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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from underground gas storage caverns in salt rock. II: A sample computation and parametric study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is of great importance and necessity to perform quantitative hazard analysis on possible accidental leakage from gas storage cavern in salt rock. To improve the working safety in the cavern, an integrated quantitative method for hazard analysis on natural gas jet release from caverns in salt rock was presented. In this paper, a sample of gas storage cavern in salt rock was analyzed to demonstrate the presented method. Furthermore, the factors that influence the hazard range of leakage accidents from gas storage cavern in salt rock were discussed. The results indicated that the release rate diminishes with increased pipe length due to friction in steady-state. Meanwhile, the hazard distance from production casing also diminishes with increased pipe length. As the pipeline gets as long as several kilometers, the predicted hazard distance will be constant. However, the hazard distance increases with increasing the operating pressure and pipeline diameter.

Shigang Yang; Qin Fang; Hao Wu; Yadong Zhang; Hengbo Xiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

3

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

5

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

7

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

8

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated with Unconsolidated Marine Sediments Diana associated with unconsolidated marine sediments. The goals are to predict gas-hydrate concentration from intercalated with unconsolidated sediments. We show that the geometrical details of how gas hy- drates

Texas at Austin, University of

9

Category:Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Sampling Technique Subcategories This...

10

Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date 1995 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area,

11

Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

Underwood, Jarrod

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Florida Mountains Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radiogenic heat production analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa)

13

Thermal stress on bottom hole rock of gas drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas drilling has higher penetration than mud drilling. The greatest reason for this phenomenon with gas is that the gas is greatly cooled by expansion as it passes through the bit and thereby cools the bottom of the hole. The thermal stress at bottom-hole occurs during this process. The concept of thermal crushing of rocks is analysed in this study. The theoretical methods are developed to analyse thermal stresses and fragmentation induced by cooling of rock. Then, the numerical computation is conducted for the thermal stress equations with the numerical result simulated for the temperature field at the bottom hole to explain the reason of high drilling rates in gas drilling. Furthermore, an experiment was conducted to verify the theory. Therefore, the theories and simulated results in this paper have a guiding signification for best understand the technique and possibly to extend its economic advantage still further. [Received: September 23, 2011; Accepted: November 20, 2011

Shunji Yang; Gonghui Liu; Jun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

15

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

16

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

17

Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas- a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers, a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container, and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use.

Garcia, Jr., Fred (Donora, PA); Schatzel, Steven J. (Bethel Park, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas; a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers and a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container; and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use. 5 figs.

Garcia, F. Jr.; Schatzel, S.J.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

20

Category:Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Soil Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Soil Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Soil Gas Sampling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Flux Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Flux Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Flux Sampling...

22

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689258

23

Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

24

Category:Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Surface Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Surface Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Surface Gas...

25

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

26

Definition: Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Various methods are applied to obtain samples used for determination of the composition of gases present in soils or hydrothermal discharges. The flux of volatile gases emitted from a hydrothermal system can also be determined by measuring the flow of gases at specific locations and comparing it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can provide an indication of hydrothermal activity at depth that is otherwise not apparent. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

27

Rock Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goff, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pre-intrusive metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks can have considerably higher Sr-isotope ratios (0.7061-0.7246 and 0.7090-0.7250, respectively). Hydrothermally altered...

28

Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling...

29

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox, 1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Soil Gas Sampling...

30

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At...

31

Finite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil and Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the geomechanics of oil and gas reservoirs. The fragile microstructure of some rocks makes it difficult to predict of Steel, Aluminum, Concrete, etc. Moreover, the pattern of rock damage in oil and gas reservoirsFinite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

32

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

33

computed seismic speeds and attenuation in rocks with partial gas ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During production of a field, gas may come out of solution and crcatr .... I.: radial spherical coordinate. SC: fractional gas saturation, (a3/b3) t: t,ime .... c#J = 0.30,.

White, J. E.

34

Rock Sampling At Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Zuni Mountains Nm Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radiogenic heat production analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_Sampling_At_Zuni_Mountains_Nm_Area_(Brookins,_1982)&oldid=387056" Category: Exploration Activities

35

An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an axisymmetric diffusion experiment coupled with tracer profiling may be a promising approach to estimate of diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks.

Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

37

Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The distribution of hydrothermally altered rocks was mapped over about 1 km2 in the Sevenmile Hole area. Two to four kilogram hand samples located by a handheld GPS were collected from many outcrops for laboratory analyses References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The

38

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Laboratory experiments aimed at evaluating gas flux sampling methods The value of using the noble gas suite in transport studies is made obvious by the eight-fold enrichment in 4Her132Xe observed in the 80% CO sample (Table 2 1), relative to abundancies in air. Our results at least show that gas samples collected by either sudden pre-evacuated container or gradual gas pump. Removal of tens of cm3 of gas through an access pipe appear to reflect steady-state values. On-site measurements other than CO2 flux could

39

Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Janik, 1992). Hot spring gas samples were collected by submerging a 20-cm-diameter plastic funnel into the pool over the bubble stream. Fumarole gas samples were collected by...

40

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

42

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_(Lewicki_%26_Oldenburg)&oldid=508144" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

43

Rock Sampling At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 30 disseminated gold or hot-spring deposits in the western U.S. were sampled for ammonium-bearing minerals during field reconnaissance studies (Figs. l and 2). Wholerock samples, approximately 3 cm across, were collected from primarily feldspathic or argillaceous lithologies and measured on a laboratory near-infrared spectrometer (Krohn and Altaner, 1987). References M. Dennis Krohn, Carol Kendall, John R. Evans, Terry L. Fries (1993)

44

Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Over 2000 km2 of 5-m resolution Hymap hyperspectral data was acquired in 2004. Subsequent image processing and data analysis has identified reflectance spectra for alunite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite, gypsum, vegetation, and carbonate. A portable spectrometer is being used for in situ validation, along with laboratory measurements and x-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in teh field. We are in the process of producing and validating mineral maps that will be used to narrow the scope

45

Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - archean metavolcanic rocks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Krner, 1985). However, the tectonic setting and age of metavolcanic rocks in Egypt are poorly... metavolcanic rocks. Metavolcanic rocks in Egypt were described by...

47

Gas Permeability of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples under Variable Confining Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

argillite under con?nement: gas and water testing. Phys.Gascoyne, M. , Wuschke, D.M. : Gas migration through water-fractured rock: results of a gas injection test. J.

Liu, Weiqun; Li, Yushou; Wang, Bo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Christopher W. Klein (1 January 2007) Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_(Klein,_2007)&oldid=689399"

49

NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

implements ... NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon components Posted: June 12, 2012 - 1:34pm The National Nuclear Security Administration...

50

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

51

Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location...

52

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration...

53

Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado...

54

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique...

55

Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration Activity...

56

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration...

57

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity...

58

Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity...

59

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Natural radioactivity measurements in rock samples of Cuihua Mountain National Geological Park, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......samples were stored in gas-tight, radon impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...radiation hazard indices from natural radioactivity of some...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Matiullah, Kenawy M. A. Natural radioactivity in marble......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaolan Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Numerical simulation of gas flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical analysis is used to identify the physical phenomena associated with barometrically driven gas (air and water vapor) flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Results from simple finite difference simulations indicate that for a fractured rock scenario, the maximum velocity of air out of an uncased 10 cm borehole is 0.002 m s{sub {minus}1}. An equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was incorporated into a multiphase, multicomponent simulator to test more complex conceptual models. Results indicate that for a typical June day, a diurnal pressure wave propagates about 160 m into the surrounding Tiva Canyon hydrogeologic unit. Dry air that enters the formation evaporates water around the borehole which reduces capillary pressure. Multiphase countercurrent flow develops in the vicinity of the hole; the gas phase flows into the formation while the liquid phase flows toward the borehole. The effect occurs within 0.5 m of the borehole. The amount of water vapor leaving the formation during 1 day is 900 cm{sup 3}. This is less than 0.1% of the total recharge into the formation, suggesting that the barometric effect may be insignificant in drying the unsaturated zone. However, gas phase velocities out of the borehole (3 m s{sup {minus}1}), indicating that observed flow rates from wells along the east flank of Yucca Mountain were able to be simulated with a barometric model.

Cooper, C.A. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspo hard rock Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

60 Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel 3, Stage 2: p....

65

REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

Ronald C. Surdam

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

67

Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Maui_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689419" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages

68

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Norman (2002) shows that the Cerro Prieto gas analyses collected by Cathy Janik and Alfred Truesdell from1977 to 1998 plot on a C02/N2 condensation

69

Ultrasonic velocity measurements for synthetic gas?hydrate samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory ultrasonic methods offer a way of studying acoustic velocity of a gas?hydrate bearing formation. By measuringultrasonic velocities of the gas?hydrate samples in various temperature and pressure conditions more effective inversion techniques can be developed to quantitatively evaluate gas?hydrate concentration and distributions. Low?temperature laboratory measurements of compressional velocities in compacted samples are conducted. These gas?hydrate samples are synthesized by using various densities at various pressures and temperatures. At ?10C the compressional velocities of the compacted gas?hydrate samples are from 2440 to 3570 m/s with the density range from 475 to 898 kg/m3. Compressional velocity measurements are made where the temperature and pressure can be controlled. When the pore pressure increases from 10 to 40 MPa the compressional velocities of the sample increases from 2340 to 2600 m/s at 1.5C. When the temperature decreases from 10 to ?13C the compressional velocity will increase from 3600 to 3800 m/s at a pore pressure of 6 MPa. Our experimental results are qualitatively in agreement with those of weighted average model and the Biot?Gassmanns model when the gas?hydrate concentration in a sediment bearing sand is about 20%. [Work supported by National Natural Science Fundation of China No. 10534040.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Organic geochemistry of Mississippian shales (Bowland Shale Formation) in central Britain: Implications for depositional environment, source rock and gas shale potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Marine Carboniferous shales are proven hydrocarbon source rocks in central Britain. In this contribution the depositional environment and shale gas/liquid potential of the lower Namurian part of the Bowland Shale Formation is studied using 77 thermally immature samples from the Duffield borehole. The Bowland Shale Formation comprises mudstone and turibidite lithofacies reflecting a pronounced sea level controlled cyclicity. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the mudstones lithofacies (including marine bands) and of fine-grained rocks within the turibidite lithofacies varies between 1.3 and 9.1%. Hydrogen index (HI) values imply the presence of kerogen type III-II. According to biomarker ratios and bulk geochemical parameters, marine bands (maximum flooding surfaces, mfs) were deposited in deep water with slightly enhanced, normal, or slightly reduced salinity. Mudstones of the highstand systems tract (HST) were deposited in environments with normal to reduced salinity, whereas photic zone anoxia favoured the preservation of marine organic matter during deposition of the mfs and the HST. The supply of landplant debris increased during the HST. Turbidites and their non-calcareous mudstone equivalents represent lowstand systems tracts deposited in low salinity environments. Terrestrial organic matter dominates in turbiditic sediments, marine organisms prevail in time-equivalent mudstones. Mudstone beneath marine bands represents transgressive systems tracts when normal marine conditions and photic zone anoxia were re-established. The mudstone lithofacies exhibits a very good to excellent potential to generate conventional mixed oil and gas. TOC content of fine-grained rocks in the turbidite lithofacies depends on the amount of detrital minerals supplied from the south. Moreover, their organic matter is gas-prone. High TOC contents and large thicknesses of the mudstone lithofacies show that the Bowland Shale Formation holds a significant shale gas/liquid potential in areas with appropriate maturity. A relatively low average HI and high clay contents may have negative effects on the shale gas potential.

D. Gross; R.F. Sachsenhofer; A. Bechtel; L. Pytlak; B. Rupprecht; E. Wegerer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Design of Sampling Strategies to Detect CO2 Emissions From Hidden Geothermal Systems, Lewicki, Oldenburg and Kennedy. The objective of this project is to investigate geothermal CO2 monitoring in the near surface as a tool to discover hidden geothermal reservoirs. A primary goal of this project is to develop an approach that places emphasis on cost and time-efficient near-surface exploration methods and yields results to guide and focus more cost-intensive geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids. To this end, we present (1) the physical properties of CO2 key to its transport in the

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid volcano-plutonic rocks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the first of a long string of bad jokes, and start looking at rocks. Get yer hiking boots ready. Purpose... will be placed on the field relationships of the various rock units...

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting natural gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

natural gas Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: affecting natural gas Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 International Conference on Gas...

74

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

75

Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method of obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant.

McManus, Gary J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Motes, Billy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bird, Susan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Self-contained cryogenic gas sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for obtaining a whole gas sample, is composed of: a sample vessel having an inlet for receiving a gas sample; a controllable valve mounted for controllably opening and closing the inlet; a valve control coupled to the valve for opening and closing the valve at selected times; a portable power source connected for supplying operating power to the valve control; and a cryogenic coolant in thermal communication with the vessel for cooling the interior of the vessel to cryogenic temperatures. A method is described for obtaining an air sample using the apparatus described above, by: placing the apparatus at a location at which the sample is to be obtained; operating the valve control to open the valve at a selected time and close the valve at a selected subsequent time; and between the selected times maintaining the vessel at a cryogenic temperature by heat exchange with the coolant. 3 figs.

McManus, G.J.; Motes, B.G.; Bird, S.K.; Kotter, D.K.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

78

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2006.01.01 - 2006.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. In an extension of our earlier work on crop systems, we investigated the effects of burning on the cycles of carbon, water, and energy in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing

79

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

80

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

Postma, Arlin K. (Halfway, OR)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently received a deposit sample from the Melter Primary Off Gas System (POG) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This sample was composed of material that had been collected while the quencher was in operation January 27, 2011 through March 31, 2011. DWPF requested, through a technical assistance request, characterization of the melter off-gas deposits by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The purpose of the Melter Off-Gas System is to reduce the amount of radioactive particles and mercury in the gases vented to the atmosphere. Gases emitted from the melter pass through the primary film cooler, quencher, Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT), Steam Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), a condenser, a high efficiency mist eliminator, and a high efficiency particulate air filter, before being vented to the Process Vessel Vent System. The film coolers cool the gases leaving the melter vapor space from {approx}750 C to {approx}375 C, by introducing air and steam to the flow. In the next step, the quencher cools the gas to about 60 C by bringing the condensate from the OGCT in contact with the effluent (Figure 1). Most of the steam in the effluent is then condensed and the melter vapor space pressure is reduced. The purpose of the OGCT is to collect and store the condensate formed during the melter operation. Condensate from the OGCT is circulated to the SAS and atomized with steam. This atomized condensate is mixed with the off-gas to wet and join the particulate which is then removed in the cyclone. The next stage incorporates a chilled water condenser which separates the vapors and elemental mercury from the off-gas steam. Primary off-gas deposit samples from the DWPF melter have previously been analyzed. In 2003, samples from just past the film cooler, from the inlet of the quencher and inside the quencher were analyzed at SRNL. It was determined that the samples were a mixture of sludge and glass frit. The major component was Si along with Fe, Al, and other elements in the radioactive waste being processed. The deposits analyzed also contained U-235 fission products and actinide elements. Prior to that, deposits in the off-gas system in the DWPF nonradioactive half scale melter and the one-tenth scale integrated DWPF melter system were analyzed and determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides entrained with iron oxides, spinels and frit particles formed by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Additional work was performed in 2007 in which researchers similarly found the deposits to be a combination of sludge and frit particles.

Newell, J.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - archaean sedimentary rocks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Archaean," the rocks are ... Source: Hamilton, Warren B. - Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines Collection: Geosciences 87 Geologic Time Name...

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted three-dimensional rock Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are economically extractable tend to be concentrated in places where hot or even molten rock (magma) ... Source: Stanford University - Department of Energy Resources Engineering,...

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered granitic rock Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

whereas Turgutlu rocks can be considered ... Source: UCLA, Ion Microprobe Facility Collection: Geosciences Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid rock discharges Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dioxide from acidic brine. For a brine-rock ... Source: Heller, Paul - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming Collection: Geosciences 55 Chapter 1....

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft gas turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aircraft gas turbines...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced gas turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced gas turbines...

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation gas turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation gas turbines...

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic gas pipeline Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pipeline Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arctic gas pipeline...

91

Gas Permeability of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples under Variable Confining Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples Smeulders, D.M.J. ,stress on permeability of coal. Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci.of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples under Variable Con?ning

Liu, Weiqun; Li, Yushou; Wang, Bo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

Postma, A.K.

1984-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggregates rock and stone Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;15 Figure A. 10: Picture BB07C1B... Beam Mark: BB07 Cut Location and View: Concrete Type: Self consolidating Aggregate: River Rock Cut ID... : Self consolidating...

94

Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor sample results - August 1993 samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-C-111 is on the ferrocyanide Watch List. Gas and vapor samples were collected to assure safe conditions before planned intrusive work was performed. Sample analyses showed that hydrogen is about ten times higher in the tank headspace than in ambient air. Nitrous oxide is about sixty times higher than ambient levels. The hydrogen cyanide concentration was below 0.04 ppbv, and the average NO{sub x} concentration was 8.6 ppmv.

Huckaby, J.L.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced natural-gas reciprocating Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

natural-gas reciprocating Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced natural-gas reciprocating Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

96

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Suitability of Tedlar gas sampling bags for siloxane quantification in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill or digester gas can contain man-made volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS), usually in the range of a few milligrams per normal cubic metre (Nm3). Until now, no standard method for siloxane quantification exists and there is controversy with respect to which sampling procedure is most suitable. This paper presents an analytical and a sampling procedure for the quantification of common VMS in biogas via GCMS and polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar) bags. Two commercially available Tedlar bag models are studied. One is equipped with a polypropylene valve with integrated septum, the other with a dual port fitting made from stainless steel. Siloxane recovery in landfill gas samples is investigated as a function of storage time, temperature, surface-to-volume ratio and background gas. Recovery was found to depend on the type of fitting employed. The siloxanes sampled in the bag with the polypropylene valve show high and stable recovery, even after more than 30 days. Sufficiently low detection limits below 10?gNm?3 and good reproducibility can be achieved. The method is therefore well applicable to biogas, greatly facilitating sampling in comparison with other common techniques involving siloxane enrichment using sorption media.

M. Ajhar; B. Wens; K.H. Stollenwerk; G. Spalding; S. Yce; T. Melin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from underground gas storage caverns in salt rock. I: Models and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is very important and necessary to perform quantitative hazard analysis for possible accidental leakage from an underground gas storage cavern in salt rock. An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from salt caverns is presented in this paper, which was constituted by a revised model for gas leakage rate calculation, a consequence analysis and a model of probability assessment for harm. The presented method was validated by comparing the analytical results with the data collected from the real accidents (including the leakage, jet fire, fireball and vapor cloud explosion). It is indicated that the proposed method was more accurate than the TNT equivalence method for vapor cloud explosion and gave more reasonable results when applied to the consequence analysis for the thermal radiation from jet fire and fireball.

Shigang Yang; Qin Fang; Yadong Zhang; Hao Wu; Linjian Ma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide on gas shale and pure mineral samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have measured methane and carbon dioxide adsorption isotherms at 40C on gas shale samples from the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Marcellus and Montney reservoirs. Carbon dioxide isotherms were included to assess its potential for preferential adsorption, with implications for its use as a fracturing fluid and/or storage in depleted shale reservoirs. To better understand how the individual mineral constituents that comprise shales contribute to adsorption, measurements were made on samples of pure carbon, illite and kaolinite as well. We were able to successfully fit all adsorption data for both gases in accordance with a Langmuir isotherm model. Our results show carbon dioxide to have approximately 23 times the adsorptive capacity of methane in both the pure mineral constituents and actual shale samples. In addition to obvious microstructural and compositional differences between real rocks and pure minerals, we hypothesize that water adsorption plays an important role in regulating surface area availability for other molecules to adsorb. The resultant volumetric swelling strain was also measured as a function of pressure/adsorption. We observe both clay and pure carbon to swell an amount that is approximately linearly proportional to the amount of adsorption.

Robert Heller; Mark Zoback

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Shale gas rock characterization and 3D submicron pore network reconstruction .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??"Determining shale gas petrophysical properties is the cornerstone to any reservoir-management practice. Hitherto, conventional core analyses are inadequate to attain the petrophysical properties of shale (more)

Elgmati, Malek, 1982-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689392

103

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689255"

104

Application Of Fluid Inclusion And Rock-Gas Analysis In Mineral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineral surfaces by heating. The most abundant of these gases, besides H2O, are usually CO2, CH4, CO and N2. We have used a gas chromatograph to analyze these gases in fluid...

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - american natural gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

natural gas Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: american natural gas Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SPE 91413SPE 91413 Anangela Garcia...

106

Gas Chromatographic Determination of Aviation Gasoline and JP-4 Jet Fuel in Subsurface Core Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......capillary column gas chromatography...subsurface material. Water samples from...have a higher water solubility than the other...aroma- tics in water and solid wastes...jars inside a nitrogen atmosphere glovebox...subsequent analysis. Gas chromatography......

Steve A. Vandegrift; Don H. Kampbell

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

108

Systems acceptance and operability testing for rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides instructions for the system acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling system, modified for use in flammable gas tanks.

Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

109

Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity...

110

Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Additional...

111

Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration...

112

Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

113

Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Valley Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Additional...

114

Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area...

115

Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

116

Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs Valley Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Gabbs_Valley_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689423" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

117

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

118

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

119

Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

120

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanometry sampling conducted in the Keaau prospect were similarly unable to define any anomalies that could reasonably be interpreted to be due to subsurface thermal effects. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Mauna_Loa_Northeast_Rift_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=389039"

122

Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the geothermal area. Ultimately for potential development of EGS. Notes A CO2 soil gas flux survey was conducted in areas recognized as geothermal upflow zones...

123

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera

124

Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Rye_Patch_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689417" Categories: Exploration Activities

125

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells.

126

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Deborah Bergfeld, William C. Evans, James F. Howle, Christopher D. Farrar (2006) Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Bergfeld,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=386973

127

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References David I. Norman, Joseph Moore (2004) Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Norman_%26_Moore,_2004)&oldid=689367"

128

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

129

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

130

Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

131

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

132

Landfill gas emission prediction using Voronoi diagrams and importance sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are among the nation's largest emitters of methane, a key greenhouse gas, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the surficial methane emissions from landfills. There are limitations in obtaining accurate ... Keywords: Air dispersion modeling, Delaunay tessellation, Kriging, Least squares, MSW landfill, Voronoi diagram

K. R. Mackie; C. D. Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

134

July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Sampling Activity Date - 2008 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09082006 to 10242006) by the eddy...

136

Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanation surveys were performed over much of the accessible surface of Lualualei Valley (Cox and Thomas, 1979). The results of these surveys (Figs 7 and 8) delineated several areas in which soil mercury concentrations or radon emanation rates were substantially above normal background values. Some of these areas were apparently coincident with the mapped fracture systems associated with the caldera boundaries.

137

Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Black Warrior Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Black_Warrior_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689412" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities

138

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and carbon dioxide (CO2) all appear in anomalously high concentrations near the hot springs and at the junction of the Fumarole Valley and the HSBV. This indicates either that Hg is being lost from a reservoir due to boiling and steam loss, probably northwest of the junction, or erosion has carried these elements in sediment from the higher elevation manifestations. The presence of such volatiles in

139

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J.

140

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lahaina-Kaanapali Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry patterns observed for the Lahaina prospect were similar to those found in Olowalu. Several localized zones of high mercury concentration or enhanced radon emanation were observed, but showed little relationship to each other or to the recognized geologic structure in the area. The data were interpreted to suggest that there might be a small thermal anomaly to the northeast of the

142

Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The high degree of cultural activity (e.g. residential areas, streets, jet runways, etc.) on Mokapu both limited the extent of the soil geochemical surveys performed and rendered their interpretation much more difficult. Soil mercury concentrations and radon emanometry data on the peninsula showed a few localized high values (Figs 13, 14), but no consistent correlation between the anomalous zones and geologic features could be

143

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry surveys were conducted along the stream beds in both Olowalu and Ukumehame Canyons and on the coastal alluvial fans (Cox and Cuff, 1981a). The results of these surveys indicated that a few minor -nomalies might be present. However, the extreme topographic relief in the area did not permit sufficient coverage of the

144

Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Sampling_At_Glass_Buttes_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689421" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities

145

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

146

Mineralogy, petrology and whole-rock chemistry of selected mechanical test samples of Yucca Mountain tuffs; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petrologic, bulk chemical and mineralogic data are presented for 19 samples of tuffaceous rocks from core holes UE-25a{number_sign}1, USW G-1, USW GU-3, and USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The suite of samples contains a wide variety of petrologic types, including zeolitized, glassy, and devitrified tuffs. Data include hand sample and thin section descriptions (with modal analyses for which uncertainties are estimated), and major element analyses with uncertainty estimates. No uncertainties were estimated for qualitative mineral identifications by X-ray diffraction. 5 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Gas, Condensate, Brine, and Solids: Pleasant Bayou Well Test, 1988-Present  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This section covers analyses performed on gas. Chemical analyses can only be related to well performance if the quantity of the various fluids are known. The IGT on-line data computer system measures the flowrate, the pressures, and the temperatures every 10 seconds. These values are automatically recorded over operator selected intervals both on magnetic media and on paper. This allows review of samples versus operating conditions. This paper covers analyses performed on gas, including: An approximate sampling schedule during flow tests; On-site sample handling and storage of gas samples; Addresses of laboratories that perform off site analyses; Sample shipping instructions; Data archiving; and Quality Control/Quality Assurance. It is expected that the above procedures will change as the flow test progresses, but deviations from the written procedures should be approved by C. Hayden of IGT and noted on the results of the analysis.

Hayden, Chris

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

2-D numerical simulation of digital rock experiments with lattice gas automation for electrical properties of reservoir formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......41074103 from National Natural Science Foundation...law from lattice-gas hydrodynamics, Phys...equation using a lattice gas Boltzmann method...1991b. Lattice gas automata for flow...Logging Analysist, Corpus Christi, TX, 1982 July......

Wenzheng Yue; Guo Tao; Shangxu Wang; Bin Tian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radon emanometry data for the same locality (Fig. 61) (Cox, 1980) similarly presented a complicated pattern of radon outgassing along the lower rift zone. Even though complexities are present within the rift zone, there

151

Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kawaihae Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil geochemistry yielded quite complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radonemanation rates within the survey area (Cox and Cuff, 1981c). Mercury concentrations (Fig. 38) showed a general minimum along the Kawaihae-Waimea roads and a broad trend of increasing mercury

152

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References J. L. Lewicki, M. L. Fischer, G. E. Hilley (2008) Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Lewicki,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=508150" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

153

Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes differences in the gaseous geochemical signatures between the Steamboat Springs and Brady's Hot Springs geothermal systems and illustrates the usefulness of Hg vapor in soils at Desert Peak for mapping the trends of concealed geologic

154

Tank 241-S-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

Huckaby, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bratzel, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Hualalai lower northwest rift and southern flank were sampled for soil mercury concentration and radon emanation rates (Cox and Cuff, 1981d). The data generated by these surveys yielded complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radon emanation rates that generally did not show coincident anomalies (Figs 42, 43). References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

156

Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks Under Fluid and Gas Flow-Physical and Chemical Effects: a Laboratory Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the culmination of a research project in which we investigated the complex modulus change in partially fluid saturated porous rocks. The investigation started with simple flow experiments over ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' surfaces, progressed to moduli measurements on partially filled single cracks, to measurements in ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' porous rocks and finally to a feasibility study in the field. For the experiments with the simple geometries we were able to measure fundamental physical properties such as contact angles of the meniscus and time dependent forces required to get the meniscus moving and to keep it moving at various velocities. From the data thus gathered we were able to interpret the complex elastic moduli data we measured in the partially saturated single cracks. While the geometry in real rocks is too complex to make precise calculations we determined that we had indeed identified the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the moduli we had measured. Thus encouraged by the laboratory studies we embarked on a field experiment in the desert of Arizona. The field site allowed for controlled irrigation. Instrumentation for fluid sampling and water penetration were already in place. The porous loosely consolidated rocks at the site were not ideal for finding the effects of the attenuation mechanism we had identified in the lab, but for logistic and cost constraint reasons we chose to field test the idea at that site. Tiltmeters and seismometers were installed and operated nearly continuously for almost 3 years. The field was irrigated with water in the fall of 2003 and with water containing a biosurfactant in the fall of 2004. We have indications that the biosurfactant irrigation has had a notable effect on the tilt data.

Harmut Spetzler

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Thermal modeling of core sampling in flammable gas waste tanks. Part 2: Rotary-mode sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks at Hanford site includes mixtures of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite with organic compounds. The waste can produce undesired violent exothermic reactions when heated locally during the rotary-mode sampling. Experiments are performed varying the downward force at a maximum rotational speed of 55 rpm and minimum nitrogen purge flow of 30 scfm. The rotary drill bit teeth-face temperatures are measured. The waste is simulated with a low thermal conductivity hard material, pumice blocks. A torque meter is used to determine the energy provided to the drill string. The exhaust air-chip temperature as well as drill string and drill bit temperatures and other key operating parameters were recorded. A two-dimensional thermal model is developed. The safe operating conditions were determined for normal operating conditions. A downward force of 750 at 55 rpm and 30 scfm nitrogen purge flow was found to yield acceptable substrate temperatures. The model predicted experimental results reasonably well. Therefore, it could be used to simulate abnormal conditions to develop procedures for safe operations.

Unal, C.; Poston, D.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Group; Witwer, K.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States). Engineering Testing Lab.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluating Local Elastic Anisotropy of Rocks and Sediments by Means of Optoacoustics While Drilling Oil and Gas Boreholes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optoacoustic method of evaluation of local elastic anisotropy while drilling oil or gas boreholes usually assumes laboratory tests...1]. These are so-called go-through tests. The pick-up of the pulse is pro...

A. V. Gladilin; S. V. Egerev; O. B. Ovchinnikov

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Joint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling-based stochastic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hypothesis using a sampling-based stochastic model, based on a typical situation of gas explorationJoint inversion of seismic AVO and EM data for gas saturation estimation using a sampling- based stochastic model Jinsong Chen*, G. Michael Hoversten, and D. W. Vasco, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Chen, Jinsong

160

2D and 3D simulations of damage in 5-grain copper gas gun samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2D and 3D Hydrocode simulations were done of a gas gun damage experiment involving a 5 grain sample with a polycrystalline flyer with a velocity of about 140 m/s. The simulations were done with the Flag hydrocode and involved explicit meshing of the 5 grains with a single crystal plasticity model and a pressure based damage model. The calculated fields were compared with two cross sections from the recovered sample. The sample exhibited grain boundary cracks at high angle and tilt grain boundaries in the sample but not at a sigma 3 twin boundary. However, the calculation showed large gradients in stress and strain at only the twin boundary, contrary to expectation. This indicates that the twin boundary is quite strong to resist the predicted high gradients and that the calculation needs the addition of a grain boundary fracture mode. The 2D and 3D simulations were compared.

Tonks, Davis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dennis - Koller, Darcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Escobedo - Diaz, Juan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas Samples Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1). References David Norman, Nigel Blarney, Lynne Kurilovitch (2002) New

162

Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on all of the data, McLin concluded that there was little to no correlation between values for CO2 flux and known or postulated faults, and between the CO2 flux and the shallow thermal anomaly. Instead, the flux values appeared to depict a completely random pattern throughout the study area. Notably, absolute values for CO2 flux were elevated throughout the surveyed areas (McLin, 2004). A possible explanation not considered by

163

An Alternative to Performing Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Container Headspace Gas Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is operating under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) for contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste. The HWFP contains limitations on allowable emissions from waste disposed in the underground. This environmental performance standard imposed on the WIPP consists of limiting volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from emplaced waste to ensure protection of human health and the environment. The standard is currently met by tracking individual waste container headspace gas concentrations, which are determined by headspace gas sampling and analysis of CH TRU waste containers. The WIPP is seeking a HWFP modification to allow the disposal of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Because RH TRU waste is limited to approximately 5% of the waste volume and is emplaced in the disposal room walls, it is possible to bound the potential RH TRU waste contribution to VOC emissions using conservative upper bounds. These conservative upper bounds were developed as an alternative to RH TRU waste canister headspace gas sampling and analysis. The methodology used to perform the calculations used to evaluate VOC emissions from emplaced RH TRU waste canisters applied the same equations as those used to evaluate VOC emissions in the original HWFP application.

Spangler, L. R.; Djordjevic, S. M.; Kehrman, R. F.; Most, W. A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

Characterization and Dessolution Test results for the January 2005 DWPF Off Gas Condensate Tank Samples (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) collects the condensate from the off-gas system of the melter. The condensate stream contains entrained solids that collect in the OGCT. Water from the OGCT is re-circulated to the Steam Atomized Scrubber and quencher and may provide a mechanism for re-introducing the particulates into the off-gas system. These particulates are thought to be responsible for plugging the downstream High Efficiency Mist Eliminator filters. Therefore, the OGCT needs to be periodically cleaned to remove the build-up of entrained solids. Currently, the OGCT is cleaned by adding nominally 12 wt% nitric acid with agitation to slurry the solids from the tank. Samples from the OGCT were sent to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) for characterization and to conduct tests to determine the optimum nitric acid concentration and residence time to allow more effective cleaning of the OGCT. This report summarizes the chemical and radionuclide results and the results from the nitric acid dissolution testing at 50% and 12% obtained for the OGCT sample.

Fellinger, T

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-T-111 using the vapor sampling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents sampling data resulting from the January 20, 1995, sampling of SST 241-T-111 using the vapor sampling system.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-BY-112 using the vapor sampling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents sampling data from the November 18, 1994, sampling of SST 241-BY-112 using the vapor sampling system.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisting gas optimization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Summary: -organized natural gas industry that markets natural gas and provides information and assistance for fuel conversions... 1...

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual landfill gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gas emissions and potential aqueous... Transfer Stations (MTS); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Landfill Gas (LFG): Geographic Wormation Systems (GIS... . Landfills generate gas...

169

Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus.

Rossabi, Joseph (105 Michael Ct., Aiken, SC 29801); May, Christopher P. (5002 Hesperus Dr., Columbia, MD 21044); Pemberton, Bradley E. (131 Glencarin Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Shinn, Jim (Box 65, RFD. #1, South Royalton, VT 05068); Sprague, Keith (Box 234 Rte. 14, Brookfield, VT 05036)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A method for direct, semi-quantitative analysis of gas phase samples using gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and complete GCICP-MS method is described for direct analysis of trace metals in a gas phase process stream. The proposed method is derived from standard analytical procedures developed for ICP-MS, which are regularly exercised in standard ICP-MS laboratories. In order to implement the method, a series of empirical factors were generated to calibrate detector response with respect to a known concentration of an internal standard analyte. Calibrated responses are ultimately used to determine the concentration of metal analytes in a gas stream using a semi-quantitative algorithm. The method was verified using a traditional gas injection from a GC sampling valve and a standard gas mixture containing either a 1 ppm Xe + Kr mix with helium balance or 100 ppm Xe with helium balance. Data collected for Xe and Kr gas analytes revealed that agreement of 620% with the actual concentration can be expected for various experimental conditions. To demonstrate the method using a relevant unknown gas mixture, experiments were performed for continuous 4 and 7 hour periods using a Hg-containing sample gas that was co-introduced into the GC sample loop with the xenon gas standard. System performance and detector response to the dilute concentration of the internal standard were pre-determined, which allowed semi-quantitative evaluation of the analyte. The calculated analyte concentrations varied during the course of the 4 hour experiment, particularly during the first hour of the analysis where the actual Hg concentration was under predicted by up to 72%. Calculated concentration improved to within 3060% for data collected after the first hour of the experiment. Similar results were seen during the 7 hour test with the deviation from the actual concentration being 1181% during the first hour and then decreasing for the remaining period. The method detection limit (MDL) was determined for the mercury by injecting the sample gas into the system following a period of equilibration. The MDL for Hg was calculated as 6.8 ?g m{sup ? 3}. This work describes the first complete GCICP-MS method to directly analyze gas phase samples, and detailed sample calculations and comparisons to conventional ICP-MS methods are provided.

Carter, Kimberly E.; Gerdes, Kirk

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Petrographic, Mineralogic, and Geochemical Studies of Hydrocarbon-derived Authigenic Carbonate Rock from Gas Venting, Seepage, Free Gas, and Gas Hydrate Sites in the Gulf of Mexico and offshore India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ACR collected from the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and ACR recovered from drilled cores in the Krishna-Godawari (KG) basin offshore India were used. All study sites are associated with hydrocarbon gas venting, seepage, free gas, or gas hydrate...

Jung, Woodong

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

White Rock  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Furnished house for rent in rural White Rock Bright and sunny Ideal for a young family Safe neighborhood 10 min drive to LANL 1300 per month, basic utilities included 1180 sq ft....

174

Rock magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The past three decades have witnessed a new paradigm, the plate tectonics paradigm, in Earth sciences. The record of the Earth's magnetic field stored in rocks played a major role in the establishment of this par...

Ronald T. Merrill

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - active gas handling Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

geopolitics of gas working paper series THE BELARUS CONNECTION: EXPORTING RUSSIAN GAS TO GERMANY... AND POLAND david victor and nadejda makarova victor 12;The Belarus Connection:...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry and Physics Discussions Trace gas measurements from... ., Rinsland, C. P., Stiller, G. P., and Zander, R.: On the assessment and uncertainty of atmospheric trace gas......

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hot-gas filter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

au Journal de Physique 111,Volume 3, dtcembre 1993 Summary: aredownstreamof the gasifier,namelythe fuelgascooler, the hot gas filter and the ductwork liner. The gas stream......

179

Method and apparatus for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL) [Pinson, AL; Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL) [Pelham, AL; Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL) [Birmingham, AL

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Method and apparatus maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL); Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL); Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

182

Sampling and Analysis of the Headspace Gas in 3013 Type Plutonium Storage Containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) sites have packaged approximately 5200 3013 containers to date. One of the requirements specified in DOESTD-3013, which specifies requirements for packaging plutonium bearing materials, is that the material be no greater than 0.5 weight percent moisture. The containers are robust, nested, welded vessels. A shelf life surveillance program was established to monitor these cans over their 50 year design life. In the event pressurization is detected by radiography, it will be necessary to obtain a head space gas sample from the pressurized container. This technique is also useful to study the head space gas in cans selected for random destructive evaluation. The atmosphere is sampled and the hydrogen to oxygen ratio is measured to determine the effects of radiolysis on the moisture in the container. A system capable of penetrating all layers of a 3013 container assembly and obtaining a viable sample of the enclosed gas and an estimate of internal pressure was designed.

Jackson, Jay M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Dallas D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

183

Calculated and measured gas formation in beryllium samples irradiated in the high flux materials testing reactor BR2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium samples have been irradiated in BR2, the materials testing reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN at Mol, Belgium, up to fission fluence values of 5.2 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} at low temperature. The gas formation (helium, tritium), as measured by SCK/CEN, as well as the induced swelling of the beryllium samples and the enhancement of the swelling due to annealing have been presented at the 17th SOFT Conference (Rome, 14--18 Sept., 1992). Since this conference, helium measurements on the same samples have been carried out at RI and calculations of the gas production have been performed, taking into account the various formation schemes. The experimental results from SCK/CEN and from RI are compared with the calculated gas formations.

De Raedt, C.M.; Sannen, L.F.; Vanmechelen, P.J. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium); Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Comparison of thermoelectric and permeation dryers for sulfur dioxide removal during sample conditioning of wet gas streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue gas conditioning for moisture removal is commonly performed for criteria pollutant measurements, in particular for extractive CEM systems at combustion sources. An implicit assumption is that conditioning systems specifically remove moisture without affecting pollutant and diluent concentrations. Gas conditioning is usually performed by passing the flue gas through a cold trap (Peltier or thermoelectric dryer) to remove moisture by condensation, which is subsequently extracted by a peristaltic pump. Many air pollutants are water-soluble and potentially susceptible to removal in a condensation dryer from gas interaction with liquid water. An alternative technology for gas conditioning is the permeation dryer, where the flue gas passes through a selectively permeable membrane for moisture removal. In this case water is transferred through the membrane while other pollutants are excluded, and the gas does not contact condensed liquid. Laboratory experiments were performed to measure the relative removal of a water-soluble pollutant (sulfur dioxide, SO{sub 2}) by the two conditioning techniques. A wet gas generating system was used to create hot, wet gas streams of known composition (15% and 30% moisture, balance nitrogen) and flow rate. Pre-heated SO{sub 2} was dynamically spiked into the wet stream using mass flow meters to achieve concentrations of 20, 50, and 100 ppm. The spiked gas was directed through a heated sample line to either a thermoelectric or a permeation conditioning system. Two gas analyzers (Western Research UV gas monitor, KVB/Analect FTIR spectrometer) were used to measure the SO{sub 2} concentration after conditioning. Both analytic methods demonstrated that SO{sub 2} is removed to a significantly greater extent by the thermoelectric dryer. These results have important implications for SO{sub 2} monitoring and emissions trading.

Dunder, T.A. [Entropy, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Research Div.; Leighty, D.A. [Perma Pure, Inc., Toms River, NJ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - allothermal gasification gas- Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the gasifer, could cause... 2002. 13. Hansen, Martin, Gas Cleaning and Gas Engines for Small-Scale Biomass Gasification... , Orlando, Florida, USA NAWTEC18-3521 STATUS OF...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon gas pressure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure of each gas in the chamber atmosphere... Bio390 Problem: Gas Laws thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Dept. ... Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy...

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial blood gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

54 ml CO2 dL blood The total CO2 content of blood in any systemic artery 49 ml CO2 d... of gas exchange with environment Difference in blood respiratory gas after...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-sea gas exchange Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

127 1 Problem Set 3: MAE 127 Summary: and 3 look at the problem of estimating air-sea CO2 gas exchange. The gas transfer velocity defining air-sea... CO2 exchange is a function...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol gas additives Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alcohol. In addition, you will not want to use... , methyl gas, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, wood alcohol, carbon, water, and a lot of other... if gas storage tanks...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gas annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reactive trace gas with a current lifetime in the atmosphere of w... gas'. The greenhouse effect of one molecule of CH4 ... Source: USGS Western Region Coastal and Marine...

191

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

192

Materials processing issues for non-destructive laser gas sampling (NDLGS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Destructive Laser Gas Sampling (NDLGS) process essentially involves three steps: (1) laser drilling through the top of a crimped tube made of 304L stainles steel (Hammar and Svennson Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} = 1.55, produced in 1985); (2) gas sampling; and (3) laser re-welding of the crimp. All three steps are performed in a sealed chamber with a fused silica window under controlled vacuum conditions. Quality requirements for successful processing call for a hermetic re-weld with no cracks or other defects in the fusion zone or HAZ. It has been well established that austenitic stainless steels ({gamma}-SS), such as 304L, can suffer from solidification cracking if their Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} is below a critical value that causes solidification to occur as austenite (fcc structure) and their combined impurity level (%P+%S) is above {approx}0.02%. Conversely, for Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} values above the critical level, solidification occurs as ferrite (bcc structure), and cracking propensity is greatly reduced at all combined impurity levels. The consensus of results from studies of several researchers starting in the late 1970's indicates that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value is {approx}1.5 for arc welds. However, more recent studies by the author and others show that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value increases to {approx}1 .6 for weld processes with very rapid thermal cycles, such as the pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) process used here. Initial attempts at NDLGS using pulsed LBW resulted in considerable solidification cracking, consistent with the results of work discussed above. After a brief introduction to the welding metallurgy of {gamma}-SS, this presentation will review the results of a study aimed at developing a production-ready process that eliminates cracking. The solution to the cracking issue, developed at LANL, involved locally augmenting the Cr content by applying either Cr or a Cr-rich stainless steel (ER 312) to the top of the crimp using the electro-spark deposition (ESD) process followed by laser mixing, drilling and rewelding. Results of a study of the ESD parameters on deposition rate and efficiency will be discussed along with mass balance calculations for determining the desired Cr content to eliminate cracking. The study also required purchase of new pulsed Nd:YAG laser welders. Evaluation of the performance of the new lasers, including beam profiling results, will also be presented. Development of a mixing, drilling and re-welding process at atmospheric pressure with inert gas shielding demonstrated the efficacy of the Cr-augmentation approach. However, extending the process to vacuum conditions proved more challenging owing to loss of laser transmission through the window from spatter and condensation of metal vapors. Solutions developed to circumvent hese issues will be reviewed. Weld microstructures found with various Cr levels will be presented and discussed.

Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

193

Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994 and December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

Huckaby, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bratzel, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Real-time quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of gas in boreholefluid samples acquired using the U-Tube sampling methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling of fluids in deep boreholes is challenging becauseof the necessity to minimize external contamination and maintain sampleintegrity during recovery. The U-tube sampling methodology was developedto collect large volume, multiphase samples at in situ pressures. As apermanent or semi-permanent installation, the U-tube can be used forrapidly acquiring multiple samples or it may be installed for long-termmonitoring applications. The U-tube was first deployed in Liberty County,TX to monitor crosswell CO2 injection as part of the Frio CO2sequestration experiment. Analysis of gases (dissolved or separate phase)was performed in the field using a quadrupole mass spectrometer, whichserved as the basis for determining the arrival of the CO2 plume. Thepresence of oxygen and argon in elevated concentrations, along withreduced methane concentration, indicate sample alteration caused by theintroduction of surface fluids during borehole completion. Despiteproducing the well to eliminate non-native fluids, measurementsdemonstrate that contamination persists until the immiscible CO2injection swept formation fluid into the observationwellbore.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - army gas-cooled reactor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENABLING SUSTAINABLE NUCLEAR POWER Summary: and NRE Design Class., "Advances in the Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor Concept", Nucl... . Tedder, J. Lackey, J....

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - ar-rich source gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

argon (Ar)-rich atmosphere... in natural gas bubble plumes: observations from the Coal Oil Point marine hydrocarbon ... Source: California at Santa Barbara, University of -...

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian natural gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of natural gas). For instance, if demand is held constant at 2004 levels and renewable energy... and Timetables of the Proposed Australian Emissions Trading ... Source: Colorado at...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - american gas-light journal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 95 Josephine Hale In Country, Out of Country: The Life and Art of Josephine Hale Summary: possible for application as streetlights as early as 1878, gas lighting...

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive gas separations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sulphur and chlorine present... in the gas to attack the metal. In the Studsvik CFB gasificationpilot plant, which uses RDF (Refuse... .1 mm after three gasi- fication...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced underground gas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mulder1 Summary: where all current underground activities take place except for oil and gas extraction and mining... with reluctant public perception still hamper such underground...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandons gas storage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage L... - Million tonnes of oil equivalent 12;Hughes: Alton Underground Natural Gas Storage Facility 2 storage... : Is there a sufficient supply of ... Source: Hughes,...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced natural gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Currently, natural gas vehicles are less competitive... , and weight of conventional tanks continue to be barriers to ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection: Energy...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic hydrogen gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Fuel Summary: : Physical storage of compressed hydrogen gas in high pressure tanks (up to 700 bar); Physical storage... of a material either as hydrogen molecules (H2...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hot gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

formation, high temperature gas flow... to describe the observed effects of particle size and porosity. Of central importance is the formation of hot... spots and the chemical...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-cooled gas turbine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University Collection: Engineering 27 Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using Summary:...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - application systems gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute of Technology Collection: Engineering 39 Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using Summary:...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive exhaust gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 1. F. Obert, Internal Combustion Engines and Air Pollution, Intext Educational Publishers, 1973 Summary: , Critical Topics in Exhaust Gas...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced flue gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 5 INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION AT WASTE-TO-ENERGY Summary: -Beam process is applied to flue gas compositions...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pressure gas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3... . Gas % Composition ... Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy Cross Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 Bio390...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscess gas formation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

if there is evidence of intestinal obstruction, abscess formation, perforation, fis... -old white woman with a history of gas- trointestinal problems presented with ab-...

211

Study in High Speed Gas Chromatography I. Injections of Narrow Sample Plugs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......bility to the device. To reduce the amount of gas used, electric valves switch off the gas flows after an injection is completed...logiques fluidiques en controle industriel. Ingenieurs de I'Automobile, Paris. 15:1 (1967). 12. M.J.E. Golay. Theory......

Gyula Gaspar; Patrick Arpino; Georges Guiochon

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced gas-cooled nuclear Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy 9 UNM engineering s p r i N g 2 0 0 6 Summary: Re); the gas cooled Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space reactor (S4) designed to operate with multiple Closed... for reducing...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hot-gas desulfurization Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Materials Science 28 Reproducedwith pennissionfrom ElsevierPergamon Biomass and Bioenerg..' Vol: 10, :os 2-3, pp..149-l66, 1996 Summary: at a commercialscale.. But hot-gas...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon gas backgrounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Appl. Phys. 38 (2005) 15771587 doi:10.10880022-37273810013 Summary: mixtures (with a gas density N) of methane and argon subjected to an external constant electric field E......

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial gas emboli Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Case of the Month Summary: -wave inversion (Figure 1). His arterial blood gas showed pH 7.16, pCO2 of 12;190 J La State Med Soc VOL 160 July... the clinical indications for...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - airflow gas deposition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gas conditions and.condensing temperature (thus pressure) are supplied as input to the heat pump... * air-flow rates at each heat exchanger * combined fan and fan-motor...

217

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

218

A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ``beyond extremely unlikely`` frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high enough temperatures to initiate a propagating reaction in the waste. However, system failure that coincides in a waste layer with high organic content and low moisture may initiate an exothermic reaction in the waste. Consequently, a conservative approach based on the current state of the knowledge resulted in limiting the drilling process to a subset of the flammable-gas tanks. Accidents from the chemical reactions and criticality category are shown to result in acceptable risk. A number of accidents are shown to potentially result in containment (tank liner) breach below the waste level. Mitigative features are provided for these accidents. Gas-release events without burn also are analyzed, and radiological and toxicological consequences are shown to be within risk guidelines. Finally, the consequences of potential spills are shown to be within the risk guidelines.

Raymond, R.E.

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

220

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

An improved approach for hydrogen analysis in metal samples using single laser-induced gas plasma and target plasma at helium atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report in this paper the results of an experimental study on hydrogen analysis of solid samples in high pressure helium ambient gas employing the basic scheme of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)....

S.N. Abdulmadjid; M.M. Suliyanti; K.H. Kurniawan; T.J. Lie; M. Pardede

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Comparative study of laser-induced plasma emission of hydrogen from zircaloy-2 samples in atmospheric and low pressure ambient helium gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study has been performed to demonstrate the advantage of employing ambient helium gas in the spectral quality improvement of hydrogen emission in laser-induced plasma from zircaloy-2 samples at...

M. Pardede; R. Hedwig; M.M. Suliyanti; Z.S. Lie; T.J. Lie

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a significant source of brine to the repository, which is consumed in the corrosion of iron and thus contributes to increased repository pressures. Fourth, the DRZ itself lowers repository pressures by providing storage for gas and access to additional gas storage in areas of the repository. Fifth, given the pathway that the DRZ provides for gas and brine to flow around the panel closures, isolation of the waste panels by the panel closures was not essential to compliance with the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's regulations in the 1996 WIPP PA.

ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

Guthrie, J. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The stability of low levels of ethylene oxide in gas sampling bags  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the stability of the EtO and in t, urn the reliabilitt of the monitoring method. Baser. upon findings of numerous bag retention studies with other chemicals it may be assumed that the EtO level in a Ted)ar bag following a period of storage (and or possible.... portable direct reading instrumentation. and charcoal tube monitoring methods Little concern or interest has been given to the use ol Ted lar or anv other type of sample bag monitoring technique even though variations of these techniques are currently...

Swerzenski, Peter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites December 2014 LMSSRWSRES00914 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

228

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Measurement of thermal properties of select intact and weathered granulites and their relationship to rock properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in hard rock: Renewable Energy, 28 , no.-14...basalt samples in Egypt: Journal of Thermal...in hard rock: Renewable Energy, 28, no. 14...basalt samples in Egypt: Journal of Thermal...parameterization on surface energy fluxes and temperatures...

D. Ramakrishnan; Rishikesh Bharti; M. Nithya; K. N. Kusuma; K. D. Singh

230

Comparison and analysis of reservoir rocks and related clays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of instrumental and chemical analyses was made on sedimentary rocks to determine the surface chemical properties of sedimentry rocks and the physical characteristic of the pores. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analytic capability was used to study the morphology of the samples, surface mineral composition and type and location of clays, and to obtain a qualitative estimate of the pore sizes. A centrifuge was used to determine the pore size distributions which are correlated with SEM observations. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an inductively coupled plasma for complete spectral analysis was used to obtain analyses of the rocks, clays, and effluents from ion exchange tests. Two of the results are as follows: (1) Sweetwater gas sands have a bimodal pore size distribution composed of pores with a mean diameter of 0.2 microns which is attributed to intergranular spaces and cracks in the expanded laborboratory sample but which will be close under the pressure of the overburden formations, and these Sweetwater sands have a distribution of pores at 2 microns which are solution vugs rather than intergranular porosity since the sand grains are completely packed together with the cementing material due to the high overburden pressures; and (2) Ion-exchange capacities of two rocks were 5.3 meq/kg and 18.0 meq/kg, and the surface areas were 0.9 m/sup 2//g and 2.30 m/sup 2//g, respectively, even though each had almost identical mineral composition, clay type and quantity, and permeability. 7 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

Crocker, M.E.; Donaldson, E.C.; Marchin, L.M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

1.4 PETROPHYSICS: Combined Rock and Fluid Character Integration of geological and petrophysical data allows development of a rock-fluid model for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the different rock types that comprise the subject reservoirs, marginal reservoirs and non-reservoir rocks). Analytical techniques used to develop this model include porosity-permeability analysis of core plug samples.4.2.2.1 Permeability determination with Nitrogen Flow Through Rock Type: Core plug samples of 1 in. and 1.5-in

Schechter, David S.

233

Forensic Discrimination of Automotive Paint Samples Using Pyrolysis-Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry with Multivariate Statistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC...Analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC...development, pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py...considerations, such as lower cost, can lead one to change...does not vary between production sites, subtle differences......

Brian K. Kochanowski; Stephen L. Morgan

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Simultaneous Determination of 16 Pyrethroid Residues in Tea Samples Using Gas Chromatography and Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......67-64-1 Acetone | Acetone Gas Chromatography-Mass...are widely used in tea production, and pesticide residues...Analysis was performed by gas chromatography with ion...chroma- tography (LC), gas chromatography (GC...sensitive, and low- cost detection for pyrethroids......

Kuang Hua; Miao Hong; Hou Xiaolin; Zhao Yunfeng; Wu Yongning; Xu Chuanlai

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Rock Magnetism To-Day  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ROCK magnetism is that branch of geophysics that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and ... that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and its stability. Workers in rock magnetism are also interested in the phenomenon of self-reversal, that is, a rock acquiring ...

SUBIR K. BANERJEE

1966-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Deformation of underground deep cavities in rock salts at their long-term operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground deep cavities are created in rock salts of various morphological types with the purpose of storage of petroleum, gas and nuclear wastes. It is well known that the rock salt has rheological properties, which can result in closure of caverns and loss of their stability. In the evaporitic rocks, especially those containing halite, time-dependent deformation is pronounced even at comparatively low stress levels. At high stress levels this creep becomes a dominant feature of the mechanical behavior of salt rocks. So the knowledge of creep behavior of rock salt is of paramount importance in underground storage application of gas, petroleum products and nuclear wastes.

Zhuravleva, T.; Shafarenko, E. [Podzemgasprom, STC, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

Brunton, G.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Dilution-based emissions sampling from stationary sources: part 2 - gas-fired combustors compared with other fuel-fired systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the recent focus on fine particle matter (PM2.5), new, self- consistent data are needed to characterize emissions from combustion sources. Emissions data for gas-fired combustors are presented, using dilution sampling as the reference. The sampling and analysis of the collected particles in the presence of precursor gases, SO{sub 2}, nitrogen oxide, volatile organic compound, and NH{sub 3} is discussed; the results include data from eight gas fired units, including a dual- fuel institutional boiler and a diesel engine powered electricity generator. These data are compared with results in the literature for heavy-duty diesel vehicles and stationary sources using coal or wood as fuels. The results show that the gas-fired combustors have very low PM2.5 mass emission rates in the range of {approximately}10{sup -4} lb/million Btu (MMBTU) compared with the diesel backup generator with particle filter, with {approximately} 5 x 10{sup -3} lb/MMBTU. Even higher mass emission rates are found in coal-fired systems, with rates of {approximately} 0.07 lb/MMBTU for a bag-filter-controlled pilot unit burning eastern bituminous coal. The characterization of PM2.5 chemical composition from the gas-fired units indicates that much of the measured primary particle mass in PM2.5 samples is organic or elemental carbon and, to a much less extent, sulfate. Metal emissions are low compared with the diesel engines and the coal- or wood-fueled combustors. The metals found in the gas- fired combustor particles are low in concentration. The interpretation of the particulate carbon emissions is complicated by the fact that an approximately equal amount of particulate carbon is found on the particle collector and a backup filter. It is likely that measurement artifacts are positively biasing 'true' particulate carbon emissions results. 49 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

England, G.C.; Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C.; Zielinska, B.; Chang, M.C.O.; Loos, K.R.; Hidy. G.M. [GE Energy, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radon monitoring in groundwater samples from some areas of northern Rajasthan, India, using a RAD7 detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and groundwater. Natural water contains dissolved...rocks(1). Radon gas and its radioactive...water samples from Cyprus and Greece in the...16.29.3 (8) Cyprus 0.3-20 5.9...water in Greece and Cyprus: implications to...water from various natural sources using nuclear......

Asha Rani; Rohit Mehra; Vikas Duggal

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

Maerefat, Nicida L. (Sugar Land, TX); Parmeswar, Ravi (Marlton, NJ); Brinkmeyer, Alan D. (Tulsa, OK); Honarpour, Mehdi (Bartlesville, OK)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Collection of Samples Under Pressure for Chromatographic Analysis and a System for Handling Gas-Condensate Type Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......only two principal handling precautions emerged...analysis of the C7+ material. Yarborough and Vogel...our knowledge. A flow diagram of the two systems is...Figure 3. Schematic diagram of gas liquid chromatograph...4-B is a schematic diagram of one possible solution......

R. H. Jacoby; J. H. Tracht

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

248

The Importance of Geochemical Parameters and Shale Composition on Rock Mechanical Properties of Gas Shale Reservoirs: a Case Study From the Kockatea Shale and Carynginia Formation From the Perth Basin, Western Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluation of the gas shale mechanical properties is very important screening criteria ... for hydraulic fracturing and as a result in gas shale sweet spot mapping. Youngs modulus and ... mechanical properties t...

Mohammad Mahdi Labani; Reza Rezaee

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Evidence for natural gas hydrate occurrences in Colombia Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multichannel and selected single-channel seismic lines of the continental margin sediments of the Colombia basin display compelling evidence for large accumulations of natural gas hydrate. Seismic bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs), interpreted to mark the base of the hydrate stability zone, are pronounced and very widespread along the entire Panama-Colombia lower continental slope. BSRs have also been identified at two locations on the abyssal plain. Water depths for these suspected hydrate occurrences range from 900 to 4000 m. Although no gas hydrate samples have been recovered from this area, biogenic methane is abundant in Pliocene turbidites underlying the abyssal plain. More deeply buried rocks beneath the abyssal plain are thermally mature. Thermogenic gas from these rocks may migrate upward along structural pathways into the hydrate stability zone and form hydrate. Impermeable hydrate layers may form caps over large accumulations of free gas, accounting for the very well-defined BSRs in the area. The abyssal plain and the deformed continental margin hold the highest potential for major economic accumulations of gas hydrate in the basin. The extensive continuity of BSRs, relatively shallow water depths, and promixity to onshore production facilities render the marginal deformed belt sediments the most favorable target for future economic development of the gas hydrate resource within the Colombia basin. The widespread evidence of gas hydrates in the Colombia basin suggests a high potential for conventional hydrocarbon deposits offshore of Panama and Colombia.

Finley, P.D.; Krason, J.; Dominic, K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy and geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy Foundation What is RoBOT? The "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" or RoBOT Program began in 2006 with funding from high school RoBOT participants on a weekend field trip to collect and document rock samples

Baxter, Ethan F.

252

Gas speciation, and [sup 13]C and [sup 18]O content of gases produced by laser sampling of carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the concentration of gaseous carbon- and oxygen-bearing species produced by laser ablation, an Ion Trap mass spectrometer (ITD) was added to a standard Nd-YAG laser microprobe system. Ultra-pure He carrier gas, flowing through a stainless steel flanged reaction chamber, sweeps laser-generated gases from the chamber during ablation. The gas is split prior to introduction in the ITD, allowing a small percentage of the effluent to enter the ITD while the majority is passed through two liquid nitrogen cold traps for collection of CO[sub 2] for standard stable isotope ratio analysis. Gas speciation is determined from multiple mass/charge spectral scans of the gas using the ITD. When lasing is performed at 30A in cw mode, the delta C-13 of laser-generated CO[sub 2] co-varies positively as a function of the CO[sub 2]/(CO+CO[sub 2]) ratio with values increasingly by 2% from 35 to 90% CO[sub 2]. As a general rule, the delta C-13 of CO[sub 2] is closest to that of the carbonate when CO[sub 2] ratios and yields are small. The delta O-18 of CO[sub 2] remains nearly constant throughout the range of CO[sub 2] ratios or yields investigated. When lasing is performed at 35A in Q-switch mode (5kHZ), the delta C-13 of CO[sub 2] decreases by 4% as the CO[sub 2] ratio increases from 40 to 60%. The delta C-13 of laser-generated CO[sub 2] approaches that of the carbonate as CO[sub 2] ratio increases and yield decreases. The delta O-18 of CO[sub 2] remains nearly constant throughout the range of CO[sub 2] ratios or yields investigated despite the fact that O[sub 2] comprises 10 to 21% of the laser-generated gas.

Romanek, C.S.; Gibson, E.K. Jr. (Planetary Science Branch/SN2, Houston, TX (United States)); Socki, R.A. (NASA/Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

ROCK THIN SECTIONING AND CUTTING PROTOCOLS FOR 3RD MAPPING PROJECTS (2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

difficult lithologies (e.g. evaporates, clays, or unconsolidated sediments), as consolidated rocks are significantly easier to prepare. Unconsolidated samples may require resin impregnation, and are liable

Henderson, Gideon

254

Microextraction in Packed Sorbent for the Determination of Pesticides in Honey Samples by Gas Chromatography Coupled to Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......yields and protecting the quality, reliability and price...in honey samples for quality control analysis. It...23), hair (24) and wine (25, 26). In the...min, followed by an increase to 250C at 5C/min and...method is adequate for quality control analysis of pesticides......

Fernanda H. Salami; Maria Eugnia C. Queiroz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

260

Petrology of the Devonian gas-bearing shale along Lake Erie helps explain gas shows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive petrologic study of 136 thin sections of the Ohio Shale along Lake Erie, when combined with detailed stratigraphic study, helps explain the occurrence of its gas shows, most of which occur in the silty, greenish-gray, organic poor Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed. Both have thicker siltstone laminae and more siltstone beds than other members of the Ohio Shale and both units also contain more clayshales. The source of the gas in the Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale is believed to be the bituminous-rich shales of the middle and lower parts of the underlying Huron Member of the Ohio Shale. Eleven petrographic types were recognized and extended descriptions are provided of the major ones - claystones, clayshales, mudshales, and bituminous shales plus laminated and unlaminated siltstones and very minor marlstones and sandstones. In addition three major types of lamination were identified and studied. Thirty-two shale samples were analyzed for organic carbon, whole rock hydrogen and whole rock nitrogen with a Perkin-Elmer 240 Elemental Analyzer and provided the data base for source rock evaluation of the Ohio Shale.

Broadhead, R.F.; Potter, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Two Large Landfill Projects BroadRock Renewables, LLC built two high efficiency electricity generating facilities that utilize landfill gas in California and Rhode Island. The...

262

URTeC 1620617 Thermal Shock in Reservoir Rock Enhances the Hydraulic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by 20%. Introduction: Thermal fracturing Injection of cold fluids into reservoir rock, induces thermalURTeC 1620617 Thermal Shock in Reservoir Rock Enhances the Hydraulic Fracturing of Gas Shales Saeid of any part of this paper without the written consent of URTeC is prohibited. Summary Thermal shock

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

263

Gas chromatographic determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and smoked rice samples after solid-phase microextraction using multiwalled carbon nanotube loaded hollow fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded on hollow fiber membrane pores. Stainless steel wire was used as unbreakable support. The major advantages of the proposed fiber are its (a) high reproducibility due to the uniform structure of the hollow fiber membranes, (b) high extraction capacity related to the porous structure of the hollow fiber and outstanding adsorptive characteristics of MWCNTs. The proposed fiber was applied for the microextraction of five representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous media (river and hubblebubble water) and smoked rice samples followed by gas chromatographic determination. Analytical merits of the method, including high correlation coefficients [(0.99630.9992) and (0.99820.9999)] and low detection limits [(9.013.0ngL?1) and (40.0150.0ngkg?1)] for water and rice samples, respectively, made the proposed method suitable for the ultra-trace determination of PAHs.

Amir Abbas Matin; Pourya Biparva; Mohammad Gheshlaghi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Rock Properties Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

C. Lum

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Shale Gas and Hydrofracturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in horizontal drilling technology and hydrofracturing allow natural gas to escape from shale formations following high pressure treatment, i.e. fracking with sand, water and chemicals. ... With fracking, natural gas prices have remained low at less than $2.50 per million BTU. ... Fracking chemicals, petrochemicals, and metals and radionuclides from source rock cause major environmental burdens if not properly treated or deep-injected. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks based on the Gassmann equation and EshelbyWalsh theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks is more difficult than it is in clastic rocks for two reasons. Firstly, the rock physics modeling uncertainties in carbonate rocks, this is due to the difficulty of accurately acquiring the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix because the experimental data on carbonate rocks have not been as thoroughly studied as silici-clastic sedimentary rocks. Secondly, due to the complex pore systems of carbonate rocks, it is very difficult to model pore geometry of carbonates, and hence hard to assess how the elastic properties change as fluid saturation changes based on the traditional Biot and Gassmann theories. In order to solve these problems, we present a new fluid substitution equation of carbonate rocks using the Gassmann equation and EshelbyWalsh theory (GEW) in this paper. Then, the specific procedures of how to calculate the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix and how to measure the effect of pore geometry in fluid substitution based on the new fluid substation equation were illustrated by experimental testing about 12 carbonate rock samples in different fluid saturation scenarios and logging data. Finally, we further compared the new fluid substitution method with the conventional Gassmann fluid substitution based on the experimental data. The results verified that the new method is more accurate and reliable in the fluid substitution of complex carbonate rocks.

Quanxiong Feng; Lian Jiang; Mingquan Liu; Huan Wan; Li Chen; Wei Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the worlds natural gas hydrate

Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

future gas hydrate core handling and preservation in sand-gas-hydrate-bearing zones, in which the sediments (particularly the sands)sand deposits are primarily being investigated in the Mount Elbert well, much of the worlds natural gas hydrate

Kneafsey, Timothy J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Source rock screening studies of Ordovician Maquoketa shale in western Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) studies of Ordovician Maquoketa Shale samples (cuttings and cores) from the shallow subsurface (500-800 ft deep) in western Illinois indicate that facies within the Maquoketa have potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. Dark, presumably organic-rich zones within the Maquoketa Shale were selected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-Eval (pyrolysis), and bulk and clay mineralogy using x-ray diffraction. Preliminary results from six samples from Schuyler, McDonough, and Fulton Counties show TOC values ranging from 4.70% to as high as 12.90%. Rock-Eval parameters, measured by heating organic matter in an inert atmosphere, indicate source rock maturity and petroleum-generative potential. Screening studies, using the Rock-Eval process, describe very good source rock potential in facies of the Maquoketa Shale. Further studies at the Illinois State Geological Survey will expand on these preliminary results. This study complements a proposed exploration model in western Illinois and further suggests the possibility of source rocks on the flanks of the Illinois basin. Long-distance migration from more deeply buried effective source rocks in southern Illinois has been the traditional mechanism proposed for petroleum in basin-flank reservoirs. Localized source rocks can be an alternative to long-distance migration, and can expand the possibilities of basin-flank reservoirs, encouraging further exploration in these areas.

Autrey, A.; Crockett, J.E.; Dickerson, D.R.; Oltz, D.F.; Seyler, B.J.; Warren, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Measurement of Radon in Soil Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CONCENTRATIONS of the order of 100,000-1,000,000 pc. radon/m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation ... m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation of radon in the soil gas and the free atmosphere has been suggested as a tool for ...

K. G. VOHRA; M. C. SUBBARAMU; A. M. MOHAN RAO

1964-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

Life Under Rocks Grade Level: First  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Procedure: Find a small and large rock (rock should be on a solid surface and not sunk in sand or muck

275

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Oil and Gas Drilling Bit Tribology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A drilling bit is used in petroleum exploration to drill a wellbore through various layers of rock formations to access oil or natural gas resources. It is engineered...1). A roller cone drill bit is categorized ...

Dr. Chih Lin Ph.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

279

Multidimensional gas chromatography of oxidative degradation products in algae-derived fuel oil samples using narrow heartcuts and rapid cycle times  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To characterize a fuel's thermal and storage stability an understanding of the process of oxidation and oxidation pathways is essential. Oxidation pathways commence with hydroperoxides which quickly decompose to form a range of alcohols, acids and other oxygen-containing species. In the presence of significant levels of hydrocarbon-based matrix, analysis of these heteroatomic species is difficult. Applying multidimensional gas chromatography with very narrow heart-cut windows (0.20min) minimizes the number of compounds transferred to the second dimension (2D) column during each heart-cut. Successive heart-cuts every 2.00min are taken throughout the analytical run, since each heart-cut has a maximum retention on 2D of <2.00min on the fast elution 2D column. Subsequent analyses involve incrementing or offsetting the heart-cut windows by 0.20min, so after 10 analyses, a complete coverage of the sample components can be obtained. On the polar 1D and non-polar 2D phase column arrangement, non-polar matrix compounds elute last on the 2D column, and this determines the largest 2tR; i.e. 2tRsample is obtained. The method requires ten sequential runs, and this can be accomplished automatically once the events table is set up. However if fewer target compounds are to be transferred, a reduced number of sequential runs can be implemented.

Blagoj Mitrevski; Rene L. Webster; Paul Rawson; David J. Evans; Hyung-Kyoon Choi; Philip J. Marriott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 3. Sedimentary Rocks Name _______________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., kaolinite), halite (rock salt), gypsum, occasionally micas (muscovite, biotite). Sed rocks can also contain

Kirby, Carl S.

282

Lithostratigraphic Classification of Basement Rocks of the Wichita Province, Oklahoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Scale .bar = 5 nun; crossed nicols. (Sample WM-142 near Panther Creek, Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge.) 1-- t o be s...l i t i c rocks i n t h e Wichita province. f Q - The name Car.lton Rhyolite was f i r s t used by . Schoonover (19481...

Benjamin N. Powell; M. Charles Gilbert; Joseph F. Fischer

283

WIPP air-intake shaft disturbed-rock zone study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disturbed-rock zone surrounding the air-intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was investigated to determine the extent and the permeability of the disturbed-rock zone as a function of radial distance from the 6.1 m diameter shaft, at different elevations within the Salado. Gas- and brine-permeability tests were performed in the bedded halite of the Salado formation at two levels within the air-intake shaft. The gas- and brine-permeability test results demonstrated that the radial distance to an undisturbed formation permeability of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2} was less than 3.0 m.

Dale, T. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Hurtado, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

285

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

none,

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks are studied in this paper. Samples involved are from Proterozoic to Neogene, including marine and lacustrine environments. Their TOC range from 0.15% to 1.69%. The carbonate contents are more than 80% except the Paleozoic Pingliang marl, Shanganning Basin. The maturations range from immature to late stage of oil generation. The Green River calcareous shale and Ghareb marl, Jordan are included for comparison. The study of kerogen types is based on analyses of kerogens including: optical method, elemental analysis, infrared spectrum, rock eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and C-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. The results of the study shows that most of the kerogens studied belong to type 1 or sapropelic type 2 (2a), while the kerogens from Triassic Qinglong limestone (restricted by), Jiangsu and Neogene Guantao limestone (small fault lacustrine), Shandong belong to mixed type 2 (2b). The study of pyrolysis kinetics is based on standard Rock Eval information (5 C/min.), a two-stage first order reaction model and optimization method which has been confirmed to be a simple, practical and effective method by a previous study. The current study reveals that different kerogen types have their own kinetic characteristics. Generally, kinetics parameters of type 1 and type 2a kerogens are greater than those of type 2b. However, high-sulfur type 1 and type 2a kerogens, such as those from Ghareb marl, Jordan, and Proterozoic kerogen, North China have relatively low kinetics parameters. The study also shows that kerogens with similar hydrocarbon potential (HI) and elemental composition (atomic H/C, O/C) may have very different kinetic processes.

Zhang, Youcheng (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography); Shisheng Hao (Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Geosciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

289

A high-pressure and high-temperature gas-loading system for the study of conventional to real industrial sized samples in catalysed gas/solid and liquid/solid reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-pressure-high-temperature gas-loading system has been developed for combined in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry investigations during catalysed gas/solid or liquid/solid reactions. The benefits of such a system are the combination of different gases, the flexibility of the cell design, the rotation of the cell, and the temperature, pressure and gas-flow ranges accessible. This opens up new opportunities for studying catalysts or compounds not just from a fundamental point of view but also for industrial applications, in both cases in operando conditions.

Andrieux, J.

2014-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coal, oil, gas... called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called Source: Rock, Chris - Department of Biological Sciences,...

291

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Where is shale gas found Where is shale gas found in the United States? Shale gas is located in many parts of the United States. These deposits occur in shale "plays" - a set of discovered, undiscovered or possible natural gas accumulations that exhibit similar geological characteristics. Shale plays are located within large-scale basins or accumulations of sedimentary rocks, often hundreds of miles across, that also may contain other oil and gas resources. 1 Shale gas production is currently occurring in 16 states. 1 U.S. Government Accountability Office, Report to Congressional Requesters, "Oil and Gas: Information on Shale Resources, Development, and

292

Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Core samples from the Dunes, California, and Raft River, Idaho, geothermal areas show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Sealed fractures can act as barriers to fluid flow. Sealed fractures often mark boundaries between regions of significantly

293

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction combined with gas chromatographychemical ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of N-nitrosamines in swimming pool water samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple sample pretreatment technique, dispersive micro-solid phase extraction, was applied for the extraction of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other four N-nitrosamines (NAs) from samples of swimming pool w...

Ssu-Chieh Fu; Shin-Hwa Tzing; Hsin-Chang Chen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

What is shale gas and why is it important?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

299

State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website Alabama Oil and Gas Board Alabama Oil and Gas Board Hackberry Lane Tuscaloosa Alabama http www gsa state al us ogb ogb html Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Alaska Division of Oil and Gas W th Ave Suite Anchorage Alaska http dog dnr alaska gov Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission W th Ave Ste Anchorage Alaska http doa alaska gov ogc Arizona Oil and Gas Commission Arizona Oil and Gas Commission W Congress Street Suite Tucson Arizona http www azogcc az gov Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Natural Resources Dr Ste Little Rock Arkansas http www aogc state ar us JDesignerPro JDPArkansas AR Welcome html California Division of Oil Gas and Geothermal Resources California

300

Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on October 16, 1996. Tank vapor characterization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-B-103 (Tank B-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constituents. Two risers (Riser 2 and Riser 7) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL.

Olsen, K.B.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

304

Tank vapor characterization project - Tank 241-TY-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on November 22, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-TY-103 (Tank TY-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constituents. Two risers (Riser 8 and Riser 18) were sampled at three different elevations (Top, Middle, and Bottom) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. No analytes were determined to be above immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP).

Olsen, K.B.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C. [and others] [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Rock Sampling At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ward...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area. References S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan, J. R. Bowman (1978) A Summary of the...

306

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

307

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2014 Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S....

308

An estimation of the penetration rate of rotary drills using the Specific Rock Mass Drillability index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of the present study was to provide a practical, convenient drillability prediction model based on rock mass characteristics, geological sampling from blast holes, and drill operational factors. Empirical equations that predict drill penetration rate have been developed using statistical analyses of data from the Sarcheshmeh Copper Mine. Seven parameters of the rock or rock mass, including uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of the rock, Schmidt hammer hardness value, quartz content, fragment size (d80), alteration, and joint dip, are included in the model along with two operational parameters of the rotary drill, bit rotational speed and thrust. These parameters were used to predict values of the newly developed Specific Rock Mass Drillability (SRMD) index. Comparing measured SRMD values to those predicted by the multi-parameter linear, or nonlinear, regression models showed good agreement. The correlation coefficients were 0.82 and 0.81, respectively.

Alireza Cheniany; Khoshrou Seyed Hasan; Kourosh Shahriar; Jafar Khademi Hamidi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 27, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-111 (Tank BX-111) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Ammonia was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-111 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.042 of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.157% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. Edwards, J.A. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-C-107 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 5, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank C-107 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 1.405% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <1.519% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Silvers, K.L. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-C-107 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on December 17, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank C-107 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 2.825% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.935% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.; Hayes, J.C. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-S-102 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on December 19, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm as specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank S-102 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 2.410% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.973% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.973% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.; Hayes, J.C. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-BY-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-101 (Tank BY-101) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Total non-methane organic compounds (TNMOCs) were the principal flammable constituent of the Tank By-101 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.136% of the LFL. Averaged measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Tank 241-BY-108 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on November 14, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected nonradioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BY-108 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 1.390% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.830% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-BX-104 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on June 10, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.270% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.675% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Hayes, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 22, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analyses plan (SAP). Total non-methane organic compounds was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.310% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.784% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Julya, J.L. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 1, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-103 (Tank BX-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-103 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.385% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.633% if the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S.; Edwards, J.A. [and others] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-104 second temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on December 12, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.248% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.645% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Tank 241-BX-104 fourth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on April 7, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-04 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.208% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.536% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Mitroshkov, A.V.; Hayes, J.C.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tank 241-BX-104 third temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on February 6, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.178 % of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.458% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Hayes, J.C. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Tank 241-C-107 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on February 7, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank C-107 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 3.233% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <3.342% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Hayes, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-S-102 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 19, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analysis of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm as specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank S-102 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 2.948% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <3.659% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Tables S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Tank 241-S-102 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on February 11, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents tile results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurlsys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by tile Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based oil measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above tile immediate notification limit of 150 ppm as specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank S-102 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 1.150% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <1.624% of the LFL, Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of tile analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Mitroshkov, A.V.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Tank 241-BY-108 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on January 30, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from tile headspace of waste storage tank 241-B-108 (Tank BY - 108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation (SESC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BY-108 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.888% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <1.979% of tile LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Simulated Flue Gas Mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An amine-based solid sorbent process to remove CO2 from flue gas has been investigated. The sorbent consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) immobilized onto silica (SiO2) support. Experiments were conducted in a packed-bed reactor and exit gas composition was monitored using mass spectrometry. The effects of feed gas composition (CO2 and H2O), temperature, and simulated steam regeneration were examined for both the silica support as well as the PEI-based sorbent. The artifact of the empty reactor was also quantified. Sorbent CO2 capacity loading was compared to thermogravimetric (TGA) results to further characterize adsorption isotherms and better define CO2 working capacity. Sorbent stability was monitored by periodically repeating baseline conditions throughout the parametric testing and replacing with fresh sorbent as needed. The concept of the Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process using this sorbent within a system where sorbent continuously flows between the absorber and regenerator was introduced. The basic tenet is to manipulate or control the level of moisture on the sorbent as it travels around the sorbent circulation path between absorption and regeneration stages to minimize its effect on regeneration heat duty.

Hoffman, James S.; Hammache, Sonia; Gray, McMahan L.; Fauth Daniel J.; Pennline, Henry W.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

327

Water-Rock interaction in the Long Valley Caldera (USA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-rock interactions within the main thermal aquifer in the Long Valley Caldera are evaluated using water chemistry data from a new suite of samples. The results reflect the impact of increased geothermal production and major CO2 loss, which appears to drive calcite precipitation in the aquifer. The study provides qualitative information on the rates of mineral reactions and the response times of chemical geothermometers to declining temperatures.

W.C. Evans; S. Hurwitz; D. Bergfeld; J. Lewicki; M.A. Huebner; C.F. Williams; S.T. Brown

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on July 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-102 (Tank BX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and and analysis plan. Ammonia and TNMOCs were the principal flammable constituents of the Tank BX-102 headspace, each determined to be present at approximately 0.002% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.107% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B. Edwards, J.A. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BY-108 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 10, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BY-108 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 1.463% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <2.940% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wellbore stability model for shale gas reservoir considering the coupling of multi-weakness planes and porous flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Irregular wellbore collapse phenomena and accidents frequently occur during drilling operations in Longmaxi shale gas reservoir. Considering shale formation with natural cross beddings and fractures, we propose a multi-weakness plane instead of a single weakness plane failure model. Shale samples obtained from the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Strata of Sichuan Basin are investigated based on characterization and analysis of mineralogy, pore structure, sliding failure condition, and rock mechanics to study the impact of porous flow on jointed shale masses. Results show that Longmaxi gas shale is a brittle and fracture-prone material with poor hydrating capacity and extremely low permeability in rock matrices. Reduction of rock strength under porous flow may contribute to changes in intensity parameters of the weakness planes. Therefore, considering the failure of multi-weakness planes under porous flow, we present a wellbore stability model for shale gas reservoir. Two types of weakness plane distribution patterns are examined to discuss the effect of the occurrence, numbers, and water saturation of weakness planes. The results demonstrate that the number of weakness planes, difference in weakness plane occurrence, and diverse water saturation levels significantly affect wellbore stability during drilling.

Chuan Liang; Mian Chen; Yan Jin; Yunhu Lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Oxidation and stabilization of hydrocarbon fuels in contact with rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground storage is the most ecologically clean and economical method for extended storage of natural gas, crude oil, and petroleum products. Such storage reservoirs are created in stable rock (granites, gneisses, limestone, etc.), rock salt deposits, clays, abandoned mines, and permafrost formations. In this investigation of the influence of rock salt deposits on the oxidation of hydrocarbons (summer-grade straight-run diesel fuel L and automotive gasoline A-76 [unleaded, low-octane]), the authors carried out a kinetic study of hydroperoxide accumulation during the oxidation of these fuels after contact with a saturated solution of rock salt (brine). The experiments were performed in a bubbler-type unit with various ratios of brine to fuel.

Klinaeva, E.V.; Golubeva, I.A.; Tolstykh, L.I. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rock allow for the release and collection of the natural gas. Fracking can be done in vertical or horizontal wells. Liquids...methods to increase gas flows, such as mechanical or chemical fracking, is often required before the wells are able to produce commercial...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick ODonoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Influence of rock mass fracturing on the net penetration rates of hard rock \\{TBMs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Penetration rates during excavation using hard rock tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are significantly influenced by the degree of fracturing of the rock mass. In the NTNU prediction model for hard rock TBM performance and costs, the rock mass fracturing factor (ks) is used to include the influence of rock mass fractures. The rock mass fracturing factor depends on the degree of fracturing, fracture type, fracture spacing, and the angle between fracture systems and the tunnel axis. In order to validate the relationship between the degree of fracturing and the net penetration rate of hard rock TBMs, field work has been carried out, consisting of geological back-mapping and analysis of performance data from a TBM tunnel. The rock mass influence on hard rock TBM performance prediction is taken into account in the NTNU model. Different correlations between net penetration rate and the fracturing factor (ks) have been identified for a variety of ks values.

F.J. Macias; P.D. Jakobsen; Y. Seo; A. Bruland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

Dilley, Lorie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1) Host institution: University of Oxford in extracting gas from these low-permeability rocks is hydraulic fracture. This involves injecting large of water and gas during hydraulic fracturing and subsequent gas recovery. This is essential in order

Henderson, Gideon

337

Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Determination of Boron in Silicate Samples by Direct Aspiration of Sample HF Solutions into ICPMS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A rapid and precise technique for the determination of boron content in silicate rocks was developed by employing isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with a flow injection system (FI-ID-ICPMS). The sample was decomposed with HF ...

Akio Makishima; Eizo Nakamura; Toshio Nakano

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

340

Interaction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formations (after Cook, 1999). Geological Storage Options for CO2 1.Depleted oil and gas reservoirs 2.Use of CO2 in enhanced oil recovery 3.Deep unused saline water-saturated reservoir rocks 4.Deep unmineable coal systems 5.Use of CO2 in enhanced coal bed methane recovery 6.Other suggested options (basalts, oil

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effect of gas production rate and rock and fluid properties on the recovery of gas from strong water drive gas reservoirs will permit gas production optimization and should result in conservation of natural and financial resources. Hence... saturations, gas production rate is not a dominant factor affecting the ultimate gas recovery. Almost all the gas is recovered whether producing the field at 0. 1 or 10 times GRR. In predicting the gas recovery in a strong water drive reser- voir...

Soemarso, Christophorus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

Digital Rock Studies of Tight Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Carl Sondergeld, Shale-gas permeability and diffusivitypermeability of gas flow in mudrocks (shales and silt-researcher conclude that gas flow in shales can be affected

Silin, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rock Energy Cooperative Place: Illinois References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA...

346

Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 C and at 200 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ? p/p0 ? 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ? 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

AN OSIRIS STUDY OF THE GAS KINEMATICS IN A SAMPLE OF UV-SELECTED GALAXIES: EVIDENCE OF 'HOT AND BOTHERED' STARBURSTS IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present data from Integral Field Spectroscopy for three supercompact UV-Luminous Galaxies (ScUVLGs). As nearby (z {approx} 0.2) compact (R {sub 50} {approx} 1-2 kpc) bright Paschen-{alpha} sources, with unusually high star formation rates (SFR = 3-100 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}), ScUVLGs are an ideal population for studying detailed kinematics and dynamics in actively star-forming galaxies. In addition, ScUVLGs appear to be excellent analogs to high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), and our results may offer additional insight into the dynamics of LBGs. Previous work by our team has shown that the morphologies of these galaxies exhibit tidal features and companions, and in this study we find that the dynamics of ScUVLGs are dominated by disturbed kinematics of the emission line gas-suggesting that these galaxies have undergone recent feedback, interactions, or mergers. While two of the three galaxies do display rotation, v/{sigma}<1-suggesting dispersion-dominated kinematics rather than smooth rotation. We also simulate how these observations would appear at z {approx} 2. Lower resolution and loss of low surface brightness features cause some apparent discrepancies between the low-z (observed) and high-z (simulated) interpretations and quantitatively gives different values for v/{sigma}, yet simulations of these low-z analogs manage to detect the brightest regions well and resemble actual high-z observations of LBGs.

Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Goncalves, Thiago S.; Martin, Chris; Wyder, Ted [California Institute of Technology, MC 405-47, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Overzier, Roderik [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Law, David R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Heckman, Tim [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)], E-mail: antara@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: ds@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: matto@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: tsg@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: cmartin@srl.caltech.edu, E-mail: wyder@srl.caltech.edu, E-mail: overzier@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE, E-mail: heckman@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: drlaw@astro.ucla.edu

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

E-Print Network 3.0 - air permeability coefficient Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Summary: . The main objective of these experiments is to find the effective permeability of the rock. 1. Small sample... periods of time. The effective permeability...

349

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I prototype hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system was developed in Precambrian basement rocks at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Core and cuttings samples from the four deep wells indicate that the reservoir of this Phase I HDR system lies within a homogeneous biotite granodiorite body of very low permeability. Natural fractures, although present, are

351

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

352

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

353

Apparatus for gas sorption measurement with integrated gas composition measurement device and gas mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing of multiple material samples includes a gas delivery control system operatively connectable to the multiple material samples and configured to provide gas to the multiple material samples. Both a gas composition measurement device and pressure measurement devices are included in the apparatus. The apparatus includes multiple selectively openable and closable valves and a series of conduits configured to selectively connect the multiple material samples individually to the gas composition device and the pressure measurement devices by operation of the valves. A mixing system is selectively connectable to the series of conduits and is operable to cause forced mixing of the gas within the series of conduits to achieve a predetermined uniformity of gas composition within the series of conduits and passages.

Micklash. II, Kenneth James; Dutton, Justin James; Kaye, Steven

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ionium Dating of Igneous Rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1967009371 Local fractionation of uranium and thorium, between minerals...solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on samples of granite...Pollution Control, U.S. Public Health Service, Cincinnati, Ohio...solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on sam-ples of...

Kunihiko Kigoshi

1967-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Diagenesis in halite-cemented source rocks, Middle Devonian, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porosity in Dawson Bay carbonates is halite plugged and the formation is sandwiched between thick units of bedded halite. The presence of displacive halite crystals within fine-grained carbonates (implying sediment plasticity during halite emplacement) and uncompacted organic-rich, carbonate-poor stromatolites indicate halite cementation occurred at an early stage. Also, halite cementation must have been completed prior to porosity loss in overlying bedded halites. By comparison with Holocene/Pleistocene bedded halites, this cementation occurred with only tens of meters of overburden. Early complete halite cementation should have converted Dawson Bay carbonates into virtually a closed system and greatly curtailed or inhibited organic-matter maturation within them Organic-rich carbonates occur immediately below Dawson Bay evaporites as rocks containing an anomalously abundant benthos (stromatoporoids, brachiopods) or as a more restricted facies, lacking megafossils or containing gastropods. Some restricted carbonates contain more than 2% extractable organic carbon. The n-alkane, pentacyclic triterpane, nonrearranged sterane and disterane distributions suggest two distinct populations of samples are present. Biomarker distributions are difficult to interpret in terms of estimating organic maturity because of source rock environmental factors (hypersalinity), but appear to be inconsistent with the geological prognosis that these source rocks would have been isolated early in their diagenesis. The problem of how kerogens can be altered in an apparently closed system has yet to be resolved.

Kendall, A.C. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (England)); Abbott, G.D.; D'Elia, V.A.A. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock - Old North Continent Slick Rock - Union Carbide More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

358

Strength and static elastic moduli of Mesaverde rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the mechanical properties of Mesaverde rocks (shale and sandstone) from various depths in five wells in Colorado and Wyoming. The properties studied were tensile strength, compressive strength, hydrostatic compressibility, shear stress under strain-controlled compression, and static elastic moduli. With respect to these properties, the sandstones are virtually isotropic. The shales, on the other hand, are definitely anisotropic. The nature and degree of anisotropy of the shales vary with the depth of sample origin. The relative values of mechanical properties between the shale and the sandstone also vary with depth. 7 references, 17 figures, 8 tables.

Lin, W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

360

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

362

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......7 per cent. 4.2.2 Anisotropic rocks Anisotropy of shales, silty shales and siltstones...dolomites). Horizons of shales, silty shales and siltstones are present...the presence of thermally anisotropic sheet silicates, note that......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Winner: Hot Rocks | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

a catch. Only a couple of EGS projects have ever produced power, and those are in Germany and France, where the rock is considerably more pliant than Australia's granite...

364

Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Thermal properties of rocks of the borehole Yaxcopoil-1 (Impact Crater Chicxulub, Mexico)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Physics, Rheology, Heat Flow...applied to invert the matrix...scientific deep drilling with dense...for dry and fluid-saturated...for dry and fluid-saturated...cylindrical or flat surfaces of...associated with drilling (and in particular...rock sample fluid-saturation...Yaxcopoil-1 drilling site, Chicxulub......

Yu. Popov; R. Romushkevich; D. Korobkov; S. Mayr; I. Bayuk; H. Burkhardt; H. Wilhelm

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Deep borehole log evidence for fractal distribution of fractures in crystalline rock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as well as large scale-lengths...fractures seen in drilling cores and...register on a borehole scanning...rock in the borehole wall. In...evidence in the drilling logs or retrieved...core that large-scale fractures...samples, and drilling history...control the large-scale trend...sensitive to borehole lithology......

Peter Leary

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Gas Mixing and Sampling Flask  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1106. R. P. DeGrazio The Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, Golden, Colorado A flask was designed whereby...Flask* by R. P. DeGrazio, The Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, Golden, Colorado Abstract A flask was designed......

R. P. DeGrazio

1968-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

299 Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Abstract The objective of this study was to get more information about the root zone, mainly the gas and ethylene, a gas sampling system was used to get gas samples from the root zone. CO2 gas samples of 20 ml

Lieth, J. Heinrich

370

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional reservoir, the gas is in interconnected pore spaces, much like a kitchen sponge, that allow easier flow to a well; but in an unconventional reservoir, like shale, the reservoir must be mechanically "stimulated" to

371

A one-dimensional model of vertical gas plume migration through a heterogeneous porous medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional model of vertical gas plume migration through a heterogeneous porous medium and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

372

EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04/13/2007.)

373

Environmental geophysics deals with issues ranging from local-scale fluid-rock changes to large-scale climatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental geophysics deals with issues ranging from local-scale fluid-rock changes to large and quarries, military bases, oil and gas fields, petroleum refineries, etc. Many derelict sites such as crankcase oils), mine spoils, and other inorganic pollutants. Accidental spills or poor disposal practice

Meju, Max

374

Chapter 10 - Coal and Coalbed Gas: Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The future of coal and coalbed gas future is intertwined as source and reservoir rocks. Coal generates coalbed gas during coalification (e.g. thermogenic gas) and methanogenesis (biogenic gas). These gas types occur as singular and mixed accumulations. Accumulation of biogenic coalbed gas has received worldwide research and development interests on sustaining production. The new coal-to-biogenic coalbed gas technology centers on stimulating indigenous microbes in coal and associated groundwater with bioengineered nutrients and amendments to farm gas from abandoned wells and non-gas-producing coals. Coal mainly as a basic fuel for electric power generation since the Industrial Revolution continues to be utilized despite environmental concerns. The outlook of coal is dimmed in the United States where natural gas has replaced power generation. However, in Asia and Europe continued economic growth is going to be fueled by coal and coalbed gas as liquefied natural gas will rely on combustion from more efficient, high-temperature power plants in the future.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Precision Gas System (PGS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This precision gas system (PGS) makes high-accuracy, high-precision measurements of CO2 mixing ratio (ppmv dry air) in air sampled at 2, 4, 25, and 60 m above the ground.

Torn, M

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

379

Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures; Annual Progress Report, 1988-1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental results we have obtained on Four-Mile gneiss have demonstrated that the yield behavior of quartzo-feldspathic rocks containing only a small percentage (10%) of mica can be markedly anisotropic, provided the mica minerals exhibit a strong crystallographic preferred orientation. Samples of gneiss oriented such that resolved shear stresses on the foliation plane are large are considerably weaker than granites of similar grain size and composition, and this weakness is attributed to enhanced nucleation of microcracks in quartz and feldspar adjacent to mica grains that are suitably oriented for slip. We expect the yield behavior of rocks containing a higher proportion of phyllosilicates to be influenced by the strongly anisotropic nature of these minerals as well, although the strengths, temperature and pressure dependencies, and flow-controlling mechanisms in such rocks may be significantly different.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.

1989-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

382

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

383

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

384

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

385

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

386

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

387

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

388

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

389

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

390

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

391

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

392

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

393

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

394

Anisotropy parameters estimate and rock physics analysis for the Barnett Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rock physics model is an important tool for the characterization of shale reservoirs. Wepropose an improved anisotropic rock physics model of shale by introducing clay lamination (CL) index as a modeling parameter in effective medium theories. The parameter CL describes the degree of preferred orientation in distributions of clay particles, which depends on deposition and diagenesis history and determines intrinsic anisotropy of shales. Those complicated parameters of sophisticated methods that are difficult to quantify are substituted by CL. The applications of the proposed rock physics method include the inversion for anisotropy parameters using log data and the construction of a rock physics template for the evaluation of the Barnett Shale reservoir. Results show reasonable agreement between the P-wave anisotropy parameter ? inverted by the proposed method and those measured from core samples. The constructed rock physics templates are calibrated on well log data, and can be used for the evaluation of porosity, lithology, and brittleness index defined in terms of mineralogy and geomechanical properties of the Barnett Shale. The templates predict that the increase in clay content leads to the increase in Poisson's ratio and the decrease in Young's modulus on each line of constant porosity, which confirms the consistent and reveals quantitative relations of the two ways of defining the brittleness index. Different scenarios of mineralogy substitutions present the varied layout of constant lines on the templates.

Zhiqi Guo; Xiang-Yang Li; Cai Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Glossary Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion cubic feet (tcf). Appalachian Basin - The geological formations that roughly follow the Appalachian Mountain range and contain

396

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

397

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......W.E., AAPG, Memoir 1. Hadgu T. , Clinton C.L., Bean J.E., 2007. Determination of heat capacity of Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layer, Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci., 44, 1022-1034. Hamilton E. , 1976. Variations of density......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Does roughening of rock-fluid-rock interfaces emerge from a stress-induced instability?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-planar solid-fluid-solid interfaces under stress are very common in many industrial and natural materials. For example, in the Earths crust, many rough and wavy interfaces can be observed in rocks in a wi...

E. Bonnetier; C. Misbah; F. Renard; R. Toussaint

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of major risks associated with hydrocarbon storage caverns in bedded salt rock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salt rock is internationally accepted as an ideal medium for energy storage. As an energy storage structure, the safety of hydrocarbon storage caverns in salt rock is related to the national economy and to social public security. Risk analysis is an important method of engineering safety evaluation. In this paper the major risks associated with hydrocarbon storage caverns in bedded salt rock are defined. The major risks are classified under the headings of oil and gas leakage, ground subsidence, and cavern failure, and are discussed under these topical titles. The factors leading to the major risks associated with storage caverns are identified by reviewing descriptions of major accidents of salt storage caverns around the world. Fault tree models for the three major risks are established and analyzed. Basic paths of the risk and their occurrence probability ranking are derived. The risk factors which contribute greatly to the risk are identified by calculating the importance degree of all the basic events. Finally, a comprehensive evaluation methodology for major risk loss is generated based on the analytic hierarchy process. This provides a theoretical foundation for the evaluation and prevention of major risks in the construction and operation of storage caverns in bedded salt rock.

Chunhe Yang; Wenjun Jing; J.J.K. Daemen; Guimin Zhang; Chao Du

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

Gonalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. Our approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that we develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

Schlueter, E.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author investigates through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. The approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that the authors develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

Schlueter, E.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

VancouverParksville White RockNew Westminster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courtenay VancouverParksville Abbotsford White RockNew Westminster Squamish Chilliwack Port McNeill Powell

406

/sup 10/Be profiles in lunar surface rock 68815  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic ray produced /sup 10/Be (t/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10/sup 6/ years) activities have been measured in fourteen carefully ground samples of lunar surface rock 68815. The /sup 10/Be profiles from 0 to 4 mm are nearly flat for all three surface angles measured and show a very slight increase with depth from the surface to a depth of 1.5 cm. These depth profiles are in contrast to the SCR (solar cosmic ray) produced /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn profiles measured from these same samples. There is no sign of SCR produced /sup 10/Be in this rock. The discrepancy between the data and the Reedy-Arnold theoretical calculation (about 2 dpm /sup 10/Be/kg at the surface) can be explained in two ways: (1) the low energy proton induced cross sections for /sup 10/Be production from oxygen are really lower than those used in the calculations or, (2) compared to the reported fits for /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn, the solar proton spectral shape is actually softer (exponential rigidity parameter Ro less than 100 MV), the omnidirectional flux above 10 MeV is higher (more than 70 protons/cm/sup 2/ s), and the erosion rate is higher (greater than 1.3 mm/My). /sup 10/Be, as a high energy product, is a very useful nuclide for helping to obtain the SCR spectral shape in the past. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Nishiizumi, K.; Imamura, M.; Kohl, C.P.; Nagai, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yoshida, K.; Yamashita, H.; Reedy, R.C.; Honda, M.; Arnold, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Rock mechanics activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of rock mechanics at nuclear waste repositories is a true multidisciplinary effort. A description and historical summary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is presented. Rock mechanics programs at the WIPP are outlined, and the current rock mechanics modeling philosophy of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division is discussed.

Francke, C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Saeb, S. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Understanding Through-Composition in Post-Rock, Math-Metal, and other Post-Millennial Rock Genres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the dawn of experimental rocks second coming in the new millennium, experimental artists have begun distancing themselves from Top-40 artists through formal structures that eschew recapitulatory verse/chorus ...

Osborn, Brad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

410

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

411

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

412

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas Resources Research to Help Unlock Nation's Largest Growing Source of Natural Gas WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of two cost-shared research and development projects targeting America's major source of natural gas: low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Tight gas is the largest of three so-called unconventional gas resources?the other two being coalbed methane (natural gas) and gas shales. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represents about 40 percent of the Nation's total gas output in 2004, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented. The constraints on producing tight gas are due to the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartments, abnormal (high or low) pressures, difficulty in predicting natural fractures that aid gas flow rates, and need to predict and avoid reservoirs that produce large volumes of water.

413

A Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO Methodology for Measuring the Rate of Reaction of CO 2 with Brine-Rock Mixtures Nicholas B. Janda (nbj2@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-2648) Philip W. Morrison, Jr. (pwm5@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-4238) Department of Chemical Engineering Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7217 Beverly Z. Saylor (bzs@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3763) Gerald Matisoff (gxm4@po.cwru.edu; 216-368-3677) Department of Geological Sciences Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7216 Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep, porous, and permeable reservoir rocks is one of the most promising technologies for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Although oil and gas reservoirs are a sensible first step for sequestration of carbon dioxide in geologic

414

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

416

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

417

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

418

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

420

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

422

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

423

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

424

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

425

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

426

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

427

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

428

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

429

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

430

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

431

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

432

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

433

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

434

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

436

Anthrax Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

437

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Next stages in HDR technology development. [Hot Dry Rock (HDR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty years of research and development have brought HDR heat mining technology from the purely conceptual stage to the establishment of an engineering-scale heat mine at Fenton Hill, NM. In April 1992, a long-term flow test (LTFT) of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill was begun. The test was carried out under steady-state conditions on a continuous basis for four months, but a major equipment failure in late July forced a temporary suspension of operations. Even this short test provided valuable information and extremely encouraging results as summarized below: There was no indication of thermal drawdown of the reservoir. There was evidence of increasing access to hot rock with time. Water consumption was in the rangki of 10--12%. Measured pumping costs were $0.003 per kilowatt of energy produced. Temperature logs conducted in the reservoir production zone during and after the flow test confirmed the fact that there was no decline in the average temperature of the fluid being produced from the reservoir. In fact, tracer testing showed that the fluid was taking more indirect pathways and thus contacting a greater amount of hot rock as the test progressed. Water usage quickly dropped to a level of 10--15 gallons per minute, an amount equivalent to about 10--12% of the injected fluid volume. At a conversion rate of 10--15%, these would translate to effective fuel costs'' of 2--3[cents] per kilowatt hour of electricity production potential. The completion of the LTFT will set the stage for commercialization of HDR but will not bring HDR technology to maturity. Relatively samples extensions of the current technology may bring significant improvements in efficiency, and these should be rapidly investigated. In the longer run, advanced operational concepts could further improve the efficiency of HDR energy extraction and may even offer the possibility of cogeneration schemes which solve both energy and water problems throughout the world.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Removing a small quantity of THT from gas storage groundwater through air stripping and gas-phase carbon adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with the response to a case of contaminated groundwater located in France. The natural gas is stored during summer in porous underground rocks. When energy requirements increase (particularly in winter), gas is drawn off, but water is also pumped during this operation. The water has a strong characteristic odour of the TetraHydroThiophene (THT), which has been used by Gaz de France as an additive in order to detect gas leakages because of its strong odour. Unfortunately, the presence of THT in medium other than natural gas can be responsible for safety problems. Gas stripping combined with adsorption on granular activated carbon was chosen to obtain removal of THT from the groundwater. The gas to water ratio for stripping column is higher than usual and the gas used for stripping was recycled in order to prevent air pollution. Carbon consumption is approximately 3 tons a year. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Girod, J.F.; Leclerc, J.P.; Muhr, H. [CNRS, Nancy (France)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Source rock, maturity data indicate potential off Namibia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Namibia`s territorial waters occupy a large portion of West Africa`s continental shelf. The area to the 1,000 m isobath is comparable in size to the combined offshore areas of Gabon, Congo, Zaire, and Angola. Around half as much again lies in 1,000--2,500 m of water. The whole unlicensed part of this area will be open for bidding when the Third Licensing Round starts Oct. 1, 1998. Offshore Namibia is underexplored by drilling with only seven exploration wells drilled. Shell`s Kudu field represents a considerable gas resource with reserves of around 3 tcf and is presently the only commercial discovery.Namibia`s offshore area holds enormous exploration potential. Good quality sandstone reservoirs are likely to be distributed widely, and a number of prospective structural and stratigraphic traps have been identified. The recognition of Cretaceous marine oil-prone source rocks combined with the results of new thermal history reconstruction and maturity modeling studies are particularly significant in assessment of the oil potential. The paper discusses resource development and structures, oil source potential, maturity, and hydrocarbon generation.

Bray, R.; Lawrence, S. [Exploration Consultants Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom); Swart, R. [National Petroleum Corp. of Namibia Pty. Ltd., Windhoek (Namibia)

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

Chapter 9 - Gas Outbursts in Coal Seams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas outbursts are sudden, violent blowouts of coal and gas from the solid coal seam into a mine entry. These dangerous incidents have occurred in most coal producing countries, although they have been relatively rare in the U.S., probably due to better mining conditions. Factors affecting the likelihood of a gas outburst are the gassiness and depth of the seam, stress fields in the rock mass, characteristics of the coal such as the permeability, the rate of mining advance, and local geologic structures like faults or clay veins. The most probable location for an outburst is at the working face where the gas pressure gradient, the main driving force, is steepest. Draining gas through boreholes drilled into the seam helps to prevent gas outbursts. This report will highlight the conditions that make a gas outburst likely and the methods used to reduce the chance of an outburst. It will also examine the differences between gas outbursts and coal mine bumps (also called bursts), which are the far more common stress-failure mode in U.S. coal mines.

Fred N. Kissell; Anthony T. Iannacchione

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Western Gas Sands Project, status report, October-November-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This WGSP Quarterly Report summarizes the progress of government-sponsored projects aimed at recovering gas from low permeability gas sands in the Western United States during October, November and December 1981. CK GeoEnergy released the final report for Development of Techniques for Optimizing Selection and Completion of Western Gas Sands. For CER's Reservoir Simulation Model Development, primary emphasis during the quarter was placed on extending the previous work to include effects of massive hydraulic fractures intersecting multiple lenses. During the quarter, the University of Oklahoma completed the two-dimensional reservoir simulator for BETC. A simplified two-dimensional hydraulic fracturing model is being developed by LLL. A major activity this quarter at Los Alamos was redesigning the NMR receiver system, making it capable of being repackaged for downhole use. Sandia summarizes the analysis of five saturated rock samples that were measured for dielectric constant. The drilling, coring, logging and casing of MWX-1 was accomplished this quarter; quality of output, mainly core, core data and logs, has been good.

Crawley, A.; Atkinson, C.H.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Size distribution functions for rock fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The capacity of 17 functions to represent the size distribution of fragmented rock is assessed on 1234 data sets of screened fragments from blasted and crushed rock of different origins, of sizes ranging from 0.002 to 2000mm. The functions evaluated are Weibull, Grady, log-normal, log-logistic and Gilvarry, in their plain, re-scaled and bi-component forms, and also the Swebrec distribution and its bi-component extension. In terms of determination coefficient, the Weibull is the best two-parameter function for describing rock fragments, with a median R2 of 0.9886. Among re-scaled, three-parameter distributions, Swebrec and Weibull lead with median R2 values of 0.9976 and 0.9975, respectively. Weibull and Swebrec distributions tie again as best bi-component, with median R2 of 0.9993. Re-scaling generally reduces the unexplained variance by a factor of about four with respect to the plain function; bi-components further reduce this unexplained variance by a factor of about two to three. Size-prediction errors are calculated in four zones: coarse, central, fines and very fines. Expected and maximum errors in the different ranges are discussed. The extended Swebrec is the best fitting function across the whole passing range for most types of data. Bimodal Weibull and Grady distributions follow, except for the coarse range, where re-scaled forms are preferable. Considering the extra difficulty in fitting a five-parameter function with respect to a three-parameter one, re-scaled functions are the best choice if data do not extend far below 20% passing. If the focus is on the fine range, some re-scaled distributions may still do (Weibull, Swebrec and Grady, with maximum errors of 1520% at 8% passing), but serious consideration should be given to bi-component distributions, especially extended Swebrec, bimodal Weibull and bimodal Grady.

Jos A. Sanchidrin; Finn Ouchterlony; Pablo Segarra; Peter Moser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

GPC behavior of metalloporphyrins from rock extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel and vanadyl porphyrins present in rock extract from the vicinity of petroleum deposit in the Persian Gulf area were isolated by the combination of adsurption chromatography on silica gel and GPC on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. In order to study the GPC behavior of these metalloporphyrins, chromatographic fractions were collected and analyzed by UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The number of carbon atoms present in the porphine substituents and the different geometry of nickel and vanadyl ions in the molecule of metalloporphyrins were found to be the main factors influencing the GPC separation of these complexes. This chromatographic technique provided an effective separation of nickel from vanadylporphyrins.

Sebor, G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

447

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged 80 and over Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: aged 80 and over Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fra Mauro Formation,Apollo 14: 11. r - rAges of Apollo 14 Rocks F. J. stadennannl, E....

449

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

on Thursday, May 9, 2002. A sample of EIA's report can be seen at: Weekly Gas Storage Test Page. The Natural Gas Weekly Market Update report will convert to the new data series...

450

Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis by ZHAOHONG WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 2011 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks Copyright 2011 Zhaohong Wang STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis...

Wang, Zhaohong

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

Vandergrift, T.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and...

456

Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

rock fractures in the laboratory. This technology has the potential for mapping fracture systems in detail and aid in determining reservoir characteristics. This research was...

457

Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagenesis transforms an unconsolidated loose sed- imentOur emphasis is on unconsolidated sand and sandstone. Thesedi- mentary rock: unconsolidated sand and sandstone. The

Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties, e.g., low permeability, potential geochemically reduced conditions...

459

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

460

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

462

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

463

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

464

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

465

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

466

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

467

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

468

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

469

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

470

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

471

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

472

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

473

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

474

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

477

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

478

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); King, Lloyd L. (Benton, WA); Jackson, Peter O. (Richland, WA); Zulich, Alan W. (Bel Air, MD)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excellent progress has been made on all project objectives and goals. All tasks have been completed in the Phase 1 study area, the initial area of project focus. Primary elements of this work include the following: The stratigraphic architecture has been established through correlation of wireline logs guided by core and outcrop studies of facies and cyclicity. A porosity model has been developed that creates a basis for calculation of porosity for wells in the study area. Rock fabrics have been defined by sampling, analysis, and description of cores and used to create transforms for calculating permeability and oil saturation from porosity data. Finally, a preliminary 3-D model has been constructed that incorporates stratigraphic architecture, rock-fabric data, and petrophysical data. Reservoir volumetrics calculated from the model show that a very large fraction of the original oil in place remains.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas sampling rock" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

482

A comparison of the rates of hydrocarbon generation from Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken formation petroleum source rocks, Williston Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent successes in the Lodgepole Waulsortian Mound play have resulted in the reevaluation of the Williston Basin petroleum systems. It has been postulated that hydrocarbons were generated from organic-rich Bakken Formation source rocks in the Williston Basin. However, Canadian geoscientists have indicated that the Lodgepole Formation is responsible for oil entrapped in Lodgepole Formation and other Madison traps in portions of the Canadian Williston Basin. Furthermore, geoscientists in the U.S. have recently shown oils from mid-Madison conventional reservoirs in the U.S. Williston Basin were not derived from Bakken Formation source rocks. Kinetic data showing the rate of hydrocarbon formation from petroleum source rocks were measured on source rocks from the Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken Formations. These results show a wide range of values in the rate of hydrocarbon generation. Oil prone facies within the Lodgepole Formation tend to generate hydrocarbons earlier than the oil prone facies in the Bakken Formation and mixed oil/gas prone and gas prone facies in the Lodgepole Formation. A comparison of these source rocks using a geological model of hydrocarbon generation reveals differences in the timing of generation and the required level of maturity to generate significant amounts of hydrocarbons.

Jarvie, D.M.; Elsinger, R.J. [Humble Geochemical Services Division, TX (United States); Inden, R.F. [Lithologic & Stratigraphic Solutions, Denver, CO (United States); Palacas, J.G. [Lakewood, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

484

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

485

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

486

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmiss