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1

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider West Virginia Department of Commerce Lays out guidelines for the conditions under which coal mining operations must notify state authorities of intentions to mine where underground gas

3

Impact of reservoir properties on mixing of inert cushion and natural gas in storage reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Underground natural gas storage is a process which effectively balances a variable demand market with a nearly constant supply of energy provided by the pipeline… (more)

Srinivasan, Balaji S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Analytical Estimation of CO2 Storage Capacity in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Based on Thermodynamic State Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions. Vertical discretization of grid size allows to improve aquifer influx modeling......................................... 55 Table 4.2? Reservoir model properties. ................................................................ 58 Table 4... fuel dependency will continue in the near future, increasing the need to develop economic and technologically feasible approaches to reduce and capture and dispose CO2 emissions. Geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and depleted oil and gas...

Valbuena Olivares, Ernesto

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

Prediction of the effects of compositional mixing in a reservoir on conversion to natural gas storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increased interest in the development of new Gas Storage Fields over the lastseveral decades has created some interesting challenges for the industry. Most existinggas… (more)

Brannon, Alan W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

Gardner, William Payton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Co-optimising CO2 storage and enhanced recovery in gas and gas condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Burning fossil fuels supply energy and releases carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon capture and storage (CCS) can reduce CO2 emissions. However, CCS is an expensive process.… (more)

Tan, Jo Ann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF CO2 SEPARATION AND STORAGE PROPERTIES OF COAL GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attractive alternative of sequestering CO{sub 2} is to inject it into coalbed methane reservoirs, particularly since it has been shown to enhance the production of methane during near depletion stages. The basis for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and simultaneous sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep coals is the preferential sorption property of coal, with its affinity for carbon dioxide being significantly higher than that for methane. Yet, the sorption behavior of coal under competitive sorptive environment is not fully understood. Hence, the original objective of this research study was to carry out a laboratory study to investigate the effect of studying the sorption behavior of coal in the presence of multiple gases, primarily methane, CO{sub 2} and nitrogen, in order to understand the mechanisms involved in displacement of methane and its movement in coal. This had to be modified slightly since the PVT property of gas mixtures is still not well understood, and any laboratory work in the area of sorption of gases requires a definite equation of state to calculate the volumes of different gases in free and adsorbed forms. This research study started with establishing gas adsorption isotherms for pure methane and CO{sub 2}. The standard gas expansion technique based on volumetric analysis was used for the experimental work with the additional feature of incorporating a gas chromatograph for analysis of gas composition. The results were analyzed first using the Langmuir theory. As expected, the Langmuir analysis indicated that CO{sub 2} is more than three times as sorptive as methane. This was followed by carrying out a partial desorption isotherm for methane, and then injecting CO{sub 2} to displace methane. The results indicated that CO{sub 2} injection at low pressure displaced all of the sorbed methane, even when the total pressure continued to be high. However, the displacement appeared to be occurring due to a combination of the preferential sorption property of coal and reduction in the partial pressure of methane. As a final step, the Extended Langmuir (EL) model was used to model the coal-methane-CO{sub 2} binary adsorption system. The EL model was found to be very accurate in predicting adsorption of CO{sub 2}, but not so in predicting desorption of methane. The selectivity of CO{sub 2} over methane was calculated to be 4.3:1. This is, of course, not in very good agreement with the measured values which showed the ratio to be 3.5:1. However, the measured results are in good agreement with the field observation at one of the CO{sub 2} injection sites. Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that low pressure injection of CO{sub 2} can be fairly effective in displacing methane in coalbed reservoirs although this might be difficult to achieve in field conditions. Furthermore, the displacement of methane appears to be not only due to the preferential sorption of methane, but reduction in partial pressure as well. Hence, using a highly adsorbing gas, such as CO{sub 2}, has the advantages of inert gas stripping and non-mixing since the injected gas does not mix with the recovered methane.

John Kemeny; Satya Harpalani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous experiments - injecting pure CO2 into carbonate cores - showed that the process is a win-win technology, sequestrating CO2 while recovering a significant amount of hitherto unrecoverable natural gas that could help defray the cost of CO2...

Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

14

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

15

A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

Yan, Bicheng

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3 Desorption parameters for the Billi coalbed methane reservoir correspond to within an acceptable range with those of the Barnett shale. For the initial reservoir pressure used in this study these values correspond to an initial methane storage of 344 scf... media has been studied extensively in coalbed methane reservoirs , where adsorption can be the primary mode of gas storage. Many analytic and semi-analytic models have been developed from the study of gas desorption from coalbed methane reservoirs...

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

20

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

22

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report," are collected from storage operators on a field-level basis. Operators can report field-level data either on a per reservoir basis or on an aggregated reservoir basis. It is possible that if all operators reported on a per reservoir basis that the demonstrated peak working gas capacity would be larger. Additionally, these data reflect inventory levels as of the last day of the report month, and a facility may have reached a higher inventory on a different day of the report month, which would not be recorded on Form EIA-191M.

23

gas cylinder storage guidelines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines All cylinders must be stored vertical, top up across the upper half the cylinder but below the shoulder. Small cylinder stands or other methods may be appropriate to ensure that the cylinders are secured from movement. Boxes, cartons, and other items used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight and keep objects away that could fall on them. Use Gas pressure regulators that have been inspected in the last 5 years. Cylinders that contain fuel gases whether full or empty must be stored away from oxidizer cylinders at a minimum of 20 feet. In the event they are stored together, they must be separated by a wall 5 feet high with

24

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

Mohaghegh, Shahab

26

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1973-2014 Withdrawals 43,752 63,495 73,368 47,070 52,054 361,393 1973-2014 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Natural Gas in Storage 381,232 399,293 406,677 450,460 510,558 515,041...

27

Development of reservoir simulator for hydraulically fractured gas wells in noncontinuous lenticular reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model is presented which forms the basis for a reservoir simulator that can be used to assist in the interpretation and prediction of the performance of hydraulically fractured gas wells completed in the western tight sands area. The model represents a first step in developing a reservoir simulator that can be used as an exploration tool and to analyze proposed gas well tests and future production trends in noncontinuous sand lense formations which are representative of the tight gas sands located in the Rocky Mountain gas provinces. The model developed consists of the necessary mathematical equations to simulate both reservoir and well performance under a variety of operating conditions. The equations developed are general in that they consider the following effects: (1) three-dimensional flow in the reservoir and one-dimensional flow in the fracture; (2) non-Darcy flow in the reservoir and fracture; (3) wellbore and fracture storage; (4) formation damage on the fracture face; (5) frictional pressure drop in the production string; (6) noncontinuous sand lenses; and (7) Klinkenberg effect. As a start toward the development of the final version of the desired reservoir simulator, a two-dimensional simulator was secured, placed on the computer, and debugged, and some test cases were run to ensure its validity. Using this simulator as a starting point, changes to reflect the effects of items 3 and 6 were made since it was believed these were the more important effects to consider at this stage of development. The development of an operational two-dimensional gas reservoir simulator was completed. Further work will be required to extend the simulator to three dimensions and incorporate all the changes reflected in items 1 to 6.

Evans, R.D.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

29

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

30

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Title Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1089E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Anders, André, Jonathan L. Slack, and Thomas J. Richardson Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 1 Date Published 08/2003 Call Number LBNL-1089E Abstract Proof-of-principle gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have been investigated. In contrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogen is stored (at low concentration) in the gas volume between glass panes of the insulated glass units (IGUs). The elimination of a solid state ion storage layer simplifies the layer stack, enhances overall transmission, and reduces cost. The cyclic switching properties were demonstrated and system durability improved with the incorporation a thin Zr barrier layer between the MnNiMg layer and the Pd catalyst. Addition of 9% silver to the palladium catalyst further improved system durability. About 100 full cycles have been demonstrated before devices slow considerably. Degradation of device performance appears to be related to Pd catalyst mobility, rather than delamination or metal layer oxidation issues originally presumed likely to present significant challenges.

32

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

33

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

35

Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...

36

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

37

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

38

Storage Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Gas Water Heaters Storage Gas Water Heaters The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance...

39

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the storage of natural gas and prior to the exercise of eminent domain by any person, firm, or corporation having such right under laws of the state of Louisiana, the commissioner, shall have found all of the following:

40

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoirs, natural gas occurs as free gas in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay Continuous, low-permeability, fractured, organic-rich gas shale units are widespread and are possible geologic storage targets .The Marcellus could act as a storage reservoir for captured CO2. In this scenario

Mohaghegh, Shahab

42

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Storage Fields Other than Salt Caverns",8,"Monthly","102014","115...

43

Natural gas cavern storage regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of an incident at an LPG storage facility in Texas by U.S. Department of Transportation resulted in recommendation that state regulation of natural gas cavern storage might be improved. Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission has established a subcommittee to analyze the benefits and risks associated with natural gas cavern storage, and to draft a regulation model which will suggest engineering and performance specifications. The resulting analysis and regulatory language will be reviewed by I.O.G.C.C., and if approved, distributed to member states (including New York) for consideration. Should the states desire assistance in modifying the language to reflect local variables, such as policy and geology, I.O.G.C.C. may offer assistance. The proposed presentation will review the I.O.G.C.C. product (if published at that date), and discuss implications of its application in New York.

Heneman, H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

45

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion...

Ajayi, Arashi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast...

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-912, "Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report." The dashed vertical lines indicate current and year-ago weekly periods. More Storage Data History 5-Year...

48

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

49

On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Economic analysis of using above ground gas storage devices for compressed air energy storage system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Above ground gas storage devices for compressed air energy storage (CAES) have three types: air storage tanks, gas cylinders, and gas storage pipelines. A cost model of these gas storage devices is established on...

Jinchao Liu; Xinjing Zhang; Yujie Xu; Zongyan Chen…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

54

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A. E.; Copp, J. F. . 111991. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field. Proceedings of () ; () : Sixteenth workshop on...

55

Pipelines and Underground Gas Storage (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules apply to intrastate transport of natural gas and other substances via pipeline, as well as underground gas storage facilities. The construction and operation of such infrastructure...

56

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Theoretical fundamentals, critical issues, and adequate formulation of effective shale gas and condensate reservoir simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The issues of relevance to describing the storage and movement of hydrocarbon gas and condensate and water through extremely low permeability shale formations are reviewed. The shale rock is viewed as a heterogeneous quad-media continuum system. Each system has different wettability storage transport and connectivity characteristics. The hydrocarbon storage is considered as being in the free gas adsorbed gas and dissolved gas. The alteration of fluid properties and flow behavior under pore confinement are emphasized. For gas transport the effective mean-radii and apparent permeability as a function of pore-size distribution and gas adsorption are examined. The nonequilibrium fluid distribution effect produced by tortuous narrow flow paths is discussed. It is emphasized that these form the essential phenomena that must be taken into account for effective simulation of shale gas and condensate reservoirs.

Faruk Civan; Deepak Devegowda; Richard Sigal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Borehole Stability Analysis of Horizontal Drilling in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Serious wellbore instability occurs frequently during horizontal drilling in shale gas reservoirs. The conventional forecast model of in ... not suitable for wellbore stability analysis in laminated shale gas for...

Jun-Liang Yuan; Jin-Gen Deng; Qiang Tan; Bao-Hua Yu…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Regulatory, technical pressures prompt more U. S. salt-cavern gas storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas storage in US salt caverns is meeting the need for flexible, high delivery and injection storage following implementation Nov. 1, 1993, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636. This ruling has opened the US underground natural-gas storage market to more participants and created a demand for a variety of storage previously provided by pipelines as part of their bundled sales services. Many of these new services such as no-notice and supply balancing center on use of high-delivery natural gas storage from salt caverns. Unlike reservoir storage, nothing restricts flow in a cavern. The paper discusses the unique properties of salt that make it ideal for gas storage, choosing a location for the storage facility, cavern depth and shape, cavern size, spacing, pressures, construction, conversion or brine or LPG storage caverns to natural gas, and operation.

Barron, T.F. (PB-KBB Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Particle dynamics in high-Alpine proglacial reservoirs modified by pumped-storage operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the pumped-storage system. It implies that this approach can be useful for further employment during planningParticle dynamics in high-Alpine proglacial reservoirs modified by pumped-storage operation Matteo distribution were surveyed and modeled in two high-Alpine reservoirs in Switzerland, connected by pumped-storage

Wehrli, Bernhard

62

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

63

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 39,062 39,062...

64

Application of horizontal drilling to tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical fractures and lithologic heterogeneity are extremely important factors controlling gas flow rates and total gas recovery from tight (very low permeability) reservoirs. These reservoirs generally have in situ matrix permeabilities to gas of less than 0.1 md. Enhanced gas recovery methods have usually involved hydraulic fracturing; however, the induced vertical hydraulic fractures almost always parallel the natural fracture and may not be an efficient method to establish a good conduit to the wellbore. Horizontal drilling appears to be an optimum method to cut across many open vertical fractures. Horizontal holes will provide an efficient method to drain heterogeneous tight reservoirs even in unfractured rocks. Although many horizontal wells have now been completed in coalbed methane and oil reservoirs, very few have been drilled to exclusively evaluate tight gas reservoirs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded some horizontal and slanthole drilling in order to demonstrate the applicability of these techniques for gas development. Four DOE holes have been drilled in Devonian gas shales in the Appalachian basin, and one hole has been drilled in Upper Cretaceous tight sandstones in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The Colorado field experiment has provided valuable information on the abundance and openness of deeply buried vertical fractures in tight sandstones. These studies, plus higher gas prices, should help encourage industry to begin to further utilize horizontal drilling as a new exploitation method for tight gas reservoirs.

Spencer, C.W. (U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States)); Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Brown, C.A. (Synder Oil Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analysis of a geopressured gas reservoir using solution plot method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependent formation compressibility and water influx require extensive study of the reservoir core samples and aquifer characteristics that are not commonly conducted. Poston and Chen solved this problem by re-arranging the material balance equation... of water compressibility (c~) and formation compressibility (c/ ). Studies of geopressured gas reservoirs have shown such reservoirs to be generally associated with either interbedded shales and or an aquifer. Each of these conditions can provide...

Hussain, Syed Muqeedul

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",8,"Monthly","102014","1151973" ,"Release...

67

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967"...

68

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",12,"Annual",2013,"6301988" ,"Release...

69

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity",11,"Annual",2013,"6301988" ,"Release...

70

General inflow performance relationship for solution-gas reservoir wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two equations are developed to describe the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of wells producing from solution-gas drive reservoirs. These are general equations (extensions of the currently available IPR's) that apply to wells with any drainage-area shape at any state of completion flow efficiency and any stage of reservoir depletion. 7 refs.

Dias-Couto, L.E.; Golan, M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NETL: Natural Gas and Petroleum Storage Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Strategic Petroleum Reserve Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0014830 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Core Laboratories Natural Gas Storage There are currently no active storage projects Storage - Completed Projects Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-DT0000358 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northrop Grumman Missions System DE-FC26-03NT41813 Geomechanical Analysis and Design Criteria Terralog Technologies DE-FC26-03NT41779 Natural Gas Storage Technology Consortium Pennsylvania State University (PSU) DE-FC26-03NT41743 Improved Deliverability in Gas Storage Fields by Identifying the Timing and Sources of Damage Using Smart Storage Technology Schlumberger Technology Corporation

72

Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

73

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

approach for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. Authors C. Y. Sun, B. H. Niu, P. F. Wen, Y. Y. Huang, H. Y. Wang, X. W. Huang and J. Li Published Journal...

74

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary Prices Exploration & Reserves Production Imports/Exports Pipelines Storage Consumption All Natural Gas Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Exploration & Reserves Imports/Exports & Pipelines Prices Production Projections Storage All Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in November 2012 on Form EIA-191, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage

75

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOVT PERMEABILITY GAS RESERVOIR PRODUCTION USING LARGE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES A Thesis by STEPHEN ALLEN HOLDITCH Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Me er) (Member) (Membe r) (Member) (Member...) August 1970 111 ABSTRACT Low Permeability Gas Reservoir Production Using Large Hydraulic Fractures. (August 1970) Stephen Allen Holditch, B. S. , Texas ARM University Directed by: Dr, R. A. Morse There has been relatively little work published...

Holditch, Stephen A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

Targac, Gary Wayne

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

79

Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

Unneberg, Arild

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission This statute declares underground storage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas to be in the public interest if it promotes the conservation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage #12;Selected BNL Research · Energy Science and Technology Department Six fully-instrumented hydride stations and complete processing

82

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

83

NETL: News Release - DOE, Penn State To Establish Gas Storage Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 11, 2003 September 11, 2003 DOE, Penn State To Establish Gas Storage Technology Consortium Goal is to Improve Performance of the Nation's Underground Gas Storage Infrastructure Map of U.S. natural gas storage sites - click for larger image FOSSIL FACT: The nation's gas industry stores natural gas in more than 400 underground storage reservoirs and salt caverns throughout the country. Click here for larger image UNIVERSITY PARK , PA - The Pennsylvania State University has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to establish and operate an underground gas storage technology consortium. The agreement between Penn State and DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas will last four-and-a-half years at a total cost of $3 million. The first phase of the agreement will last

84

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index in estimating reservoir performance. • The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions • The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index in estimating reservoir performance. ? The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions ? The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

87

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

88

Gas Storage Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Gas Storage Act (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Illinois Commerce Commission Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate distribution to the public in the State of Illinois, if the said business of such corporation is regulated or subject to regulation under either the laws of the State of Illinois or the laws of the United States, shall have the right to enter upon, take or damage private property or any interest

89

Characterization and reservoir evaluation of a hydraulically fractured, shaly gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Shaly Gas Reservoir. ( December 1991 ) Cesar Alfonso Santiago Molina, Ingeniero de Petroleos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven W. Poston Shale content in reservoir rocks affect their petrophysical properties... for their support. The author also wishes to express his deepest appreciation to Dr. H. Chen for all the help and suggestions he made in this study. The author expresses his gratitude to every one in Empresa Colombiana de Petroleos, Ecopetrol, who made possible...

Santiago Molina, Cesar Alfonso

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

91

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Production Optimization in Shale Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Natural gas from organic rich shales has become an important part of the supply of natural gas in the United States. Modern drilling and… (more)

Knudsen, Brage Rugstad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

MathematicalGeology, Vol. 11,No. I,1979 Modeling and Optimizing a Gas-Water Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gas in psia pressure of gas in psia at time t constant production rate of gas in moles per year production rate at time t in moles per year ideal gas constant constant rate of water injection in cubic feet of the reservoir in cubic feet, below which gas production ceases initial reservoir volume in cubic feet reservoir

Waterman, Michael S.

94

Identification of parameters influencing the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing with the aid of a neural network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performing hydraulic fractures on gas storage wells to improve their deliverability is a common practice in the eastern part of the United States. Most of the fields in this part of the country being used for storage are old. Reservoir characteristic data necessary for most reservoir studies and hydraulic fracture design and evaluation are scarce for these old fields. This paper introduces a new methodology by which parameters that influence the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing may be identified in the absence of sufficient reservoir data. Control and manipulation of these parameters, once identified correctly, could enhance the outcome of frac jobs in gas storage fields. The study was conducted on a gas storage field in the Clinton formation of Northeastern Ohio. It was found that well performance indicators prior to a hydraulic fracture play an important role in how good the well will respond to a new frac job. Several other important factors were also identified.

McVey, D.S.; Mohaghegh, S.; Aminian, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

96

US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL BOGATCHEV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL...

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCOUNTING FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ACCOUNTING FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL...

Mengal, Salman Akram

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

Ma, Xiaodan

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

CO2 gas/oil ratio prediction in a multi-component reservoir by combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to producein a complex reservoir containing oil, water, hydrocarbonincluding oil, water and gas) and reservoir pressure. The

Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Criteria for displacement by gas versus water in oil reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on of a Two-Dimensional Technique for Computing Performance of Gas-Or ive Reservoirs", Soc. Pet. Enq. J. {Mar. 1963), 19-27; Trans. , AINE, 228. 15. Cardwell, W. T. , Jr. and Parsons, R. L. : 0Gravity Drainage Theory", Trans. , AIME (1949) 179, 199... on of a Two-Dimensional Technique for Computing Performance of Gas-Or ive Reservoirs", Soc. Pet. Enq. J. {Mar. 1963), 19-27; Trans. , AINE, 228. 15. Cardwell, W. T. , Jr. and Parsons, R. L. : 0Gravity Drainage Theory", Trans. , AIME (1949) 179, 199...

Piper, Larry Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

Jeffrey Savidge

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Sourcekey","N5030CO2","N5010CO2","N5020CO2","N5070CO2","N5050CO2","N5060CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","Colorado Natural Gas in Underground...

104

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE FINAL REPORT DOE CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC26-97FT34349 SUBMITTED BY: PB-KBB INC. 11757 KATY FREEWAY, SUITE 600 HOUSTON, TX 77079 SEPTEMBER 1998 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

105

Quantitative dynamic analysis of gas desorption contribution to production in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Unlike in conventional gas reservoirs, gas in shale reservoirs is stored mainly as free gas and adsorbed gas, and a small amount of dissolved gas. Well production from shale gas reservoirs usually exhibits sharply decline trend in the early period of production and then turns to long-term stable production at a relatively low rate, for which gas desorption contribution has been considered as a possible explanation. This study aims at providing an accurate evaluation of the contribution from gas desorption to dynamic production. Through incorporation of artificial component subdivision in a numerical simulator, the production contributions of the free and adsorbed gas can be obtained separately. This analysis approach is validated firstly and then applied to two case studies based on conceptual models of Barnett and Antrim Shale. The results show that desorbed gas dominates the production in Antrim Shale, while it only plays a small role in the production in Barnett Shale. The impact of permeability and initial gas saturation are also analyzed. In previous studies, numerical and analytical simulators were used to investigate the difference between the production performances with or without desorption, attributing the production increase to gas desorption. However, our study shows this treatment overestimates the contribution from gas desorption. This work provides a simple but accurate method for the dynamic analysis of desorption contribution to total production, contributing to reservoir resource assessment, the understanding of production mechanisms, and shale gas production simulation.

Tingyun Yang; Xiang Li; Dongxiao Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effect of gas production rate and rock and fluid properties on the recovery of gas from strong water drive gas reservoirs will permit gas production optimization and should result in conservation of natural and financial resources. Hence... saturations, gas production rate is not a dominant factor affecting the ultimate gas recovery. Almost all the gas is recovered whether producing the field at 0. 1 or 10 times GRR. In predicting the gas recovery in a strong water drive reser- voir...

Soemarso, Christophorus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions...

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is… (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a… (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

111

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ See All Natural Gas Reports ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report for week ending December 20, 2013. | Released: December 27, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. | Next Release: January 3, 2014 Working gas in underground storage, lower 48 states Summary text CSV JSN Historical Comparisons Stocks billion cubic feet (Bcf) Year ago (12/20/12) 5-Year average (2008-2012) Region 12/20/13 12/13/13 change (Bcf) % change (Bcf) % change East 1,568 1,683 -115 1,889 -17.0 1,810 -13.4 West 429 450 -21 523 -18.0 462 -7.1 Producing 1,074 1,115 -41 1,251 -14.1 1,111 -3.3 Salt 263 277 -14 310 -15.2 208 26.4 Nonsalt 811 839 -28 940 -13.7 903 -10.2

112

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

113

Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

114

Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: FY1 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

Thomas A. Buscheck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EIA - AEO2010 -Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Introduction Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40 percent of natural gas production and about 35 percent of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in “darcies.”)

116

Matrix Heterogeneity Effects on Gas Transport and Adsorption in Coalbed and Shale Gas Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In coalbeds and shales, gas transport and storage are important for accurate ... rates and for the consideration of subsurface greenhouse gas sequestration. They involve coupled fluid phenomena in ... transport, ...

Ebrahim Fathi; I. Yücel Akkutlu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

STORAGE OF CHILLED NATURAL GAS IN BEDDED SALT STORAGE CAVERNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of a two-phase study that examines the economic and technical feasibility of converting a conventional natural gas storage facility in bedded salt into a refrigerated natural gas storage facility for the purpose of increasing the working gas capacity of the facility. The conceptual design used to evaluate this conversion is based on the design that was developed for the planned Avoca facility in Steuben County, New York. By decreasing the cavern storage temperature from 43 C to -29 C (110 F to -20 F), the working gas capacity of the facility can be increased by about 70 percent (from 1.2 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 4.4 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 2.0 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 7.5 Bcf) while maintaining the original design minimum and maximum cavern pressures. In Phase I of the study, laboratory tests were conducted to determine the thermal conductivity of salt at low temperatures. Finite element heat transfer calculations were then made to determine the refrigeration loads required to maintain the caverns at a temperature of -29 C (-20 F). This was followed by a preliminary equipment design and a cost analysis for the converted facility. The capital cost of additional equipment and its installation required for refrigerated storage is estimated to be about $13,310,000 or $160 per thousand Nm{sup 3} ($4.29 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf)) of additional working gas capacity. The additional operating costs include maintenance refrigeration costs to maintain the cavern at -29 C (-20 F) and processing costs to condition the gas during injection and withdrawal. The maintenance refrigeration cost, based on the current energy cost of about $13.65 per megawatt-hour (MW-hr) ($4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu)), is expected to be about $316,000 after the first year and to decrease as the rock surrounding the cavern is cooled. After 10 years, the cost of maintenance refrigeration based on the $13.65 per MW-hr ($4 per MMBtu) energy cost is estimated to be $132,000. The gas processing costs are estimated to be $2.05 per thousand Nm{sup 3} ($0.055 per Mcf) of gas injected into and withdrawn from the facility based on the $13.65 per MW-hr ($4 per MMBtu) energy cost. In Phase II of the study, laboratory tests were conducted to determine mechanical properties of salt at low temperature. This was followed by thermomechanical finite element simulations to evaluate the structural stability of the cavern during refrigerated storage. The high thermal expansion coefficient of salt is expected to result in tensile stresses leading to tensile failure in the roof, walls, and floor of the cavern as it is cooled. Tensile fracturing of the cavern roof may result in loss of containment of the gas and/or loss of integrity of the casing shoe, deeming the conversion of this facility not technically feasible.

JOel D. Dieland; Kirby D. Mellegard

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Storage Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Gas Storage Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

119

Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

120

Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research into gas injection processes in four main areas: laboratory experiments to measure three-phase relative permeability; network modeling to predict three-phase relative permeability; benchmark simulations of gas injection and water flooding at the field scale; and the development of fast streamline techniques to study field-scale ow. The aim of the work is to achieve a comprehensive description of gas injection processes from the pore to the core to the reservoir scale. To this end, measurements of three-phase relative pemeability have been made and compared with predictions from pore scale modeling. At the field scale, streamline-based simulation has been extended to compositional displacements, providing a rapid method to predict oil recovery from gas injection.

Franklin M. Orr, Jr.; Martin J. Blunt

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly understood, but recent studies have indicated that GHG emissions; and over 5 weeks in August--September, the peak GHG emission period, during 2012. (Pacific Northwest

122

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field May 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- In a newly awarded project, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are partnering with European scientists to track injected carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world's first and longest running carbon storage operation located at the Sleipner gas field in the North Sea. The researchers--from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) in New York--will conduct surveys on the seafloor to monitor injected CO2 in the 1 kilometer-deep reservoir, where more than

123

Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research carried out in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University from September 1997 - September 1998 under the second year of a three-year grant from the Department of Energy on the "Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs." The research effort is an integrated study of the factors affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involves theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulation. The original proposal described research in four areas: (1) Pore scale modeling of three phase flow in porous media; (2) Laboratory experiments and analysis of factors influencing gas injection performance at the core scale with an emphasis on the fundamentals of three phase flow; (3) Benchmark simulations of gas injection at the field scale; and (4) Development of streamline-based reservoir simulator. Each state of the research is planned to provide input and insight into the next stage, such that at the end we should have an integrated understanding of the key factors affecting field scale displacements.

Blunt, Martin J.; Orr, Franklin M.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Schedule  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ‹ Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Schedule Holiday Release Schedule The standard release time and day of the week will be at 10:30 a.m. (Eastern time) on Thursdays with the following exceptions. All times are Eastern. Alternate Release Date Release Day Release Time Holiday 7/6/2012 Friday 10:30 a.m. 7/4/2012 (Wednesday) is Independence Day 11/21/2012 Wednesday 12:00 p.m. 11/22/2012 (Thursday) is Thanksgiving Day 12/28/2012 Friday 10:30 a.m. 12/25/2012 (Tuesday) is Christmas Day 1/4/2013 Friday 10:30 a.m. 1/1/2013 (Tuesday) is New Year's Day 7/3/2013 Wednesday 12:00 p.m. 7/4/2013 (Thursday) is Independence Day 10/22/2013 Tuesday 10:30 a.m. EIA Closed 11/27/2013 Wednesday 12:00 p.m. 11/28/2013 (Thursday) is Thanksgiving Day

125

Geological controls on gas accumulation in a unique Zechstein carbonate reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potentially contribute and combine favourably to Wissey's reservoir quality and gas reserves. It is nowGeological controls on gas accumulation in a unique Zechstein carbonate reservoir Craig Duguid, The King's Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JW, Scotland, UK Email: S0567834@sms.ed.ac.uk Gas

126

Inflow Performance Relationships (IPR) for Solution Gas Drive Reservoirs -- a Semi-Analytical Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLOW PERFORMANCE RELATIONSHIPS (IPR) FOR SOLUTION GAS DRIVE RESERVOIRS ? A SEMI-ANALYTICAL APPROACH A Thesis by MAR?A ALEJANDRA NASS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... Inflow Performance Relationships (IPR) For Solution Gas Drive Reservoirs ? a Semi-Analytical Approach Copyright 2010 Mar?a Alejandra Nass INFLOW PERFORMANCE RELATIONSHIPS (IPR) FOR SOLUTION GAS DRIVE RESERVOIRS ? A SEMI...

Nass, Maria A.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

128

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have beencontrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogenThe application of electrochromic devices based on tungsten

Anders, Andre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Impact of carbon dioxide sequestration in depleted gas-condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Depleted gas-condensate reservoirs are becoming important targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Since depleted below the dew point, retrograde condensate has been deposited in the pore… (more)

Ramharack, Richard M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

,"New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

131

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued in the detection of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Tasks include modeling, data analysis, geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin, and remote sensing.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Two-phase pressure transient analysis for multi-stage fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most researches on shale gas production and pressure transient analysis placed more emphasis on single-phase flow, the two-phase flow caused by flowback after hydrofracture in shale gas reservoirs does not attract much attention. This paper presents a two-phase pressure transient analysis model of multi-stage fractured horizontal well with the consideration of wellbore storage, skin effect, two-phase saturation, hydraulic fractures parameters and desorption characteristics of shale gas reservoirs. Accurate solution to this flow model is obtained by the use of source function theory, Laplace transform, three-dimensional eigenvalue method and orthogonal transformation. Pseudo-pressure and pseudo-pressure derivative type curve is plotted by using the Stehfest algorithm. Seven different flow regimes have been identified and the effects of influence factors such as initial saturation, skin factor, absorption index, fracture stages, horizontal well lateral length and wellbore storage coefficient have also been discussed. The presents research could be used to interpret the pressure behavior more accurately and effectively of shale gas reservoirs.

Weiyang Xie; Xiaoping Li; Liehui Zhang; Junchao Wang; Lina Cao; Lin Yuan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from themodel included the oil reservoir and the well with a toppressures of the deep oil reservoir, to a two-phase oil-gas

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Schedule  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Schedule Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Schedule Holiday Release Schedule The standard release time and day of the week will be at 10:30 a.m. (Eastern time) on Thursdays with the following exceptions. All times are Eastern. Alternate Release Date Release Day Release Time Holiday 11/27/2013 Wednesday 12:00 p.m. 11/28/2013 (Thursday) is Thanksgiving Day 12/27/2013 Friday 10:30 a.m. 12/25/2013 (Wednesday) is Christmas Day 1/3/2014 Friday 10:30 a.m. 1/1/2014 (Wednesday) is New Year's Day 11/14/2014 Friday 10:30 a.m. 11/11/2014 (Tuesday) is Veterns Day 11/26/2014 Wednesday 12:00 p.m. 11/27/2014 (Thursday) is Thanksgiving Day 12/24/2014 Wednesday 12:00 p.m. 12/25/2014 (Thursday) is Christmas Day 12/31/2014 Wednesday 12:00 p.m. 1/1/2015 (Thursday) is New Year's Day

137

New Advances in Shale Gas Reservoir Analysis Using Water Flowback Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas reservoirs with multistage hydraulic fractures are commonly characterized by analyzing long-term gas production data, but water flowback data is usually not included in the analysis. However, this work shows there can be benefits...

Alkouh, Ahmad

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed, which can overcome ... gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurizati...

YuHu Bai; QingPing Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessing the Effect of Timing of Availability for Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Largest Oil and Gas Pools in the Alberta Basin: Description of Data and Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from large stationary sources and storage in geological media is a technologically-feasible mitigation measure for the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere in response to climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) can be sequestered underground in oil and gas reservoirs, in deep saline aquifers, in uneconomic coal beds and in salt caverns. The Alberta Basin provides a very large capacity for CO2 storage in oil and gas reservoirs, along with significant capacity in deep saline formations and possible unmineable coal beds. Regional assessments of potential geological CO2 storage capacity have largely focused so far on estimating the total capacity that might be available within each type of reservoir. While deep saline formations are effectively able to accept CO2 immediately, the storage potential of other classes of candidate storage reservoirs, primarily oil and gas fields, is not fully available at present time. Capacity estimates to date have largely overlooked rates of depletion in these types of storage reservoirs and typically report the total estimated storage capacity that will be available upon depletion. However, CO2 storage will not (and cannot economically) begin until the recoverable oil and gas have been produced via traditional means. This report describes a reevaluation of the CO2 storage capacity and an assessment of the timing of availability of the oil and gas pools in the Alberta Basin with very large storage capacity (>5 MtCO2 each) that are being looked at as likely targets for early implementation of CO2 storage in the region. Over 36,000 non-commingled (i.e., single) oil and gas pools were examined with effective CO2 storage capacities being individually estimated. For each pool, the life expectancy was estimated based on a combination of production decline analysis constrained by the remaining recoverable reserves and an assessment of economic viability, yielding an estimated depletion date, or year that it will be available for CO2 storage. The modeling framework and assumptions used to assess the impact of the timing of CO2 storage resource availability on the region’s deployment of CCS technologies is also described. The purpose of this report is to describe the data and methodology for examining the carbon dioxide (CO2) storage capacity resource of a major hydrocarbon province incorporating estimated depletion dates for its oil and gas fields with the largest CO2 storage capacity. This allows the development of a projected timeline for CO2 storage availability across the basin and enables a more realistic examination of potential oil and gas field CO2 storage utilization by the region’s large CO2 point sources. The Alberta Basin of western Canada was selected for this initial examination as a representative mature basin, and the development of capacity and depletion date estimates for the 227 largest oil and gas pools (with a total storage capacity of 4.7 GtCO2) is described, along with the impact on source-reservoir pairing and resulting CO2 transport and storage economics. The analysis indicates that timing of storage resource availability has a significant impact on the mix of storage reservoirs selected for utilization at a given time, and further confirms the value that all available reservoir types offer, providing important insights regarding CO2 storage implementation to this and other major oil and gas basins throughout North America and the rest of the world. For CCS technologies to deploy successfully and offer a meaningful contribution to climate change mitigation, CO2 storage reservoirs must be available not only where needed (preferably co-located with or near large concentrations of CO2 sources or emissions centers) but also when needed. The timing of CO2 storage resource availability is therefore an important factor to consider when assessing the real opportunities for CCS deployment in a given region.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Bachu, Stefan

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

,"U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","9302014" ,"Next Release...

142

,"U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","9302014" ,"Next Release...

143

,"U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","9302014" ,"Next...

144

,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12...

145

,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","1031...

146

,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","10312014"...

147

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release...

148

AN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT TO COMPARE GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT TO COMPARE GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS Joseph W. Wilder 1 , George J. Moridis 2 , Scott J. Wilson 3 , Masanori Kurihara 4 , Mark D. White 5 , Yoshihiro Masuda 6 , Brian J. Anderson 7, 8 *, Timothy S. Collett 9 , Robert B. Hunter 10 , Hideo Narita 11 , Mehran Pooladi-Darvish 12 , Kelly Rose 7 , Ray Boswell 7 1 Department of Theoretical & Applied Math University of Akron 302 Buchtel Common Akron, OH 44325-4002 USA 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California Earth Sciences Division, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 USA 3 Ryder Scott Company, Petroleum Consultants 621 17th Street, Suite 1550 Denver, Colorado 80293 USA 4 Japan Oil Engineering Company, Ltd. Kachidoki Sun-Square 1-7-3, Kachidoki, Chuo-ku,

149

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may

150

Numerical investigation of gas flow rate in shale gas reservoirs with nanoporous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Theoretical analysis of transport mechanism of gas flow in shale gas reservoirs with nanoporous media was carried out on the basis of molecular kinetic theory. The motion equation and mathematical model of shale gas transport in multi-scale medium are established in this article. The pressure distribution equation of radial flow was derived, and the computing method of the control area of gas well was presented. Additionally, the volume flow rate equations of vertical and horizontal fractured wells were obtained. Through Newton iterative method, volume flow rate was analyzed, considering various factors such as production pressure drawdown, fracture half-length, fracture conductivity, fracture spacing and diffusion coefficient. According to the numerical results, the volume flow rate of the gas well increases when the diffusion coefficient grows. Consequently diffusion in shale gas reservoirs with nanoporous media plays an important role. With increase of fracture half-length, the volume flow rate increases first and then tends towards stability. Moreover, for certain length of the horizontal wellbore, when fracture spacing increases and the number of the fractures lessens, the control area and the volume flow rate of the gas well decreases. Therefore, there is an optimum allocation among these factors to achieve maximum volume flow.

Hongqing Song; Mingxu Yu; Weiyao Zhu; Peng Wu; Yu Lou; Yuhe Wang; John Killough

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Modeling effects of diffusion and gravity drainage on oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs under gas injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas injection in naturally fractured reservoirs maintains the reservoir pressure, and increases oil recovery primarily by gravity drainage and to a lesser extent by mass transfer between the flowing gas in the fracture and the porous matrix...

Jamili, Ahmad

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

Buscheck, Thomas A.

153

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Storage Fields" Salt Cavern Storage Fields" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm10vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

154

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity With Data for November 2012 | Release Date: July 24, 2013 | Next Release Date: Spring 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Overview Natural gas working storage capacity increased by about 2 percent in the Lower 48 states between November 2011 and November 2012. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has two measures of working gas storage capacity, and both increased by similar amounts: Demonstrated maximum volume increased 1.8 percent to 4,265 billion cubic feet (Bcf) Design capacity increased 2.0 percent to 4,575 Bcf Maximum demonstrated working gas volume is an operational measure of the highest level of working gas reported at each storage facility at any time

155

Identification of parameters influencing the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing with the aid of a neural network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performing hydraulic fractures on gas storage wells to improve their deliverability is a common practice in the eastern part of the US. Most fields used for storage in this region are old, and the reservoir characteristic data necessary for most reservoir studies and hydraulic fracture design and evaluation are scarce. This paper introduces a new method by which parameters that influence the response of gas storage wells to hydraulic fracturing may be identified in the absence of sufficient reservoir data. Control and manipulation of these parameters, once identified correctly, could enhance the outcome of frac jobs in gas storage fields. The authors conducted the study on a gas storage field in the Clinton formation of northeastern Ohio. They found that well-performance indicators before a hydraulic fracture play an important role in how good the well will respond to a new frac job. They also identified several other important factors. The identification of controlling parameters serves as a foundation for improved frac job design in the fields where adequate engineering data are not available. Another application of this type of study could be the enhancement of selection criteria among the candidate wells for hydraulic fracturing. To achieve the objective of this study, the authors designed, trained, and applied an artificial neural network. The paper will discuss the results of the incorporation of this new technology in hydraulic fracture design and evaluation.

McVey, D.S. [East Ohio Gas Co., North Canton, OH (United States); Mohaghegh, S.; Aminian, K.; Ameri, S. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 5,535 5,563 5,789 6,051 6,354 6,516 1990-2013

157

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 481,448 506,368 537,381 569,532 588,760 616,097 1990-2013

158

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 7,627 7,917 7,809 8,111 7,771 8,769 1997-2013

159

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 18,802 21,071 24,355 26,317 27,099 27,826 1990-2013

160

California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 494,687 526,990 548,682 551,855 553,972 563,219 1990-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 93,084 97,539 101,216 104,637 109,135 112,135 1990-2013

162

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 28,455 28,958 28,160 28,582 28,018 29,312 1995-2013

163

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 87,254 89,244 91,822 94,240 97,911 101,106 1990-2013

164

Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 30,412 33,787 37,711 40,833 43,621 45,359 1990-2013

165

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 638,154 659,387 666,457 668,068 696,056 730,492 1990-2013

166

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 390,648 417,691 447,275 468,055 493,454 516,625 1990-2013

167

California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 494,687 526,990 548,682 551,855 553,972 563,219 1990-2013

168

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 270,117 293,368 310,075 317,797 325,829 340,801 1990-2013

169

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 188,580 205,724 214,887 222,273 217,684 229,843 1990-2013

170

Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 200,725 214,725 228,046 244,878 256,709 266,439 1990-2013

171

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 165,997 174,089 181,856 187,293 192,663 201,374 1990-2013

172

Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 28,203 29,473 30,384 31,284 32,766 34,652 2013-2013

173

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 207,626 210,385 214,435 219,447 224,995 224,335 1990-2013

174

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 90,464 90,588 89,999 89,825 91,028 93,007 1990-2013

175

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 746,993 774,182 809,958 842,081 876,844 917,781 1990-2013

176

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 209,512 215,593 221,664 230,749 245,317 261,998 1990-2013

177

Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 28,203 29,473 30,384 31,284 32,766 34,652 2013-2013

178

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 11,133 11,575 11,977 12,383 12,816 13,020 1990-2013

179

Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 215,593 221,664 230,749 245,317 261,998 273,823 1990-2013

180

Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 97,539 101,216 104,637 109,135 112,135 113,539 1990-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 70,182 74,046 80,390 87,199 94,797 100,693 1990-2013

182

Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 746,993 774,182 809,958 842,081 876,844 917,781 1990-2013

183

Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 293,368 310,075 317,797 325,829 340,801 351,660 1990-2013

184

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 205,724 214,887 222,273 217,684 229,843 244,371 1990-2013

185

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 506,368 537,381 569,532 588,760 616,097 641,658 1990-2013

186

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 89,244 91,822 94,240 97,911 101,106 102,341 1990-2013

187

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 340 340 340 340 340 340 1997-2013

188

Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 5,563 5,789 6,051 6,354 6,516 6,874 1990-2013

189

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 21,071 24,355 26,317 27,099 27,826 28,494 1990-2013

190

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 7,917 7,809 8,111 7,771 8,769 9,216 1997-2013

191

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 10,867 11,358 11,873 12,197 12,433 12,660 1990-2013

192

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 53,540 55,026 57,959 59,418 61,671 62,862 1990-2013

193

Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 30,412 33,787 37,711 40,833 43,621 45,359 1990-2013

194

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 390,648 417,691 447,275 468,055 493,454 516,625 1990-2013

195

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 567,796 613,368 634,789 656,308 693,662 712,848 1990-2013

196

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 520,387 567,796 613,368 634,789 656,308 693,662 1990-2013

197

Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 25,055 25,858 26,866 27,234 29,408 31,383 1990-2013

198

Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 10,867 11,358 11,873 12,197 12,433 12,660 1990-2013

199

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 582,834 638,154 659,387 666,457 668,068 696,056 1990-2013

200

Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 11,133 11,575 11,977 12,383 12,816 13,020 1990-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 205,601 207,626 210,385 214,435 219,447 224,995 1990-2013

202

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 643,563 706,443 777,107 839,963 906,927 972,307 1990-2013

203

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - EIA  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

November 1, 2013 | Released: November 7, 2013 at November 1, 2013 | Released: November 7, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. | Next Release: November 14, 2013 Working gas in underground storage, lower 48 states Summary text CSV JSN Historical Comparisons Stocks billion cubic feet (Bcf) Year ago (11/01/12) 5-Year average (2008-2012) Region 11/01/13 10/25/13 net change implied flow (Bcf) % change (Bcf) % change East 1,974 C 1,952 R 22 R 12 C 2,095 -5.8 2,072 -4.7 West 555 C 543 R 12 R 2 C 547 1.5 511 8.6 Producing 1,285 C 1,250 R 35 R 15 C 1,284 0.1 1,174 9.5 Salt 325 C 310 R 15 R 5 C 306 6.2 211 54.0

204

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 643,563 706,443 777,107 839,963 906,927 972,307 1990-2013

205

Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 200,725 214,725 228,046 244,878 256,709 266,439 1990-2013

206

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

207

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 1991 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 243,944 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 1992 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 248,389 250,206 1993 250,206 250,206 247,228 246,345 247,699 247,950 247,109 248,215 248,944 251,050 247,420 247,425 1994 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 251,384 247,435 247,435 247,435 247,435 1995 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419 247,419

208

Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 184,212 180,918 178,620 181,242 179,235 181,374 183,442 187,348 185,848 181,029 1991 179,697 178,285 176,975 176,918 178,145 179,386 181,094 182,534 182,653 181,271 178,539 174,986 1992 111,256 109,433 109,017 109,150 110,146 110,859 111,885 112,651 112,225 110,868 107,520 101,919 1993 96,819 92,399 89,640 87,930 86,773 86,048 87,257 87,558 88,012 87,924 85,137 81,930 1994 78,106 72,445 71,282 70,501 71,440 73,247 74,599 75,685 77,456 78,490 76,784 74,111 1995 70,612 68,618 67,929 68,727 70,007 72,146 75,063 78,268 79,364 78,810 75,764 70,513

209

Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 22,371 18,661 17,042 17,387 20,796 23,060 26,751 30,924 33,456 34,200 30,588 1991 24,821 19,663 16,425 15,850 17,767 18,744 22,065 26,710 31,199 37,933 35,015 30,071 1992 23,328 18,843 14,762 14,340 15,414 17,948 23,103 27,216 32,427 35,283 32,732 29,149 1993 23,702 18,626 15,991 17,160 18,050 20,109 24,565 29,110 33,303 34,605 32,707 30,052 1994 23,623 20,052 18,102 17,396 17,194 19,647 24,780 29,088 33,077 35,877 36,408 33,424 1995 27,732 21,973 19,542 18,899 19,227 21,026 23,933 27,541 31,972 36,182 36,647 31,830

210

Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 33,234 33,553 34,322 39,110 43,935 47,105 53,425 58,298 62,273 65,655 66,141 60,495 1991 43,838 39,280 39,196 45,157 48,814 50,833 52,841 54,954 60,062 64,120 56,034 50,591 1992 40,858 39,723 37,350 37,516 41,830 46,750 51,406 51,967 58,355 59,621 59,164 52,385 1993 46,427 38,859 32,754 35,256 42,524 46,737 51,884 55,215 61,028 60,752 38,314 31,086 1994 21,838 17,503 20,735 25,099 29,837 30,812 37,339 42,607 44,739 47,674 48,536 43,262 1995 32,938 27,069 23,018 27,735 34,699 36,337 40,488 41,240 47,530 50,166 40,729 32,224

211

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 352,686 352,686 352,686 351,920 352,686 352,686 353,407 353,407 353,407 353,407 359,236 358,860 1991 349,459 348,204 334,029 335,229 353,405 349,188 350,902 352,314 353,617 354,010 353,179 355,754 1992 358,198 353,313 347,361 341,498 344,318 347,751 357,498 358,432 359,300 359,504 359,321 362,275 1993 362,222 358,438 351,469 354,164 360,814 359,349 359,455 359,510 359,530 361,433 360,977 360,971 1994 360,026 357,906 358,611 360,128 361,229 361,294 361,339 361,335 361,335 361,335 361,238 362,038 1995 357,538 357,538 357,538 356,900 357,006 356,909 357,848 357,895 357,967 357,994 357,994 358,094

212

Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 65,683 55,509 49,604 47,540 48,128 53,233 64,817 76,933 92,574 99,253 115,704 93,290 1991 59,383 54,864 49,504 47,409 53,752 61,489 64,378 67,930 78,575 89,747 80,663 82,273 1992 76,311 63,152 53,718 48,998 51,053 53,700 57,987 69,653 79,756 82,541 73,094 61,456 1993 44,893 33,024 27,680 26,796 46,806 58,528 64,198 75,616 89,955 92,825 87,252 76,184 1994 52,998 41,644 39,796 40,779 49,519 55,059 64,664 77,229 86,820 91,309 84,568 74,364 1995 59,292 47,263 37,998 39,071 48,761 60,148 65,093 65,081 81,654 93,880 90,905 73,982

213

Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1995 499 497 233 233 260 302 338 556 1,148 1,075 886 485 1996 431 364 202 356 493 971 1,164 1,553 1,891 2,008 1,879 1,119 1997 588 404 429 559 830 923 966 1,253 1,515 1,766 1,523 1,523 1998 773 585 337 582 727 1,350 1,341 1,540 1,139 1,752 1,753 1,615 1999 802 688 376 513 983 1,193 1,428 1,509 1,911 1,834 1,968 1,779 2000 865 863 1,178 1,112 1,202 1,809 1,890 1,890 1,780 1,638 1,434 1,349 2001 1,020 1,261 657 851 807 1,384 1,538 1,651 1,669 1,549 2,837 2,848 2002 2,435 2,119 1,849 2,106 2,206 2,076 2,326 2,423 2,423 1,863 2,259 2,117

214

Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 0 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 1991 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 21,300 18,800 18,800 18,800 1992 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 1993 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 1994 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 1995 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 18,800 21,123

215

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 27,491 22,694 17,504 13,313 17,552 23,767 28,965 33,972 35,196 34,955 34,660 1991 26,266 24,505 17,544 16,115 17,196 21,173 25,452 30,548 35,254 36,813 37,882 36,892 1992 33,082 29,651 22,962 18,793 18,448 20,445 24,593 30,858 36,770 38,897 35,804 33,066 1993 28,629 23,523 21,015 17,590 20,302 24,947 28,113 31,946 36,247 34,224 30,426 29,254 1994 24,249 19,331 16,598 11,485 16,989 18,501 23,590 28,893 34,044 34,298 32,687 29,307 1995 24,948 21,446 16,467 12,090 14,043 19,950 25,757 29,774 32,507 33,707 35,418 30,063

216

Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 46,050 1991 47,530 47,483 47,483 47,483 47,483 47,868 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 48,150 1992 48,150 48,150 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 48,149 47,851 48,049 1993 48,039 48,049 48,049 48,049 47,792 48,049 48,049 48,049 48,049 49,038 70,555 70,688 1994 71,043 71,801 71,955 71,959 71,959 71,959 71,959 71,959 71,959 72,652 72,671 72,671 1995 74,188 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 75,551 77,682

217

Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 262,136 1991 264,324 264,324 264,304 264,497 265,121 265,448 265,816 266,390 262,350 266,030 267,245 267,245 1992 267,245 267,245 265,296 262,230 262,454 263,788 266,852 260,660 257,627 258,575 259,879 262,144 1993 261,841 255,035 251,684 252,604 253,390 254,839 253,518 254,115 254,299 254,043 254,646 251,132 1994 263,981 263,749 263,836 264,541 265,702 266,435 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 1995 266,702 266,702 266,643 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 266,702 267,311

218

California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 125,898 106,575 111,248 132,203 157,569 170,689 174,950 177,753 182,291 196,681 196,382 153,841 1991 132,323 132,935 115,982 136,883 163,570 187,887 201,443 204,342 199,994 199,692 193,096 168,789 1992 125,777 109,000 93,277 107,330 134,128 156,158 170,112 182,680 197,049 207,253 197,696 140,662 1993 106,890 87,612 100,869 109,975 138,272 152,044 175,917 185,337 199,629 210,423 198,700 164,518 1994 121,221 77,055 76,162 95,079 123,190 143,437 161,081 170,434 191,319 203,562 186,826 161,202 1995 130,241 125,591 117,650 114,852 141,222 167,231 181,227 179,508 194,712 212,867 214,897 188,927

219

Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 115,418 117,492 109,383 110,052 117,110 131,282 145,105 158,865 173,570 188,751 197,819 190,747 1991 141,417 109,568 96,781 103,300 122,648 146,143 159,533 169,329 190,953 211,395 197,661 165,940 1992 120,212 91,394 79,753 85,867 106,675 124,940 136,861 152,715 174,544 194,414 187,236 149,775 1993 103,287 66,616 47,157 49,577 86,976 120,891 149,120 176,316 212,046 227,566 213,581 170,503 1994 112,054 93,499 80,056 101,407 134,333 155,279 184,802 207,383 230,726 239,823 235,775 197,145 1995 145,373 106,289 97,677 107,610 126,266 154,036 174,808 175,953 199,358 213,417 188,967 141,572

220

Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 53,604 51,563 52,120 53,225 54,581 56,980 58,990 61,428 62,487 60,867 1991 54,085 53,423 53,465 53,581 54,205 56,193 58,416 60,163 61,280 61,366 59,373 57,246 1992 30,371 28,356 27,542 27,461 27,843 28,422 29,588 29,692 30,555 29,505 27,746 23,929 1993 20,529 18,137 17,769 18,265 19,253 21,322 23,372 24,929 26,122 27,044 24,271 21,990 1994 21,363 18,661 19,224 20,115 21,689 22,447 23,568 25,072 26,511 27,440 26,978 25,065 1995 22,086 20,762 19,352 18,577 19,027 20,563 22,264 23,937 25,846 27,025 26,298 24,257

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 459 343 283 199 199 199 333 467 579 682 786 787 1999 656 532 401 321 318 462 569 645 749 854 911 855 2000 691 515 452 389 371 371 371 371 371 420 534 619 2001 623 563 490 421 525 638 669 732 778 840 598 597 2002 647 648 650 650 625 622 609 605 602 600 512 512 2003 404 294 226 179 214 290 365 460 463 508 508 447 2004 344 293 281 312 345 391 454 509 514 539 527 486 2005 444 364 265 184 143 126 126 126 88 79 73 60 2006 52 52 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44

222

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 163,571 125,097 100,438 110,479 158,720 215,000 265,994 318,024 358,535 364,421 359,766 306,561 1991 194,349 153,061 137,579 147,399 174,145 196,678 219,025 254,779 297,531 315,601 305,179 272,103 1992 201,218 144,582 93,826 103,660 140,908 188,078 222,215 264,511 306,113 331,416 332,959 288,433 1993 217,967 120,711 66,484 89,931 133,866 187,940 233,308 272,685 320,921 334,285 328,073 278,791 1994 172,190 97,587 75,470 114,979 166,013 222,300 272,668 315,887 339,424 354,731 335,483 294,393 1995 232,561 139,624 111,977 124,790 168,112 221,731 253,442 290,185 338,021 355,887 311,749 236,656

223

Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 311,360 252,796 228,986 221,127 269,595 333,981 410,982 481,628 534,303 553,823 542,931 472,150 1991 348,875 285,217 262,424 287,946 315,457 372,989 431,607 478,293 498,086 539,454 481,257 405,327 1992 320,447 244,921 179,503 179,306 224,257 292,516 367,408 435,817 504,312 532,896 486,495 397,280 1993 296,403 194,201 133,273 148,416 222,106 303,407 386,359 468,790 534,882 568,552 516,491 426,536 1994 282,144 193,338 162,719 203,884 276,787 351,286 425,738 502,577 568,235 599,504 579,874 516,887 1995 410,946 298,325 247,016 245,903 299,050 364,569 438,995 492,773 545,157 577,585 511,573 392,896

224

Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 129,245 118,053 119,532 116,520 130,817 139,698 150,336 158,048 165,206 171,008 180,706 154,515 1991 111,225 106,204 111,759 125,973 140,357 150,549 151,393 156,066 166,053 169,954 144,316 133,543 1992 115,658 107,281 103,919 109,690 117,435 128,505 145,962 153,948 166,637 174,182 154,096 123,225 1993 46,462 26,472 19,429 30,902 49,259 67,110 82,104 95,435 111,441 118,880 101,220 86,381 1994 56,024 35,272 32,781 49,507 73,474 86,632 102,758 115,789 124,652 129,107 126,148 109,979 1995 86,312 72,646 62,779 67,245 83,722 96,319 103,388 101,608 113,587 126,287 116,265 92,617

225

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 96 108 95 1980's 99 77 208 329 327 163 398 242 163 146 1990's 437 259 110 108 79 53 66 84 42 37 2000's 42 52 18 13 9 48 12 56 85 178 2010's 1 18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

226

Inflow performance relationships for solution-gas-drive reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this theoretical study, a numerical model was used to examine the influence of pressure level and skin factor on the inflow performance relationships (IPR's) of wells producing under solution-gas-drive systems. Examination of the synthetic deliverability curves suggests that the exponent of the deliverability curve is a function of time and that the exponent is usually greater than unity. The implication of this observation to field data is discussed. The accuracy of procedures given in the literature to predict oilwell deliverabilities is also examined. It is shown that these methods can be used to predict future performance provided that the exponent of the deliverability curve is known and that extrapolations over large time ranges are avoided. If single-point tests are used to predict future performance (such tests assume that the exponent of the deliverability curve is constant), then errors in predictions will be minimized. Although relative permeability and fluid property data are required, the Muskat material-balance equation and the assumption that GOR is independent of distance can be used to predict future production rates. This method avoids problems associated with other methods in the literature and always yields reliable results. New methods to modify the IPR curve to incorporate changes in skin factor are presented. A new flow-efficiency definition based on the structure of the deliverability equations for solution-gas-drive reservoirs is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the currently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells.

Camacho-V, R.G.; Raghavan, R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

1 INTRODUCTION Gas storage caverns were developed mainly for sea-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovery periods. This operation mode also is considered for Compressed Air Storage (CAES) facilities1 INTRODUCTION Gas storage caverns were developed mainly for sea- sonal storage, with one or a few are discussed. In Section 4, the energy bal- ance equation is established and some simplifica- tions allow

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Reservoir oil bubblepoint pressures revisited; solution gasoil ratios and surface gas specific gravities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir oil bubblepoint pressures revisited; solution gas­oil ratios and surface gas specific, for bubblepoint pressure and other fluid properties, require use of stock-tank gas rate and specific gravity in estimating stock-tank vent gas rate and quality for compliance purposes. D 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All

Valkó, Peter

229

Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoirs 19. Cheng et al. (2007) Decline Curve Analysis for Multilayered Tight Gas Reservoirs 20. Blasingame and Rushing Method for Gas-in-Place and Reserves Estimation (2005) 21. Clarkson et al. (2007) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane... Wells 22. Clarkson et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 23. Rushing et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 24. Lewis and Hughes (2008) Production Data Analysis for Shale Gas Wells 25. Mattar et al...

Currie, Stephanie M.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

230

Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Development of gas-bearing reservoirs in the Trenton Llimestone Formation of New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Authority completed a study of the natural gas-bearing potential of New York State's Trenton Limestone Formation. The report includes an analysis of existing gas-well information and geological maps covering 33 counties in western and central New York State. The Trenton Limestone Formation is a limestone sequence with zones of shale interbeds that, when jointed and fractured, form reservoirs for natural gas. These reservoirs appear to be large and capable of sustained production, providing the production rates are carefully monitored to maintain reservoir pressure. Test wells have shown evidence of natural gas in all areas where the formation is present. The areas with the greatest reservoir potential trend from northeast to southwest beginning near the Adirondack foothills in Oneida County. When reservoir volumes are matched with a high success rate of discovery and minimum drilling costs, the northeastern part of central New York State appears to be the most likely region for both local use and commercial exploration. The Trenton formation in this area of the State generally contains gas at above-normal hydrostatic pressure. This indicates that the gas reservoirs are extensive and reach considerable depths. Due to the geophysical conditions of the reservoirs, however, it is important to carefully manage production and maintain pre-production pressure for optimum gas recovery.

Robinson, J.E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose an integrated study method for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. This method combines analyses of geology, seismology, and geochemistry. First, geological analysis is made using data of material sources, structures, sediments, and geothermal regimes to determine the hydrocarbon-formation conditions of gas hydrate in marine areas. Then analyses of seismic attributes,such as BSR, AVO, and BZ as well as forward modeling are conducted to predict the potential

233

Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act of 1972 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Underground Gas Storage Act, which permits the building of reserves for withdrawal in periods of peak demand, was created to promote the economic development of the State of Georgia and provide for more economical distribution of gas to the domestic, commercial, and industrial consumers of the State. Any gas utility desiring to utilize or operate an

234

Nebraska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 55,226 54,179 53,869 54,783 56,160 57,690 56,165 56,611 57,708 58,012 57,606 54,005 1991 52,095 51,060 50,341 51,476 54,531 56,673 56,409 56,345 57,250 56,941 56,535 54,163 1992 52,576 51,568 51,525 52,136 53,768 56,396 58,446 59,656 60,842 60,541 57,948 54,512 1993 51,102 49,136 48,100 49,069 52,016 55,337 57,914 59,772 61,281 10,707 8,936 6,562 1994 3,476 743 886 1,845 3,983 4,882 6,505 6,852 8,978 9,908 10,078 8,075 1995 6,063 5,068 4,138 3,940 4,583 5,449 3,881 4,059 4,443 3,676 2,078 485 1996 - - - - - 806 1,938 3,215 3,960 3,389 2,932 1,949

235

Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 8,882 5,257 3,304 2,365 1,893 5,005 7,942 10,880 11,949 12,154 12,235 9,008 1991 6,557 6,453 3,509 6,342 7,864 10,580 12,718 12,657 12,652 14,112 15,152 14,694 1992 12,765 9,785 9,204 8,327 9,679 10,854 11,879 13,337 14,533 13,974 13,312 9,515 1993 6,075 2,729 3,958 4,961 9,491 10,357 12,505 13,125 15,508 13,348 9,567 11,274 1994 9,672 5,199 4,765 6,867 9,471 11,236 13,045 13,496 14,629 14,846 14,458 12,884 1995 10,750 8,520 8,267 8,500 11,070 12,622 14,035 13,764 16,258 16,158 16,224 12,869 1996 6,547 5,488 4,672 4,780 6,742 10,060 11,344 15,100 14,244 12,391 11,634 9,724

236

Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 1,708 1,141 1,211 1,688 2,017 2,129 2,261 2,309 2,370 2,397 2,395 2,007 1991 1,551 1,313 1,207 1,362 1,619 1,931 2,222 2,214 2,307 2,273 2,191 2,134 1992 1,685 1,556 1,228 1,019 1,409 1,716 2,013 2,193 2,319 2,315 2,307 2,104 1993 1,708 1,290 872 824 1,141 1,485 1,894 2,022 2,260 2,344 2,268 1,957 1994 1,430 1,235 1,045 888 1,237 1,642 2,011 2,213 2,362 2,360 2,356 2,284 1995 1,771 1,294 1,037 990 1,321 1,584 1,890 2,121 2,362 2,368 2,365 2,110 1996 1,329 1,069 847 935 1,301 1,596 1,883 2,093 2,295 2,328 2,297 2,070

237

Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 8,081 5,796 6,047 7,156 7,151 7,146 7,140 7,421 7,927 8,148 8,157 7,869 1991 7,671 5,875 4,819 6,955 7,638 7,738 8,033 8,335 8,547 8,765 8,964 8,952 1992 7,454 6,256 5,927 7,497 7,924 8,071 8,337 8,555 8,763 8,954 8,946 8,939 1993 7,848 6,037 4,952 6,501 7,550 8,001 8,104 8,420 8,627 8,842 8,720 8,869 1994 7,602 7,073 6,794 4,640 6,094 7,449 7,765 8,072 8,341 8,548 8,778 8,783 1995 8,200 7,921 7,879 7,608 8,230 8,221 8,210 8,559 9,022 9,145 9,311 8,981 1996 7,558 7,658 7,225 6,931 8,250 8,511 8,751 8,958 9,162 9,372 9,067 8,993

238

Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 1,309 844 534 742 1,055 1,364 1,553 1,894 2,218 2,349 2,255 1,897 1999 1,519 1,070 745 929 1,202 1,413 1,641 1,830 2,248 2,357 2,175 1,708 2000 998 843 814 1,063 1,642 1,848 2,066 2,215 2,223 2,594 2,242 1,529 2001 991 823 532 963 1,477 1,869 2,113 2,416 2,677 2,651 2,711 2,503 2002 2,029 1,356 968 1,090 1,627 1,899 2,181 2,322 2,631 2,838 2,559 2,065 2003 1,042 546 367 660 1,107 1,582 1,994 2,710 3,247 3,281 3,167 2,621 2004 1,570 1,195 865 1,024 1,706 1,990 2,188 2,925 3,253 4,115 4,082 3,077

239

Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 3,705 2,366 1,668 2,849 4,357 5,601 6,365 7,001 7,373 7,562 7,517 6,766 1991 5,691 4,726 2,959 1,980 2,694 4,248 5,706 6,798 7,472 7,811 7,834 7,347 1992 5,779 4,239 2,653 2,211 3,783 5,323 6,518 7,528 7,981 8,154 7,055 6,475 1993 4,557 3,161 2,433 2,007 3,651 4,949 6,130 7,172 7,750 8,240 7,509 6,406 1994 5,145 4,018 3,073 648 1,858 3,357 4,553 5,628 6,312 6,566 6,129 5,491 1995 3,814 3,429 2,989 3,856 5,035 6,069 6,765 6,765 7,251 7,251 7,193 6,371 1996 5,120 4,179 3,528 3,396 4,119 5,292 6,425 6,862 6,965 6,759 6,206 4,967

240

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 393,598 297,240 289,617 356,360 461,202 516,155 604,504 678,168 747,928 783,414 775,741 673,670 1995 549,759 455,591 416,294 457,969 533,496 599,582 638,359 634,297 713,319 766,411 700,456 552,458 1996 369,545 263,652 195,447 224,002 279,731 339,263 391,961 474,402 578,991 638,500 562,097 466,366 1997 314,140 248,911 297,362 326,566 401,514 471,824 478,925 532,982 617,733 705,879 642,254 494,485 1998 391,395 384,696 362,717 457,545 550,232 610,363 684,086 748,042 784,567 893,181 888,358 768,239 1999 611,978 585,458 530,610 568,307 653,498 728,071 744,307 750,460 826,493 858,836 849,011 718,513

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241

West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 95,718 84,444 80,152 86,360 105,201 122,470 139,486 155,506 168,801 172,513 172,198 155,477 1991 102,542 81,767 79,042 86,494 101,636 117,739 132,999 142,701 151,152 154,740 143,668 121,376 1992 87,088 60,200 32,379 33,725 57,641 75,309 97,090 115,537 128,969 141,790 135,853 143,960 1993 112,049 69,593 41,670 46,361 84,672 111,540 131,113 150,292 170,597 176,189 162,821 129,738 1994 71,547 38,973 20,662 41,766 67,235 97,887 125,442 147,683 168,538 174,514 166,920 140,377 1995 96,574 55,283 43,199 48,420 72,781 96,991 120,021 128,965 146,728 161,226 138,140 98,925

242

Predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of gas production from the coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is challenging due to the complex interaction of storage and transport mechanisms. The vast majority of the gas in CBM reservoirs is stored by adsorption in the coal matrix which practically has no permeability. The flow to production wells however takes place through the cleats or the natural fracture system which store relatively small amounts of gas. These unique coal characteristics have resulted in classification of CBM as an “unconventional” gas resource. Gas production from CBM reservoirs is governed by gas diffusion through coal matrix followed by gas desorption into the cleat system through which the gas flows to the wellbore generally under two-phase conditions. As a result, the production profile of the CBM reservoirs greatly differs from conventional gas reservoirs. This precludes the use of common techniques such as decline curves to forecast the recovery, future revenues, and well performance. Numerical reservoir models (simulators) that incorporate the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs are by far the best tools for predicting the gas production from the CBM reservoirs. It is however cumbersome, time consuming, and expensive to use a complex reservoir simulator for evaluating CBM prospects when the required reservoir parameters are not available. Therefore, there is a need for a quick yet reliable tool for predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs. This paper presents a set of production type curves that can be used for predicting gas and water the production from CBM prospects. The type curves are particularly useful for parametric studies when the key characteristics are not well established. A numerical reservoir model that incorporated the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs was employed to develop the type curves. The impact of various reservoir parameters on the type curves was investigated to confirm the uniqueness of the type curves. The application and limitation of the type curves have been also discussed.

K. Aminian; S. Ameri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;CONTENTS Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2 Meet the staff, the contour interval should be 6 inches. #12;STATE GEOLOGIST'S EDITORIAL Shale We Look For Gas? Recently, you

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

244

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - EIA  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

December 20, 2013. | Released: December 27, 2013 December 20, 2013. | Released: December 27, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. | Next Release: January 3, 2014 Working gas in underground storage, lower 48 states Summary text CSV JSN Historical Comparisons Stocks billion cubic feet (Bcf) Year ago (12/20/12) 5-Year average (2008-2012) Region 12/20/13 12/13/13 change (Bcf) % change (Bcf) % change East 1,568 1,683 -115 1,889 -17.0 1,810 -13.4 West 429 450 -21 523 -18.0 462 -7.1 Producing 1,074 1,115 -41 1,251 -14.1 1,111 -3.3 Salt 263 277 -14 310 -15.2 208 26.4 Nonsalt 811 839 -28 940 -13.7 903 -10.2 Total 3,071 3,248 -177 3,662 -16.1 3,384 -9.2

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandons gas storage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage L... - Million tonnes of oil equivalent 12;Hughes: Alton Underground Natural Gas Storage Facility 2 storage... : Is there a sufficient supply of ... Source: Hughes,...

247

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 -2,863 -1,902 -2,297 -1,134 -1,671 -1,997 -907 -144 629 992 2,290 1,354 1991 30,778 27,964 37,141 36,920 15,424 -18,322 -46,969 -63,245 -61,004 -48,820 -54,587 -34,458 1992 6,870 -8,479 -43,753 -43,739 -33,236 -8,601 3,190 9,732 8,583 15,815 27,780 16,330 1993 16,748 -23,871 -27,342 -13,729 -7,043 -138 11,093 8,174 14,808 2,868 -4,885 -9,642 1994 -45,776 -23,124 8,987 25,048 32,148 34,360 39,360 43,202 18,502 20,447 7,409 15,602 1995 60,371 42,037 36,507 9,811 2,098 -569 -19,226 -25,702 -1,403 1,156 -23,733 -57,737

248

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO 2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada Stefan Bachu (Stefan.Bachu@gov.ab.ca; 780-427-1517) Alberta Energy and Utilities Board 4999-98 Avenue Edmonton, AB, T6B 2X3, Canada Introduction Human activity since the industrial revolution has had the effect of increasing atmospheric concentrations of gases with a greenhouse effect, such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ), leading to climate warming and weather changes (Bryant, 1997; Jepma and Munasinghe, 1998). Because of its relative abundance compared with the other greenhouse gases, CO 2 is by far the most important, being responsible for about 64% of the enhanced "greenhouse effect" (Bryant, 1997). Given their inherent advantages, such as availability, competitive cost, ease of

249

Pressure Transient Analysis for Multi-stage Fractured Horizontal Wells in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article presents the PTA on the multi-stage fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoirs incorporating desorption and diffusive flow in ... considering the mechanisms of desorption and diffusion in shale

Jingjing Guo; Liehui Zhang; Haitao Wang; Guoqing Feng

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Analysis of condensate banking dynamics in a gas condensate reservoir under different injection schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensate reservoir under natural depletion, and injection of methane, injection of carbon dioxide, produced gas recycling and water injection. To monitor the condensate banking dynamics near the wellbore area, such as oil saturation and compositional...

Sandoval Rodriguez, Angelica Patricia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Application of the Stretched Exponential Production Decline Model to Forecast Production in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production forecasting in shale (ultra-low permeability) gas reservoirs is of great interest due to the advent of multi-stage fracturing and horizontal drilling. The well renowned production forecasting model, Arps? Hyperbolic Decline Model...

Statton, James Cody

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside...

Seo, Jeong Gyu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Notice of Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Changes  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Released: September 23, 2013 Released: September 23, 2013 EIA to Modify Format of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report to Better Serve Customers The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is announcing changes to the format of its Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR) to better serve its customers who make use of automated computer systems to collate information on changes in natural gas storage. Specifically, EIA intends to enhance the WNGSR summary table. In addition to what is currently presented, EIA plans to provide an estimate of the "implied flow" of working natural gas into or out of underground natural gas storage facilities that excludes reportable reclassifications-those totaling 7 billion cubic feet (Bcf) or more-from the weekly "net change" in

254

A placement model for matrix acidizing of vertically extensive, multilayer gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PLACEMENT MODEL FOR MATRIX ACIDIZING OF VERTICALLY EXTENSIVE, MULTILAYER GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by MANABU NOZAKI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A PLACEMENT MODEL FOR MATRIX ACIDIZING OF VERTICALLY EXTENSIVE, MULTILAYER GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by MANABU NOZAKI Submitted to the Office...

Nozaki, Manabu

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electrical anisotropy of gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present new results and interpretations of the electrical anisotropy and reservoir architecture in gas hydrate-bearing sands using logging data collected during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II. We focus specifically on sand reservoirs in Hole Alaminos Canyon 21 A (AC21-A), Hole Green Canyon 955 H (GC955-H) and Hole Walker Ridge 313 H (WR313-H). Using a new logging-while-drilling directional resistivity tool and a one-dimensional inversion developed by Schlumberger, we resolve the resistivity of the current flowing parallel to the bedding, R? and the resistivity of the current flowing perpendicular to the bedding, R?. We find the sand reservoir in Hole AC21-A to be relatively isotropic, with R? and R? values close to 2 ? m. In contrast, the gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic. In these reservoirs, R? is between 2 and 30 ? m, and R? is generally an order of magnitude higher. Using Schlumberger’s WebMI models, we were able to replicate multiple resistivity measurements and determine the formation resistivity the gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoir in Hole WR313-H. The results showed that gas hydrate saturations within a single reservoir unit are highly variable. For example, the sand units in Hole WR313-H contain thin layers (on the order of 10–100 cm) with varying gas hydrate saturations between 15 and 95%. Our combined modeling results clearly indicate that the gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic due to varying saturations of gas hydrate forming in thin layers within larger sand units.

Ann E. Cook; Barbara I. Anderson; John Rasmus; Keli Sun; Qiming Li; Timothy S. Collett; David S. Goldberg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The performance of a volatile oil reservoir overlain by a gas cap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1960 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

Ellis, Joseph Ralph, Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

The effects of production rate and gravitational segregation on gas injection performance of oil reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Approved as. to style...

Ferguson, Ed Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

The production characteristics of a solution gas-drive reservoir as measured on a centrifugal model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Texas in partial fulfillment oi' the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1955 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE PRODUCTION CHARACTERISTICS OF A SOLUTION GAS-DRIVE RESERVOIR AS MEASURED ON A CENTRIFUGAL MODEL A Thesis... gas drive reservoir per- formancee at high pressures. The construe tj onal and operational details for the model are given, The results of forty model flow tests are given in which magnitudes of the we11 densi4y, production rate, fluid viscosity...

Goodwin, Robert Jennings

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

Maria Cecilia Bravo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Reservoir Engineering Optimization Strategies for Subsurface CO{sub 2} Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to outline a methodology for calculating the optimum number of injection wells for geologic CCS. The methodology is intended primarily for reservoir pressure management, and factors in cost as well. Efficiency may come in many forms depending on project goals; therefore, various results are presented simultaneously. The developed methodology is illustrated via application in a case study of the Rocky Mountain Carbon Capture and Storage (RMCCS) project, including a CCS candidate site near Craig, Colorado, USA. The forecasting method provided reasonable estimates of cost and injection volume when compared to simulated results.

Mclntire, Blayde; McPherson, Brian

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fractured gas reservoirs in the Devonian shale of the Illinois and Appalachian basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Devonian and Lower Mississippian black shale sequence of Kentucky includes the New Albany Shale of Illinois basin and the Ohio Shale of the Appalachian basin. Fractured reservoirs in the Ohio Shale contain a major gas resource, but have not been so prolific in the New Albany Shale. The authors propose two models of fractured shale reservoirs in both the Illinois and the Appalachian basins, to be tested with gas production data. (1) Where reactivated basement faults have propagated to the surface, the lack of an effective seal has prevented the development of overpressure. The resulting fracture system is entirely tectonic is origin, and served mainly as a conduit for gas migration from the basin to the surface. Gas accumulations in such reservoirs typically are small and underpressured. (2) Where basement faults have been reactivated but have not reached the surface, a seal on the fractured reservoir is preserved. In areas where thermal maturity has been adequate, overpressuring due to gas generation resulted in a major extension of the fracture system, as well as enhanced gas compression and adsorption. Such gas accumulations are relatively large. Original overpressuring has been largely lost, due both to natural depletion and to uncontrolled production. The relative thermal immaturity of the Illinois basin accounts for the scarcity of the second type of fractured reservoir and the small magnitude of the New Albany Shale gas resource.

Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, D.; Nuttall, B. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

December 19, 2013 December 19, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through September 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

263

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

November 7, 2013 November 7, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through August 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

264

,"Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural...

265

Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Storage Water Heaters Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters October 7, 2013 - 10:43am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

266

South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

267

South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

268

Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

269

Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

270

Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

271

New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

272

California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

273

Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

274

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

275

Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

276

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 251...

277

Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

278

Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

279

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

280

Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

282

Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0...

283

Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

284

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

285

Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 294...

286

Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 110...

287

Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

288

Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

289

New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

290

Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

291

Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

292

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

293

New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

294

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

295

Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

296

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

297

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

298

Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

299

Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

300

Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

302

Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

303

Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

304

Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

305

Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

306

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

307

New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

308

Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

309

Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

310

North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

311

New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

312

Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0...

313

Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

314

Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

315

Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

316

California Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

317

California Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

318

Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

319

Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

320

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

322

Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

323

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

324

Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

325

South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

326

Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

327

Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

328

Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

329

Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

330

Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

331

Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

332

Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

333

Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

334

Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's...

335

Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

336

South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

337

Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

338

South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

339

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

340

North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

342

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

343

,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1302015 12:57:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070CO2"...

344

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"182015 12:49:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070NY2"...

345

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"182015 12:49:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070NY2"...

346

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:07:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NY2"...

347

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5060NY2"...

348

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5060NY2"...

349

,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:07:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5290NY2"...

350

Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 - No Data Reported; -- Not...

351

Revision Policy for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

September 23, 2013 September 23, 2013 This report consists of the following sections: General EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Revisions Policy - a description of how revisions to the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report estimates may occur EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Policy to Allow Unscheduled Release of revisions - a description of the policy that will be implemented in the event of an out-of-cycle release Revisions to the Historical Database - a description of how revisions will be noted in the Historical database The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is announcing changes Revisions may be presented for the most recent estimates of working gas in storage under a number of circumstances that occur after release of the estimates. These include: I. A respondent revises previously submitted data (respondents are

352

Revision Policy for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

April 26, 2005 April 26, 2005 This report consists of the following sections: General EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Revisions Policy - a description of how revisions to the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report estimates may occur EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Policy to Allow Unscheduled Release of revisions - a description of the policy that will be implemented in the event of an out-of-cycle release Revisions to the Historical Database - a description of how revisions will be noted in the Historical database Revisions may be presented for the most recent estimates of working gas in storage under a number of circumstances that occur after release of the estimates. These include: I. A respondent revises previously submitted data (respondents are requested to submit revisions if the change is greater than 500 million

353

Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent) Percent) Pennsylvania Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 18.8 22.4 37.0 33.4 9.7 -8.5 -17.7 -19.9 -17.0 -13.4 -15.2 -11.2 1992 3.5 -5.5 -31.8 -29.7 -19.1 -4.4 1.5 3.8 2.9 5.0 9.1 6.0 1993 8.3 -16.5 -29.1 -13.2 -5.0 -0.1 5.0 3.1 4.8 0.9 -1.5 -3.3 1994 -21.0 -19.2 13.5 27.9 24.0 18.3 16.9 15.8 5.8 6.1 2.3 5.6 1995 35.1 43.1 48.4 8.5 1.3 -0.3 -7.1 -8.1 -0.4 0.3 -7.1 -19.6 1996 -32.3 -32.6 -49.9 -39.0 -28.4 -18.3 -0.5 4.4 0.7 -0.2 3.9 26.8 1997 31.1 63.7 89.6 41.7 24.2 9.7 -4.5 -6.2 -2.2 -2.4 -0.3 -8.7 1998 5.7 9.8 22.4 52.3 49.3 32.7 23.0 11.1 3.1 4.1 12.5 17.6

354

A High Density Polarized Hydrogen Gas Target for Storage Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A High Density Polarized Hydrogen Gas Target for Storage Rings K. Zapfe \\Lambday , B. Braun z , H of gaseous polarized hydrogen was formed by injecting polarized H atoms (produced by Stern­Gerlach spin separation) into a storage cell consisting of a cylindrical tube open at both ends. The target was placed

355

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database) and to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama and to identify those resources that are producible at moderate cost. These objectives will be achieved through detailed geological, engineering, and geostatistical characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on the completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data relevant to the Smackover reservoir in southwestern Alabama. Subtask 2 comprises the geological and engineering characterization of Smackover reservoir lithofacies. This has been accomplished through detailed examination and analysis of geophysical well logs, core material, well cuttings, and well-test data from wells penetrating Smackover reservoirs in southwestern Alabama. From these data, reservoir heterogeneities, such as lateral and vertical changes in lithology, porosity, permeability, and diagenetic overprint, have been recognized and used to produce maps, cross sections, graphs, and other graphic representations to aid in interpretation of the geologic parameters that affect these reservoirs. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities for Smackover reservoirs. This research has been based primarily on the evaluation of key geologic and engineering data from selected Smackover fields. 1 fig.

Mancini, E.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ESS 2012 Peer Review - CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs and TMH Response of GSFs - Payton Gardner, SNL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CAES Geo Performance CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs, Thermal-Mechanical- Hydraulic Response of Geological Storage Formations for CAES 27 September 2012 SJ Bauer, M Martinez, W. Payton Gardner, J Holland 2 CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs / Thermal-Mechanical-Hydraulic (T-M-H) Response of Geological Storage Formations for CAES  Problem: Siting of CAES facilities may be limited by specific geologic conditions  Opportunity: Fundamental understanding of T-M-H will enable/extend CAES siting potential throughout the US 3 Images taken from: http://www.rwe.com/ 1. CAES in Mined Salt Caverns  Model large scale salt cavern response to air pressure cycling  Experimentally evaluate thermal cycling effect on domal salt

357

A new p/z technique for the analysis of abnormally pressured gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/cumulative production data. The match of the c, data and the c, "type curves" should yields gas-in-place (G) and the ratio of aquifer to reservoir (M), as well as validate the c, function. 11 As described above, the Fetkovich, et al. method requires specific... the following: ~ The development of a gas material balance equation that has particular application to abnormally pressured gas reservoirs (this is the same formulation used by Fetkovich, et al. , 1998, and is re-presented in Appendix A for reference (as well...

Gan, Ronald Gunawan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Processing dipole acoustic logging data to image fracture network in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recent advance in borehole remote acoustic reflection imaging is the utilization of a dipole acoustic system in a borehole to emit and receive elastic waves to and from a remote geologic reflector in formation. An important application of this new technique is the delineation of fracture network in shale gas reservoirs as interest and activities in shale gas exploration increase in China. We develop a data processing procedure and implement it to handle routine processing of dipole acoustic logging data. The procedure takes into account the characteristics of the dipole data such as frequency dispersion attenuation recording length and dipole source orientation etc. to obtain an image of reflectors within 20~30 meters around the borehole. We have applied the technique to process dipole acoustic data from several wells drilled into gas reservoirs in China. The obtained images clearly identify major fracture network in the gas producing intervals of the reservoir demonstrating the effectiveness of the imaging technique.

Zhuang Chunxi; Su Yuanda; Tang Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Sourcekey","N5030NY2","N5010NY2","N5020NY2","N5070NY2","N5050NY2","N5060NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","New York Natural Gas in...

360

General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of this study is twofold. First aim is to help operators with simple screening criteria which can help...

Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gas hydrate-filled fracture reservoirs on continental margins.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Many scientists predicted that gas hydrate forms in fractures or lenses in fine-grained sediments, but only in the last decade were gas hydrates found… (more)

Cook, Ann Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Management of a complex cavern storage facility for natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Epe cavern storage facility operated by Ruhrgas AG has developed into one of the largest gas cavern storage facilities in the world. Currently, there are 32 caverns and 18 more are planned in the future. Working gas volume will increase from approximately 1.5 {times} 10{sup 9} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The stratified salt deposit containing the caverns has a surface area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} and is 250 m thick at the edge and 400 m thick in the center. Caverns are leached by a company that uses the recovered brine in the chlorine industry. Cavern dimensions are determined before leaching. The behavior of each cavern, as well as the thermodynamic properties of natural gas must be considered in cavern management. The full-length paper presents the components of a complex management system covering the design, construction, and operation of the Epe gas-storage caverns.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

"Solution plot technique"-Analysis of water influx in gas reservoirs using simulation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the reservoir-aquifer boundary. The most widely used methods for estimating water- influx which can be applied to water-drive gas reservoirs include: 1. Van Everdingen-Hurst Radial, unsteady statet. 2. Carter and Tracy, unsteady state2. 3, Fetkovich, pseudo... of calculating water- influx, and involves the use of the convolution integral method. Fetkovich proposed a model that utilizes a pseudo-steady state productivity index and the aquifer material balance for estimating the water influx. The Van Everdingen...

Hardikar, Sachin Suresh

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Two-tank working gas storage system for heat engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-tank working gas supply and pump-down system is coupled to a hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine. The system has a power control valve for admitting the working gas to the engine when increased power is needed, and for releasing the working gas from the engine when engine power is to be decreased. A compressor pumps the working gas that is released from the engine. Two storage vessels or tanks are provided, one for storing the working gas at a modest pressure (i.e., half maximum pressure), and another for storing the working gas at a higher pressure (i.e., about full engine pressure). Solenoid valves are associated with the gas line to each of the storage vessels, and are selectively actuated to couple the vessels one at a time to the compressor during pumpdown to fill the high-pressure vessel with working gas at high pressure and then to fill the low-pressure vessel with the gas at low pressure. When more power is needed, the solenoid valves first supply the low-pressure gas from the low-pressure vessel to the engine and then supply the high-pressure gas from the high-pressure vessel. The solenoid valves each act as a check-valve when unactuated, and as an open valve when actuated.

Hindes, Clyde J. (Troy, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heterogeneity effect on non-wetting phase trapping in strong water drive gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In strong water drive gas reservoirs (WDGR), the presence of entrance water in the gas zone has negative effects on the relative permeability; therefore, gas is trapped behind the water front as a non-wetting phase. Understanding WDGR could be complicated and depends on both the petrophysical and operational parameters, such as, reservoir heterogeneity, permeability, production rate and so on. In order to quantify the uncertainty associated with reservoirs, it is critical to create porous media models that incorporate stratigraphic details. In the present study, experimental models were used to simulate WDGR and describe the heterogeneity effect on residual gas saturation and the recovery factor. In models, distinct gas and water (aquifer portion) zones were designed, wherein the ratio of the permeability of the aquifer to the gas zone was varied over three ranges. All tests were conducted in the presence of connate water, and the main WDGR set-up was constructed for high pressure operational conditions. All porous media were characterized by Dykstra–Parsons coefficient as heterogeneity index. The results demonstrate that the residual gas saturation depends on both heterogeneity index and permeability ratio. Results reveal that heterogeneity is not always detrimental to gas recovery. In addition, when the ratio of the aquifer to gas zone permeability is less than one, the amount of trapped gas reduces as the heterogeneity of the porous media increases and consequently, the recovery factor may be improved.

Mohammad Rezaee; Behzad Rostami; Peyman Pourafshary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments… (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

8 - Measurement and monitoring technologies for verification of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in underground reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter reviews some of the current technologies available for storage site monitoring, focusing on a limited range of core monitoring technologies required to provide storage site assurance at the industrial scale. Monitoring strategy has two elements: deep-focused for storage performance testing and verification and the early detection of deviations from predicted behaviour; and shallow -focused for leakage detection, verification of emissions performance and public acceptance. Key deep-focused monitoring technologies include 3D time-lapse seismic and downhole pressure and temperature measurement. For shallow monitoring, key technologies include soil gas, surface flux and atmospheric measurement. Selection of suitable monitoring strategies is highly site-specific, and tool testing and development is ongoing.

R.A. Chadwick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Enhanced CO2 Gas Storage in Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) such as carbon dioxide (CO2) is largely believed to be a primary contributor to global warming. ... Four coals of various rank exploited from four main coal seams in China were tested. ...

Shu-Qing Hao; Sungho Kim; Yong Qin; Xue-Hai Fu

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 341 1994-Jan 01/07 331 01/14 316 01/21 303 01/28 290 1994-Feb 02/04 266 02/11 246 02/18 228 02/25 212 1994-Mar 03/04 206 03/11 201 03/18 205 03/25 202 1994-Apr 04/01 201 04/08 201 04/15 202 04/22 210 04/29 215 1994-May 05/06 225 05/13 236 05/20 242 05/27 256

373

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 841 2007-Jan 01/05 823 01/12 806 01/19 755 01/26 716 2007-Feb 02/02 666 02/09 613 02/16 564 02/23 538 2007-Mar 03/02 527 03/09 506 03/16 519 03/23 528 03/30 550 2007-Apr 04/06 560 04/13 556 04/20 568 04/27 590 2007-May 05/04 610 05/11 629 05/18 648 05/25 670

374

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 570 1994-Jan 01/07 532 01/14 504 01/21 440 01/28 414 1994-Feb 02/04 365 02/11 330 02/18 310 02/25 309 1994-Mar 03/04 281 03/11 271 03/18 284 03/25 303 1994-Apr 04/01 287 04/08 293 04/15 308 04/22 334 04/29 353 1994-May 05/06 376 05/13 399 05/20 429 05/27 443

375

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates Latest Update: November 25, 2008 This report consists of the following sections: Survey and Survey Processing - a description of the survey and an overview of the program Sampling - a description of the selection process used to identify companies in the survey Estimation - how the regional estimates are prepared from the collected data Computing the 5-year Averages, Maxima, Minima, and Year-Ago Values for the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - the method used to prepare weekly data to compute the 5-year averages, maxima, minima, and year-ago values for the weekly report Derivation of the Weekly Historical Estimates Database - a description of the process used to generate the historical database for the

376

The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?, including tight gas, gas/oil shale, oil sands, and coal-bed methane. North America has a substantial growth in its unconventional oil and gas market over the last two decades. The primary reason for that growth is because North America, being a mature...

Lin, Jiajing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

Molecular Gas Reservoir in low-z Powerful Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a survey for molecular gas in 3C radio galaxies at redshifts z gas masses in the range 10^7--10^9 Msun. The remainder had typical upper limits in molecular gas masses of ~10^8 Msun.

Jeremy Lim; Stephane Leon; Francoise Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

378

Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH’S) at the Low ng/l Level in the Biesbosch Water Storage Reservoirs (NETH.) for the Study of the Degradation of Chemicals in Surface Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concentrations of six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s) in water of the storage reservoirs of the Dutch...

N. Van Den Hoed; Ms M. T. H. Halmans…

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Utilization of CO2 as cushion gas for porous media compressed air energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage for large-scale deployment of intermittent solar andsolar energy systems. The number of cycles that occur in 30 years in a natural gas storage

Oldenburg, C.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Finite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil and Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the geomechanics of oil and gas reservoirs. The fragile microstructure of some rocks makes it difficult to predict of Steel, Aluminum, Concrete, etc. Moreover, the pattern of rock damage in oil and gas reservoirsFinite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Production decline analysis of horizontal well in gas shale reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The major factor influencing the increase of natural gas use is the rise in its global demand. Due to the relentlessly increasing demand, there have… (more)

Adekoya, Folarin.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Development of gas production type curves for coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists on methane production from the coal seams. The unique coal characteristic results in a dual-porosity system.… (more)

Garcia Arenas, Anangela.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Vidal, J.M. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CA (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services and Technology, Houston, TX (United States)); Coover, D.M. Jr. (Pintas Creek Oil Company, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Bloxsom, W.E. (Coastal Texas Oil and Gas, Houston, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1988-2012 Salt Caverns

385

Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 572,477 572,477 580,380 580,380 580,380 577,944 1988-2012

386

Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 690,678 740,477 766,768 783,579 812,394 831,190 1988-2012

387

Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 220,359 220,359 220,368 221,751 221,751 221,751 1988-2012

388

Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 29,415 29,415 29,565 29,565 29,565 28,750 1989-2012 Salt Caverns

389

Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,060,558 1,062,339 1,069,405 1,069,898 1,075,472 1,078,979

390

Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 1,200 1,200 1,200 0 1998-2012 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2012

391

Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 19,300 26,900 26,900 32,900 35,400 35,400 1995-2012 Salt Caverns

392

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,067 111,167 111,120 111,120 106,764 124,937 1988-2012

393

Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,294 114,937 114,274 111,271 111,313 110,749 1988-2012

394

Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 588,711 615,858 651,968 670,880 690,295 699,646 1988-2012

395

Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 374,201 374,201 376,301 376,301 376,301 376,301 1988-2012

396

Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 9,560 6,200 9,500 9,500 9,500 9,500 1998-2012 Salt Caverns

397

Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 166,909 187,251 210,128 235,638 240,241 289,416 1988-2012

398

Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 759,365 759,153 776,964 776,822 776,845 774,309 1988-2012

399

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 849,115 666,248 313,952 100,096 58,314 80,472 115,649 125,989 55,418 51,527 183,799 473,674 2012 619,332 515,817 205,365 126,403 73,735 90,800 129,567 133,919 66,652 85,918 280,933 489,707 2013 791,849 646,483 480,032 134,680 48,945 68,117 98,141 101,568 66,273 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators

400

Gas-storage calculations yield accurate cavern, inventory data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses how determining gas-storage cavern size and inventory variance is now possible with calculations based on shut-in cavern surveys. The method is the least expensive of three major methods and is quite accurate when recorded over a period of time.

Mason, R.G. (Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Corp., Houston, TX (US))

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

402

Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 50,130 81,827 167,632 312,290 457,725 420,644 359,267 370,180 453,548 436,748 221,389 90,432 2012 74,854 56,243 240,351 263,896 357,965 323,026 263,910 299,798 357,109 327,767 155,554 104,953 2013 70,592 41,680 99,330 270,106 465,787 438,931 372,458 370,471 418,848 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground Storage - All Operators

403

The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of therma...

Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Optimizing production from water drive gas reservoirs based on desirability concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There are various factors which determine the optimization and economic production from water drive gas reservoirs. These factors play an important role in designing an effective reservoir development plan. The present study, in the first step, investigates the relation between recovery factor, volumetric sweep efficiency and cumulative water production with six different engineering and geologic factors using design of experiments (DOE) and response surface methodology (RSM). Next, all derived response functions are optimized simultaneously based on the concept of desirability. In this manner, part of water drive gas reservoirs is simulated using Box–Behnken design. Important factors that have been studied include reservoir horizontal permeability (Kh), permeability anisotropy (Kv/Kh), aquifer size (Vaq), gas production rate (Qg), perforated thickness (Hp) and tubing head pressure (THP). The results indicate that by combining various levels of factors and considering relative importance of each response function, optimized conditions could be raised in order to maximizing recovery factor, volumetric sweep efficiency and minimizing cumulative water production. Also high rates of gas production result poor volumetric sweep efficiency and early water breakthrough, hence ultimate recovery factor decreases by 3.2–8.4%.

Meysam Naderi; Behzad Rostami; Maryam Khosravi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Stress-dependent permeability on tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2 Diffusivity Equation, Liquid Case?????????????.?. 8 2.3 Diffusivity Equation, Gas Case??????????????.?. 9 2.4 Stress-Dependent Formations????????????????. 11 2.5 Linear Flow???????????????????????. 14 2.6 Radial Flow???????????????????????. 14 2... laboratory data is not available. 1.3 Methodology The methodology consists of using both analytical and numerical models of a stress- sensitive formation saturated with irreducible water saturation and gas. The model considers analytical...

Rodriguez, Cesar Alexander

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Avoca, New York Salt Cavern Gas Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first salt cavern natural gas storage facility in the northeastern United States designed to serve the interstate gas market is being developed by J Makowski Associates and partners at Avoca in Steuben County, New York. Multiple caverns will be leached at a depth of about 3800 ft from an approximately 100 ft interval of salt within the F unit of the Syracuse Formation of the Upper Silurian Salina Group. The facility is designed to provide 5 Bcf of working gas capacity and 500 MMcfd of deliverability within an operating cavern pressure range between 760 psi and 2850 psi. Fresh water for leaching will be obtained from the Cohocton River aquifer at a maximum rate of 3 million gallons per day and produced brine will be injected into deep permeable Cambrian age sandstones and dolostones. Gas storage service is anticipated to commence in the Fall of 1997 with 2 Bcf of working gas capacity and the full 5 Bcf or storage service is scheduled to be available in the Fall of 1999.

Morrill, D.C. [J. Makowski and Associates, Boston, MA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 9,072,508 9,104,181 9,111,242 9,117,296 9,132,250 9,171,017 1989-2013 Alaska 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 83,592 2013-2013 Lower 48 States 8,988,916 9,020,589 9,027,650 9,033,704 9,048,658 9,087,425 2012-2013 Alabama 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 35,400 2002-2013 Arkansas 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 2002-2013 California 592,711 592,711 592,711 599,711 599,711 599,711 2002-2013 Colorado 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 122,086 2002-2013

408

Influence of reservoir heterogeneity on gas resource potential for geologically based infill drilling, Brooks and I-92 reservoirs, Frio Formation, south Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas resource potential for strategic infill drilling or recompletion in a reservoir can be calculated by subtracting gas volumes derived using the material balance (pressure decline) method from volumes derived using a volumetric method. This resource potential represents remaining gas that is not in communication with existing wells. Frio reservoirs in mature, nonassociated gas plays located downdip from the Vicksburg fault zone are characterized by multiple, vertically stacked sandstones. The Brooks reservoir, in La Gloria field, lies in a fluvial-dominated system that contains dip-elongate channel sandstone belts 1-2 mi wide. Within these belts are six or more vertically stacked channel-fill, point-bar and splay deposits. Depositional environments were interpreted from SP logs. Individual sandstones are separated vertically by thin mudstone layers and pinch out laterally into flood-plain deposits.

Jackson, M.L.W.; Ambrose, W.A. (Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

410

Calculation of geothermal reservoir temperatures and steam fractions from gas compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with the chemical equilibria and physical characteristics of the fluid in the reservoir (temperature, steam fraction with respect to total water, gas/steam ratio, redox conditions), which seem to be responsible for the observed concentrations of some reactive species found in the geothermal fluids (CO2, H2, H2S and CH4). Gas geochemistry is of particular interest in vapor-dominated fields where the fluid discharged consists of almost pure steam containing a limited number of volatile chemical species. Considering several geothermal systems, a good correlation has been obtained among the temperatures calculated from the gas geothermometers and the temperatures measured in the reservoir of evaluated by other physical or chemical methods. 24 refs., 5 figs.

D'Amore, F.; Truesdell, A.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was an integrated study of the physics and chemistry affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involved theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. Specifically, advances were made on streamline-based simulation, analytical solutions to 1D compositional displacements, and modeling and experimental measures of three-phase flow.

Blunt, M.J.; Orr, F.M. Jr.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,222 2,508 2,491 977 2,376 2,105 1,766 1,135 2,109 1,879 1990's 3,008 1,522 2,759 2,663 2,985 2,414 2,809 1,875 1,816 2,181 2000's 884 1,606 1,849 1,889 913 1,065 1,391 2,312 2,186 1,867 2010's 1,175 1,688 3,028 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Tennessee Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into

413

Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 20,484 1,508 1,555 1,024 678 1,834 1,942 1,150 1,702 2,930 1990's 2,779 1,969 1,573 1,855 3,788 3,746 6,523 3,221 1,760 607 2000's 3,241 6,772 3,426 5,422 5,570 5,971 7,705 2,817 4,372 3,182 2010's 2,693 3,306 2,097 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Georgia Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into

414

Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,107 1,966 4,352 785 2,714 923 777 806 6,321 737 1990's 1,027 1,517 849 2,320 2,638 1,316 4,337 2,520 1,589 2,000 2000's 795 1,477 1,726 2,197 1,602 831 1,447 2,663 982 691 2010's 1,983 609 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Indiana Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into

415

Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,626 1,876 1,865 1,223 1,812 2,117 1,989 112 231 2,167 1990's 190 173 173 173 116 1,214 1,631 1,096 632 1,318 2000's 972 691 7,692 1,691 973 1,510 487 1,057 869 1,008 2010's 664 1,977 1,699 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Virginia Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into

416

New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,617 4,658 4,518 4,770 4,781 4,317 5,384 3,236 3,243 1,433 1990's 3,740 2,683 2,422 2,620 4,835 3,055 5,033 3,926 4,922 7,035 2000's 7,688 3,844 6,373 9,189 7,532 8,448 4,574 7,290 5,792 4,919 2010's 3,304 5,018 3,483 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage New Jersey Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into

417

Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,063 2,576 5,243 256 3,089 289 154 670 477 1,008 1990's 1,196 2,012 4,659 5,671 3,867 2,346 5,262 2,134 1,269 1,697 2000's 1,226 702 943 3,153 1,665 2,626 2,438 3,080 3,178 1,652 2010's 1,458 1,858 1,408 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Iowa Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into

418

A dynamic prediction model for gas-water effective permeability in unsaturated coalbed methane reservoirs based on production data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective permeability of gas and water in coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is vital during CBM development. However, few studies have investigated it for unsaturated CBM reservoirs rather than saturated CBM reservoirs. In this work, the dynamic prediction model (PM-Corey model) for average gas-water effective permeability in two-phase flow in saturated CBM reservoirs was improved to describe unsaturated CBM reservoirs. In the improved effective permeability model, Palmer et al. absolute permeability model segmented based on critical desorption pressure and Chen et al. relative permeability model segmented based on critical water saturation were introduced and coupled comprehensively under conditions with the identical reservoir pressures and the identical water saturations through production data and the material balance equations (MBEs) in unsaturated CBM reservoirs. Taking the Hancheng CBM field as an example, the differences between the saturated and unsaturated effective permeability curves were compared. The results illustrate that the new dynamic prediction model could characterize not only the stage of two-phase flow but also the stage of single-phase water drainage. Also, the new model can accurately reflect the comprehensive effects of the positive and negative effects (the matrix shrinking effect and the effective stress effect) and the gas Klinkenberg effect of coal reservoirs, especially for the matrix shrinkage effect and the gas Klinkenberg effect, which can improve the effective permeability of gas production and render the process more economically. The new improved model is more realistic and practical than previous models.

Junlong Zhao; Dazhen Tang; Hao Xu; Yanjun Meng; Yumin Lv; Shu Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,373 1980's 2,279 2,809 3,155 2,745 2,482 2,712 1,666 1,401 1,640 2,139 1990's 2,242 1,321 1,481 1,767 3,404 1,884 2,871 2,268 2,022 1,841 2000's 2,211 2,420 1,421 1,529 1,147 1,164 1,132 1,171 858 2,487 2010's 1,515 1,100 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields,

422

U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,637 1980's 2,648 3,080 3,520 3,071 2,778 3,053 1,855 1,556 1,979 2,313 1990's 2,492 1,655 1,773 1,930 3,606 2,518 3,209 2,455 2,240 2,265 2000's 2,463 2,898 1,752 1,653 1,244 1,243 1,197 1,244 1,678 2,656 2010's 1,701 1,260 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields of Natural Gas, Wet After

423

U.S. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,301 4,579 2,566 1980's 2,577 2,998 3,419 2,965 2,686 2,960 1,771 1,499 1,909 2,243 1990's 2,412 1,604 1,724 1,866 3,480 2,452 3,110 2,382 2,162 2,196 2000's 2,368 2,800 1,694 1,610 1,206 1,208 1,155 1,188 1,622 2,598 2010's 1,668 1,227 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

424

Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,865 2,742 1,850 2,222 1,303 2,477 1,695 1,228 2,053 3,757 1990's 2,377 1,923 3,065 2,931 2,879 3,035 3,985 2,416 3,562 3,005 2000's 2,664 2,273 2,234 2,960 1,564 1,487 1,121 3,864 3,509 2,748 2010's 2,738 1,499 2,893 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Withdrawals of Liquefied Natural Gas from Storage Tennessee Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

425

Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,885 15,234 14,021 6,599 9,844 9,261 6,184 5,732 5,782 10,004 1990's 6,586 4,399 5,147 5,531 5,550 5,898 6,107 5,049 2,712 3,934 2000's 4,480 6,382 5,683 10,035 9,485 7,643 5,966 10,006 5,863 7,244 2010's 5,507 7,558 3,805 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Massachusetts Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

426

Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,046 4,051 3,234 1,970 3,714 2,309 2,657 1,381 3,023 2,268 1990's 4,311 2,390 2,869 4,329 5,826 3,523 5,590 4,615 5,092 5,146 2000's 4,918 4,907 862 4,496 2,938 3,416 2,200 2,292 2,683 1,681 2010's 2,353 2,620 2,651 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Pennsylvania Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

427

Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Salt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 101 2007-Jan 01/05 109 01/12 107 01/19 96 01/26 91 2007-Feb 02/02 78 02/09 63 02/16 52 02/23 54 2007-Mar 03/02 59 03/09 58 03/16 64 03/23 70 03/30 78 2007-Apr 04/06 81 04/13 80 04/20 80 04/27 83 2007-May 05/04 85 05/11 88 05/18 92 05/25 97 2007-Jun 06/01 100 06/08 101 06/15 102 06/22 102 06/29 102

428

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 2,322 1994-Jan 01/07 2,186 01/14 2,019 01/21 1,782 01/28 1,662 1994-Feb 02/04 1,470 02/11 1,303 02/18 1,203 02/25 1,149 1994-Mar 03/04 1,015 03/11 1,004 03/18 952 03/25 965 1994-Apr 04/01 953 04/08 969 04/15 1,005 04/22 1,085 04/29 1,161 1994-May 05/06 1,237 05/13 1,325 05/20 1,403 05/27 1,494

429

New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,300 3,541 4,329 4,979 3,313 4,064 3,468 3,422 3,202 2,444 1990's 2,298 2,221 2,471 2,313 3,565 2,982 3,219 3,330 4,305 6,752 2000's 7,501 3,732 4,778 6,554 5,603 5,915 3,680 5,513 5,971 4,425 2010's 3,693 4,404 3,278 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Withdrawals of Liquefied Natural Gas from Storage New Jersey Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

430

Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 1,411 1994-Jan 01/07 1,323 01/14 1,199 01/21 1,040 01/28 958 1994-Feb 02/04 838 02/11 728 02/18 665 02/25 627 1994-Mar 03/04 529 03/11 531 03/18 462 03/25 461 1994-Apr 04/01 465 04/08 475 04/15 494 04/22 541 04/29 593 1994-May 05/06 636 05/13 690 05/20 731 05/27 795

431

Altering Wettability in Gas Condensate Sandstone Reservoirs for Gas Mobillity Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and high temperature, simulating the natural environment of a reservoir. Several experimental techniques are implemented to examine the effect of treatments on wettability. These include flow displacement tests and oil imbibitions. The experimental work...

Fernandez Martinez, Ruth Gabriela

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

Inflow performance relationship for perforated wells producing from solution gas drive reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IPR curve equations, which are available today, are developed for open hole wells. In the application of Nodal System Analysis in perforated wells, an accurate calculation of pressure loss in the perforation is very important. Nowadays, the equation which is widely used is Blount, Jones and Glaze equation, to estimate pressure loss across perforation. This equation is derived for single phase flow, either oil or gas, therefore it is not suitable for two-phase production wells. In this paper, an IPR curve equation for perforated wells, producing from solution gas drive reservoir, is introduced. The equation has been developed using two phase single well simulator combine to two phase flow in perforation equation, derived by Perez and Kelkar. A wide range of reservoir rock and fluid properties and perforation geometry are used to develop the equation statistically.

Sukarno, P. [Inst. Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Tobing, E.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Evaluation of Storage Reallocation and Related Strategies for Optimizing Reservoir System Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

necessity to use limited storage capacity as effectively as possible warrants periodic re-evaluations of operating policies. Reallocation of storage capacity between purposes represents a general strategy for optimizing the beneficial use of limited storage...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Carriere, Patrick E.

434

CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan; William M. Goodman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide- Polyethylenimine- Dextran Sulfate Polymer Gel System as a Water Shut-Off Agent in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies such as horizontal wells and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have made ultra-low permeability shale and tight gas reservoirs productive but the industry is still on the learning curve when it comes to addressing various production...

Jayakumar, Swathika 1986-

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

Characteristics of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging response in fracture oil and gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fracture oil and gas reservoirs exist in large numbers. The accurate logging evaluation of fracture reservoirs has puzzled petroleum geologists for a long time. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging is an effective new technology for borehole measurement and formation evaluation. It has been widely applied in non-fracture reservoirs, and good results have been obtained. But its application in fracture reservoirs has rarely been reported in the literature. This paper studies systematically the impact of fracture parameters (width, number, angle, etc), the instrument parameter (antenna length) and the borehole condition (type of drilling fluid) on NMR logging by establishing the equation of the NMR logging response in fracture reservoirs. First, the relationship between the transverse relaxation time of fluid-saturated fracture and fracture aperture in the condition of different transverse surface relaxation rates was analyzed; then, the impact of the fracture aperture, dip angle, length of two kinds of antennas and mud type was calculated through forward modeling and inversion. The results show that the existence of fractures affects the NMR logging; the characteristics of the NMR logging response become more obvious with increasing fracture aperture and number of fractures. It is also found that T2 distribution from the fracture reservoir will be affected by echo spacing, type of drilling fluids and length of antennas. A long echo spacing is more sensitive to the type of drilling fluid. A short antenna is more effective for identifying fractures. In addition, the impact of fracture dip angle on NMR logging is affected by the antenna length.

Lizhi Xiao; Kui Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Simulator for unconventional gas resources multi-dimensional model SUGAR-MD. Volume I. Reservoir model analysis and validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are: (1) To develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales. (2) To determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales. (3) To recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales. (4) To analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance. (5) To study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. The flow equations that are the mathematical basis of the two-dimensional model are presented. It is assumed that gas transport to producing wells in Devonian shale reservoirs occurs through a natural fracture system into which matrix blocks of contrasting physical properties deliver contained gas. That is, the matrix acts as a uniformly distributed gas source in a fracture medium. Gas desorption from pore walls is treated as a uniformly distributed source within the matrix blocks. 24 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Average Reservoir Fluid Pro erties Before Break- Through Ultimate Economic Re cover Fraction OIP 1(a) (b) (c) 2(a) (b) (c) 3(a) (b) (c) (b) (c) (d) 5(*) (b) (c} 6(a) (b) (c) 3800 4200 4600 3800 4200 4600 3800 4ZOO 4600 3000...-through recovery of 75 per cent. Nitrogen resulted in an 81 per cent break- through recovery, after reaching miscibility at 4160 psi. Although nitrogen gave a higher break-through recovery than flue gas, flue gas 25 0. 80 4600 psi 4200 psi f4 0 0 0 'g 4...

Maxwell, H. D.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Development and application of type curves for pressure transient analysis of horizontal wells in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even though significant progresses have been made in the past few years, there appears to be a lack of information regarding the characterisation of shale gas formations. A major purpose of this study is to demonstrate impacts of horizontal well geometries and gas flow parameters as well as shale gas reservoir system on horizontal well production behaviour and flow regime on pressure transient analysis (PTA). Extensive numerical simulations were conducted to model transient pressure behaviour of a horizontal well and apply the results to well test analysis in shale gas reservoirs. Based on the results from numerical simulations, a set of type curves have been developed in terms of dimensionless pseudopressure and time. Results from type curve matching for synthetic pressure data in shale gas reservoirs demonstrate that the conventional analysis approach may still be applicable for the quantitative analysis on the transient gas flow behaviour and determination of formation properties. [Received: June 21, 2013; Accepted: August 6, 2013

Sung Jun Lee; Tae Hong Kim; Kun Sang Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Modeling Reallocation of Reservoir Storage Capacity Between Flood Control and Conservation Purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pattern at BRDE29 (Dennis) .................................... 284 6.4 Average Daily Flow Pattern at 515631 (Granbury Reservoir) .................. 285 6.5 Average Daily Flow Pattern at BRGR30 (Glen Rose)............................... 285... Pattern at BRDE29 (Dennis) .................................... 284 6.4 Average Daily Flow Pattern at 515631 (Granbury Reservoir) .................. 285 6.5 Average Daily Flow Pattern at BRGR30 (Glen Rose)............................... 285...

Kim, Tae Jin

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Detailed Studies of a HighDensity Polarized Hydrogen Gas Target for Storage Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed Studies of a High­Density Polarized Hydrogen Gas Target for Storage Rings Kirsten Zapfe 1 (1996) 293 Abstract A high­density target of polarized atomic hydrogen gas for applications in storage rings was produced by injecting atoms from an atomic beam source into a T­shaped storage cell

443

Estimation of original gas in place from short-term shut-in pressure data for commingled tight gas reservoirs with no crossflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas production (GP) under these circumstances. This research studies different empirical methods to estimate the original gas in place (OGIP) for one-layer or commingled two-layer tight gas reservoirs without crossflow, from short-term (72-hour) shut...

Khuong, Chan Hung

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's -3,383 2,585 -1,618 -700 2,734 45 593 -2,043 -1,644 -6,447 1990's 308 -3,967 -1,844 -2,368 -6,820 -3,134 -5,364 -3,517 -7,243 -2,447 2000's -7,518 350 767 4,359 1,584 3,129 156 -1,560 -1,694 -1,221 2010's -963 -753 -1,384 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Net Withdrawals of Liquefied Natural Gas from Storage Massachusetts Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals

445

Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,915 3,084 3,526 3,090 2,266 2,936 2,398 247 3,186 4,242 1990's 1,679 2,412 2,797 4,534 5,030 3,921 4,722 5,852 4,559 4,477 2000's 5,124 2,844 1,820 3,688 3,627 3,694 1,571 2,685 2,532 2,371 2010's 2,314 2,415 1,763 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Withdrawals of Liquefied Natural Gas from Storage Pennsylvania Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from

446

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 58,880 70,469 16,774 11,878 2,078 1,522 2,158 2,524 1,024 3,314 29,483 47,719 1995 56,732 27,801 27,857 15,789 4,280 2,252 3,265 11,858 5,401 6,025 14,354 53,469 1996 89,320 52,624 24,847 9,346 4,785 4,298 12,886 21,661 6,866 14,578 24,096 48,438 1997 73,240 41,906 22,756 15,182 4,297 3,613 5,381 8,030 7,770 12,343 22,625 88,975 1998 54,800 50,704 27,864 16,746 3,265 2,619 6,278 6,049 5,822 4,599 14,013 62,377 1999 54,762 45,467 35,081 31,196 7,773 3,792 4,982 14,342 6,642 10,488 15,128 54,531

447

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 201,567 147,250 61,339 23,149 9,789 29,178 13,371 19,352 10,151 24,102 52,809 137,962 1995 166,242 120,089 100,955 31,916 17,279 19,712 35,082 62,364 16,966 33,762 102,735 181,097 1996 223,932 157,642 141,292 36,788 27,665 26,393 32,861 27,599 20,226 34,000 116,431 142,519 1997 204,601 103,715 43,894 54,285 24,898 34,122 65,631 42,757 30,579 32,257 113,422 180,582 1998 143,042 69,667 97,322 25,555 30,394 38,537 33,314 37,034 51,903 17,812 60,078 168,445 1999 189,816 77,848 104,690 44,930 22,829 26,085 58,109 60,549 25,888 43,790 66,980 165,046

448

AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 530,741 349,007 159,102 30,353 9,093 4,218 8,493 5,462 6,537 22,750 119,120 256,340 1995 419,951 414,116 196,271 76,470 8,845 14,449 13,084 9,496 3,715 25,875 247,765 398,851 1996 435,980 333,314 236,872 66,149 12,958 4,261 2,804 5,141 5,152 24,515 213,277 269,811 1997 474,777 267,717 218,640 76,956 11,974 4,401 7,277 5,503 5,269 39,662 165,807 309,399 1998 339,858 244,813 256,560 37,278 8,764 11,317 14,830 15,207 16,026 23,854 94,110 287,801 1999 437,182 261,305 244,041 43,642 13,904 11,738 17,499 14,984 9,984 37,822 122,731 385,958

449

AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 20,366 29,330 55,297 93,538 129,284 83,943 104,001 98,054 88,961 65,486 49,635 27,285 1995 24,645 25,960 57,833 78,043 101,019 100,926 77,411 54,611 94,759 84,671 40,182 33,836 1996 34,389 48,922 38,040 76,100 98,243 88,202 88,653 109,284 125,616 91,618 37,375 48,353 1997 45,327 35,394 89,625 83,137 107,821 99,742 71,360 95,278 116,634 117,497 49,750 33,170 1998 41,880 59,324 73,582 119,021 128,323 96,261 107,136 94,705 87,920 129,117 58,026 47,924 1999 35,830 50,772 49,673 80,879 110,064 100,132 72,348 67,286 103,587 79,714 66,465 32,984

450

Dependence of gas shale fracture permeability on effective stress and reservoir pressure: Model match and insights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although permeability data for different gas shales have been reported previously and attempts have been made to match permeability with empirical correlations, theoretical studies of shale permeability modelling are lacking. In this work, the correlation between fracture permeability and effective stress is established for gas shales through theoretical derivation. This model is able to match the permeability data for different gas shales. The matching results for the gas shale studied show that the model coefficient, fracture compressibility, which decreases as initial shale permeability increases, is strongly affected by the flow directions and varies with the shale’s mineralogical composition. Furthermore, the correlation between fracture permeability and reservoir pressure has also been established. Sensitivity study shows that fracture permeability may decrease significantly with the reservoir pressure drawdown. Moreover, the horizontal fracture permeability drop is found to be significantly affected by the Young’s modulus’ anisotropic ratio (Eh/Ev). The insights gained warrant further theoretical and experimental studies to evaluate shale fracture permeability.

Dong Chen; Zhejun Pan; Zhihui Ye

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

E-Print Network 3.0 - ageologic storage reservoir Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JafarGandomi* and Andrew Curtis, School of GeoSciences, The University of Edinburgh, Kings Summary: of a range of 1D subsurface CO2 reservoir models. Each model consists of a...

452

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Semi-Lagrangian Approach for Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation Zhuliang Chen such as fuel and electricity, natural gas prices exhibit seasonality dynamics due to fluctuations in demand [28]. As such, natural gas storage facilities are constructed to provide a cushion for such fluctuations

Forsyth, Peter A.

453

Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 228,019 220,410 215,229 215,377 219,838 224,572 230,226 236,154 239,871 243,782 241,829 227,519 1991 225,964 215,495 211,852 213,588 218,084 228,720 234,297 240,868 252,335 263,855 255,740 241,570 1992 221,741 209,087 205,548 208,105 217,022 225,236 236,833 247,704 258,372 267,472 258,308 237,797 1993 218,826 208,027 205,378 210,868 217,693 225,793 236,688 247,032 259,649 265,238 258,580 240,957 1994 222,694 213,205 210,208 212,114 217,678 224,185 234,433 245,426 257,120 266,215 261,645 243,875 1995 223,356 212,480 208,011 207,340 211,295 219,417 229,558 244,448 256,135 263,260 252,590 237,557

454

Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 59,806 56,937 55,229 54,606 57,328 55,249 67,314 75,921 83,365 86,778 66,668 58,461 1991 61,574 54,369 50,745 51,761 54,314 60,156 66,484 70,498 74,646 75,367 70,399 63,453 1992 59,541 59,119 59,059 60,896 64,403 67,171 70,690 75,362 78,483 79,756 74,021 67,181 1993 61,308 56,251 52,595 52,028 58,713 65,349 69,968 75,120 80,183 85,406 79,818 75,184 1994 70,826 63,733 66,678 68,028 74,061 78,089 83,551 89,773 98,223 102,035 99,841 94,306 1995 86,450 83,059 79,507 80,647 84,154 90,012 97,005 100,430 101,993 102,510 103,779 93,925

455

New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 124,150 116,994 113,349 121,215 131,103 139,757 148,861 155,592 158,419 160,981 150,947 1991 127,051 118,721 114,190 117,571 124,275 132,029 140,317 149,058 157,799 163,054 158,736 151,036 1992 146,171 131,831 119,880 122,969 132,698 142,107 153,543 163,508 169,298 172,708 169,361 158,828 1993 145,521 129,184 118,756 122,771 133,838 144,835 154,895 162,969 172,642 174,589 171,253 161,801 1994 143,310 129,129 120,675 129,563 138,273 150,582 159,688 168,628 173,584 174,977 172,352 163,470 1995 149,768 135,478 129,570 130,077 138,659 150,010 156,744 165,026 173,947 175,635 165,945 148,196

456

Iowa Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 1,740 243 1,516 3,236 5,817 8,184 5,657 5,928 4,903 4,971 1,423 854 1991 1,166 155 231 1,829 4,897 8,985 6,518 8,058 11,039 10,758 2,782 860 1992 488 43 1,246 3,184 7,652 7,568 11,453 11,281 11,472 9,000 1,228 1,203 1993 0 0 733 5,547 6,489 7,776 10,550 10,150 12,351 8,152 2,437 0 1994 0 75 1,162 3,601 7,153 7,638 11,999 12,405 13,449 10,767 2,678 0 1995 0 0 251 1,041 5,294 9,889 12,219 17,805 13,756 8,855 1,283 391 1996 2 2 0 40 1,921 7,679 12,393 13,168 12,537 10,556 2,760 0

457

Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 296,629 281,511 286,917 279,978 298,202 307,083 317,720 325,432 332,591 338,392 353,804 327,277 1991 283,982 278,961 284,515 298,730 313,114 323,305 324,150 328,823 338,810 342,711 317,072 306,300 1992 288,415 280,038 276,287 282,263 290,192 301,262 318,719 326,705 339,394 346,939 330,861 299,990 1993 275,054 253,724 246,989 257,844 277,833 296,860 311,870 325,201 341,207 348,646 330,986 316,146 1994 285,115 259,794 257,148 273,797 298,007 311,154 327,281 340,312 349,174 353,630 350,671 334,502 1995 310,835 297,169 287,302 291,768 308,245 320,842 327,910 326,131 338,685 351,385 343,918 320,269

458

Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 293,785 290,491 289,197 288,193 293,815 288,808 290,947 293,015 295,663 296,921 295,421 290,602 1991 289,270 287,858 286,548 286,491 287,718 288,959 290,667 292,107 292,226 290,844 288,112 284,559 1992 281,148 279,325 278,909 279,042 280,038 280,751 281,777 282,543 282,117 280,760 277,412 271,811 1993 266,711 262,291 259,532 257,822 256,665 255,940 257,149 257,450 257,904 257,816 253,710 250,503 1994 246,679 239,940 238,777 237,993 238,931 240,738 242,090 243,176 244,948 245,981 244,275 241,603 1995 238,103 236,109 235,420 236,218 237,498 239,637 242,554 245,760 246,856 246,301 243,255 238,004

459

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 888,010 816,597 813,746 830,132 876,457 908,444 941,985 966,686 1,002,402 1,021,144 997,644 956,234 1995 902,782 884,830 865,309 860,012 897,991 945,183 975,307 986,131 1,011,948 1,032,357 1,033,363 982,781 1996 896,744 853,207 837,980 849,221 885,715 916,778 929,559 928,785 946,748 949,983 939,649 899,689 1997 833,239 796,139 788,601 801,955 844,880 890,703 923,845 947,277 969,170 980,388 967,286 880,627 1998 828,658 780,476 768,264 773,053 823,311 872,913 900,181 925,287 965,846 1,001,548 1,009,978 953,379

460

Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 96,943 93,233 91,600 91,945 93,696 95,361 97,632 101,323 105,497 108,028 108,772 105,317 1991 99,409 90,625 87,381 86,706 88,659 89,700 93,022 97,673 102,161 119,470 106,066 101,121 1992 94,379 89,893 85,767 85,259 86,457 88,999 94,154 98,267 103,478 106,422 103,871 100,288 1993 95,109 90,016 87,368 88,414 89,388 91,515 95,971 100,516 104,709 106,058 104,160 101,505 1994 95,846 92,274 90,200 89,473 89,417 91,870 97,002 101,310 105,300 109,518 110,149 107,215 1995 101,661 95,902 93,464 92,724 93,156 94,955 97,862 101,470 106,201 110,610 111,401 106,609

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461

Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 806,109 754,941 721,785 717,863 749,618 782,498 812,054 847,731 881,760 900,526 903,640 870,265 1991 801,635 753,141 727,699 720,275 751,641 781,883 810,535 844,477 877,485 904,206 885,341 851,258 1992 791,129 743,484 716,909 709,150 742,812 774,578 805,097 843,543 878,334 905,597 887,454 844,108 1993 783,875 735,236 710,377 713,214 746,899 779,762 810,546 844,320 882,456 907,957 898,655 854,691 1994 781,826 737,719 723,108 722,735 746,576 776,189 808,832 843,372 880,762 907,622 898,872 866,846 1995 803,422 745,457 721,311 716,886 745,970 774,803 804,912 837,002 868,941 899,868 885,665 841,580

462

Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 439,384 418,280 409,494 412,498 435,089 454,844 474,266 493,301 510,714 521,774 518,006 489,515 1991 477,781 454,923 439,191 448,258 461,362 490,259 505,168 523,544 538,399 546,343 533,483 506,672 1992 463,200 428,363 392,474 394,514 420,383 452,412 478,259 500,938 516,378 527,568 522,419 491,542 1993 452,510 407,121 368,376 371,641 401,431 433,291 462,741 490,248 515,994 522,961 510,471 470,120 1994 413,475 378,216 361,279 377,103 406,526 438,293 471,603 498,156 519,996 530,505 526,490 498,597 1995 448,479 410,867 391,082 385,953 413,796 445,322 472,162 495,448 513,913 522,766 498,715 455,782

463

Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 245,145 234,971 229,066 227,002 227,589 232,695 244,279 256,395 272,036 278,715 307,106 283,959 1991 247,980 246,067 240,702 238,606 244,878 254,222 257,114 260,728 271,373 282,551 273,225 274,836 1992 267,254 254,115 244,632 239,589 241,818 244,415 248,599 260,231 270,362 273,183 262,414 247,855 1993 229,148 213,533 208,832 213,112 235,850 247,585 253,023 261,780 276,136 278,233 268,816 259,719 1994 243,371 229,217 228,379 229,034 240,066 245,355 256,229 268,820 278,655 283,143 276,402 266,198 1995 251,176 239,135 228,409 230,202 239,892 252,703 252,472 252,461 269,034 280,066 272,406 255,483

464

Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 167,899 166,624 167,576 172,320 177,680 185,467 192,473 199,674 202,983 198,545 192,581 1991 183,697 180,169 176,535 181,119 183,491 186,795 192,143 195,330 198,776 198,351 191,831 189,130 1992 189,866 188,587 183,694 182,008 180,781 182,342 185,893 187,501 191,689 202,391 200,871 197,857 1993 192,736 181,774 172,140 171,465 177,888 185,725 193,275 198,075 204,437 205,524 199,683 188,970 1994 170,283 157,974 153,378 158,141 167,847 177,200 186,856 193,717 197,308 200,665 200,993 192,700 1995 179,376 166,756 162,223 165,687 178,354 185,982 192,799 196,645 203,357 205,882 196,585 185,704

465

Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 79,285 79,603 80,373 85,161 89,985 93,156 99,475 104,348 108,323 111,705 112,191 106,545 1991 91,368 86,763 86,679 92,641 96,297 98,701 100,991 103,104 108,211 112,270 104,184 98,741 1992 89,008 87,873 85,498 85,665 89,979 94,898 99,555 100,116 106,504 107,770 107,015 100,433 1993 94,466 86,908 80,802 83,305 90,316 94,786 99,933 103,264 109,076 109,790 108,869 101,774 1994 92,881 89,305 92,689 97,058 101,796 102,770 109,298 114,566 116,697 120,326 121,207 115,933 1995 107,126 102,620 98,569 103,285 110,250 111,888 116,039 116,791 123,081 125,717 116,280 109,906

466

Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 456,385 449,625 443,662 508,009 518,658 531,197 544,212 538,450 539,191 556,768 562,961 526,092 1991 444,671 436,508 436,440 453,634 468,302 487,953 491,758 497,878 513,315 517,099 502,004 486,831 1992 455,054 440,895 435,515 438,408 456,948 469,532 491,515 508,950 511,787 516,598 496,232 459,458 1993 414,216 388,921 376,731 396,804 423,544 444,755 453,961 466,560 450,853 457,581 445,059 431,719 1994 381,924 342,046 350,039 374,226 407,219 419,997 446,215 462,725 485,146 495,417 500,640 478,036 1995 465,108 443,908 434,564 455,756 479,313 497,829 498,982 490,940 510,646 520,173 509,944 463,202

467

Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 66,554 61,757 56,567 52,684 52,375 56,614 62,829 68,028 73,035 74,259 80,053 1991 71,524 69,768 62,807 61,367 62,448 66,425 70,705 75,800 80,506 82,065 83,134 82,145 1992 78,319 74,888 68,199 64,030 63,685 65,682 69,830 76,095 82,007 84,134 81,041 78,303 1993 73,838 68,733 66,224 62,799 65,511 70,157 73,322 77,155 81,457 81,981 79,475 78,303 1994 72,798 67,880 65,147 60,034 65,538 67,050 71,639 76,943 82,093 82,347 80,736 77,356 1995 73,047 69,545 64,567 59,852 62,142 70,945 73,047 77,326 80,150 81,357 82,831 77,475

468

Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 50,980 47,820 48,924 49,656 52,214 53,271 55,370 58,030 60,465 61,702 59,577 58,586 1991 55,450 52,159 50,537 51,458 52,941 54,594 55,998 58,233 60,342 61,017 61,304 61,207 1992 56,350 51,413 48,752 47,855 51,162 53,850 55,670 58,057 60,123 61,373 61,882 59,775 1993 56,503 52,155 50,240 49,746 51,939 53,114 54,206 55,924 58,423 61,103 61,504 58,605 1994 52,059 49,590 50,127 51,375 53,420 54,885 56,985 58,443 59,992 61,761 60,987 59,854 1995 57,642 53,398 53,293 53,049 55,049 57,080 56,891 58,074 60,121 61,273 60,740 57,798

469

Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 27,878 27,848 27,810 27,846 27,946 28,419 28,946 29,427 29,707 29,734 29,656 29,429 1991 27,498 27,132 26,811 26,616 26,747 27,086 27,573 27,587 27,587 27,587 26,958 26,294 1992 25,642 25,124 24,681 24,523 24,507 25,016 25,868 26,532 26,966 26,770 26,404 25,781 1993 25,148 24,276 23,798 23,676 22,852 22,866 22,856 22,856 22,856 22,731 22,096 21,239 1994 19,771 18,729 17,426 17,116 17,647 18,199 18,762 19,566 19,776 19,712 19,354 18,757 1995 17,752 16,999 16,460 16,330 16,541 17,854 19,348 20,738 20,895 20,815 20,197 18,048

470

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 516,257 477,783 453,124 462,399 511,406 619,401 671,431 711,942 717,828 719,002 665,421 1991 543,808 501,265 471,608 482,628 527,550 545,866 569,927 607,093 651,148 669,612 658,358 627,857 1992 559,416 497,895 441,187 445,158 485,227 535,829 579,713 622,943 665,414 690,920 692,280 650,707 1993 580,189 479,149 417,953 444,095 494,680 547,289 592,762 632,195 680,452 695,718 689,050 639,761 1994 532,216 455,494 434,081 475,107 527,242 583,595 634,007 677,221 700,758 716,066 696,721 656,431 1995 590,100 497,162 469,515 481,690 525,118 578,640 611,291 648,080 695,988 713,882 669,744 594,750

471

Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 377,554 379,627 371,519 372,188 379,245 393,418 407,240 421,000 435,705 450,886 459,955 452,883 1991 405,740 373,892 361,085 367,797 387,769 411,591 425,349 435,719 453,303 477,425 464,906 433,184 1992 387,456 358,639 345,049 348,097 369,129 388,728 403,713 413,375 432,171 452,989 447,115 411,919 1993 365,128 321,651 298,841 302,181 340,366 375,731 402,638 430,431 466,345 481,609 468,227 421,634 1994 376,035 357,247 343,892 365,948 400,035 421,714 451,504 474,085 497,428 506,525 502,477 463,847 1995 412,075 372,991 364,320 374,312 392,968 420,738 441,510 442,655 466,060 480,119 455,669 408,882

472

California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 369,842 350,519 355,192 376,146 401,513 414,633 418,894 421,696 426,235 440,326 397,785 1991 376,267 376,879 359,926 380,826 407,514 431,831 445,387 448,286 448,383 448,081 441,485 417,177 1992 374,166 357,388 341,665 355,718 382,516 404,547 418,501 431,069 445,438 455,642 446,085 390,868 1993 357,095 337,817 348,097 356,320 385,972 399,994 423,027 433,552 448,573 461,473 446,120 411,943 1994 372,605 328,438 327,546 346,463 374,574 394,821 412,465 421,818 438,754 450,997 434,260 408,636 1995 377,660 373,010 365,068 362,271 388,641 414,650 428,646 426,927 442,131 460,286 462,316 436,346

473

Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 799 683 623 539 539 539 673 807 919 1,022 1,126 1,127 1999 996 872 741 661 658 802 909 985 1,089 1,194 1,251 1,195 2000 1,031 855 792 729 711 711 711 711 711 760 874 959 2001 963 903 830 761 865 978 1,009 1,072 1,118 1,180 938 937 2002 987 988 990 990 965 962 949 945 942 940 852 852 2003 744 634 566 519 554 630 705 800 803 848 848 787 2004 684 633 621 652 685 731 794 849 854 879 867 826 2005 784 704 605 524 483 466 466 466 428 419 413 400

474

Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 82,538 81,491 81,181 82,095 83,472 85,002 83,477 83,923 85,020 84,918 81,317 1991 79,407 78,372 77,653 78,788 81,843 83,985 83,721 83,657 84,562 84,253 83,847 81,475 1992 79,888 78,880 78,837 79,448 81,080 83,708 85,758 86,968 88,154 87,853 85,260 81,824 1993 78,414 76,448 75,412 76,380 79,328 82,649 85,226 87,084 88,593 88,564 86,793 84,418 1994 81,833 79,100 79,242 80,202 82,339 83,239 85,362 85,709 87,835 88,765 88,935 86,932 1995 84,820 83,825 82,895 82,697 83,340 84,206 35,388 35,566 35,950 35,183 33,585 31,992

475

Enabling Utility-Scale Electrical Energy Storage through Underground Hydrogen-Natural Gas Co-Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Energy storage technology is needed for the storage of surplus baseload generation and the storage of intermittent wind power, because it can increase the flexibility… (more)

Peng, Dan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs L. A. Davis Lorne.Davis@coe.ttu.edu Department of Petroleum Engineering A. L. Graham Alan.Graham@coe.ttu.edu H. W. Parker** Harry.Parker@coe.ttu.edu Department of Chemical Engineering Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409 M. S. Ingber ingber@me.unm.edu A. A. Mammoli mammoli@me.unm.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 L. A. Mondy lamondy@engsci.sandia.gov Energetic and Multiphase Processes Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0834 Quanxin Guo quan@advantekinternational.com Ahmed Abou-Sayed a.abou-sayed@att.net

477

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

478

U.S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: 1998-2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: 1998-2005 S. Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: 1998-2005 Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, October 2006 1 This special report examines the current status of the underground natural gas storage sector in the United States and how it has changed since 1998, particularly in regards to deliverability from storage, working gas capacity, ownership, and operational capabilities. In addition, it includes a discussion and an analysis of underground natural gas storage expansions in 2005 and an examination of the level of proposed additional storage expansions over the next several years. Questions or comments on the contents of this article should be directed to James Tobin at james.tobin@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-4835.

479

AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 280,414 208,968 200,997 216,283 261,894 293,909 326,049 349,274 387,670 405,477 381,931 342,394 1995 288,908 270,955 251,410 246,654 284,291 328,371 362,156 372,718 398,444 418,605 419,849 366,944 1996 280,620 236,878 221,371 232,189 268,812 299,619 312,736 313,747 330,116 333,134 322,501 282,392 1997 216,113 179,067 171,563 184,918 227,756 273,507 306,641 330,075 351,975 363,189 350,107 263,455 1998 211,982 163,084 150,923 155,766 206,048 254,643 281,422 305,746 346,135 379,917 388,380 330,906

480

Study of Multi-scale Transport Phenomena in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These challenges have impeded efficient economic development of shale resources. New fundamental insights and tools are needed to improve the state of shale gas development. Few attempts have been made to model the compositional behavior of fluids in shale gas...

Freeman, Craig Matthew

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas storage reservoirs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines progress in the second 3 months of the first year of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs.'' The development of an automatic technique for analytical solution of one-dimensional gas flow problems with volume change on mixing is described. The aim of this work is to develop a set of ultra-fast compositional simulation tools that can be used to make field-scale predictions of the performance of gas injection processes. To achieve the necessary accuracy, these tools must satisfy the fundamental physics and chemistry of the displacement from the pore to the reservoir scales. Thus this project focuses on four main research areas: (1) determination of the most appropriate methods of mapping multicomponent solutions to streamlines and streamtubes in 3D; (2) development of techniques for automatic generation of analytical solutions for one-dimensional flow along a streamline; (3) experimental investigations to improve the representation of physical mechanisms that govern displacement efficiency along a streamline; and (4) theoretical and experimental investigations to establish the limitations of the streamline/streamtube approach. In this report they briefly review the status of the research effort in each area. They then give a more in depth discussion of their development of techniques for analytic solutions along a streamline including volume change on mixing for arbitrary numbers of components.

Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP in low Permeability Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

Mark Willis; Daniel Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

483

Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas cylinders. Safe procedures for their use are as follows: · All compressed gas combustible material. · Keep cylinders out of the direct sun and do not allow them to be overheated. · Gas

de Lijser, Peter

484

Lower 48 States Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,985 38,541 -75,406 -222,622 -232,805 -210,409 -190,434 -133,607 -91,948 -46,812 73,978 350,936 2012 778,578 852,002 1,047,322 994,769 911,345 800,040 655,845 556,041 481,190 406,811 271,902 259,915 2013 -216,792 -360,517 -763,506 -767,663 -631,403 -489,573 -325,475 -214,105 -148,588 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013

485

Integrated Multi-Well Reservoir and Decision Model to Determine Optimal Well Spacing in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on unconventional gas has increased with tight gas sands, gas shales and coalbed methane being the primary contributors. Elsewhere, the potential of unconventional gas formations is just beginning to be explored, with assessments under way in Europe, South...

Ortiz Prada, Rubiel Paul

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z