrocarbon production originates not only

  17. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  18. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnall, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local natural gas sector or the local economy in general.natural gas by residential customers will have effects throughout the economy,Natural Gas Supply Policy, Fueling the Demands of a Growing Economy",

  19. Climate change: A crack in the natural-gas bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Shearer, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. D. & Wirth, T. E. Natural Gas: A Bridge Fuel for the 21stexpanding supplies of natural gas will not help us to avoidLIM ATE CHANGE A crack in the natural-gas bridge Integrated

  20. A crack in the natural-gas bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Shearer, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. D. & Wirth, T. E. Natural Gas: A Bridge Fuel for the 21stexpanding supplies of natural gas will not help us to avoidLIM ATE CHANGE A crack in the natural-gas bridge Integrated

  1. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  2. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics U.S. Department or other Federal agencies. #12;#12;1 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

  3. Natural gas: available today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingram, C.C. Jr.

    1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas energy is becoming the centerpiece in the future-energy strategies for the US as policymakers recognize that (1) up to 60 years of recoverable conventional gas supplies remain to be discovered and produced in the US and (2) supplemental sources promise to offset an anticipated decline in Lower-48 production, resulting in a net increase in the total gas supply. The US gas industry expects to provide 23-33 trillion CF/yr of gas for domestic consumption by the year 2000, with supplemental sources (SNG, pipeline and LNG imports, Alaskan gas, and natural gas from unconventional sources) contributing 40-60%.

  4. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  5. Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Gas power, its promises and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seay, J.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the recent decline in natural gas supply, it is still the dominant domestic source of energy supply and the most widely used fuel in the industrial, commercial, and household sectors. The basic problem of the gas industry is that of finding new supplies cost-competitive with other fuels in order to maintain the delivery of adequate gaseous energy to its customers, utilizing the existing and literally irreplaceable underground transmission and distribution system. The decline in gas supplies is traced to regulation of the field price of natural gas at a level too low to insure continuing additions to reserves at a rate sufficient to balance production. As a result, the US is drawing down its inventory of gas supply. The higher prices for gas in the field established by the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 provides additional economic incentives for exploration and development of new natural gas, and it is hoped that the higher prices will elicit new supplies. The US has available a large resource base of gas yet to be discovered, natural gas in unconventional sources, and the potential of additional incremental supplies from gasification of coal, the largest remaining fossil fuel resource.

  7. Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

  8. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  9. Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production tends to decline hyperbolically. Hyperbolic decline indicates that water volume is of greatest concern early in the life of a coalbed methane project. Regional mapping indicates that gas production is controlled primarily by the ability to depressurize permeable coal seams that are natively within the steep part of the adsorption isotherm. Water production is greatest within the freshwater intrusion and below thick Cretaceous cover strata and is least in areas of underpressure. Water management strategies include instream disposal, which can be applied effectively in most parts of the basin. Deep disposal may be applicable locally, particularly where high salinity limits the ability to dispose into streams. Artificial wetlands show promise for the management of saline water, especially where the reservoir yield is limited. Beneficial use options include municipal water supply, agricultural use, and industrial use. The water may be of use to an inland shrimp farming industry, which is active around the southwestern coalbed methane fields. The best opportunities for beneficial use are reuse of water by the coalbed methane industry for drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This research has further highlighted opportunities for additional research on treatment efficiency, the origin of nitrogen compounds, organic geochemistry, biogenic gas generation, flow modeling, and computer simulation. Results of this study are being disseminated through a vigorous technology transfer program that includes web resources, numerous presentations to stakeholders, and a variety of technical publications.

  10. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  11. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  12. Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Childers

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

  13. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greek, B.F. (C and EN, Houston, TX (US))

    1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  14. Fiber Supply Associate Company Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    materials acquisition, harvesting, logistics coordination, contract negotiations, and inventory management, Purchasing, Industrial Engineering, Operations management, Materials Management, Supply Chain) Authorized leadership roles such as Fiber Specialist, Fiber Supply Manager, Region Manager, Director, General Manager

  15. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  16. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  17. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  18. Petroleum Supply Monthly, September 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whited, D.; Jacobus, P. (eds.)

    1990-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in this PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. 12 figs., 46 tabs.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in this report describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importer, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in this report describes the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. 12 figs., 54 tabs.

  1. Estimate of the Geothermal Energy Resource in the Major Sedimentary Basins in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, A.; Porro, C.; Augustine, C.; Roberts, B.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties such as depth to basement and formation thickness are well known. The availability of this data reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin. This study estimates the magnitude of recoverable geothermal energy from 15 major known U.S. sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by (Muffler, 1979). A qualitative recovery factor was determined for each basin based on data on flow volume, hydrothermal recharge, and vertical and horizontal permeability. Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient information was gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data were insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission databases. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size, temperature distribution, and a probable quantitative recovery factor.

  2. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousandby thePricePricetheTable 1. U.S. Supply,

  4. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

  5. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

  6. LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    more on imported supplies, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). Currently, the U.S. has four LNG have proposed to site LNG import facilities in California, in other locations in the U.S, and in Baja California, Mexico. In the early 1970s, California's gas utilities were planning to build an LNG import

  7. Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MtBE) contamination of the City of Santa Monica drinking water supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, A.; Farrow, J.R.C. [Komex H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R.A. [City of Santa Monica, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 1996, the City of Santa Monica ceased pumping groundwater from two Well Fields (Charnock and Arcadia) used for public drinking water supply due to persistent and increasing concentrations of MtBE in all seven municipal water supply wells. This lost production accounted for 50% of the City`s total drinking water supply. In late 1996, the City, in cooperation with State and Federal agencies, initiated an investigation of MtBE contamination at the two well fields. The objectives of the investigation were as follows: (1) Review available data on the production, use, chemical characteristics, fate and transport, toxicology, and remediation of MtBE; (2) Identify locations of potential sources of MtBE groundwater contamination at the well fields; (3) Develop an understanding of the hydrologic pathways from the potential sources to the drinking water wells; and (4) Evaluate alternative treatment technologies for the removal of MtBE from drinking water. In addition to a review of available information about MtBE, the investigation included an extensive review of literature and available data relevant to the well fields, including well field production histories, site and regional hydrogeology, all well logs and production in the groundwater basins, general groundwater quality, and the record of MtBE detection. Based upon the review of background information, conceptual hydrogeologic models were developed. A detailed review of agency files for over 45 potential source sites was conducted. The information from this review was summarized, and source site screening and ranking criteria were developed. A field program was conducted at the major well field (Charnock), including soil gas surveys, CPTs, soil borings and well installations, geophysics, and aquifer testing. The field program provided site data which allowed the conceptual hydrogeologic model to be refitted to actual site conditions.

  8. AGA encouraging industry to adopt gas option. [American Gas Association

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, G.H.

    1980-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Gas Association (AGA) supports a policy of increasing conventional natural gas production and sustaining the higher level for at least 40 years in addition to developing unconventional sources by coal gasification, methane, biomass, and other technologies. International efforts to shift from petroleum to gas are responding to the need for appropriate policies. With gas supplying 40% of the energy consumed by American buildings and by industry and agriculture, the country has a significant financial investment in equipment and distribution systems. Although deregulation of gas prices will not prevent a decline in conventional production for the next decade, new sources and technologies will combine to maintain supplies. Policies are needed to enhance the US coal gasification capability and to promote the use of dual-fired furnaces. The worldwide gas option is an appropriate to other oil-importing countries as it is to the US. (DCK)

  9. Heat Supply Who What Where and -Why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ................................................. 6 District-heating (DH) supply: key figures .............................. 6 What is biomass Geothermics ..........................................................................11 Waste for heat supplyHeat Supply in Denmark Who What Where and - Why #12;Title: Heat Supply in Denmark - Who What Where

  10. High Prices Show Stresses in New England Natural Gas Delivery...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Since 2012, limited supply from the Canaport and Everett liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals coupled with congestion on the Tennessee and Algonquin pipelines have led to...

  11. Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, K.J.; Barrie, S.L.; Buttner, W.J.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein. 5 figs.

  12. Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kirk J. (Shelley, ID); Barrie, Scott L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Buttner, William J. (White Bear Lake, MN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein.

  13. Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound RVP Waiver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    trends, and current laws and regulations. The EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) is usedPotential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound RVP Waiver September 2002 #12;ii Energy Information by the Office of Oil and Gas of the Energy Information Administration. General questions concerning the report

  14. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  15. Switching power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalka, A.M.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

  16. NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrick, Steven [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Cordaro, Joseph [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Founds, Nanette [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Chambellan, Curtis [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

  17. Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

  18. Method of Liquifying a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, William T.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Klingler, Kerry M.

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of liquefying a gas is disclosed and which includes the steps of pressurizing a liquid; mixing a reactant composition with the pressurized liquid to generate a high pressure gas; supplying the high pressure gas to an expansion engine which produces a gas having a reduced pressure and temperature, and which further generates a power and/or work output; coupling the expansion engine in fluid flowing relation relative to a refrigeration assembly, and wherein the gas having the reduced temperature is provided to the refrigeration assembly; and energizing and/or actuating the refrigeration assembly, at least in part, by supplying the power and/or work output generated by the expansion engine to the refrigeration assembly, the refrigeration assembly further reducing the temperature of the gas to liquefy same.

  19. Petroleum geology of the Southern Bida Basin, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braide, S.P. (Federal Univ., of Technology, Minna (Nigeria))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Bida basin is located in central Nigeria and is a major sedimentary area with a 3.5-km-thick sedimentary fill. However, it is the least understood of Nigeria's sedimentary basins because serious oil and gas exploration has not been undertaken in the basin. The surrounding Precambrian basement rocks experienced severe deformation during the Late Panafrican phase (600 {plus minus} 150 m.y.), and developed megashears that were reactivated during the Late Campanian-Maestrichtian. The ensuing wrenchfault tectonics formed the basin. The sedimentary fill, which comprises the Lokoja Formation are chiefly, if not wholly, nonmarine clastics. These have been characterized into facies that rapidly change from basin margin to basin axis, and have undergone only relatively mild tectonic distortion. Subsurface relations of the Lokoja Formation are postulated from outcrop study. The potential source rocks are most likely within the basinal axis fill and have not been deeply buried based on vitrinite reflectance of <0.65%. These findings, with the largely nonmarine depositional environment, suggest gas and condensate are the most likely hydrocarbons. Alluvial fans and deltaic facies that interfinger with lacustrine facies provide excellent reservoir capabilities. Potential traps for hydrocarbon accumulation were formed by a northwest-southeast-trending Campanian-Maestrichtian wrench system with associated northeast-southwest-oriented normal faults. The traps include strata in alluvial fans, fractured uplifted basement blocks, and arched strata over uplifted blocks. However, the size of hydrocarbon accumulations could be limited to some extent by a lack of effective hydrocarbon seal, because the dominant seals in the formation are unconformities.

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, May 1998, with data for March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. 16 figs., 66 tabs.

  1. Petroleum supply monthly with data from January 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  2. Petroleum supply monthly with data for March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  3. Reserve estimates in western basins: Unita Basin. Final report, Part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde group and Wasatch formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Total in-place resource is estimated at 395.5 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 3.8 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Two plays were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources; in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. About 82.1% of the total evaluated resource is contained within sandstones that have extremely poor reservoir properties with permeabilities considered too low for commerciality using current frac technology.

  4. Outline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    .S., electric power generation accounts for significant portions of fuel demands 30% of the natural gas demand (over 50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand #12;OutlineOutline Introduction Literature Review Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions

  5. Introduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples Conclusions An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    50% in the summer) 90% of the coal demand over 45% of the residual fuel oil demand. #12;Introduction, the wholesale electricity price in New England decreased by 38% mainly because the delivered natural gas priceIntroduction Literature Review Integrated Electric Power Supply Chains Empirical Examples

  6. Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

  7. Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and...

  8. Tariffs with Dynamic Supply Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Giannini FDN iibrary TARIFFS WITH DYNAMIC SUPPLY RESWNSEpaper studies the optimal tariff in a dynamic framework. Thesellers, the optimal tariff is dynam- ically inconsistent;

  9. Potential for long-term LNG supplies to the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lihn, M.L.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics discussed here include: (1) terminal capacity; (2) potential sources for US LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports; (3) LNG liquefaction and transportation capacity; (4) historical US LNG imports; (5) LNG supply costs; (6)delivered cost of future LNG imports.

  10. Developing a strategic roadmap for supply chain process improvement in a regulated utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Brent E. (Brent Edward)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis covers work done at Tracks Energy, a regulated utility, to develop a strategic roadmap for supply chain process improvement. The focus of Tracks Energy has always been on keeping the lights on and the gas flowing ...

  11. Supply chain management for fast-moving products in the electronic industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zafiriou, Konstantinos F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Thesis was to strategically redesign and transform the supply chain of a series of detonators in a leading Company serving the oil and gas industry. The scope of the Thesis included data gathering and ...

  12. NuclearHydrogen Oil and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Policy NuclearHydrogen Transport Education Oil and gas Distribution Society Supply Ecology Demand Hydrogen 08 Policy and society 10 Environment 11 Transport 12 Manufacturing 14 Oil and gas 15 Nuclear 16 and infrastructure, and broaden our methods of generation. Our declining reserves of oil and gas must be repla

  13. RESONANT TRANSITION SWITCHING WELDING POWER SUPPLY N. Frohleke, H. Mundinger, S. Beineke, P. Wallmeier, H. Grotstollen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    RESONANT TRANSITION SWITCHING WELDING POWER SUPPLY N. Frohleke, H. Mundinger, S. Beineke, P-bridge topology used in a welding power supply. A new driving scheme adapts the resulting power circuitry for both the droplet and the short-circuiting transfer welding modes occurring in the gas metal arc welding process

  14. Design of a Free Piston Pneumatic Compressor as a Mobile Robot Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.

    Design of a Free Piston Pneumatic Compressor as a Mobile Robot Power Supply Jose A. Riofrio.j.barth@vanderbilt.edu Abstract ­ The design of a free piston compressor (FPC) intended as a pneumatic power supply is achieved by matching the dynamic load of the compressor to the ideal adiabatic expansion of the hot gas

  15. Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Smart Grid involves changes in both the demand side and supply side. On the supply side, more renewable energy will be integrated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution. On the demand side, smarter demand management systems will be available to respond to the electricity price and improve

  16. Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

  17. Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major U.S. Sedimentary Basins (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, C.; Augustine, C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study estimates the magnitude of geothermal energy from fifteen major known US sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties are known. This reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin as well as a relative assessment of geologic risk elements for each play. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by Muffler (USGS). Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient Information were gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data was insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission websites. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size and temperature distribution, and to qualitatively assess reservoir productivity.

  18. Latest Ordovicianearliest Silurian acritarchs and chitinozoans from1 subsurface samples in Jebel Asba, Kufra Basin, SE Libya2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Asba, Kufra Basin, SE Libya2 3 Bindra Thusu1 , Syed Rasul1 , Florentin Paris2 , Guido Meinhold3 & Gas B.V., Dat Al Imad Complex Tower 5 Floor 13, P.O. Box 91651, Tripoli,15 Libya16 17 * Corresponding of the Kufra Basin,36 southeastern Libya, yielded well-diversified palynomorph assemblages with transparent and

  19. Simulation and integration of liquefied natural gas (lng) processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Sobhi, Saad Ali

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    gas (LNG). When there is a considerable distance involved in transporting natural gas, LNG is becoming the preferred method of supply because of technical, economic, and political reasons. Thus, LNG is expected to play a major role in meeting...

  20. Natural Gas Procurement Challenges for a Project Financed Cogeneration Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R. L.; Calvert, T. B.; Pavlish, B. A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A decision to project finance a 110 megawatt combined cycle cogeneration facility in 1986 in place of conventional internal financing greatly changed the way in which natural gas was normally procured by Union Carbide Corporation. Natural gas supply...

  1. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  2. Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Bo

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models...

  3. The potential impact of renewable energy deployment on natural gas prices in New England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Deployment on Natural Gas Prices in New England Datethe price and supply of natural gas have deepened in recentcan directly hedge natural gas price risk by reducing the

  4. RECONCILING HYDROPOWER AND ENVIRONMENTAL WATER USES IN THE LEISHUI RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    RECONCILING HYDROPOWER AND ENVIRONMENTAL WATER USES IN THE LEISHUI RIVER BASIN X. S. AIa,b , S of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA b State Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower alternative policies to improve the water supply for two conflicting uses, hydropower and environmental, using

  5. Power Supply Synchronization without Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehlis, Jeff

    1 Power Supply Synchronization without Communication Leonardo A. B. T^orres, Jo~ao P. Hespanha, Jeff Moehlis Abstract--We consider the synchronization of power supplies in an isolated grid with multiple small-to-medium power sources. We show how to achieve a coordinated or synchronized behavior

  6. WATER SUPPLY A Handbook on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    WATER SUPPLY HANDBOOK A Handbook on Water Supply Planning and Resource Management Institute for Water Resources Water Resources Support Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 7701 Telegraph Road Studies Division December 1998 Revised IWR Report 96-PS-4 #12;U.S. Army Institute for Water Resources

  7. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  8. GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson Biomass and Resource Efficiency: the need for a supply led approach the wood come from? Western EU Deficit Eastern EU Deficit Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Is probably at production ceiling under current conditions Japan

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly, September 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for September 1984. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. The focus article discusses EIA data series for crude oil imports, motor gasoline supplied, and distillate and residual fuel oil supplied, as well as crude oil production. A companion article, An Evaluation of Crude Oil Production Statistics beginning on page xvii compares crude oil production volumes reported in EIA's petroleum supply publications with those shown in state reports.

  10. Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium IVBrisbane, QLD, 1014 September, 2012 1 1 School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    -poor lithologies. Thick brown coal sequences in the Latrobe Valley area create temperatures of about 60­70°C-commodity basin containing reserves of oil, gas, brown coal, heat, and groundwater, and with significant

  11. Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Ting

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector...

  12. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, M.A. (Conoco, Cairo (Egypt))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recent well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.

  13. Role of hydrogeology in Rocky Mountain 1 underground coal gasification test, Hanna basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, D.J.; Schmit, C.R.; Beaver, F.W.; Evans, J.M. (North Dakota Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute, Grand Forks (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience has shown that the designs and implementation of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) operations that are technically sound and environmentally safe require a thorough understanding of the hydrogeology of the UCG site, complemented by an understanding of the potential interactions between the elements of the hydrogeologic system and UCG process. This is significant because UCG is conducted in the saturated zone, consumes large volumes of ground water, and has the potential to adversely affect ground water quality and flow. The textural, mineralogical, chemical, and structural character of the geologic materials constituting the UCG reactor, as well as the occurrence, flow, and quality of fluids moving through that three-dimensional matrix of geologic materials, must be understood. The US Department of Energy and an industry consortium led by the Gas Research Institute recently conducted the Rocky Mountain 1 Test in the Hanna basin of Wyoming. For this test, the hydrogeologic aspects of the site were characterized to an extent unprecedented in UCG testing. This information was then used to develop and evaluate operating strategies intended to prevent or minimize contamination. Such strategies included gasifying at less than hydrostatic pressure to enhance ground water flow toward the gasification modules and to restrict contamination to the module area. Hydrogeologic information also allowed a more complete evaluation of process-setting interactions. For example, a substantial and widespread drop in elevation heat noted for the ground water in the target coal emphasized the importance of an adequate water supply for UCG, particularly in a long-term commercial operation.

  14. Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

  15. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  16. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  17. Petroleum supply monthly with data for June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in this publication describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United states and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the U.S. The report includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Both summary and detailed statistics are presented. 16 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. Improve supply chain resilience by multi-stage supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jie, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

  19. Improving supply chain resilience by multi-stage supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jingxia, M. Eng, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

  20. Water supply and demand in an energy supply model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbey, D; Loose, V

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

  1. Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

  2. Pipeline Politics: Natural Gas in Eurasia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landrum, William W.; Llewellyn, Benjamin B.; Limesand, Craig M.; Miller, Dante J.; Morris, James P.; Nowell, Kathleen S.; Sherman, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    important to US efforts to reduce its reliance on Middle Eastern energy resources. Presently, pipelines in Eurasia stretch across thousands of miles throughout unstable political regions. Disruptions in gas and oil supplies negatively affect the economies...

  3. Natural Gas 2007 Year-In-Review

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2007 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2007 from the...

  4. Natural Gas 2006 Year-In-Review

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2006 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2006 from the...

  5. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  6. Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine...

  7. DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies Power Plan, both natural gas-fired cogeneration and the use of combustion turbines as a means of backing

  8. UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Exploring the petroleum potential of a frontier province: Cretaceous stratigraphy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Exploring Myanmar. It has been shown that gas and oil exists in the basin and that a considerable unconventional biogenic gas system exists in the deep-waters offshore. The sediments of the Rakhine Basin were deposited

  9. Effective contracts in supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shum, Wanhang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, we have seen significant increase in the level of outsourcing in many industries. This increase in the level of outsourcing increases the importance of implementing effective contracts in supply chains. ...

  10. Horizontal well successfully drilled in Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.R. [Mississippi Valley Gas Co., Jackson, MS (United States); Skeen, B. [Sperry-Sun Drilling Services, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The first horizontal well successfully drilled and completed in the very abrasive Black Warrior basin required the use of several state-of-the-art drilling technologies and quick decision making at the well site. Mississippi Valley Gas Co.`s first horizontal well in the Goodwin natural gas storage field has a deliverability about six times that of a conventional vertical well in the same reservoir. The MVG Howard 35-4 No. 1 was drilled in 23 days during September and October 1995. The well reached 1,805 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 3,660 ft measured depth. The horizontal section length was 1,650 ft. The well reached the target, and the economics were favorable. The paper describes the geology of the basin, Goodwin field, the decision for a horizontal well, the difficulties encountered, and evaluation of the technologies used.

  11. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of subsurface Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, R.H.; Maylan, M.A.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of Mississippi and Alabama is a Paleozoic foreland basin developed between the North American craton and the Appalachian and Ouachita orogenic belts. The basin fill consists of a middle Mississippian to Lower Pennsylvanian clastic wedge, transitional in character, between Appalachian molasse and Ouachita flysch. Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, shales, coals, and thin conglomerates make up the greater part of the wedge, thickening to 11,000 ft in northeast Mississippi. Although the outcropping and near-surface Pottsville is economically importance as a source of coal in Alabama, only minor amounts of gas have been derived from the subsurface Pottsville of Mississippi (Clay and Monroe Counties). Production from the Black Warrior basin, mostly gas, is chiefly from Chesterian (Mississippian) sands and limestones in the shallower part of the basin, principally in Monroe County. Cores of Pottsville sandstones from four wells in the deeper part of the Black Warrior basin (Calhoun and Choctaw Counties) have been examined to determine their petrography, diagenetic history, and reservoir quality. This part of the basin is relatively unexplored, and the primary objective of the study was to determine if suitable hydrocarbon reservoirs are present.

  12. Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State: Part I. How to find and develop shale gas in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Appalachian Basin contains vast volumes of shale gas, and a significant potion of this is contained in three shales in south-central New York - the Rhinestreet, the Geneseo and the Marcellus. The economics of shale-gas exploration in New York are not very attractive to the large oil and gas companies, which seek a rapid return on their investments. The situation may be quite different for organizations which are more concerned with security of supply and stability of cost; these may include manufacturing companies, colleges, hospitals, state institutions and industrial or agricultural cooperatives. For these, production of even a modest 50 Mcf/day/well, declining slowly over many years, would be appealing if it could be guaranteed. To date three wells have been artificially fractured in the Marcellus shale of New York, and all three appear to be producers. This is only a small sample, and one of the wells is known to have encountered natural fractures. However, it does raise the possbility that (while nothing in exploration can be truly guaranteed) the chances of extracting at least some gas from the Marcellus - using modern fracturing techniques - are good. The chances are improved if geological techniques can identify zones of a suitable degree of natural fracturing in the shale. These techniques are aided by detailed structure maps of the shale units; such a map has been prepared for the Geneseo shale, as part of this project. The present conclusion is that the most likely source of shale gas in south-central New York is the Marcellus formation. Shale-gas wells should be drilled with air. The dry open hole should be logged with gamma-ray, density, temperature and noise logs. The shale should be artificially fractured using a nitrogen stimulation technique. Recommendations are given for each of these steps in the text.

  13. Natural gas monthly, November 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during November 1988, were estimated at 1755 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during November 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 215 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 35 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 13 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1492 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 70 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1422 billion cubic feet, similar to the November 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988 was estimated at 1702 billion cubic feet, including 173 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 12 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 95 billion cubic feet that were imported. In November 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1684 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988, an estimated 1467 billion cubic feet were consumed, 148 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 82 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  14. Natural gas monthly, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during March 1989, were estimated at 1777 billion cubic feet, 0.4 percent below withdrawals during March 1988. Of the total quantity, an estimated 211 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 36 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 12 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1518 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 71 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1447 billion cubic feet, similar to the March 1988 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989 was estimated at 1881 billion cubic feet, including 319 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 14 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In March 1988, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1841 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989, an estimated 1837 billion cubic feet were consumed, 93 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs and 8 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 57 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  15. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  16. Abstract--The paper reviews solutions being explored to face the supply problems faced in the Chilean electricity market oven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    and transportation of natural gas. Private investors were strongly behind the process, and invested heavily in the Chilean electricity market oven recent years, given unexpected restrictions in natural gas transfers from Argentina. Investment in generation came to a stall, given uncertainties in natural gas supply and the risk

  17. Natural gas monthly, April 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1998 with data for October 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. 82 tabs.

  19. Environmental decision making: supply-chain considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing environmental impact and enable the reductionthe supply chain (3) environmental impact and cost must bethe supply chain’s environmental impact and flexibility (

  20. Supplying High-Quality, Raw Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supplying High-Quality, Raw Biomass The building blocks to supply high-quality raw biomass start with harvesting and collection practices, product storage and recommendations of...

  1. US Department of Energy Region IV Unconventional Gas Program: summary and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telle, W.R.; Thompson, D.A.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Region IV Unconventional Gas Program involved the evaluation of unconventional gas resources at ten sites in the coal fields of the Eastern US. These projects dealt mainly with coalbed methane resources, although three of them also examined potential gas resources in Devonian black shales. The resource evaluations were accomplished primarily through recovery of core samples of potential gas-bearing strata and determination of specific gas content using the US Bureau of Mines direct method. In some cases actual gas production from the test holes was evaluated. Four of the projects were sited in the Warrior Basin, three in the Central Appalachian Basin, and one each in the Northern Appalachian Basin, the Deep River Basin of North Carolina, and the Valley Coal Fields of Virginia. Results from three of the projects, two in the Warrior Basin and one in the Northern Appalachian Basin, indicated the potential for economic recovery of coalbed methane. The projects included in this program provided a large body of data which is valuable to subsequent unconventional gas research. The program also provides new direction for unconventional gas exploration. Adjustments to coalbed methane resource estimates for some Eastern coal basins may be indicated by the results obtained. An update on the legal status of coalbed methane ownership in states where projects were conducted is provided in Appendix I. 5 references, 33 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  3. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  4. New study shows prospects for unconventional natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharer, J.C.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With reserves of conventional sources of natural gas in the lower 48 expected to decline in coming decades, the potential of various supplemental gas sources is of critical interest to energy planners and decision makers. Substantial quantities of supplemental supplies can be produced domestically from Alaskan and unconventional sources or synthesized through conversion of organic materials. In addition, imports of LNG and pipeline gas from Canada and Mexico can further supplement the supply of gas available. Small quantities of gas already are being produced commercially from unconventional sources: approximately 0.8 tcf annually from western tight gas sands and 0.1 tcf from E. Devonian gas shales. A consensus is beginning to form in the gas industry on a reasonable range for forecasts of unconventional gas resources and potential production. The assessed resources include western tight gas sand, E. Devonian gas shales, coal seam methane, and methane from geopressured zones.

  5. K-Basins design guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  6. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A WINDOWED HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER USING A SUSPENSION OF ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES AS THE SOLAR ABSORBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with a regenerated gas turbine sys- tem providing severaltemperature for powering a gas turbine or to supply indus-from the compressor of a gas turbine and passes on to the

  7. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A WINDOWED HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER USING A SUSPENSION OF ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES AS THE SOLAR ABSORBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the compressor of a gas turbine and passes on to thewith a regenerated gas turbine sys- tem providing severaltemperature for powering a gas turbine or to supply indus-

  8. Operational Performance of Sedimentation Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleything, Matthew D.

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and sludge pumps and clog pipes. (Lee, 2007) Composition of grit varies widely, with moisture content ranging from 13 to 63 percent, and volatile content ranging from 1 to 56 percent. The specific gravity of clean grit particles may be as high as 2... for unobstructed flow of the inlet water into the basin when the basin was almost full to capacity with sediment. The outlet of the sediment basin is an oil/water separator. This is for oil leaks and spills from the plant island. The design called...

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1999, with data for January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four petroleum supply publications produced by the Petroleum Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  10. Petroleum supply monthly, with data for August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly, March 1996 (with data for January 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  12. Petroleum supply monthly, September 1995 with data for July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly - with data for May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. This document contains a glossary.

  14. Petroleum supply monthly, with data for September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  15. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1995 with data for May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  16. Petroleum supply monthly with data from April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  17. Petroleum supply monthly, May 1995 with data for March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1995 with data for April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  19. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  20. Petroleum Supply Monthly, May 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products through May, 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. This issue features a ''Mid-Year Petroleum Review'', beginning on page xiii and focusing on major petroleum supply developments in the first half of 1985 and the outlook for the remainder of the year. The article discusses changes in consumption, domestic crude oil production, refinery operations, foreign trade, stocks (including the Strategic Petroleum Reserve) and prices. 33 tabs.

  1. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for July 1984. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. This issue also presents IEA's winter 1984-1985 distillate fuel outlook and an overview of distillate fuel oil. These articles focus on the respective roles of production, imports, and stocks in meeting distillage fuel oil demand. Regional supply patterns, especially for the East Coast are also discussed. 33 tables. (DMC)

  2. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  3. Optimization Online - Consideration of Gas Supply Contracts with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo A. M. Moraes

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 18, 2008 ... As shown by our numerical experience, this flexibility may result in reduced water spillages in periods with favorable hydrology.

  4. California's LNG Terminals: The Promise of New Gas Supplies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers California's LNG terminals and is given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall Meeting, held on November 28-29, 2007 in San Diego, California.

  5. A transition radiation detector and gas supply system for AMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirköz, Bilge Melahat, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is an experiment that will be on the International Space Station for three years. It will look for anti-matter and dark matter. Supersymmetric dark matter could produce an excess in the 10-300GeV ...

  6. Interstate Deliveries of Natural Gas (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0 0.0Decade4Year114,9379 20102,985,348

  7. Interstate Receipts of Natural Gas (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0 0.0Decade4Year114,9379

  8. Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|JulyR--FOIA SupportDOE'sDepartmentThisIn thisin

  9. Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4PDF Office

  10. Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4PDF OfficeMarch

  11. U.S. Natural Gas Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoalWithdrawals (Million Cubic

  12. District of Columbia Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic Feet)Cubic--2,8190 0 0 0

  13. U.S. Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1 and No.Decreases (BillionDecadeArea:

  14. Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0ProgramConnecticut900

  15. Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996) in

  16. Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartmentEnergy Factors AffectingFarewellFaucetsin New

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Annual Supply and Disposition Balance

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReservesCubic Feet) YearNov-14Area:

  18. Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through

  19. Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information Administration22)May£661.Data Monthly Annual

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Annual Supply and Disposition Balance

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet) U.S.Developmental WellsYear JanDeliveries

  1. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total of 15 metrics. Pathway reliability General objectives Adequacy Security Functional zones Primary energy supply

  2. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total of 15 metrics. Pathway reliability General objectives Adequacy Security Functional zones Primary energy supply

  3. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

  4. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S. (USGS); Riedel, M. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Cochran, J.R. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY); Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Navi Mumbai, India); Sathe, A.V. (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Uttaranchal, INDIA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

  5. Petroleum Supply Monthly, March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for March 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. 13 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly, April 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products through April, 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks.

  7. Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for October 1984. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administraction for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks.

  8. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  10. Natural gas monthly, August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

  11. Pipeline Politics: Natural Gas in Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landrum, William W.; Llewellyn, Benjamin B.; Limesand, Craig M.; Miller, Dante J.; Morris, James P.; Nowell, Kathleen S.; Sherman, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eurasia is a major source of oil and natural gas, and events in the region have a great potential to destabilize global security patterns. Supplies of natural gas and oil from Eurasia are vital for the functioning of European economies, and also...

  12. Natural gas annual 1994: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data fro the Nation from 1930 to 1994, and by State from 1967 to 1994.

  13. Impact of mine closure and access facilities on gas emissions from old mine workings to surface: examples of French iron and coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : examples of French iron and coal Lorraine basins C. Lagny, R. Salmon, Z. Pokryszka and S. Lafortune (INERIS of mine shafts located in the iron Lorraine basin, in the Lorraine and in North-East coal basins are quite in mine workings but gas entrance and exit are allowed. Coal shafts are secured and can be equipped

  14. FRACTURED RESERVOIR E&P IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN BASINS: A 3-D RTM MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Ortoleva; J. Comer; A. Park; D. Payne; W. Sibo; K. Tuncay

    2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Key natural gas reserves in Rocky Mountain and other U.S. basins are in reservoirs with economic producibility due to natural fractures. In this project, we evaluate a unique technology for predicting fractured reservoir location and characteristics ahead of drilling based on a 3-D basin/field simulator, Basin RTM. Recommendations are made for making Basin RTM a key element of a practical E&P strategy. A myriad of reaction, transport, and mechanical (RTM) processes underlie the creation, cementation and preservation of fractured reservoirs. These processes are often so strongly coupled that they cannot be understood individually. Furthermore, sedimentary nonuniformity, overall tectonics and basement heat flux histories make a basin a fundamentally 3-D object. Basin RTM is the only 3-D, comprehensive, fully coupled RTM basin simulator available for the exploration of fractured reservoirs. Results of Basin RTM simulations are presented, that demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Furthermore, it is shown how Basin RTM is a basis for a revolutionary automated methodology for simultaneously using a range of remote and other basin datasets to locate reservoirs and to assess risk. Characteristics predicted by our model include reserves and composition, matrix and fracture permeability, reservoir rock strength, porosity, in situ stress and the statistics of fracture aperture, length and orientation. Our model integrates its input data (overall sedimentation, tectonic and basement heat flux histories) via the laws of physics and chemistry that describe the RTM processes to predict reservoir location and characteristics. Basin RTM uses 3-D, finite element solutions of the equations of rock mechanics, organic and inorganic diagenesis and multi-phase hydrology to make its predictions. As our model predicts reservoir characteristics, it can be used to optimize production approaches (e.g., assess the stability of horizontal wells or vulnerability of fractures to production-induced formation pressure drawdown). The Piceance Basin (Colorado) was chosen for this study because of the extensive set of data provided to us by federal agencies and industry partners, its remaining reserves, and its similarities with other Rocky Mountain basins. We focused on the Rulison Field to test our ability to capture details in a well-characterized area. In this study, we developed a number of general principles including (1) the importance of even subtle flexure in creating fractures; (2) the tendency to preserve fractures due to the compressibility of gases; (3) the importance of oscillatory fracture/flow cycles in the expulsion of natural gas from source rock; and (4) that predicting fractures requires a basin model that is comprehensive, all processes are coupled, and is fully 3-D. A major difficulty in using Basin RTM or other basin simulator has been overcome in this project; we have set forth an information theory technology for automatically integrating basin modeling with classical database analysis; this technology also provides an assessment of risk. We have created a relational database for the Piceance Basin. We have developed a formulation of devolatilization shrinkage that integrates organic geochemical kinetics into incremental stress theory, allowing for the prediction of coal cleating and associated enhancement of natural gas expulsion from coal. An estimation of the potential economic benefits of the technologies developed or recommended here is set forth. All of the above findings are documented in this report.

  15. Document Supply Services Quick Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , phrase, ISBN/ISSN in the Search Term field (other options are available in the dropdown menu). Note1 Document Supply Services Quick Guide The DSS Portal makes requesting easy! Search for your item and password. If you are having difficulty please read the login help on the main DSS webpage. 2. Enter a word

  16. Fastbus Power Supply Manual University of Washington Seattle, 26 March, 1996 Fastbus Power Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    supplies each have their own built­in cooling fans, and the lower­current supplies are sufficiently cooledFastbus Power Supply Manual University of Washington Seattle, 26 March, 1996 page 1 Fastbus Power Supplies HGB, 03/26/1996 Overview Each of the four Fastbus crates of the SuperK OD DAQ system is supplied

  17. More wells will expand knowledge of Knox group, Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, D.E. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (US))

    1991-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arbuckle group of the Arkoma, Ardmore, and Anadarko basins was essentially untested in 1986. This paper reports that in these basins, shallower Pennsylvanian reservoirs were easy to reach and more economical to develop. The general consensus was that if a karstic reservoir was not present at the top of the Arbuckle group then there was no potential for oil and gas. Today the story is different; production zones are being found throughout the Arbuckle group, and drilling has been as deep as 28,000 ft. The Black Warrior basin is in a similar setting to the Arkoma, it is a foreland basin that has produced from multiple Mississippian and Pennsylvanian horizons at shallow depths. The Knox carbonate is present in a similar structural setting to that of the Arbuckle group at depths generally above 15,000 ft. In addition, Alabama is even more fortunate in that the buried Appalachian fold and thrust belt along the southern boundary of the basin also provides additional Knox targets with great promise. In this area Knox dolomites are fractured and folded and are juxtaposed by thrust faulting against Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks that are excellent sources of oil and gas. Therefore, the Knox is essentially untested in the Black Warrior basin.

  18. Evolution of the Apalachicola basin (northeastern Gulf of Mexico) during the Jurassic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid of multichannel seismic correlated with well data defines four Jurassic seismic sequences in the Apalachicola basin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sequences, which developed in response to basin architecture, sea level fluctuations, sediment supply, and salt movement document the depositional history of the basin during the Jurassic. Evaporation of water entering the basin resulted in deposition of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt sequence. The Louann generally lacks internal reflections, except updip where discontinuous parallel-divergent reflections probably represent interbedding of salt with clastics around the basin margin. The updip limit of thick salt coincides with a basement hinge line. The second sequence contains rocks of the Norphlet and Smackover formations. Norphlet clastics were deposited during a sea level rise. As the transgression continued, Oxfordian Smackover carbonates were deposited and upward shoaling occurred as sea level reached a stillstand. Smackover carbonates prograded over a shallow shelf, and buildups occurred over salt structures, basement highs, and basement hinge lines. The sequence thickens locally into growth faults associated with salt movement. During deposition of the Kimmeridgian Haynesville sequence, clastics entered the basin updip and carbonate deposition continued downdip. Growth faulting continued and a prominent shelf margin was established. Coarse fluvial and deltaic sediments of the Tithonian-earliest Berriasian Cotton Valley group comprise the final sequence. The Knowles Limestone records a transgression toward the end of the sequence. Progradation of the Knowles and establishment of a prominent shelf margin set the foundation for development of the overlying Lower Cretaceous margin.

  19. Potential for long-term LNG supplies to the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been a component of the US gas supply mix since 1970. Between 1970 and 1981 LNG terminals were constructed that have the current capability of receiving annual LNG shipments equivalent to about 700 Bcf. Additional terminal capacity was proposed and sites were under consideration in 1985 when reduced demand for natural gas and softening of gas prices resulted in the termination of plans for new capacity and suspension of contracts for imports. In the 1990s, however, shipments of LNG are again being received, and it is expected that imports of LNG by seaborne trade will play a significant role in meeting the growing US requirements for natural gas supply. It is expected that all existing US terminals will be operational by the mid-1990s, and the existing terminal capacity would be fully utilized by the year 2000. The report summarizes the analysis of the LNG terminal capacity aimed at identifying future LNG liquefaction and transportation needs.

  20. Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    basin, northeast China. Mar. Petrol. Geol. 15, 41-55. Huang,greenhouse gas reduction. Mar. Petrol Geol. 23, 61-77. Xu,Northeastern China. Mar. Petrol Geol. 16, 771-792. Lists of

  1. THE OUTLOOK FOR GLOBAL TRADE IN LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gas (LNG) to the year 2020. Because of substantial uncertainties in the current markets for LNG view of world LNG trade that was common several years ago and a low case that reflects concern of LNG trade from proven natural gas reserves in potential exporting countries. While Pacific Basin

  2. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  3. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  4. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  6. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1998, with data for February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas--the US (50 States and District of Columbia), 5 PAD Districts and 12 Refining Districts. 16 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. Stresses and fractures in the Frontier Formation, Green River Basin, predicted from basin-margin tectonic element interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural fractures and in situ stresses commonly dictate subsurface reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, as well as the effectiveness of stimulation techniques in low-permeability, natural gas reservoirs. This paper offers an initial prediction for the orientations of the fracture and stress systems in the tight gas reservoirs of the Frontier Formation, in the Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming. It builds on a previous report that addressed fractures and stresses in the western part of the basin and on ideas developed for the rest of the basin, using the principle that thrust faults are capable of affecting the stress magnitudes and orientations in little-deformed strata several hundreds of kilometers in front of a thrust. The prediction of subsurface stresses and natural fracture orientations is an undertaking that requires the willingness to revise models as definitive data are acquired during drilling. The predictions made in this paper are offered with the caveat that geology in the subsurface is always full of surprises.

  8. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    hydrocarbons such as natural gas. Whereas an over- all goal for the century is to achieve a sustainable system to increased use of unconventional gas resources as a result of declining supplies of conventional resources case study of energy transitions we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly, November 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for November 1984. Information on crude oil, gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Summary statistics include data from 1973 to 1984. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude oil, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied,and ending stocks. The focus article, US Petroleum Developments - - 1984., summarizes changes in consumption, refinery operations, petroleum stocks, imports, production and prices. The article includes an update on refinery closings.

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly, January 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for January, 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. This month's issue features Trends in Petroleum Product Consumption. This article describes the changing patterns of US petroleum product consumption in recent years, for the major projects and by end-use sectors.

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly, December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for December 1984. Information on crude oil, gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gases are included. Summary statistics include data from 1973 through January 1985. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tubulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude oil, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. The featured article, US Petroleum Import/Export Trends, highlights 1984 activities and discusses historical US trade patterns for crude oil and petroleum products. 12 figures, 33 tables.

  12. High voltage DC power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Droege, Thomas F. (Batavia, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively.

  13. 1992 Conversion Resources Supply Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years conservation of electric power has become an integral part of utility planning. The 1980 Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) requires that the region consider conservation potential in planning acquisitions of resources to meet load growth. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed its first estimates of conservation potential in 1982. Since that time BPA has updated its conservation supply analyses as a part of its Resource Program and other planning efforts. Major updates were published in 1985 and in January 1990. This 1992 document presents updated supply curves, which are estimates of the savings potential over time (cumulative savings) at different cost levels of energy conservation measures (ECMs). ECMs are devices, pieces of equipment, or actions that increase the efficiency of electricity use and reduce the amount of electricity used by end-use equipment.

  14. High voltage DC power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Droege, T.F.

    1989-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

  15. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiman, W.D.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration activity in South America, Central America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986 was considerably reduced compared to 1985. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Venezuela had increased oil production, with Colombia showing a dramatic 71% increase attributed mainly to bringing on-stream the pipeline connecting Occidental-Shell-Ecopetrol's Cano Limon complex to the port of Covenas. Significant discoveries were reported from Argentina in the Olmedo, Oran, and San Jorge basins; Brazil in the offshore Campos and Amazon basins; Colombia in the Llanos basin; Ecuador in the Oriente basin; Mexico in the Bay of Campeche; Peru in the Ucayali basin; and Venezuela in the Eastern Venezuela basin. Eastern Venezuela's Furrial discovery is reported to have recoverable reserves of more than 1 million bbl of oil, and Shell's Ucayali basin discovery is reported to hold more than 7 tcf of gas. 7 figures, 10 tables.

  17. Petroleum geology of Benue trough and southeastern Chad basin, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petters, S.W.; Ekweozor, C.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cretaceous cyclic sedimentation in the southern Benue trough, together with unconformities, provide a tripartite subdivision of the sedimentary succession into (1) the Albian Asu River Group, (2) the late Cenomanian to early Santonian Cross River Group (new name) and interfingering marginal marine sandstones, and (3) the post-Santonian coal measures sequence. Most of the Albian to Eocene marine shales in the Benue trough and the Turonian shales in the southern Chad basin contain well over 0.5% total organic carbon, with values of up to 7.4% in Turonian anaerobic shales. Based on the high content of soluble organic matter, thermal maturity, and the predominantly terrigenous character of the Late Cretaceous shales, mostly natural gas was probably generated in both basins. The late Santonian folding and uplift would have disrupted petroleum reservoirs. Also, crude oil accumulations which were not dissipated by tectonism would be relocated at relatively shallow depths and hence become accessible to invading meteoric waters.

  18. The ending of an era: After more than 10 years, the Rio Grande Basin Initiative concludes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : #29;) irrigation district studies; #31;) irrigation education and training; #28;) institutional incentives for e#23;cient water use; #25;) on-farm irrigation system management; #26;) urban water conservation; #14;) environment, ecology and water... and predicted population growth will continue to strain limited water supplies both for agricultural irrigation and urban water consumption. In #31;#30;#30;#29; the E#28;cient Irrigation for Water Conservation in the Rio Grande Basin initiative, also known...

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, May 1999, with data for March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary supplies of petroleum products in the US (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. 72 tabs.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF CENTRAL APPALACHIAN BASIN CBM DEVELOPMENT: POTENTIAL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the carbon sequestration potential of the Pennsylvanian-age coalbeds in the Central Appalachian Basin favorable reservoirs for carbon sequestration due to their thickness, depth, rank, and permeability high gas content should provide the optimum reservoirs for carbon sequestration since these coals