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Sample records for gas sampling rock

  1. Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    resource at depth. These hand samples can be collected using a rock hammer or sledge. Data Access and Acquisition Under a detailed investigation, a systematic sampling procedure...

  2. Rock Sampling At Jemez Mountain Area (Eichelberger & Koch, 1979...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock Sampling At Jemez Mountain Area (Eichelberger & Koch, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Jemez Mountain...

  3. Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region...

  4. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  5. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David J.; McNamee, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  6. Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples You are accessing a document from ...

  7. Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of Test Results for Daya Bay Rock Samples A series of ...

  8. Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of geothermometric calculations and geochemical modeling of the data. In the case of gas flux sampling, different measurement techniques and devices may disrupt or alter the...

  9. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic...

  10. Rock Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goff, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Long Valley Caldera...

  11. Category:Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Subcategories This category has the following 3 subcategories, out of 3 total. G Gas Flux Sampling 1 pages S Soil Gas Sampling 1 pages Surface Gas...

  12. Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Sampling (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Downhole Fluid Sampling Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  13. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extends in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  14. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling a gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extend in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Little Rock Gains Momentum with Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Buses Little Rock Gains Momentum with Natural Gas Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Little Rock Gains Momentum with Natural Gas Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Little Rock Gains Momentum with Natural Gas Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Little Rock Gains Momentum with Natural Gas Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Little Rock Gains Momentum with Natural Gas Buses on Delicious Rank

  16. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  17. Acoustic and electrical properties of Mexican geothermal rock samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, E.A.; King, M.S.

    1984-12-01

    Acoustic compressional and shear-wave velocities have been measured on a suite of ten sandstone samples obtained from wells in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field and on two rock samples from other Mexican geothermal fields. The samples were tested in both their dry and fully brine-saturated states at uniaxial stresses to 15 MPa. Electrical resistivities and associated phase angles have been measured on the same core samples as a function of frequency in the range 10 Hz to 10/sup 5/ Hz under drained conditions at hydrostatic confining stresses to 10 MPa. The electrical properties were measured on samples tested in their fully saturated state, using brines of two different concentrations.

  18. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Jr., Fred; Schatzel, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas- a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers, a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container, and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use.

  19. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, F. Jr.; Schatzel, S.J.

    1998-04-21

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas; a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers and a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container; and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use. 5 figs.

  20. Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff &...

  1. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  2. Category:Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Soil Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Soil Gas...

  3. Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Gas Flux Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Flux...

  4. Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The...

  5. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rocks Rocks Rocks have been used by mankind throughout history. In geology, rock is a naturally occurring composite of one or more minerals or mineraloids. One of our most popular...

  6. Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies...

  7. Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  8. Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

  9. Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of...

  10. Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al.,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At...

  11. Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration...

  12. Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  13. Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004)) Jump to: navigation, search...

  14. Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Colrado Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration...

  15. Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  16. Category:Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Surface Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Surface...

  17. Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show that gas samples collected by either sudden pre-evacuated container or gradual gas pump. Removal of tens of cm3 of gas through an access pipe appear to reflect steady-state...

  18. Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al.,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search...

  19. An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an

  20. Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "normal" background soil gas contents of a particular geothermal area. References Toxic Substances Hydrology Program 2.0 2.1 The Application of Soil-Gas Technique to...

  1. Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area...

  2. Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And...

  3. Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details...

  4. Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details...

  5. Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

  6. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration...

  7. Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area...

  8. Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity...

  9. Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details...

  10. Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  11. Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

  12. Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  13. Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002)...

  14. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen...

  15. NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implements ... NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon components Posted: June 12, 2012 - 1:34pm The National Nuclear Security Administration...

  16. Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International...

  17. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur...

  18. Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)...

  19. Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik,...

  20. Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik,...

  1. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff &...

  2. Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the true flux of hydrothermal gases may affect the results of geochemical modeling of gas dispersion in the near-surface environment.3 References 1.0 1.1 Measuring...

  3. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Laug, Matthew T.; Lambert, John D. B.; Herzog, James P.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  4. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  5. Characterization of trapped gas saturation and heterogeneity in core sampling using miscible-displacement experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.H.; Jikich, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Trapped gas saturation and permeability heterogeneity were evaluated in Berea cores at reservoir conditions, using standard miscible displacement experiments, with and without surfactants. Pressure and production history were influenced by core heterogeneity and foam lamellae formation when aqueous surfactant was present in the core. The objective of the dispersion-capacitance model was to estimate trapped gas saturations; however longitudinal dispersion and mass transfer also were examined. The results show that the dispersion-capacitance model accurately fits trapped gas saturation controlled by rock heterogeneities and foam lamellae for lamella generating mechanisms that allow a continuous gas phase (leave-behind lamellae). The practical applications resulting from this study can aid in core sample selection and scaling short laboratory corefloods to field dimensions for applications to foam stimulation and underground storage of natural gas.

  6. The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

  7. Apparatus and method for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-11

    A dilution apparatus for diluting a gas sample. The apparatus includes a sample gas conduit having a sample gas inlet end and a diluted sample gas outlet end, and a sample gas flow restricting orifice disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end connected with the sample gas conduit and providing fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of the sample gas conduit. A diluted sample gas conduit is provided within the sample gas conduit having a mixing end with a mixing space inlet opening disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end, thereby forming an annular space between the sample gas conduit and the diluted sample gas conduit. The mixing end of the diluted sample gas conduit is disposed at a distance from the sample gas flow restricting orifice. A dilution gas source connected with the sample gas inlet end of the sample gas conduit is provided for introducing a dilution gas into the annular space, and a filter is provided for filtering the sample gas. The apparatus is particularly suited for diluting heated sample gases containing one or more condensable components.

  8. Apparatus and process for collection of gas and vapor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Peterson, Kurt D.; Riha, Brian D.

    2008-04-01

    A gas sampling apparatus and process is provided in which a standard crimping tool is modified by an attached collar. The collar permits operation of the crimping tool while also facilitating the introduction of a supply of gas to be introduced into a storage vial. The introduced gas supply is used to purge ambient air from a collection chamber and an interior of the sample vial. Upon completion of the purging operation, the vial is sealed using the crimping tool.

  9. Rock matrix and fracture analysis of flow in western tight gas sands: Annual report, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dandge, V.; Graham, M.; Gonzales, B.; Coker, D.

    1987-12-01

    Tight gas sands are a vast future source of natural gas. These sands are characterized as having very low porosity and permeability. The main resource development problem is efficiently extracting the gas from the reservoir. Future production depends on a combination of gas price and technological advances. Gas production can be enhanced by fracturing. Studies have shown that many aspects of fracture design and gas production are influenced by properties of the rock matrix. Computer models for stimulation procedures require accurate knowledge of flow properties of both the rock matrix and the fractured regions. In the proposed work, these properties will be measured along with advanced core analysis procedure aimed at understanding the relationship between pore structure and properties. The objective of this project is to develop reliable core analysis techniques for measuring the petrophysical properties of tight gas sands. Recent research has indicated that the flow conditions in the reservoir can be greatly enhanced by the presence of natural fractures, which serve as a transport path for gas from the less permeable matrix. The study is mainly concerned with the dependence of flow in tight gas matrix and healed tectonic fractures on water saturation and confining pressure. This dependency is to be related to the detailed pore structure of tight sands as typified by cores recovered in the Multi-Well experiment. 22 refs., 34 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-11-01

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied

  11. Evaluation for the Frequency of Gas Sampling for the High Burnup...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the ... could change gas composition culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. ...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Abstract Ecosystem-atmosphere ...

  13. Analytical results, statistical analyses, and sample-locality maps of rocks from the Anchorage Quadrangle, southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, D.J.; Arbogast, B.F.; O'Leary, R.M.; Van Trump, G. Jr.; Silberman, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report give the analytical results, statistical analyses, and sample-locality maps of rocks from the Anchorage Quadrangle in southern Alaska is presented.

  14. Sampling and analysis plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105 KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, D.J.

    1996-08-09

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the equipment,procedures and techniques for obtaining gas and liquid samples from sealed K West fuel canisters. The analytical procedures and quality assurance requirements for the subsequent laboratory analysis of the samples are also discussed.

  15. GNS Castor V/21 Headspace Gas Sampling 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston, Philip Lon

    2016-01-01

    Prior to performing an internal visual inspection, samples of the headspace gas of the GNS Castor V/21 cask were taken on June 12, 2014. These samples were taken in support of the CREIPI/Japanese nuclear industry effort to validate fuel integrity without visual inspection by measuring the 85Kr content of the cask headspace

  16. FASTGAS: Fast Gas Sampling for palladium exchange tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.; VerBerkmoes, A.A.

    1991-06-01

    A mass spectrometric technique for measuring the composition of gas flows in rapid H/D exchange reactions in palladium compacts has been developed. This method, called FASTGAS (Fast Gas Sampling)'' has been used at atmospheric pressures and above with a time response of better than 100 ms. The current implementation of the FASTGAS technique is described in detail and examples of its application to palladium hydride exchange tests are given. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McManus, Gary J.; Motes, Billy G.; Bird, Susan K.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method of obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant.

  18. Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McManus, G.J.; Motes, B.G.; Bird, S.K.; Kotter, D.K.

    1996-03-26

    Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, is composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method is described for obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant. 3 figs.

  19. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2001.07.11 - 2001.07.25 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer Data Availability Data are being processed for inclusion in ARM Archive. For data sets, see below. Summary July, 2001: Three systems were deployed in four fields during a

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Abstract Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2005.03.01 - 2006.01.08 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Abstract Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2007.01.01 - 2007.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Abstract Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns PGS Validation 2011-2013 2011.03.01, Fischer, SGP PGS Validatation 2010 2010.03.01, Fischer, SGP PGS Validatation 2009.03.01, Fischer, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2008.01.01 - 2008.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets,

  5. Numerical simulation of gas flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical analysis is used to identify the physical phenomena associated with barometrically driven gas (air and water vapor) flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Results from simple finite difference simulations indicate that for a fractured rock scenario, the maximum velocity of air out of an uncased 10 cm borehole is 0.002 m s{sub {minus}1}. An equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was incorporated into a multiphase, multicomponent simulator to test more complex conceptual models. Results indicate that for a typical June day, a diurnal pressure wave propagates about 160 m into the surrounding Tiva Canyon hydrogeologic unit. Dry air that enters the formation evaporates water around the borehole which reduces capillary pressure. Multiphase countercurrent flow develops in the vicinity of the hole; the gas phase flows into the formation while the liquid phase flows toward the borehole. The effect occurs within 0.5 m of the borehole. The amount of water vapor leaving the formation during 1 day is 900 cm{sup 3}. This is less than 0.1% of the total recharge into the formation, suggesting that the barometric effect may be insignificant in drying the unsaturated zone. However, gas phase velocities out of the borehole (3 m s{sup {minus}1}), indicating that observed flow rates from wells along the east flank of Yucca Mountain were able to be simulated with a barometric model.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J.

    2011-11-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently received a deposit sample from the Melter Primary Off Gas System (POG) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This sample was composed of material that had been collected while the quencher was in operation January 27, 2011 through March 31, 2011. DWPF requested, through a technical assistance request, characterization of the melter off-gas deposits by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The purpose of the Melter Off-Gas System is to reduce the amount of radioactive particles and mercury in the gases vented to the atmosphere. Gases emitted from the melter pass through the primary film cooler, quencher, Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT), Steam Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), a condenser, a high efficiency mist eliminator, and a high efficiency particulate air filter, before being vented to the Process Vessel Vent System. The film coolers cool the gases leaving the melter vapor space from {approx}750 C to {approx}375 C, by introducing air and steam to the flow. In the next step, the quencher cools the gas to about 60 C by bringing the condensate from the OGCT in contact with the effluent (Figure 1). Most of the steam in the effluent is then condensed and the melter vapor space pressure is reduced. The purpose of the OGCT is to collect and store the condensate formed during the melter operation. Condensate from the OGCT is circulated to the SAS and atomized with steam. This atomized condensate is mixed with the off-gas to wet and join the particulate which is then removed in the cyclone. The next stage incorporates a chilled water condenser which separates the vapors and elemental mercury from the off-gas steam. Primary off-gas deposit samples from the DWPF melter have previously been analyzed. In 2003, samples from just past the film cooler, from the inlet of the quencher and inside the quencher were analyzed at SRNL. It was determined that the samples were a

  7. Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP)...

  8. Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  9. Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  10. Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

  11. Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal...

  12. Characterization of trapped gas saturation and heterogeneity in core samples using miscible-displacement experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.H.; Jikich, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Trapped gas saturation and permeability heterogeneity were evaluated in Berea cores at reservoir conditions, using standard miscible displacement experiments, with and without surfactants. Pressure and production history were influenced by core heterogeneity and foam lamellae formation when aqueous surfactant was present in the core. A simple dispersion model and a three-coefficient dispersion-capacitance model (Coates-Smith) were fit to the experimental data. The dispersion-capacitance model successfully matched the experiments in which foam lamella formed, while the simple dispersion model was used only for determining initial core flow heterogeneity. The objective of the dispersion-capacitance model was to estimate trapped gas saturations; however longitudinal dispersion and mass transfer also were examined. The results show that the dispersion-capacitance model accurately fits trapped gas saturation controlled by rock heterogeneities and foam lamellae for lamella generating mechanisms that allow a continuous gas phase (leave-behind lamellae). The practical applications resulting from this study can aid in core sample selection and scaling short laboratory corefloods to field dimensions for applications to foam stimulation and underground storage of natural gas.

  13. Rock Sampling At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    collected included: geographic coordinates, rock type, magnetic susceptibility, and density. References US Geological Survey (2012) Geophysical Studies in the Vicinity of Blue...

  14. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  15. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  16. Strontium-85 and plutonium-239 sorption in rock samples from the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Lu, N.; Marusak, N.L.; Scheber, B.; Chipera, S.; Daukeyev, D.; Khromushin, I.

    1999-03-01

    The adsorption and desorption of strontium and plutonium were studied as a function of rock type and simulated ground waters from the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). Seven different rock types were obtained from the Balapan Region of the STS and were subjected to x-ray diffraction analyses. Two different ground waters were simulated using data supplied by the National Nuclear Center. The results indicate the sorption of strontium is strongly dependent on the minerals present in the rock species and on the total ionic strength of the ground water whereas, in all cases, plutonium was strongly irreversibly sorbed.

  17. Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to other geothermal systems hosted within sedimentary rocks, suggesting that organic carbon and nitrogen in Paleozoic and Miocene strata were depleted during 13 million years...

  18. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  19. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  20. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS You ...

  1. Full-Column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Final Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Full-Column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Final Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full-Column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Final Campaign Report ...

  2. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS Soil vapor extraction ...

  3. Sampling and Analysis Plan for canister liquid and gas sampling at 105-KW fuel storage basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.A.; Green, M.A.; Makenas, B.J.; Trimble, D.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) details the sampling and analyses to be performed on fuel canisters transferred to the Weasel Pit of the 105-KW fuel storage basin. The radionuclide content of the liquid and gas in the canisters must be evaluated to support the shipment of fuel elements to the 300 Area in support of the fuel characterization studies (Abrefah, et al. 1994, Trimble 1995). The following sections provide background information and a description of the facility under investigation, discuss the existing site conditions, present the constituents of concern, outline the purpose and scope of the investigation, outline the data quality objectives (DQO), provide analytical detection limit, precision, and accuracy requirements, and address other quality assurance (QA) issues.

  4. Rock Sampling At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 30 disseminated gold or hot-spring deposits in the western U.S. were sampled for ammonium-bearing minerals...

  5. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  6. Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the near surface: Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at...

  7. Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David I. Norman, Joseph Moore (2004) Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  8. Method and apparatus for measuring the gas permeability of a solid sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carstens, D.H.W.

    1984-01-27

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the permeability of a gas in a sample. The gas is allowed to reach a steady flow rate through the sample. A measurable amount of the gas is collected during a given time period and then delivered to a sensitive quadrupole. The quadrupole signal, adjusted for background, is proportional to the amount of gas collected during the time period. The quadrupole can be calibrated with a standard helium leak. The gas can be deuterium and the sample can be polyvinyl alcohol.

  9. Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area...

  10. Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye...

  11. Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

  12. Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  13. Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Black...

  14. Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  15. Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area...

  16. Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

  17. Systems acceptance and operability testing for rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29

    This document provides instructions for the system acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling system, modified for use in flammable gas tanks.

  18. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  19. Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration...

  20. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Retrieved from "http:...

  1. Sample Format Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline Monthly Sales and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are: Northeast, Midwest, South, West Send to: The Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Regulatory Activities, U.S. Dept. of Energy, FE-34, P.O. Box 44375 Washington, D.C....

  2. Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Wood

    2009-10-08

    Between 1951 and 1992, underground nuclear weapons testing was conducted at 828 sites on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - Full-column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsFull-column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Campaign Links Final Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Full-column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2015-2017 2015.03.01, Fischer, SGP Balloon-Borne Full-column Greenhouse Gas Profiling 2014.03.01, Fischer, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Full-column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 2012.01.13 - 2014.02.28 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer

  4. Draft evaluation of the frequency for gas sampling for the high burnup confirmatory data project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockman, Christine T.; Alsaed, Halim A.; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-03-26

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-15SN0802041, “Draft Evaluation of the Frequency for Gas Sampling for the High Burn-up Storage Demonstration Project” under Work Package FT-15SN080204, “ST Field Demonstration Support – SNL”. This report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project. The evaluation of: 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be present in the project cask and, 2) the degradation mechanisms that could change gas compositions culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. This adaptive strategy is compared against the sampling frequency that has been developed based on operational considerations. Gas sampling will provide information on the presence of residual water (and byproducts associated with its reactions and decomposition) and breach of cladding, which could inform the decision of when to open the project cask.

  5. Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    deviations from expected ratios. One well was also found to have an abnormally high sulfate concentration. All three wells are located in the same general area and are sampling...

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2002.01.01 - 2002.07.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Abstract The PGS validation will continue measuring the...

  7. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  8. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  9. Evaluation for the Frequency of Gas Sampling for the High Burnup Confirmation Data Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High-Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project.  The evaluation of 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be...

  10. Waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats during FY 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roggenthen, D.K.; Nieweg, R.G.

    1990-10-01

    Rocky Flats Plant transuranic waste drums were sampled for gas composition. Glass, metal, graphite, and solidified inorganic sludge transuranic waste forms were sampled. A vacuum system was used to sample each layer of containment inside a waste drum, including individual waste bags. G values were calculated for the waste drums. G(H{sub 2}) was below 0.6 and G(Total) was below 1.3 for all waste forms discussed in this report. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR HEADSPACE GAS SAMPLING OF TRANSURANIC WASTE DRUMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polley, M.; Ankrom, J.; Wickland, T.; Warren, J.

    2003-02-27

    A fast, safe, and cost-effective method for obtaining headspace gas samples has been developed and implemented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A sample port is installed directly into a drum lid using a pneumatic driver, allowing sampling with a side-port needle. Testing has shown that the sample port can be installed with no release of radioactive material. Use of this system at LANL has significantly reduced the time required for sampling, and eliminates the need for many safety precautions previously used. The system has significantly improved productivity and lowered radiation exposure and cost.

  12. Critique of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant off-gas sampling requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goles, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Off-gas sampling and monitoring activities needed to support operations safety, process control, waste form qualification, and environmental protection requirements of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) have been evaluated. The locations of necessary sampling sites have been identified on the basis of plant requirements, and the applicability of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference sampling equipment to these HWVP requirements has been assessed for all sampling sites. Equipment deficiencies, if present, have been described and the bases for modifications and/or alternative approaches have been developed.

  13. Mass spectrometric helium analysis of solid and gas samples from cold-fusion type experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, B.M.

    1995-12-01

    A custom mass spectrometer system, operating in static mode, has been used to measure helium in both solid and gas samples front cold-fusion type experiments. The mass spectrometer is a 2-in. Radius, 60{degrees}, permanent angle magnet instrument with a single electron-multiplier collecting. Depending on the absolute levels of helium expected, the analysis are conducted by isotope dilution or by measuring absolute collector values. Solid samples are vaporized to ensure complete helium release. Prior to analysis, the fraction of sample gas to be analyzed is exposed to a series of physical and chemical getters, including room temperature Zr-Al alloy (SAES type 101) and liquid-nitrogen cooled activated charcoal. This is done to remove active gases and hydrogen isotopes which could interfere with the helium determinations. Generally, the analysis protocol is to analyze an equal or greater number of {open_quotes}controls{close_quotes} along with the samples to accurately characterize system background and reproducibility. Absolute sensitivity for the system is approximately 1 x 10{sup 9} atoms. Absolute accuracy is 1% or better for helium levels > 10{sup 11} atoms. With few exceptions, helium analysis of solid samples front cold fusion type experiments have yielded no excess helium above usual system background. A few samples have shown helium levels in the low 10{sup 9} atom range, and some gas samples have shown {sup 4}He levels up to several hundred ppm.

  14. Tank 241-T-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  15. Tank 241-U-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  16. Tank 241-S-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  17. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  18. Waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats during FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roggenthen, D.K.; McFeeters, T.L.; Nieweg, R.G.

    1991-02-11

    Rocky Flats Plant Transuranic Waste Drums were sampled for gas composition. Combustibles, plastics, Raschig rings, solidified organic sludge, and solidified inorganic sludge transuranic waste forms were sampled. Plastic bag material and waste samples were also taken from some solidified sludge waste drums. A vacuum system was used to sample each layer of containment inside a waste drum, including individual waste bags. G values (gas generation) were calculated for the waste drums. Analytical results indicate that very low concentrations of potentially flammable or corrosive gas mixtures will be found in vented drums. G(H{sub 2}) was usually below 1.6, while G(Total) was below 4.0. Hydrogen permeability tests on different types of plastic waste bags used at Rocky Flats were also conducted. Polyvinylchloride was slightly more permeable to hydrogen than polyethylene for new or creased material. Permeability of aged material to hydrogen was slightly higher than for new material. Solidified organic and inorganic sludges were sampled for volatile organics. The analytical results from two drums of solidified organic sludges showed concentrations were above detection limits for four of the 36 volatile organics analyzed. The analytical results for four of the five solidified inorganic sludges show that concentrations were below detection limits for all volatile organics analyzed. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, David E.; Hass, William J.

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER AND STEAM ATOMIZED SCRUBBER DEPOSIT SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2007-06-06

    This report summarizes the results from the characterization of deposits from the inlets of the primary off-gas Quencher and Steam Atomized Scrubber (SAS) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), as requested by a technical assistance request. DWPF requested elemental analysis and compound identification to help determine the potential causes for the substance formation. This information will be fed into Savannah River National Laboratory modeling programs to determine if there is a way to decrease the formation of the deposits. The general approach to the characterization of these samples included x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) The deposits are not high level waste glass from the DWPF melt pool based on comparison of the compositions of deposits to the composition of a sample of glass taken from the pour stream of the melter during processing of Sludge Batch 3. (2) Chemical composition results suggest that the deposits are probably a combination of sludge and frit particles entrained in the off-gas. (3) Gamma emitters, such as Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-154, Am-241, and Am-243 were detected in both the Quencher and SAS samples with Cs-137 having the highest concentration of the gamma emitters. (4) No evidence existed for accumulation of fissile material (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239) relative to Fe in either deposit. (5) XRD results indicated both samples were primarily amorphorous and contained some crystals of the iron oxides, hematite and magnetite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})), along with sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}). The other main crystalline compound in the SAS deposit was mercurous chloride. The main crystalline compound in the Quencher deposit was a uranium oxide compound. These are all sludge components. (6) SEM analysis of the Quencher deposit revealed crystalline uranium compounds within the sample

  1. Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprio, G.S.

    1995-11-01

    This document presents sampling data resulting from the June 8, 1995, sampling of SST 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System.

  2. THE SMALL ISOLATED GAS-RICH IRREGULAR DWARF (SIGRID) GALAXY SAMPLE: DESCRIPTION AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Jerjen, Helmut; Meurer, Gerhardt R.

    2011-09-15

    Using an optically unbiased selection process based on the HIPASS neutral hydrogen survey, we have selected a sample of 83 spatially isolated, gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the southern hemisphere with cz between 350 and 1650 km s{sup -1}, and with R-band luminosities and H I masses less than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The sample is an important population of dwarf galaxies in the local universe, all with ongoing star formation, and most of which have no existing spectroscopic data. We are measuring the chemical abundances of these galaxies, using the integral-field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope, the Wide-Field Spectrograph. This paper describes our survey criteria and procedures, lists the survey sample, and reports on initial observations.

  3. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, Joseph; May, Christopher P.; Pemberton, Bradley E.; Shinn, Jim; Sprague, Keith

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus.

  4. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, J.; May, C.P.; Pemberton, B.E.; Shinn, J.; Sprague, K.

    1999-03-30

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus. 8 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farthing, William Earl [Pinson, AL; Felix, Larry Gordon [Pelham, AL; Snyder, Todd Robert [Birmingham, AL

    2008-02-12

    An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

  6. Method and apparatus maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farthing, William Earl; Felix, Larry Gordon; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  8. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-S-103 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-S-103. This document presents In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the June 12, 1996 sampling of SST 241-S-103. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  9. Vapor and gas sampling of the single-shell tank 241-S-101 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-S-101. This document presents In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the June 6, 1996 sampling of SST 241-S-101. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  10. Measurement of Fission Gas Release from Irradiated U-Mo Monolithic Fuel Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of annealing post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1050 C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in literature.

  11. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated U–Mo monolithic fuel samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine J.; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium–molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of heating post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium–molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1000 °C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature.

  12. CORRELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND GAS METALLICITY FOR STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE MAIN GALAXY SAMPLE OF SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Xinfa

    2011-05-15

    Using two volume-limited samples of the Main Galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 with luminosities of -20.5 {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -18.5 and -22.5 {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -20.5, respectively, I explore the correlation between environment and gas metallicity for star-forming galaxies. Overall, results indicate that galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have lower gas metallicity than galaxies in the densest regimes, and that the correlation between environment and gas metallicity is fundamental.

  13. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno 58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ROCK DRILLING; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCK MECHANICS; ROTARY DRILLING; WELL...

  14. Application of a dry-gas meter for measuring air sample volumes in an ambient air monitoring network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.

    2009-05-24

    Ambient air monitoring for non-research applications (e.g. compliance) occurs at locations throughout the world. Often, the air sampling systems employed for these purposes employee simple yet robust equipment capable of handling the rigors of demanding sampling schedules. At the Hanford Site (near Richland, Washington) concentrations of radionuclides in ambient air are monitored continuously at 44 locations. In 2004, mechanical dry-gas meters were incorporated into the Hanford Site ambient air sample collection system to allow the direct measurement of sample volumes. These meters replaced a portable airflow measurement system that required two manual flow measurements and a sample duration measurement to determine sample volume. A six-month evaluation of the dry-gas meters compared sample volumes calculated using the original flow rate method to the direct sample volume measurement (new method). The results of the evaluation indicate that use of the dry-gas meters result in accurate sample volume measurements and provide greater confidence in the measured sample volumes. In several years of in-network use, the meters have proven to be reliable and have resulted in an improved sampling system.

  15. Real-time quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of gas in boreholefluid samples acquired using the U-Tube sampling methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.

    2006-01-11

    Sampling of fluids in deep boreholes is challenging becauseof the necessity to minimize external contamination and maintain sampleintegrity during recovery. The U-tube sampling methodology was developedto collect large volume, multiphase samples at in situ pressures. As apermanent or semi-permanent installation, the U-tube can be used forrapidly acquiring multiple samples or it may be installed for long-termmonitoring applications. The U-tube was first deployed in Liberty County,TX to monitor crosswell CO2 injection as part of the Frio CO2sequestration experiment. Analysis of gases (dissolved or separate phase)was performed in the field using a quadrupole mass spectrometer, whichserved as the basis for determining the arrival of the CO2 plume. Thepresence of oxygen and argon in elevated concentrations, along withreduced methane concentration, indicate sample alteration caused by theintroduction of surface fluids during borehole completion. Despiteproducing the well to eliminate non-native fluids, measurementsdemonstrate that contamination persists until the immiscible CO2injection swept formation fluid into the observationwellbore.

  16. Sampling and Analysis of the Headspace Gas in 3013 Type Plutonium Storage Containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Jay M.; Berg, John M.; Hill, Dallas D.; Worl, Laura A.; Veirs, Douglas K.

    2012-07-11

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites have packaged approximately 5200 3013 containers to date. One of the requirements specified in DOESTD-3013, which specifies requirements for packaging plutonium bearing materials, is that the material be no greater than 0.5 weight percent moisture. The containers are robust, nested, welded vessels. A shelf life surveillance program was established to monitor these cans over their 50 year design life. In the event pressurization is detected by radiography, it will be necessary to obtain a head space gas sample from the pressurized container. This technique is also useful to study the head space gas in cans selected for random destructive evaluation. The atmosphere is sampled and the hydrogen to oxygen ratio is measured to determine the effects of radiolysis on the moisture in the container. A system capable of penetrating all layers of a 3013 container assembly and obtaining a viable sample of the enclosed gas and an estimate of internal pressure was designed.

  17. Materials processing issues for non-destructive laser gas sampling (NDLGS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-09

    The Non-Destructive Laser Gas Sampling (NDLGS) process essentially involves three steps: (1) laser drilling through the top of a crimped tube made of 304L stainles steel (Hammar and Svennson Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} = 1.55, produced in 1985); (2) gas sampling; and (3) laser re-welding of the crimp. All three steps are performed in a sealed chamber with a fused silica window under controlled vacuum conditions. Quality requirements for successful processing call for a hermetic re-weld with no cracks or other defects in the fusion zone or HAZ. It has been well established that austenitic stainless steels ({gamma}-SS), such as 304L, can suffer from solidification cracking if their Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} is below a critical value that causes solidification to occur as austenite (fcc structure) and their combined impurity level (%P+%S) is above {approx}0.02%. Conversely, for Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} values above the critical level, solidification occurs as ferrite (bcc structure), and cracking propensity is greatly reduced at all combined impurity levels. The consensus of results from studies of several researchers starting in the late 1970's indicates that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value is {approx}1.5 for arc welds. However, more recent studies by the author and others show that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value increases to {approx}1 .6 for weld processes with very rapid thermal cycles, such as the pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) process used here. Initial attempts at NDLGS using pulsed LBW resulted in considerable solidification cracking, consistent with the results of work discussed above. After a brief introduction to the welding metallurgy of {gamma}-SS, this presentation will review the results of a study aimed at developing a production-ready process that eliminates cracking. The solution to the cracking issue, developed at LANL, involved locally augmenting the Cr content by applying either Cr or a Cr-rich stainless steel (ER 312) to the top of

  18. A Principle Component Analysis of Galaxy Properties from a Large, Gas-Selected Sample

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, Yu-Yen; Chao, Rikon; Wang, Wei-Hao; Chen, Pisin

    2012-01-01

    Disney emore » t al. (2008) have found a striking correlation among global parameters of H i -selected galaxies and concluded that this is in conflict with the CDM model. Considering the importance of the issue, we reinvestigate the problem using the principal component analysis on a fivefold larger sample and additional near-infrared data. We use databases from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L -band Feed Array Survey for the gas properties, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for the optical properties, and the Two Micron All Sky Survey for the near-infrared properties. We confirm that the parameters are indeed correlated where a single physical parameter can explain 83% of the variations. When color ( g - i ) is included, the first component still dominates but it develops a second principal component. In addition, the near-infrared color ( i - J ) shows an obvious second principal component that might provide evidence of the complex old star formation. Based on our data, we suggest that it is premature to pronounce the failure of the CDM model and it motivates more theoretical work.« less

  19. Tank 241-BY-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  20. Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1993 and September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  1. Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map

  3. Performances of a bent-crystal spectrometer adapted to resonant x-ray emission measurements on gas-phase samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Journel, Loiec; El Khoury, Lara; Marin, Thierry; Guillemin, Renaud; Carniato, Stephane; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Hague, Coryn F.; Simon, Marc

    2009-09-15

    We describe a bent-crystal spectrometer adapted to measure x-ray emission resulting from core-level excitation of gas-phase molecules in the 0.8-8 keV energy range. The spectrometer is based on the Johann principle, and uses a microfocused photon beam to provide high-resolution (resolving power of {approx}7500). A gas cell was designed to hold a high-pressure (300 mbar) sample of gas while maintaining a high vacuum (10{sup -9} mbar) in the chamber. The cell was designed to optimize the counting rate (2000 cts/s at the maximum of the Cl K{alpha} emission line), while minimizing self-absorption. Example of the K{alpha} emission lines of CH{sub 3}Cl molecules is presented to illustrate the capabilities of this new instrument.

  4. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-04-15

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ``beyond extremely unlikely`` frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites January 2016 LMS/SRE/SRW/S00915 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2015, Slick Rock, Colorado January 2016 RINs 15087319 and 15107424 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .....................................................5 Data Assessment

  6. Entropic description of gas hydrate ice/liquid equilibrium via enhanced sampling of coexisting phases

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Kim, Jaegil; Keyes, Tom

    2015-04-28

    Metastable β ice holds small guest molecules in stable gas hydrates, so its solid/liquid equilibrium is of interest. However, aqueous crystal/liquid transitions are very difficult to simulate. A new MD algorithm generates trajectories in a generalized NPT ensemble and equilibrates states of coexisting phases with a selectable enthalpy. Furthermore, with replicas spanning the range between β ice and liquid water we find the statistical temperature from the enthalpy histograms and characterize the transition by the entropy, introducing a general computational procedure for first-order transitions.

  7. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-05-18

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  8. Assessment of thermal evolution stages and oil-gas migration of carbonate source rocks of early tertiary in eastern Sichuan, China, by organic inclusion analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Jixi; Li Benchao; Fu Jiamo

    1989-03-01

    The Jialinjiang Formation of early Tertiary in Sichuan, China, is a series of limestone and dolomite sediments deposited in a platform shoal environment. The diagenetic sequence and organic inclusions trapped in minerals of 95 samples from 20 drillings have been studied. At the late diagenetic stage, pale yellow organic inclusions consisted of liquid hydrocarbons disseminated in pore-infiltrating dolomite, and the homogeneous temperature of contemporaneous saline liquid inclusions possessing a low gas-liquid ratio was 86/degree/C. This indicates the evolution of the organic matter had gone over the oil generating threshold and oil formation had initiated. In the limestone formed at the late diagenetic stage, more brown-yellow organic inclusions were scattered and/or developed along with fissures, comprising 60-70% liquid hydrocarbons and 30-40% gaseous hydrocarbons. Contemporaneous saline liquid inclusions with gas-liquid ratios of 5-10% had homogeneous temperatures of 90/degree/-130/degree/C. These findings show that the organic material had entered a high evolution stage and oil migration had taken place on a large scale.

  9. Field Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Mapping Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Macrophotography Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Field Sampling Gas Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Surface Gas...

  10. Full-Column Greenhouse Gas Sampling 2012-2014 Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, M. L.; Sweeney, C.

    2016-01-01

    The vertical distributions of CO2, CH4, and other gases provide important constraints when determining terrestrial and ocean sources and sinks of carbon and other biogeochemical processes in the Earth system. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Earth System Research Laboratory to quantify the vertically resolved distribution of atmospheric carbon-cycle gases(CO2, CH4 ) within approximately 99% of the atmospheric column at the DOE ’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma . During the 2012 to 2014 campaign period, 12 successful Air C ore flights were conducted from the SGP site . In addition to providing critical data for evaluating remote sensing and earth system models, valuable lessons were learned that motivate improvements to the sampling and recovery systems and campaign logistics . With the launch of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory - 2 (OCO - 2) and Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite ( GOSAT ) satellites, we look forward to proposing additional sampling and analysis efforts at the SGP site and at other sites to characterize the vertical distribution of CO2, CH4 over time and space.

  11. Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, V.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Pereira, A.S.; Cardoso, J.N. ); Cabral, J.A. )

    1999-07-15

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC columns. The combination of this technique with mass spectrometry is not so common and application to aerosols is novel. The HTGC and HTGC-MS analyses of smoke samples taken by particle filtration from combustion of different species of plants provided the characterization of various classes of HMW compounds reported to occur for the first time in emissions from biomass burning. Among these components are a series of wax esters with up to 58 carbon numbers, aliphatic hydrocarbons, triglycerides, long chain methyl ketones, alkanols and a series of triterpenyl fatty acid esters which have been characterized as novel natural products. Long chain fatty acids with more than 32 carbon numbers are not present in the smoke samples analyzed. The HMW compounds in smoke samples from the burning of plants from Amazonia indicate the input of directly volatilized natural products in the original plants during their combustion. However, the major organic compounds extracted from smoke consist of a series of lower molecular weight polar components, which are not natural products but the result of the thermal breakdown of cellulose and lignin. In contrast, the HMW natural products may be suitable tracers for specific sources of vegetation combustion because they are emitted as particles without thermal alternation in the smoke and can thus be related directly to the original plant material.

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site November 2014 LMS.........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site December 2013 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  14. Groundwater Sampling and Soil Gas Data Analysis, Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky -- June - August 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jennifer Pauline; Peterson, Lance Nutting; Taylor, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater and soil gas sampling conducted at the Distler Brickyard Site, Hardin County, Kentucky, June-August, 2000. The purpose of the sampling activities was to address remaining data gaps regarding the feasibility of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for remediation of chloroethene/ane contamination. Specifically, data gaps fall into four categories: 1) effect of seasonal recharge on contaminant concentrations, 2) geochemical conditions in the Fine Grained Alluvium (FGA), 3) conditions along the flowpath between Wells GW-11 and MW-3, and 4) the extent of aerobic degradation in the Coarse Grained Alluvium (CGA). A data collection strategy composed of both groundwater sampling and passive soil vapor sampling devices (Gore-Sorbers?) was used. The Gore-Sorber? technology was used to collect data from the FGA, which because of its low hydraulic conductivity and variable saturation makes collection of groundwater samples problematic. Gore-Sorbers were deployed in 15 wells, most of them being in the FGA, and groundwater samples were collected in 17 wells, which were mostly in the CGA. Both sampling methods were utilized in a subset of wells (7) in order to determine the general comparability of results obtained from each method. Results indicate that water levels in both the FGA and CGA were higher in June-August 2000 than in October 1999, likely due to increased infiltration of precipitation through the FGA during the wetter months. Redox conditions in the FGA and downgradient CGA were iron-reducing, less reducing than in October-1999. In general, concentrations of chloroethenes/anes were higher in June-August 2000 than October 1999. Trichloroethene (TCE) was present at concentrations as high as 65 µg/L in the FGA and 19 µg/L in the CGA. This is substantially higher than the maximum concentration in October 1999 of 11 µg/L. The following conclusions were drawn from these data collection activities: 1) two potential

  15. SHIF'ROCK, NEW MEXICO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SHIF'ROCK, NEW MEXICO Sampled February 2001 DATA PACKAGE CONTENTS This data package includes the following information: Item No. Description of Contents 1. Site Hydrologist S u i ~ ~ n ~ a r y 2. Dafa Package Assessment, which includes the following: a. Field procedures verification checklist b. Confirmation that chain-of-custody was maintained. c. Confirmation that holding time requirements were met. d. Evaluation of the adequacy of the QC sample results. Data Assessn~ent Summary, which

  16. Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2001-05-09

    This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

  17. Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J. )

    1989-08-01

    Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

  18. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

    1994-08-23

    A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, Nicida L.; Parmeswar, Ravi; Brinkmeyer, Alan D.; Honarpour, Mehdi

    1994-01-01

    A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

  20. Hunting space rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hunting space rocks Hunting space rocks Nina Lanza is studying the solar system by spending six weeks on an ice sheet in Antarctica. The 36-year-old staff scientist at the Los ...

  1. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  2. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-06-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Natural Gas Analysis Data ...

  4. Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

    2001-04-01

    The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand

  6. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-31

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation variesmore » with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5–16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4–14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3–21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4–19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor–capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and repaired, which the company expected to complete by the end of the gas day May 8. Turkey Gathering and Eagle Rock Cargray Plant in Texas are shut in while repairs are being...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock Slick Rock Sites slick_map Slick Rock Disposal Site Slick Rock Processing Site Last Updated: 12/14

  9. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  10. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  11. Rock slope stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kliche, C.A.

    1999-07-01

    Whether you're involved in surface mine design, surface mine production, construction, education, or regulation, this is an important new book for your library. It describes the basic rock slope failure modes and methods of analysis--both kinematic and kinetic techniques. Chapters include geotechnical and geomechanical analysis techniques, hydrology, rock slope stabilization techniques, and geotechnical instrumentation and monitoring. Numerous examples, drawings and photos enhance the text.

  12. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  13. Gilmer Co. Rock

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern WV (Panel 5 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  14. Stressed state and stress relaxation in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodus, E.V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper continues an experimental investigation of stress relaxation in rocks under various types of stressed states at different deformation phases, including the transcriptional region. The tests were done in the conditions of uniaxial compression, compression under hydrostatic pressures varying up to values at which the rock strength characteristics attained a plateau, and a for bending. All testes with stress relaxation were done in the laboratory on rock samples. The procedures are described. When characterized by the drop of stresses close to the ultimate strengths during the time equal to the first 3 minutes of relaxation, the rocks in tests with uniaxial compression formed the following series according to decreasing relaxation activity: bauxite 57%, brown coal 50%, potassium and rock salt 35%, schist 15% marble 13%, burst-safe sandstone 5%, and apatite 4%. The test data on stress relaxation in rocks make it possible in any mining situation to evaluate the reduction of the released elastic energy due to stress relaxation and, on this basis, determine the potential efficiency of controlling the bed destruction pattern.

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report. The sample change occurred over a transition period that began with the release of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR)...

  16. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  17. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing

  18. Scientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste

  19. Hunting space rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hunting space rocks Hunting space rocks Nina Lanza is studying the solar system by spending six weeks on an ice sheet in Antarctica. The 36-year-old staff scientist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is on a treasure hunt of sorts. January 15, 2016 Nina Lanza Nina Lanza is part of a team driving across the Trans-Antarctica Mountains on snowmobiles in search of meteorites. (Courtesy of Nina Lanza) "One of the most interesting things from meteorites is every rocky body has a

  20. CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

    1960-02-16

    A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

  1. Engineering rock mass classifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference on rock mass classification, consolidating into one handy source information widely scattered through the literature. Includes new, unpublished material and case histories. Presents the fundamental concepts of classification schemes and critically appraises their practical application in industrial projects such as tunneling and mining.

  2. Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

  3. Category:Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Density page? For detailed information on Rock Density as...

  4. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  5. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  6. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. Concentrations in produced water discharge plume/receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  7. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. concentrations in produced water discharge plume / receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentration of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  8. Gilmer Co. Rock

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary ...

  9. An experimental comparison of laboratory techniques in determining bulk properties of tuffaceous rocks; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J. III; Price, R.H.

    1994-04-01

    Samples of tuffaceous rock were studied as part of the site characterization for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. These efforts were scoping in nature, and their results, along with those of other investigations, are being used to develop suitable procedures for determining bulk properties of tuffaceous rock in support of thermal and mechanical properties evaluations. Comparisons were made between various sample preparation, handling, and measurement techniques for both zeolitized and nonzeolitized tuff in order to assess their effects on bulk property determinations. Laboratory tests included extensive drying regimes to evaluate dehydration behavior, the acquisition of data derived from both gas and water pycnometers to compare their suitability in determining grain densities, a comparison of particle size effects, and a set of experiments to evaluate whole core saturation methods. The results affirm the added complexity of these types of measurements where there is a zeolite component in the sample mineralogy. Absolute values for the bulk properties of zeolitized tuff are immeasurable due to the complex nature of their dehydration behavior. However, the results of the techniques that were investigated provide a basis for the development of preferred, consistent methods for determining the grain density, dry and saturated bulk densities, and porosity of tuffaceous rock, including zeolitic tuff in support of thermal and mechanical properties evaluations.

  10. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  11. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  12. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  13. Gas-recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heckman, R.A.

    1971-12-14

    Nuclear explosions have been proposed as a means for recovering gas from underground gas-bearing rock formations. In present practice, the nuclear device is positioned at the end of a long pipe which is subsequently filled with grout or concrete. After the device is exploded, the grout is drilled through to provide a flow path for the released gas to the ground surface. As settled grout is brittle, often the compressive shock of the explosion fractures the grout and deforms the pipe so that it may not be removed nor reused. In addition, the pipe is sometimes pinched off completely and the gas flow is totally obstructed. (2 claims)

  14. Gas-Recovery System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heckman, R. A.

    1971-12-14

    Nuclear explosions have been proposed as a means for recovering gas from underground gas-bearing rock formations. In present practice, the nuclear device is positioned at the end of a long pipe which is subsequently filled with grout or concrete. After the device is exploded, the grout is drilled through to provide a flow path for the released gas to the ground surface. As settled grout is brittle, often the compressive shock of the explosion fractures the grout and deforms the pipe so that it may not be removed nor reused. In addition, the pipe is sometimes pinched off completely and the gas flow is totally obstructed. (2 claims)

  15. New Tracers of Gas Migration in the Continental Crust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurz, Mark D.

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases are exceptional tracers in continental settings due to the remarkable isotopic variability between the mantle, crust, and atmosphere, and because they are inert. Due to systematic variability in physical properties, such as diffusion, solubility, and production rates, the combination of helium, neon, and argon provides unique but under-utilized indices of gas migration. Existing noble gas data sets are dominated by measurements of gas and fluid phases from gas wells, ground waters and hot springs. There are very few noble gas measurements from the solid continental crust itself, which means that this important reservoir is poorly characterized. The central goal of this project was to enhance understanding of gas distribution and migration in the continental crust using new measurements of noble gases in whole rocks and minerals from existing continental drill cores, with an emphasis on helium, neon, argon. We carried out whole-rock and mineral-separate noble gas measurements on Precambrian basement samples from the Texas Panhandle. The Texas Panhandle gas field is the southern limb of the giant Hugoton-Panhandle oil and gas field; it has high helium contents (up to ~ 2 %) and 3He/4He of 0.21 (± 0.03) Ra. Because the total amount of helium in the Panhandle gas field is relatively well known, crustal isotopic data and mass balance calculations can be used to constrain the ultimate source rocks, and hence the helium migration paths. The new 3He/4He data range from 0.03 to 0.11 Ra (total), all of which are lower than the gas field values. There is internal isotopic heterogeneity in helium, neon, and argon, within all the samples; crushing extractions yield less radiogenic values than melting, demonstrating that fluid inclusions preserve less radiogenic gases. The new data suggest that the Precambrian basement has lost significant amounts of helium, and shows the importance of measuring helium with neon and argon. The 4He/40Ar values are particularly useful

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. ...

  17. Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique...

  18. Polyport atmospheric gas sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic

    1995-01-01

    An atmospheric gas sampler with a multi-port valve which allows for multi, sequential sampling of air through a plurality of gas sampling tubes mounted in corresponding gas inlet ports. The gas sampler comprises a flow-through housing which defines a sampling chamber and includes a gas outlet port to accommodate a flow of gases through the housing. An apertured sample support plate defining the inlet ports extends across and encloses the sampling chamber and supports gas sampling tubes which depend into the sampling chamber and are secured across each of the inlet ports of the sample support plate in a flow-through relation to the flow of gases through the housing during sampling operations. A normally closed stopper means mounted on the sample support plate and operatively associated with each of the inlet ports blocks the flow of gases through the respective gas sampling tubes. A camming mechanism mounted on the sample support plate is adapted to rotate under and selectively lift open the stopper spring to accommodate a predetermined flow of gas through the respective gas sampling tubes when air is drawn from the housing through the outlet port.

  19. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  20. A new friction factor correlation for laminar, single-phase flows through rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazridoust, K. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

    2006-09-30

    Single-phase flow through fractured media occurs in various situations, such as transport of dissolved contaminants through geological strata, sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs, and in primary oil recovery. In the present study, fluid flows through a rock fracture were simulated. The fracture geometry was obtained from the CT scans of a rock fracture produced by the Brazilian method in a sandstone sample. A post-processing code using a CAD package was developed and used to generate the three-dimensional fracture from the CT scan data. Several sections along the fracture were considered and the GambitTM code was used to generate unstructured grids for flow simulations. FLUENTTM was used to analyze the flow conditions through the fracture section for different flow rates. Because of the small aperture of the fractures, the gravitational effects could be neglected. It was confirmed that the pressure drop was dominated by the smallest aperture passages of the fracture. The accuracy of parallel plate models for estimating the pressure drops through fractures was studied. It was shown that the parallel plate flow model with the use of an appropriate effective fracture aperture and inclusion of the tortuosity factor could provide reasonable estimates for pressure drops in the fracture. On the basis of the CFD simulation data, a new expression for the friction factor for flows through fractures was developed. The new model predictions were compared with the simulation results and favorable agreement was found. It was shown that when the length of the fracture and the mean and standard deviation of the fracture are known, the pressure loss as a function of the flow rate could be estimated. These findings may prove useful for design of lab experiments, computational studied of flows through real rock fractures, or inclusions in simulators for large-scale flows in highly fractured rocks.

  1. Gilmer Co. Rock

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern WV (Panel 5 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  2. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  3. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N.

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  4. Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Simulated Flue Gas Mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, James S.; Hammache, Sonia; Gray, McMahan L.; Fauth Daniel J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2012-04-24

    An amine-based solid sorbent process to remove CO2 from flue gas has been investigated. The sorbent consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) immobilized onto silica (SiO2) support. Experiments were conducted in a packed-bed reactor and exit gas composition was monitored using mass spectrometry. The effects of feed gas composition (CO2 and H2O), temperature, and simulated steam regeneration were examined for both the silica support as well as the PEI-based sorbent. The artifact of the empty reactor was also quantified. Sorbent CO2 capacity loading was compared to thermogravimetric (TGA) results to further characterize adsorption isotherms and better define CO2 working capacity. Sorbent stability was monitored by periodically repeating baseline conditions throughout the parametric testing and replacing with fresh sorbent as needed. The concept of the Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process using this sorbent within a system where sorbent continuously flows between the absorber and regenerator was introduced. The basic tenet is to manipulate or control the level of moisture on the sorbent as it travels around the sorbent circulation path between absorption and regeneration stages to minimize its effect on regeneration heat duty.

  5. Computed microtomography of reservoir core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, M.E.; Muegge, E.L.; Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.

    1995-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is often utilized to evaluate and characterize structural characteristics within reservoir core material systems. Generally, medical CT scanners have been employed because of their availability and ease of use. Of interest lately has been the acquisition of three-dimensional, high resolution descriptions of rock and pore structures for characterization of the porous media and for modeling of single and multiphase transport processes. The spatial resolution of current medical CT scanners is too coarse for pore level imaging of most core samples. Recently developed high resolution computed microtomography (CMT) using synchrotron X-ray sources is analogous to conventional medical CT scanning and provides the ability to obtain three-dimensional images of specimens with a spatial resolution on the order of micrometers. Application of this technique to the study of core samples provides two- and three-dimensional high resolution description of pore structure and mineral distributions. Pore space and interconnectivity is accurately characterized and visualized. Computed microtomography data can serve as input into pore-level simulation techniques. A generalized explanation of the technique is provided, with comparison to conventional CT scanning techniques and results. Computed microtomographic results of several sandstone samples are presented and discussed. Bulk porosity values and mineralogical identification were obtained from the microtomograms and compared with gas porosity and scanning electron microscope results on tandem samples.

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    on Thursday, May 9, 2002. A sample of EIA's report can be seen at: Weekly Gas Storage Test Page. The Natural Gas Weekly Market Update report will convert to the new data series...

  7. Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger...

  8. Rock Sampling At Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger...

  9. Rock Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date 1973 - 1974 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Masters thesis Norma Biggar, Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Notes Petrographic analysis...

  10. Rock Sampling At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Neal Hot Springs and the surrounding areas. This study was conducted by a geophysics field camp from the Colorado School of Mines. Notes Geochemical FingerprintingXRF...

  11. Rock Sampling At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area. References S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan, J. R. Bowman (1978) A Summary of the...

  12. Black Rock Point Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Features: Relict Geothermal Features: Volcanic Age: Host Rock Age: Host Rock Lithology: Cap Rock Age: Cap Rock Lithology: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Geofluid...

  13. Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  14. Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy...

  15. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L.; Morrell, Roger J.

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  16. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock...

  17. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at Paleochori, Milos, Greece. http:www.photovolcanica.comVolcanoInfoMilosMilos.html Hydrothermally deposited rock includes rocks and minerals that have precipitated from...

  18. Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G + Gas Sampling (3 categories) 4 pages W + Water Sampling (2 categories) 3...

  19. Shale Gas Spreads to the South | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Innovation » Oil & Gas » Shale » Shale Gas 101 Shale Gas 101 Shale Gas 101 This webpage has been developed to answer the many questions that people have about shale gas and hydraulic fracturing (or fracking). The information provided below explains the basics, including what shale gas is, where it's found, why it's important, how it's produced, and challenges associated with production. Natural gas production from "shale" formations (fine-grained sedimentary rocks

  20. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  1. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M.

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  2. Source rock screening studies of Ordovician Maquoketa shale in western Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Autrey, A.; Crockett, J.E.; Dickerson, D.R.; Oltz, D.F.; Seyler, B.J.; Warren, R.

    1987-09-01

    Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) studies of Ordovician Maquoketa Shale samples (cuttings and cores) from the shallow subsurface (500-800 ft deep) in western Illinois indicate that facies within the Maquoketa have potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. Dark, presumably organic-rich zones within the Maquoketa Shale were selected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-Eval (pyrolysis), and bulk and clay mineralogy using x-ray diffraction. Preliminary results from six samples from Schuyler, McDonough, and Fulton Counties show TOC values ranging from 4.70% to as high as 12.90%. Rock-Eval parameters, measured by heating organic matter in an inert atmosphere, indicate source rock maturity and petroleum-generative potential. Screening studies, using the Rock-Eval process, describe very good source rock potential in facies of the Maquoketa Shale. Further studies at the Illinois State Geological Survey will expand on these preliminary results. This study complements a proposed exploration model in western Illinois and further suggests the possibility of source rocks on the flanks of the Illinois basin. Long-distance migration from more deeply buried effective source rocks in southern Illinois has been the traditional mechanism proposed for petroleum in basin-flank reservoirs. Localized source rocks can be an alternative to long-distance migration, and can expand the possibilities of basin-flank reservoirs, encouraging further exploration in these areas.

  3. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gasmore » breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.« less

  4. Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

  5. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  6. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lakota/Dakota Nation  BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION  SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE  EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE  WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY  ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO)  WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY  OCETI SAKOWIN POWER PROJECT  DEMD Sand & Gravel Study  OIl & GAS PREPARATION WORK GROUP  COMMUNITY SCALE PV SYSTEM INSTALLATION  ONE OF SEVEN

  7. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  8. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  9. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional

  10. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M.

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  11. What is shale gas and why is it important?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

  12. Rock index properties for geoengineering in underground development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, J.E.

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes the use of index testing to obtain rock properties that are useful in the design and construction planning of an underground development for civil engineering or mining projects. The index properties discussed include: point load; Schmidt hammer hardness; abrasion hardness; and total hardness. The first two index properties correlate to uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and Young's modulus. Discussions are given on empirical, normalized relationships of UCS to rock mass properties and the integrated use with semi-empirical, geotechnical design methods. The hardness property indices correlate to construction performance parameters and some relevant experience is cited. Examples of data are presented from an index testing program carried out primarily on siltstone, sandstone and limestone rock core samples retrieved from depths up to 1005 m (3300 ft) in a borehole drilled in the Paradox Basin in eastern Utah. The borehole coring was done for a nuclear waste repository site investigation.

  13. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  14. Rock Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wisconsin Phone Number: (608) 752-4550 or (866) 752-4550 Website: www.rock.coop Outage Hotline: (866) 752-4550 Outage Map: www.rock.coopcontentcurrent- References: EIA...

  15. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arch Rock is a systems and software company that builds products and technology for wireless sensor networks. References: ArchRock Corporation1 This article is a stub. You can...

  16. RockPort Capital Partners (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RockPort Capital Partners (California) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: RockPort Capital Partners (California) Name: RockPort Capital Partners (California) Address: 3000 Sand Hill...

  17. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protections: Sampling Protections: Sampling Protection #3: Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental Sampling Board, a key piece of the Strategy, ensures that LANL collects relevant and appropriate data to answer questions about the protection of human and environmental health, and to satisfy regulatory requirements. LANL must demonstrate the data are technically justified

  18. Mars Rover finds changing rocks, surprising scientists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars Rover finds changing rocks, surprising scientists Mars Rover finds changing rocks, surprising scientists As NASA's Curiosity rover treks up a three-mile-high mountain on Mars, the rocks are changing. Back on Earth, scientists analyzing the data realized this was something different: It turned out to be the first of the high-silica rocks. December 24, 2015 Mars landscape This color-adjusted composite of images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover in September shows the lower portion of Mount

  19. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  20. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  1. Thermochemically Driven Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TDGF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Goodwin

    2008-12-31

    Chapter 4: use of diesel-fuel to raise the rock temperature by a combustion process in the well. The requirements for such a Gas-Vapor Generator are laid out, and the development of a prototype machine is explained. This is backed up with laboratory experiments showing that the fuel-water mixture used does significantly increase the viscosity of the oil samples. The prototype Gas-Vapor Generator is shown to be able to operate at temperatures of 240 C and pressures of 200 atm. Unfortunately, geopolitical and economic factors outside of our control led to the cancellation of the project before the field testing phase of the generator could be commenced. Nevertheless, it is to be hoped that this report demonstrates both the feasibility and desirability of the Gas-Vapor Generator approach to the application of TDGF technology in both existing and new wells, and provides a foundation for further research in the future.

  2. EA-225 Split Rock Energy LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Split Rock Energy LLC EA-225 Split Rock Energy LLC Order authorizing Split Rock Energy LLC to export electric energy to Canada. EA-225 Split Rock Energy LLC (34.81

  3. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  4. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection 3: Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental ...

  5. Protections: Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and unexpected contaminants August 1, 2013 Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon Monitoring stormwater in Los Alamos Canyon The Environmental Sampling Board, a key piece...

  6. Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Vimal; Singh, Tejinder Pal; Chauhan, R. P.; Mudahar, G. S.

    2015-08-28

    Radon and its progeny are major contributors in the radiation dose received by general population of the world. Because radon is a noble gas, a large portion of it is free to migrate away from radium. The primary sources of radon in the houses are soils and rocks source emanations, emanation from building materials, and entry of radon into a structure from outdoor air. Keeping this in mind the study of radon exhalation rate from some soil samples of the Kharar, Punjab has been carried out using Can Technique. The equilibrium radon concentration in various soil samples of Kharar area of district Mohali varied from 12.7 Bqm{sup −3} to 82.9 Bqm{sup −3} with an average of 37.5 ± 27.0 Bqm{sup −3}. The radon mass exhalation rates from the soil samples varied from 0.45 to 2.9 mBq/kg/h with an average of 1.4 ± 0.9 mBq/kg/h and radon surface exhalation rates varied from 10.4 to 67.2 mBq/m{sup 2}/h with an average of 30.6 ± 21.8 mBq/m{sup 2}/h. The radon mass and surface exhalation rates of the soil samples of Kharar, Punjab were lower than that of the world wide average.

  7. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  8. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  9. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  10. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  11. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-07

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  12. DOE - Fossil Energy: The Cleanest Coal Technology - A Real Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-Cleanest Coal Technology An Energy Lesson Cleaning Up Coal The Cleanest Coal Technology - a Real Gas Don't think of coal as a solid black rock. Think of it as a mass of atoms. ...

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and repaired, which the company expected to complete by the end of the gas day May 8. Turkey Gathering and Eagle Rock Cargray Plant in Texas are shut in while repairs are being...

  14. Hydraulic-fracture propagation in layered rock: experimental studies of fracture containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teufel, L. W.; Clark, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture geometry is an important concern in the design of a massive hydraulic fracture treatment for improved natural gas recovery from tight gas sands. Possible prediction of vertical fracture growth and containment in layered rock requires an improved understanding of the parameters which may control fracture growth across layer interfaces. We have conducted laboratory hydraulic fracture experiments and elastic finite element studies which show that at least two distinct geologic conditions may inhibit or contain the vertical growth of hydraulic fractures in layered rock; (1) a weak interfacial shear strength of the layers and (2) a compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress in the bounding layer. The second condition is more important and more likely to occur at depth. Variations in the horizontal stress can result from differences in elastic properties of individual layers in a layered rock sequence. A compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress can occur in going from high shear modulus into low shear modulus layers.

  15. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

    1996-01-24

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates

  16. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  17. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D.; Johnson, Craig

    2000-01-01

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  18. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) three-month Rock the Watt campaign to reduce energy use at its main campus in Richland, Washington. The campaign objectives were to educate PNNL employees about energy conservation opportunities in their workplace and to motivate them to help PNNL save energy and costs and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Apparatus for the measurement of radionuclide transport rates in rock cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weed, H.C.; Koszykowski, R.F.; Dibley, L.L.; Murray, I.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus and procedure for the study of radionuclide transport in intact rock cores are presented in this report. This equipment more closely simulates natural conditions of radionuclide transport than do crushed rock columns. The apparatus and the procedure from rock core preparation through data analysis are described. The retardation factors measured are the ratio of the transport rate of a non-retarded radionuclide, such as /sup 3/H, to the transport rate of a retarded radionuclide. Sample results from a study of the transport of /sup 95m/Tc and /sup 85/Sr in brine through a sandstone core are included.

  20. Organic petrology, thermal maturity, geology, and petroleum source rock potential of Lower Permian coal, Karoo supersystem, Zambia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utting, J. ); Wielens, H. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on data concerning organic petrology and thermal maturity of Lower Karoo coal measures (Lower Permian) which are of considerable importance in determining the hydrocarbon potential of sediments in the rift-valley and half-graben complexes of the Luangwa and Zambezi valleys of eastern and southern Zambia, respectively, and in the extensive sedimentary basin developed on relatively stable Precambrian basement in western Zambia, a total area in excess of 3000 km{sup 2}. Samples from seven outcrop and subsurface localities situated in the northeast (northern Luangwa Valley), east (mid-Luangwa Valley), south (mid-Zambezi Valley), and the Western Province of Zambia were studied. The coal measures are from 9 to 280 m thick, but individual coal seams are generally less than 6 m. The coal macerals contain an average of 60% vitrinite and 9% liptinite, enough to have potential to generate hydrocarbon. A few samples contain twice this amount of liptinite. Reflected-light microscopy and the thermal alteration index of spores were used to determine the thermal maturity. The organic matter in samples studied is within the oil generation zone (thermal alteration index 2{minus} to 2+; %R{sub 0} max = 0.5-0.9). The petrological and palynological data indicate that the organic matter consists of Types II (generally approximately 25% in carbonaceous shale samples), III, and IV, indicating source rock potential. Late Karoo ( ) and post-Karoo fault blocks with differential vertical displacements may have produced structural traps suitable for oil and gas accumulation.

  1. Impact of Rock Bolts on Seepage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. C. Ahlers

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured tuff is a key factor for assessing the long-term viability of the proposed high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Rock bolts are among the methods proposed for ground control in the emplacement drifts. They may provide a conduit whereby percolating water that would otherwise bypass the drift will seep into the drift. The objective of this study is to assess the impact that the use of rock bolts may have on seepage. The impact of rock bolts on seepage is studied using a numerical model that is finely discretized around the rock bolt. There are several sources of uncertainty and variability with respect to the flow system around the drift and rock bolt. There is uncertainty about the capillary strength of the fractures around the drift. There is also uncertainty about how the permeability and capillary strength of the grout used to cement the steel rock bolts into the bolt holes will change over time. There is variability expected in the percolation rates incident upon the drifts depending on location. The uncertainty and variability of these parameters are approached by evaluating the rock bolt impact over a range of values for several model parameters. It is also important to consider where the last fracture capable of carrying flow away from the rock bolt intersects the rock bolt. Three models are used where the last fracture is 0, 10 and 50 cm above the drift.

  2. Winner: Hot Rocks | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Winner: Hot Rocks Winner: Hot Rocks December 31, 2008 - 2:07pm Addthis Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australia's Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the world-rock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an eight-year-old company based in Milton, Queensland, will prove otherwise when it turns on its 1-megawatt pilot plant here. The company has done more to harness this unconventional

  3. Hydrothermally Altered Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paleochori cliffs Milos, Greece. http:www.photovolcanica.comVolcanoInfoMilosMilos.html Hydrothermal alteration refers to rocks that have been altered from their original...

  4. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown...

  5. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  6. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  7. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  8. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  9. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-01-31

    During this phase of the project the research team concentrated on acquisition of acoustic emission data from the high porosity rock samples. The initial experiments indicated that the acoustic emission activity from high porosity Danian chalk were of a very low amplitude. Even though the sample underwent yielding and significant plastic deformation the sample did not generate significant AE activity. This was somewhat surprising. These initial results call into question the validity of attempting to locate AE activity in this weak rock type. As a result the testing program was slightly altered to include measuring the acoustic emission activity from many of the rock types listed in the research program. The preliminary experimental results indicate that AE activity in the sandstones is much higher than in the carbonate rocks (i.e., the chalks and limestones). This observation may be particularly important for planning microseismic imaging of reservoir rocks in the field environment. The preliminary results suggest that microseismic imaging of reservoir rock from acoustic emission activity generated from matrix deformation (during compaction and subsidence) would be extremely difficult to accomplish.

  11. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  12. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mango, F.D.

    1995-12-31

    The view that natural gas is thermolytic, coming from decomposing organic debris, has remained almost unchallenged for nearly half a century. Disturbing contradictions exist, however: Oil is found at great depth, at temperatures where only gas should exist and oil and gas deposits show no evidence of the thermolytic debris indicative of oil decomposing to gas. Moreover, laboratory attempts to duplicate the composition of natural gas, which is typically between 60 and 95+ wt% methane in C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}, have produced insufficient amounts of methane (10 to 60%). It has been suggested that natural gas may be generated catalytically, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. This talk will discuss experimental results that support this hypothesis. Various transition metals, as pure compounds and in source rocks, will be shown to generate a catalytic gas that is identical to natural gas. Kinetic results suggest robust catalytic activity under moderate catagenetic conditions.

  13. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars. Recording Aqueous and Surface-atmosphere Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Kenneth M.; Mustard, John F.; Salvatore, Mark R.

    2015-03-05

    The rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. Moreover, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water–rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water–rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. These results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  14. Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

    1996-01-24

    The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 °C and at 200 °C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ≤ p/p0 ≤ 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130°C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ≈ 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated

  15. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  16. Source rocks of the Sub-Andean basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raedeke, L.D. )

    1993-02-01

    Seven source rock systems were mapped using a consistent methodology to allow basin comparison from Trinidad to southern Chile. Silurian and Devonian systems, deposited in passive margin and intracratonic settings, have fair-good original oil/gas potential from central and northern Bolivia to southern Peru. Kerogens range from mature in the foreland to overmature in the thrust belt. Permian to Carboniferous deposition in local restricted basins formed organic-rich shales and carbonates with very good original oil/gas potential, principally in northern Bolivia and southern Peru. Late Triassic to early Jurassic marine shales and limestones, deposited in deep, narrow, basins from Ecuador to north-central maturity. Locally, in the Cuyo rift basin of northern Argentina, a Triassic lacustrine unit is a very good, mature oil source. Early Cretaceous to Jurassic marine incursions into the back-arc basins of Chile-Argentina deposited shales and limestones. Although time transgressive (younging to the south), this system is the principal source in southern back-arc basins, with best potential in Neuquen, where three intervals are stacked A late Cretaceous marine transgressive shale is the most important source in northern South America. The unit includes the La Luna and equivalents extending from Trinidad through Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, and into northern Peru. Elsewhere in South America upper Cretaceous marine-lacustrine rocks are a possible source in the Altiplano and Northwest basins of Bolivia and Argentina. Middle Miocene to Oligocene source system includes shallow marine, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments from Trinidad to northern Peru.

  17. Measurements of water vapor adsorption on The Geysers rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously between 90 and 30{degrees}C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang, some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed.

  18. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion

  19. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation to support the future development ranging from 50 to 150 megawatts (MW) of wind power.

  20. Apparatus for gas sorption measurement with integrated gas composition measurement device and gas mixing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micklash. II, Kenneth James; Dutton, Justin James; Kaye, Steven

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for testing of multiple material samples includes a gas delivery control system operatively connectable to the multiple material samples and configured to provide gas to the multiple material samples. Both a gas composition measurement device and pressure measurement devices are included in the apparatus. The apparatus includes multiple selectively openable and closable valves and a series of conduits configured to selectively connect the multiple material samples individually to the gas composition device and the pressure measurement devices by operation of the valves. A mixing system is selectively connectable to the series of conduits and is operable to cause forced mixing of the gas within the series of conduits to achieve a predetermined uniformity of gas composition within the series of conduits and passages.

  1. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    1999-02-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  2. Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density Rock Lab Analysis X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Retrieved from...

  3. Gas venting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edwin F.

    1976-01-01

    Improved gas venting from radioactive-material containers which utilizes the passageways between interbonded impervious laminae.

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report. The sample change occurred over a transition period that began with the release of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR)...

  5. Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Abstract The composition of noble gases in both gas and water samples collected from Horseshoe Spring, Yellowstone National Park, was...

  6. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Dvorkin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES This report covers the results of developing the rock...

  7. Stress-dependent permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stress-dependent permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical study We ...

  8. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and inindurateda...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ...

  9. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Case study ...

  10. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon SequestrationStorage This report ...

  11. RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) Name: RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) Address: 160 Federal Street, 18th Floor Place: Boston, Massachusetts Zip: 02110 Region:...

  12. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water and water saturated with Supercritical CO2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: EGS rock reactions ...

  13. Rock County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Rock County, Wisconsin CDH Energy EcoEnergy Places in Rock County, Wisconsin Avon, Wisconsin Beloit, Wisconsin Bradford, Wisconsin Brodhead, Wisconsin Center, Wisconsin...

  14. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  15. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  16. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 1995 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The primary objective of this study is to provide the Standing Rock Sioux Nation with a strategic overview of the electric energy issues and opportunities they will be facing beginning in the year 2001.

  17. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  18. Mars Rover finds changing rocks, surprising scientists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It turned out to be the first of the high-silica rocks. December 24, 2015 Mars landscape This color-adjusted composite of images taken by NASA's Curiosity rover in September...

  19. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's (SRST) cultural identity demands that tribal development occur in a sustainable manner and in a manner protective of the tribe's natural resources to preserve them for following generations.

  20. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  1. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III; Berryman, J.G.

    1994-03-28

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  2. Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sampling Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Weapons assessment efficiencies through use of nondestructive laser gas sampling Nondestructive laser welding process far less expensive, no underground testing. June 8, 2012 Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling Nondestructive Laser Gas Sampling is expected to save several million dollars per year and requires no underground testing. "We're continually innovating and working to improve the way we do

  3. Fundamentals of gas measurement II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    A knowledge of the Fundamentals of Gas Measurement is essential for all technicians and engineers that are called upon to perform gas volume calculations. These same people must have at least a working knowledge of the fundamentals to perform their everyday jobs including equipment calibrations, specific gravity tests, collecting gas samples, etc. To understand the fundamentals, one must be familiar with the definitions of the terms that are used in day-to- day gas measurement operations. They also must know how to convert some values from one quantity as measured to another quantity that is called for in the gas purchase or sales contracts or transportation agreements.

  4. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  5. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, Arye Z. [Newton, MA

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  6. Natural gas production problems : solutions, methodologies, and modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Herrin, James M.; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Basinski, Paul M.; Olsson, William Arthur; Arnold, Bill Walter; Broadhead, Ronald F.; Knight, Connie D.; Keefe, Russell G.; McKinney, Curt; Holm, Gus; Holland, John F.; Larson, Rich; Engler, Thomas W.; Lorenz, John Clay

    2004-10-01

    Natural gas is a clean fuel that will be the most important domestic energy resource for the first half the 21st centtuy. Ensuring a stable supply is essential for our national energy security. The research we have undertaken will maximize the extractable volume of gas while minimizing the environmental impact of surface disturbances associated with drilling and production. This report describes a methodology for comprehensive evaluation and modeling of the total gas system within a basin focusing on problematic horizontal fluid flow variability. This has been accomplished through extensive use of geophysical, core (rock sample) and outcrop data to interpret and predict directional flow and production trends. Side benefits include reduced environmental impact of drilling due to reduced number of required wells for resource extraction. These results have been accomplished through a cooperative and integrated systems approach involving industry, government, academia and a multi-organizational team within Sandia National Laboratories. Industry has provided essential in-kind support to this project in the forms of extensive core data, production data, maps, seismic data, production analyses, engineering studies, plus equipment and staff for obtaining geophysical data. This approach provides innovative ideas and technologies to bring new resources to market and to reduce the overall environmental impact of drilling. More importantly, the products of this research are not be location specific but can be extended to other areas of gas production throughout the Rocky Mountain area. Thus this project is designed to solve problems associated with natural gas production at developing sites, or at old sites under redevelopment.

  7. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  8. Handling and characterization of glow-discharge polymer samples...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for the light gas gun Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Handling and characterization of glow-discharge polymer samples for the light gas gun Authors: Akin, M C ; ...

  9. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1002 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by the USGS are Indicated fig2.jpg (30091 bytes) Source: Edited from U.S. Geological Survey, "The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska," Open File Report 98-34, 1999.

  10. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the sixth quarter of this research project the research team developed a method and the experimental procedures for acquiring the data needed for ultrasonic tomography of rock core samples under triaxial stress conditions as outlined in Task 10. Traditional triaxial compression experiments, where compressional and shear wave velocities are measured, provide little or no information about the internal spatial distribution of mechanical damage within the sample. The velocities measured between platen-to-platen or sensor-to-sensor reflects an averaging of all the velocities occurring along that particular raypath across the boundaries of the rock. The research team is attempting to develop and refine a laboratory equivalent of seismic tomography for use on rock samples deformed under triaxial stress conditions. Seismic tomography, utilized for example in crosswell tomography, allows an imaging of the velocities within a discrete zone within the rock. Ultrasonic or acoustic tomography is essentially the extension of that field technology applied to rock samples deforming in the laboratory at high pressures. This report outlines the technical steps and procedures for developing this technology for use on weak, soft chalk samples. Laboratory tests indicate that the chalk samples exhibit major changes in compressional and shear wave velocities during compaction. Since chalk is the rock type responsible for the severe subsidence and compaction in the North Sea it was selected for the first efforts at tomographic imaging of soft rocks. Field evidence from the North Sea suggests that compaction, which has resulted in over 30 feet of subsidence to date, is heterogeneously distributed within the reservoir. The research team will attempt to image this very process in chalk samples. The initial tomographic studies (Scott et al., 1994a,b; 1998) were accomplished on well cemented, competent rocks such as Berea sandstone. The extension of the technology to weaker samples is

  11. Extent of water-rock interactions in Lower Permian Wolfcamp carbonates, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.S.; Posey, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    A laterally-extensive permeable zone in upper Wolfcampian carbonate strata constitutes the first important transmissive unit below a thick evaporite sequence that is being considered for nuclear waste isolation. The extent of water-rock interaction was evaluated by comparing the chemical and isotopic composition of formation water and core collected at four DOE test wells. Wolfcamp mineralogy is dominantly calcite and dolomite with minor anhydrite at each of the four sites despite minor variations in depositional environment, diagenetic alteration, and abundance of clastic material. Isotopic compositions of calcite and dolomite and of anhydrite are within the ranges expected for Permian marine sediments altered by early diagenesis. Wolfcamp formation water compositions are more variable than host rock compositions, and are not completely controlled by local water-rock equilibria. Wolfcamp brines from two wells in the western part of the basin have depleted isotopic compositions relative to the two eastern wells and have not equilibrated with Wolfcamp carbonates, whereas the eastern fluids have. Strontium in the western samples is more radiogenic than that of the eastern samples, indicating a greater influence of clays or feldspars on the western fluids. Comparison of water and rock compositions suggests: (1) the western brines have interacted less with the carbonate host than the eastern brines due to shorter residence times or greater water: rock ratios, and (2) the minerals encountered along flow paths prior to entering the Wolfcamp are different for the western and eastern Wolfcamp brines.

  12. Underground Research Laboratories for Crystalline Rock and Sedimentary Rock in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shigeta, N.; Takeda, S.; Matsui, H.; Yamasaki, S.

    2003-02-27

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has started two off-site (generic) underground research laboratory (URL) projects, one for crystalline rock as a fractured media and the other for sedimentary rock as a porous media. This paper introduces an overview and current status of these projects.

  13. EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04/13/2007.)

  14. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  15. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  16. Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reductions - Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-30

    BroadRock Renewables, LLC built two high efficiency electricity generating facilities that utilize landfill gas in California and Rhode Island. The two projects received a total of $25 million in U.S. Department of Energy funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Private-sector cost share for the projects totaled approximately $186 million.

  17. Major marine source rocks and stratigraphic cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duval, B.C.

    1995-11-01

    The identification of continental encroachment cycles and subcycles by using sequence stratigraphy can assist explorationists in locating source rocks. The continental encroachment cycles are associated with the breakup of the supercontinents and fit a smooth long-term eustatic curve. They are first order, with a duration greater than 50 m.y., and are composed of transgressive and regressive phases inducing major changes in shoreline. The limit between the transgressive and regressive phases corresponds to a major downlap surface, and major marine source rocks are often found in association with this surface, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Potential {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} source rock intervals can also be sought by sequence stratigraphy because each continental encroachment cycle is composed of several subcycles, and the same configuration of a regressive forestepping phase overlying a transgressive backstepping phase also creates a downlap surface that may correspond with organic-rich intervals. The stratigraphic distribution of source rocks and related reserves fits reasonably well with continental encroachment cycles and subcycles. For instance, source rocks of Silurian, Upper Jurassic, and Middle-Upper Cretaceous are associated with eustatic highs and bear witness to this relationship. The recognition and mapping of such downlap surfaces is therefore a useful step to help map source rocks. The interpretation of sequence stratigraphy from regional seismic lines, properly calibrated with geochernical data whenever possible, can be of considerable help in the process. Several examples from around the world illustrate the power of the method: off-shore of eastern Venezuela, coastal basin of Angola, western Africa, the North Sea, south Algeria, and the North Caucasian trough.

  18. The cretaceous source rocks in the Zagros Foothills of Iran: An example of a large size intracratonic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordenave, M.L. ); Huc, A.Y. )

    1993-02-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt of Iran is one of the world most prolific petroleum producing area. However, most of the oil production is originated from a relatively small area, the 60,000 km[sup 2] wide Dezful Embayment which contains approximately 12% of the proven oil global reserves. The distribution of the oil and gas fields results from the area extent of six identified source rock layers, their thermal history and reservoir, cap rock and trap availability. In this paper, the emphasis is three of the layers of Cretaceous sources rocks. The Garau facies was deposited during the Neocomian to Albian interval over Lurestan, Northeast Khuzestan and extends over the extreme northeast part of Fars, the Kazhdumi source rock which deposited over the Dezful Embayment, and eventually the Senonian Gurpi Formation which has marginal source rock characteristics in limited areas of Khuzestan and Northern Fars. The deposition environment of these source rock layers corresponds to semipermanent depressions, included in an overall shallow water intracratonic basin communicating with the South Tethys Ocean. These depressions became anoxic when climatic oceanographical and geological conditions were adequate, i.e., humid climate, high stand water, influxes of fine grained clastics and the existence of sills separating the depression from the open sea. Distribution maps of these source rock layers resulting from extensive field work and well control are also given. The maturation history of source rocks is reconstructed from a set of isopachs. It was found that the main contributor to the oil reserves is the Kazhdumi source rock which is associated with excellent calcareous reservoirs.

  19. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y.; Dick, Aaron J.; Cort, George E.

    1998-01-01

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  20. Gas magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of a precessional rate of a gas, such as an alkali gas, in a magnetic field is made by promoting a non-uniform precession of the gas in which substantially no net magnetic field affects the gas during a majority of the precession cycle. This allows sensitive gases that would be subject to spin-exchange collision de-phasing to be effectively used for extremely sensitive measurements in the presence of an environmental magnetic field such as the Earth's magnetic field.

  1. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  2. Gas separating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  3. Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, ... Grid Integration & Advanced Inverters Materials & Fabrication Microsystems Enabled ...

  4. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Camp Desert Rock

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Camp Desert Rock Photo - Camp Desert Rock Camp Desert Rock, also known as Desert Atom Camp, Nevada, was home to the U.S. Army's Atomic Maneuver Battalion in the 1950s. More than 2,300 soldiers were trained here in 1955. The 100 semi-permanent buildings and more than 500 tents often were filled to the 6,000 personnel capacity. Desert Rock Airport, with its 7,500 foot runway, was built on the former Camp Desert Rock. At peak operation Camp Desert Rock comprised of 100 semi-permanent buildings,

  5. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  6. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  7. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G.

    1982-04-01

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  8. Transient Non Lin Deformation in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sartori, Enrico

    1998-10-14

    MATLOC is a nonlinear, transient, two-dimensional (planer and axisymmetric), thermal stress, finite-element code designed to determine the deformation within a fractured rock mass. The mass is modeled as a nonlinear anistropic elastic material which can exhibit stress-dependent bi-linear locking behavior.

  9. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie M.

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) evaluate the relationship between geothermal fluid processes and the compositions of the fluid inclusion gases trapped in the reservoir rocks; and 2) develop methodologies for interpreting fluid inclusion gas data in terms of the chemical, thermal and hydrological properties of geothermal reservoirs. Phase 1 of this project was designed to conduct the following: 1) model the effects of boiling, condensation, conductive cooling and mixing on selected gaseous species; using fluid compositions obtained from geothermal wells, 2) evaluate, using quantitative analyses provided by New Mexico Tech (NMT), how these processes are recorded by fluid inclusions trapped in individual crystals; and 3) determine if the results obtained on individual crystals can be applied to the bulk fluid inclusion analyses determined by Fluid Inclusion Technology (FIT). Our initial studies however, suggested that numerical modeling of the data would be premature. We observed that the gas compositions, determined on bulk and individual samples were not the same as those discharged by the geothermal wells. Gases discharged from geothermal wells are CO2-rich and contain low concentrations of light gases (i.e. H2, He, N, Ar, CH4). In contrast many of our samples displayed enrichments in these light gases. Efforts were initiated to evaluate the reasons for the observed gas distributions. As a first step, we examined the potential importance of different reservoir processes using a variety of commonly employed gas ratios (e.g. Giggenbach plots). The second technical target was the development of interpretational methodologies. We have develop methodologies for the interpretation of fluid inclusion gas data, based on the results of Phase 1, geologic interpretation of fluid inclusion data, and integration of the data. These methodologies can be used in conjunction with the relevant geological and hydrological information on the system to

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Salmon, Mississippi, Site, Water Sampling Location Map .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........1 Water Sampling Locations at the Rulison, .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  12. Systems and methods for sample analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Guangtao; Li, Xin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-01-13

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for sample analysis. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample that includes a probe including a material connected to a high voltage source, a device for generating a heated gas, and a mass analyzer.

  13. Systems and methods for sample analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Guangtao; Li, Xin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2015-10-20

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for sample analysis. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system for analyzing a sample that includes a probe including a material connected to a high voltage source, a device for generating a heated gas, and a mass analyzer.

  14. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly with eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.

  15. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly withmore » eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.« less

  16. DOE - Fossil Energy: Squeezing Oil Out of Rock

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-Squeezing Out Oil An Energy Lesson Looking Down an Oil Well Looking Down an Oil Well Squeezing Oil out of Rocks Imagine trying to force oil through a rock. Can't be done, you ...

  17. Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit......

  18. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID May 20, 2011 delete me old download page ...

  19. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux...

  20. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy- Important Lessons From Fenton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy- Important Lessons From Fenton Hill Abstract The concept of Hot Dry Rock...

  1. Handling and characterization of glow-discharge polymer samples...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of glow-discharge polymer samples for the light gas gun Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Handling and characterization of glow-discharge polymer samples for the light ...

  2. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  3. Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing sites and disposal site at Slick Rock, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History The Slick Rock processing sites consist of two former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing

  4. CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

  5. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock's elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties

  6. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock

  7. Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlueter, E.M.

    1995-02-01

    The author investigates through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. The approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that the authors develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

  8. Scientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid ... of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Nuclear Fuel ...

  9. Characteristics of neutrons produced by muons in a standard rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malgin, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Characteristics of cosmogenic neutrons, such as the yield, production rate, and flux, were determined for a standard rock. The dependences of these quantities on the standard-rock depth and on the average muon energy were obtained. These properties and dependences make it possible to estimate easy the muon-induced neutron background in underground laboratories for various chemical compositions of rock.

  10. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  11. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave

  12. MODELING UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE VULNERABILITY IN JOINTED ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. SWIFT; D. STEEDMAN

    2001-02-01

    The vulnerability of underground structures and openings in deep jointed rock to ground shock attack is of chief concern to military planning and security. Damage and/or loss of stability to a structure in jointed rock, often manifested as brittle failure and accompanied with block movement, can depend significantly on jointed properties, such as spacing, orientation, strength, and block character. We apply a hybrid Discrete Element Method combined with the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach to simulate the MIGHTY NORTH event, a definitive high-explosive test performed on an aluminum lined cylindrical opening in jointed Salem limestone. Representing limestone with discrete elements having elastic-equivalence and explicit brittle tensile behavior and the liner as an elastic-plastic continuum provides good agreement with the experiment and damage obtained with finite-element simulations. Extending the approach to parameter variations shows damage is substantially altered by differences in joint geometry and liner properties.

  13. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  14. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K.; Alper, Naum I.

    1994-01-01

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  15. motion-of-large-riprap-rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of a Computational Approach to Detect Instability and Incipient Motion of Large Riprap Rocks" Presentation at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting Washington DC, January 14, 2014 Paper number 14-3035 Cezary Bojanowski Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC), Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory Steven Lottes Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC), Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory Abstract

  16. Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring.

  17. Viscous-sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1979-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge is disclosed. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  18. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2014 LMSGRN.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and May 2014 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site October 2014 LMSRBLS00514 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site October 2015 LMS.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site July 2015 LMSMNT.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site October 2015 LMSRBLS00515 .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site May 2015 LMSRULS00115 Available .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Produced Water Sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site January 2016 LMSRULS00915 .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    July 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site July 2014 LMSMNT.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site January 2014 LMSMNTS01013 This .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado Processing Site October 2013 LMSNAP.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMSTUB.........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site January .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  16. Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, M.H.; Sundell, K.A.

    1986-08-01

    Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind river basins, and they pinch out with angular unconformity against the base of the volcanics, providing enormous potential for stratigraphic oil accumulations. Vibroseis and portable seismic data have confirmed and further delineate large anticlines of Paleozoic rocks, which were originally discovered by detailed surface geologic mapping. These structures can be projected along anticlinal trends from the western Owl Creek Mountains to beneath the volcanics as well. The overlying volcanics are generally soft, reworked sediments. However, large, hard boulders and blocks of andesite-dacite, which were previously mapped as intrusives, are present and are the result of catastrophic landslide/debris flow. The volcanics locally contain highly porous and permeable sandstones and abundant bentonite stringers. Oil and gas shows were observed throughout a 2400-ft thick interval of the Eocene Tepee Trail and Aycross Formations. Shows were recorded 9100 ft above sea level in the volcanic rocks. A minimum of 10 million bbl of oil (asphaltum) and an undetermined amount of gases and lighter oils have accumulated within the basal volcanic sequence, based on the evaluation of data from two drill sites. Significant amounts of hydrocarbons have migrated since the volcanics were deposited 50 Ma. Large Laramide anticlines were partially eroded and breached into the Paleozoic formations and resealed by overlying volcanics with subsequent development of a massive tar seal.

  17. Analysis of K west basin canister gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trimble, D.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    Gas and Liquid samples have been collected from a selection of the approximately 3,820 spent fuel storage canisters in the K West Basin. The samples were taken to characterize the contents of the gas and water in the canisters providing source term information for two subprojects of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) (Fulton 1994): the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment System Subproject (Ball 1996) and the K Basins Fuel Retrieval System Subproject (Waymire 1996). The barrels of ten canisters were sampled for gas and liquid in 1995, and 50 canisters were sampled in a second campaign in 1996. The analysis results from the first campaign have been reported (Trimble 1995a, 1995b, 1996a, 1996b). The analysis results from the second campaign liquid samples have been documented (Trimble and Welsh 1997; Trimble 1997). This report documents the results for the gas samples from the second campaign and evaluates all gas data in terms of expected releases when opening the canisters for SNFP activities. The fuel storage canisters consist of two closed and sealed barrels, each with a gas trap. The barrels are attached at a trunion to make a canister, but are otherwise independent (Figure 1). Each barrel contains up to seven N Reactor fuel element assemblies. A gas space of nitrogen was established in the top 2.2 to 2.5 inches (5.6 to 6.4 cm) of each barrel. Many of the fuel elements were damaged allowing the metallic uranium fuel to be corroded by the canister water. The corrosion releases fission products and generates hydrogen gas. The released gas mixes with the gas-space gas and excess gas passes through the gas trap into the basin water. The canister design does not allow canister water to be exchanged with basin water.

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08 Site ID (CSD Index Number): CO.08 Site Name: Slick Rock Mill Site Site Summary: Site Link: Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Site External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Slick Rock Mill Site Slick Rock (North Continent) Mill 1 Slick Rock (Union Carbide) Mill 2 Uranium Mill No. 1 in Slick Rock (East) Uranium Mill No. 2 in Slick Rock (West) Alternate Name Documents: Location: San Miguel County, Colorado Location Documents: Historical Operations (describe contaminants):

  19. Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeway, Katy; Rogers, R.E.; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D.

    2000-02-01

    This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

  20. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-11-18

    During the seven quarter of the project the research team analyzed some of the acoustic velocity data and rock deformation data. The goal is to create a series of ''deformation-velocity maps'' which can outline the types of rock deformational mechanisms which can occur at high pressures and then associate those with specific compressional or shear wave velocity signatures. During this quarter, we began to analyze both the acoustical and deformational properties of the various rock types. Some of the preliminary velocity data from the Danian chalk will be presented in this report. This rock type was selected for the initial efforts as it will be used in the tomographic imaging study outlined in Task 10. This is one of the more important rock types in the study as the Danian chalk is thought to represent an excellent analog to the Ekofisk chalk that has caused so many problems in the North Sea. Some of the preliminary acoustic velocity data obtained during this phase of the project indicates that during pore collapse and compaction of this chalk, the acoustic velocities can change by as much as 200 m/s. Theoretically, this significant velocity change should be detectable during repeated successive 3-D seismic images. In addition, research continues with an analysis of the unconsolidated sand samples at high confining pressures obtained in Task 9. The analysis of the results indicate that sands with 10% volume of fines can undergo liquefaction at lower stress conditions than sand samples which do not have fines added. This liquefaction and/or sand flow is similar to ''shallow water'' flows observed during drilling in the offshore Gulf of Mexico.

  1. Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

  2. Summary of Rock-Property Measurements for Hong Kong TuffSamples...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Dobson, Patrick F. ; Nakagawa, Seiji Publication Date: 2005-09-21 OSTI Identifier: 885236 Report Number(s): LBNL--58878 R&D Project: 366256; BnR: YN0100000; TRN: ...

  3. Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

    2013-03-05

    Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... levels at the site to natural thorium in the uranium ore. ... screened for radium-226 by gas flow proportional counting. ... Chromatography Peak Integration The integration of analyte ...

  5. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  6. Explosive shaped charge penetration into tuff rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, M.G.

    1988-10-01

    Analysis and data for the use of Explosive Shaped Charges (ESC) to generate holes in tuff rock formation is presented. The ESCs evaluated include Conical Shaped Charges (CSC) and Explosive Formed Projectiles (EFP). The CSCs vary in size from 0.158 to 9.1 inches inside cone diameter. The EFPs were 5.0 inches in diameter. Data for projectile impact angles of 30 and 90 degrees are presented. Analytically predicted depth of penetration data generally compared favorably with experimental data. Predicted depth of penetration versus ESC standoff data and hole profile dimensions in tuff are also presented. 24 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory Kayla Zimmerman | (650) 926-6281 Lisa Hammon, LCLS Lab Coordinator Welcome to the LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory. This small general use wet lab is located in Rm 109 of the Far Experimental Hall near the MEC, CXI, and XCS hutches. It conveniently serves all LCLS hutches and is available for final stage sample preparation. Due to space limitations, certain types of activities may be restricted and all access must be scheduled in advance. User lab bench

  8. Flow dynamics and potential for Biodegradation of Organic Contaminants in Fractured Rock Vadose Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, J.T.; Holman, H.-Y.; Su, T.-S.; Liou, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Pruess, K.; Hunter-Devera, J.C.

    1998-12-01

    We present an experimental approach for investigating the potential for bioremediation of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in fractured-rock vadose zones. This approach is based on the coupling of fluid flow dynamics and biotransformation processes. Fluid flow and distribution within fracture networks may be a significant factor in the ability of microorganisms to degrade VOCs, as they affect the availability of substrate, moisture and nutrients. Biological activity can change liquid surface tension and generate biofilms that may change the nettability of solid surfaces, locally alter fracture permeability and redirect infiltrating liquids. Our approach has four components: (1) establishing a conceptual model for fluid and contaminant distribution in the geologic matrix of interest; (2) physical and numerical experiments of liquid seepage in the fracture plane; (3) non-destructive monitoring of biotransformations on rock surfaces at the micron-scale; and, (4) integration of flow and biological activity in natural rock ''geocosms''. Geocosms are core-scale flow cells that incorporate some aspects of natural conditions, such as liquid seepage in the fracture plane and moisture content. The experimental work was performed with rock samples and indigenous microorganisms from the site of the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), located in a basalt flow basin where VOC contamination threatens the Snake River Aquifer. The insights gained from this approach should contribute to the design of techniques to monitor and stimulate naturally occurring biological activity and control the spread of organic contaminants.

  9. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steltenpohl, M.G. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Goldberg, S.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)); Hanley, T.B. (Columbus College, GA (United States)); Kunk, M.J. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 [plus minus] 15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomgenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghenian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  10. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B.; Lock, D.E.

    1996-08-01

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  11. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  12. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1998-08-03

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-113 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment.

  13. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-116

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    1999-02-24

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-116 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment.

  14. Basin-centered gas evaluated in Dnieper-Donets basin, Donbas foldbelt, Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, B.E.; Ulmishek, G.F.; Clayton, J.L.; Kabyshev, B.P.; Pashova, N.T.; Krivosheya, V.A.

    1998-11-23

    An evaluation of thermal maturity, pore pressures, source rocks, reservoir quality, present-day temperatures, and fluid recovery data indicates the presence of a large basin-centered gas accumulation in the Dnieper-Donets basin (DDB) and Donbas foldbelt (DF) of eastern Ukraine. This unconventional accumulation covers an area of at least 35,000 sq km and extends vertically through as much as 7,000 m of Carboniferous rocks. The gas accumulation is similar, in many respects, to some North American accumulations such as Elmworth in the Alberta basin of western Canada, the Greater Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming, and the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma. Even though rigorous assessments of the recoverable gas have not been conducted in the region, a comparison of the dimensions of the accumulation to similar accumulations in the US indicates gas resources in excess of 100 tcf in place. The paper describes the geology, the reservoirs, source rocks, seals, and recommendations for further study.

  15. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Interference Check Sample (ICS) Analysis ICP interference check samples ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the required frequency to verify the ...

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona Disposal Site June 2015 .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  18. Visual Sample Plan Flyer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This flyer better explains that VSP is a free, easy-to-use software tool that supports development of optimal sampling plans based on statistical sampling theory.

  19. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siting Guidelines | Department of Energy Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting guidelines, both in the US and other countries. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign

  20. Disposal in Crystalline Rocks: FY'15 Progress Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Disposal in Crystalline Rocks: FY'15 Progress Report Disposal in Crystalline Rocks: FY'15 Progress Report The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media. The major accomplishments are summarized in the report: 1) Development of Fuel Matrix Degradation Model

  1. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Lab | Department of Energy Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Case study describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) three-month Rock the Watt campaign to reduce energy use at its main campus in Richland, Washington. The campaign objectives were to educate PNNL employees about energy conservation opportunities in their workplace and to motivate

  2. Picture of the Week: Bismuth and tin on the rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Bismuth and tin on the rocks Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using state-of-the-art experimental techniques to see and understand how microstructures evolve during materials processing. February 15, 2016 Bismuth and tin on the rocks Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using state-of-the-art experimental techniques to see and understand how microstructures evolve during materials processing. Bismuth and tin on the rocks Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Split Rock Site - 043 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WNI Split Rock Site (043) Active UMTRCA Title II site; when complete, site will be managed by LM Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Split Rock, WY, Disposal Site Location: Fremont County, Wyoming Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Disposal site Site Disposition: Remediation under UMTRCA Title II - site not ready to transition Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary

  4. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractured...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Gutierrez, Marte 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  6. Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties, e.g., low permeability, potential geochemically reduced conditions...

  7. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phillips, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

  8. Glen Rock, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Glen Rock, New Jersey BGA Engineering LLC References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  9. AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal Systems Demonstration AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation of Well at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstration January 22, 2013 - ...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI) Split Rock site is a Uranium Mill ...

  11. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  12. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations Citation Details In-Document...

  13. Rock Island County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Illinois Hillsdale, Illinois Milan, Illinois Moline, Illinois Oak Grove, Illinois Port Byron, Illinois Rapids City, Illinois Reynolds, Illinois Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois...

  14. City of Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Rock Hill Place: South Carolina Phone Number: 803-325-2500 Website: www.cityofrockhill.comdepartm...

  15. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References...

  16. Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area...

  17. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WoldeGabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

  18. Natural Gas Applications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    natural gas demand, thereby contributing to larger net injections of natural gas into storage. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases The Natural Gas Annual 2006: The Energy...

  20. GAS SEAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

    1961-07-11

    A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data ...

  2. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  3. New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) ... Underground Base Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New Mexico Underground Natural Gas ...

  4. New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) ... Underground Base Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New York Underground Natural Gas ...

  5. The Sample Preparation Laboratories | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Patty 1 Sam Webb 2 John Bargar 3 Arizona 4 Chemicals 5 Team Work 6 Bottles 7 Glass 8 Plan Ahead! See the tabs above for Laboratory Access and forms you'll need to complete. Equipment and Chemicals tabs detail resources already available on site. Avoid delays! Hazardous materials use may require a written Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) before you work. Check the Chemicals tab for more information. The Sample Preparation Laboratories The Sample Preparation Laboratories provide wet lab

  6. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  7. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary ... Fossil Energy Research Benefits FE's early investments in shale research in the 1970s ...

  8. Precambrian oil and gas in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisheng Hao; Guangdi Liu

    1989-03-01

    Abundant Precambrian oil and gas occurring mainly in two large basins, Sichuan basin in southwestern China and Bohai Bay basin in northern China, account for a considerable portion of the reserves and production in China. The Precambrian producing formations are all carbonates. Weiyuan gas field in Sichuan basin is one of the large gas fields in China. Its gas is produced primarily from the dolomite of the Dengying Formation (Sinian System) and was generated chiefly in the algal dolomite of the same system. However, a deeper origin for the gas cannot be ruled out. Renqiu oil field in Bohai Bay basin, a buried-hill oil field, is also one of the largest oil fields in China. The oil is produced primarily from the dolomite of the Wumishan Formation of the middle-upper Proterozoic and was generated chiefly in the Oligocene Shahejie Formation. It is also possible that the oil was partly sourced by middle-upper Proterozoic rocks. In addition, many oil and gas shows have been found in the middle-upper Proterozoic of the Yanshan fold-belt at the northern margin of the Bohai Bay basin. According to an organic geochemical study, the middle-upper Proterozoic in the area has a good potential for hydrocarbon generation, and formation conditions for indigenous hydrocarbon accumulation should exist in the Bohai Bay basin and nearby Yanshan foldbelt. From the analyses of hydrocarbon generation, reservoir, cap rock, trapping, and preservation, the presentation systematically describes the petroleum geological features and hydrocarbon prospects of the Precambrian in China.

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    sand with very little natural rock bottom and reef habitat. Without artificial reefs, fish and marine life typically would become widely dispersed. In the Gulf of Mexico...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    resources, but challenges occur in producing this resource because of the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartment, abnormal pressures, difficulty in...

  11. Modeling of Immiscible, Two-Phase Flows in a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2009-01-01

    One potential method of geologically sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject the gas into brine-filled, subsurface formations. Within these low-permeability rocks, fractures exist that can act as natural fluid conduits. Understanding how a less viscous fluid moves when injected into an initially saturated rock fracture is important for the prediction of CO2 transport within fractured rocks. Our study examined experimentally and numerically the motion of immiscible fluids as they were transported through models of a fracture in Berea sandstone. The natural fracture geometry was initially scanned using micro-computerized tomography (CT) at a fine volume-pixel (voxel) resolution by Karpyn et al. [1]. This CT scanned fracture was converted into a numerical mesh for two-phase flow calculations using the finite-volume solver FLUENT® and the volume-of-fluid method. Additionally, a translucent experimental model was constructed using stereolithography. The numerical model was shown to agree well with experiments for the case of a constant rate injection of air into the initially water-saturated fracture. The invading air moved intermittently, quickly invading large-aperture regions of the fracture. Relative permeability curves were developed to describe the fluid motion. These permeability curves can be used in reservoir-scale discrete fracture models for predictions of fluid motion within fractured geological formations. The numerical model was then changed to better mimic the subsurface conditions at which CO2 will move into brine saturated fractures. The different fluid properties of the modeled subsurface fluids were shown to increase the amount of volume the less-viscous invading gas would occupy while traversing the fracture.

  12. NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Site | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) hosts international CTBT on-site inspection experts at Nevada National Security Site Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 2:26pm CTBT surrogate inspectors and other inspection experts visited the Nevada National Security Site, a former nuclear explosive test site. Here they are pictured on the edge of the Sedan Crater. This month, NNSA hosted a Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on-site inspection activity at the Nevada National

  13. Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  14. Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  15. Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the ground in the Lower East Rift Zone were measured using alpha particle sensitive cellulose nitrate films. The survey was successful in defining an area of geothermal...

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing Lands Research Laboratory (GRL), we conducted a...

  17. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Bergfeld...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from locations west and east of the plant revealed the presence of isobutane related to plant operations. The 13C values of diffuse CO2 range from - 5.7 to - 3.4, similar...

  18. Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation2011-2014 Final Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We did observe that, because of the drought, the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 was much lower in 2011 than in 2010. Concomitantly, sensible heat fluxes increased and latent heat ...

  19. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    between chamber CO2 fluxes and the atmospheric parameters over a comparable time period. Energy balance closure was assessed by statistical regression of EC energy fluxes...

  20. Sample Format In-Transit Natural Gas (Pipeline) Monthly Sales...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (7) (8) (9) Origin & Final Destination Country (one country) Transit Country Initial Border Crossing Point Foreign Transporter at Initial Border Crossing U.S. Transporter at...

  1. Sample Format Natural Gas Exports by Pipeline Monthly Sales and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Destination Country Point of EXIT from U.S. Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Avg. Price at U.S. Border (U.S.MMBtu) Supplier(s) Foreign Transporter U.S....

  2. Sample Format Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline Monthly Sales and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) Country of Origin Point of ENTRY into U.S. Volume (Mcf at U.S. Border) Avg. Price at U.S. Border (U.S.MMBtu) Supplier(s) Foreign Transporter U.S....

  3. Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    H. Ibser, Jennifer Lewicki, B. Mack. Kennedy, Michael Swyer (2013) Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal System, Nevada, Status Update Additional...

  4. Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden...

  5. Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2005) Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring...

  6. Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2004) Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface...

  7. A comparison of the rates of hydrocarbon generation from Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken formation petroleum source rocks, Williston Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvie, D.M.; Elsinger, R.J.; Inden, R.F.; Palacas, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    Recent successes in the Lodgepole Waulsortian Mound play have resulted in the reevaluation of the Williston Basin petroleum systems. It has been postulated that hydrocarbons were generated from organic-rich Bakken Formation source rocks in the Williston Basin. However, Canadian geoscientists have indicated that the Lodgepole Formation is responsible for oil entrapped in Lodgepole Formation and other Madison traps in portions of the Canadian Williston Basin. Furthermore, geoscientists in the U.S. have recently shown oils from mid-Madison conventional reservoirs in the U.S. Williston Basin were not derived from Bakken Formation source rocks. Kinetic data showing the rate of hydrocarbon formation from petroleum source rocks were measured on source rocks from the Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken Formations. These results show a wide range of values in the rate of hydrocarbon generation. Oil prone facies within the Lodgepole Formation tend to generate hydrocarbons earlier than the oil prone facies in the Bakken Formation and mixed oil/gas prone and gas prone facies in the Lodgepole Formation. A comparison of these source rocks using a geological model of hydrocarbon generation reveals differences in the timing of generation and the required level of maturity to generate significant amounts of hydrocarbons.

  8. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL Clean Cities

    2010-04-01

    Fact sheet answers questions about natural gas production and use in transportation. Natural gas vehicles are also described.

  9. Microsoft Word - 4Q2011_Gas_samp.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fourth Quarter 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 6 December 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) directive to protect human health and the environment, samples are collected from producing gas wells and analyzed to ensure no Rulison related

  10. Experience with in situ measurement of rock deformability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1981-07-01

    Although in situ tests have the advantage of involving a large volume or rock tested under the same environmental conditions as are prevailing in the rock mass, such tests are expensive and time consuming. In addition, there are a number of controversial questions pertinent to in situ tests.

  11. Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J.; Ward, Jr., Jack A.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

  12. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L.

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  13. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  14. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  15. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory

  16. Rapid imbibition of water in fractures within unsaturated sedimentary rock

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Donnelly, B.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Tremsin, Anton S.; McKay, L. D.; Distefano, Victoria H.; Cai, J. C.; Santodonato, Louis J.

    2015-01-27

    The spontaneous imbibition of water and other liquids into gas-filled fractures in variably-saturated porous media is important in a variety of engineering and geological contexts. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated this phenomenon. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework for predicting the 1-dimensional movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over the rough surfaces of fracture faces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Quantitative datamore » on spontaneous imbibition of water in unsaturated Berea sandstone cores were acquired to evaluate the proposed model. The cores with different permeability classes ranging from 50 to 500 mD and were fractured using the Brazilian method. Spontaneous imbibition in the fractured cores was measured by dynamic neutron radiography at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility (beam line CG-1D, HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and the fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. The matrix sorptivities ranged from 2.9 to 4.6 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly as the permeability class increased. The sorptivities of the fracture zones ranged from 17.9 to 27.1 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width. The dispersion coefficients ranged from 23.7 to 66.7 mm2 s-1 and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width and damage zone width. Both theory and observations indicate that fractures can significantly increase spontaneous imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increase the dispersion of the wetting front. In conclusion, further research is needed to investigate this phenomenon in other natural and engineered

  17. Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage

    Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

    levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a sample of operators that report on Form EIA-912, "Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report." The EIA first...

  18. Water and Sediment Sampling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MDC Blank 7222014 Below MDC Below MDC Water Sampling Results Location Sample Date WIPP ... Tut Tank 3132014 Below MDC Below MDC Fresh Water Tank 3122014 Below MDC Below MDC Hill ...

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 100, 17B, 1A, 72, and 81 were classified as Category II. The sample results were qualified with a "Q" flag, indicating the data are qualitative because of the sampling technique. ...

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... the applicable MDL. Inductively Coupled Plasma Interference Check Sample Analysis ... and background correction factors for all inductively coupled plasma instruments. ...

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Data Durango Processing Site Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Hydrographs Time-Concentration ...

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Hydrograph Time-Concentration ...

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Time-Concentration Graph ...

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Static Water Level Data ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........3 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  12. Petroleum source rock potential and thermal maturity, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Samples collected from 20 geographically widespread wells in the sparsely drilled Palo Duro Basin were analyzed for total organic carbon content (TOC). Highest values of TOC, up to 6.9%, occur in Upper Permian San Andres dolomite in the southern part of the basin. Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian (Wolfcampian) basinal shales contain up to 2.4% TOC and are fair to very good source rocks. Kerogen color and vitrinite reflectance, which indicate maximum paleotemperatures, were analyzed in all samples containing greater than 0.5% TOC. Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian kerogen is yellow orange to orange, an indication that temperatures were sufficiently high to begin to generate hydrocarbons from lipid-rich organic material. Palo Duro Basin samples have a broad range of vitrinite reflectance values, but populations with the lowest reflectance probably indicate the true temperatures that were reached in the basin. Average reflectance in representative Pennsylvanian vitrinite is 0.52%; in Wolfcampian samples the average reflectance is 0.48%. These values are consistent with kerogen color and suggest that basinal source rocks may have begun to generate hydrocarbons.

  13. Gas/liquid sampler for closed canisters in KW Basin - test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitkoff, C.C.

    1995-01-23

    Test report for the gas/liquid sampler designed and developed for sampling closed canisters in the KW Basin.

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Sampling at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2015 LMS/AMB/S01114 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-November 2014, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico February 2015 RIN 14116607 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site Planned Sampling Map...........................................................3 Data

  15. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site March 2016 LMS/AMB/S01215 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-December 2015, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico March 2016 RIN 15117494 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site Planned Sampling Map...........................................................3 Data Assessment

  16. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site

  17. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site February 2015 LMS/MON/S01214 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-December 2014, Monument Valley, Arizona February 2015 RIN 14126645 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Monument Valley, Arizona, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ..................................................5

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Alternate Water Supply System Sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site May 2014 LMS/RVT/S00314 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-March 2014, Riverton, Wyoming May 2014 RIN 14035986 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, WY, Processing Site, Sample Location Map ...................................................................3 Data

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    February 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site April 2015 LMS/GJO/S00215 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-February 2015, Grand Junction, Colorado, Site April 2015 RIN 15026795 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Sample Location Map

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sampling at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/GRJ/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Grand Junction, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13075515 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ....................................................3 Data Assessment