Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Offshore Natural Gas Royalty Regime (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The province’s offshore contains large natural gas deposits. The Provincial Government has developed an Offshore Natural Gas Royalty Regime that will ensure these resources are developed in the...

2

Gas royalty - Vela, Middleton, and Weatherford  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of gas royalties is evident in this review of oil and gas cases dating from 1926. The author describes the decisions and changes in the gas royalty clause over the years in order to determine the intent of the parties in setting the measure of the royalty payment on gas production under Texas law. The Foster, Vela, and Middleton cases were the major vehicles for the legal development. The author also examines subsequent cases involving the market value of price-regulated gas and court decisions on royalty determination in other jurisdictions. Producers need to take protective steps in anticipation of early deregulation of gas prices to make sure there is no exposure to claims of market value in excess of contract proceeds. Corrective measures include contract amendments or negotiations with both the gas purchaser and the royalty owners to secure a lease amendment.

Harmon, F.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act Year 1996 Url Royaltysimplact.jpg Description To improve the management of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases References Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996[1] The Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 was created to improve the management of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. References ↑ "Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Federal_Oil_and_Gas_Royalty_Simplification_and_Fairness_Act_of_1996&oldid=334637

4

Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 1982 of 1982 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 Year 1982 Url RoyaltyAct.jpg Description The Royalty Management Act affirmed the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to administer and enforce all rules and regulations governing oil and gas leases on Federal or Indian Land References Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982[1] The Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 (30 U.S.C. § 1701 et seq.) - The Royalty Management Act affirmed the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to administer and enforce all rules and regulations governing oil and gas leases on Federal or Indian Land, and established a policy aimed at developing a comprehensive system to manage royalties derived from leased oil and gas operations. Typically, oil and

5

Overview of the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Deep Gas in Shallow Water Royalty Relief Provisions Similar to deepwater leases, royalty relief incentives have been offered since 2001 to

6

Overview of the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program This report provides a brief overview of the offshore royalty relief program operated by the Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service. It describes the basics of revenue collection and royalty payments as well as provisions under which certain oil and natural gas leases are exempt from royalty obligations. Questions or comments on this article may be directed to Erin Mastrangelo at Erin.Mastrangelo@eia.doe.gov or (202)586-6201. In order to explore and develop offshore oil and natural gas resources, the Department of Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS) awards leases to interested parties through a competitive bidding process. The high bidders must pay a cash bonus bid and

7

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a one-factor regime-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both market futures and options on futures. Calibration results indicate that the regime-switching model is a better fit to market data compared to a one-factor mean-reverting model similar to those used by other authors to value gas storage. We extend a semi-Lagrangian timestepping scheme from Chen and Forsyth (2007) to solve the gas storage pricing problem, essentially a stochastic control problem, and conduct a convergence analysis of the scheme. Numerical results also indicate that the regime-switching model can generate operational strategies for gas storage facilities that reflect the existence of multiple regimes in the market as well as the regime shifts due to various exogenous events.

Zhuliang Chen; Peter A. Forsyth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both

Forsyth, Peter A.

9

DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in which flow regime transition occurs.

X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Open Strings on D-Branes and Hagedorn Regime in String Gas Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider early time cosmic evolution in string gas cosmology dominated by open strings attached to D-branes. After reviewing statistical properties of open strings in D-brane backgrounds, we use dilaton-gravity equations to determine the string frame fields. Although, there are distinctions in the Hagedorn regime thermodynamics and dilaton coupling as compared to closed strings, it seems difficult to avoid Jeans instability and assume thermal equilibrium simultaneously, which is already a known problem for closed strings. We also examine characteristics of a possible subsequent large radius regime in this setup.

Arslanargin, Ayse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Effects of trap anisotropy on impurity scattering regime in a Fermi gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the low-lying oscillation modes and the ballistic expansion properties of a harmonically trapped gas of fermionic K40 atoms containing thermal Rb87 impurities as functions of the anisotropy of the trap. Numerical results are obtained by solving the Vlasov-Landau equations for the one-body phase-space distribution functions and are used to test simple scaling Ansatzes. Starting from the gas in a weak impurity-scattering regime inside a spherical trap, the time scales associated to motions in the axial and azimuthal directions enter into competition as the trap is deformed to an elongated cigar-like shape. This competition gives rise to coexistence of collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviors in the low-lying surface modes of the gas as well as to a dependence of the aspect ratio of the expanding cloud on the collision time.

P. Capuzzi; P. Vignolo; M. P. Tosi

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small number of analytical models and published numerical studies there is currently little consensus regarding the large-scale flow behavior over time in such systems. The purpose of this work is to construct a fit-for-purpose numerical simulator which will account for a variety of production features pertinent to these systems, and to use this model to study the effects of various parameters on flow behavior. Specific features examined in this work include hydraulically fractured horizontal wells, multiple porosity and permeability fields, desorption, and micro-scale flow effects. The theoretical basis of the model is described in Chapter I, along with a validation of the model. We employ the numerical simulator to examine various tight gas and shale gas systems and to illustrate and define the various flow regimes which progressively occur over time. We visualize the flow regimes using both specialized plots of rate and pressure functions, as well as high-resolution maps of pressure distributions. The results of this study are described in Chapter II. We use pressure maps to illustrate the initial linear flow into the hydraulic fractures in a tight gas system, transitioning to compound formation linear flow, and then into elliptical flow. We show that flow behavior is dominated by the fracture configuration due to the extremely low permeability of shale. We also explore the possible effect of microscale flow effects on gas effective permeability and subsequent gas species fractionation. We examine the interaction of sorptive diffusion and Knudsen diffusion. We show that microscale porous media can result in a compositional shift in produced gas concentration without the presence of adsorbed gas. The development and implementation of the micro-flow model is documented in Chapter III. This work expands our understanding of flow behavior in tight gas and shale gas systems, where such an understanding may ultimately be used to estimate reservoir properties and reserves in these types of reservoirs.

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheibel (1997) “Current Gas Turbine Developments and Futurefor Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines,” October 2000. Available onlineNext Evolution of the F Gas Turbine,” April 2001. Available

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Oil and Gas General Provisions (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter describes general provisions for the exploration and development of oil and gas resources in Montana. The chapter addresses royalty interests, regulations for the lease of local...

15

Deepwater royalty relief product of 3 1/2 year U.S. political effort  

SciTech Connect

Against the backdrop of more than 20 years of increasingly stringent environmental regulation, ever-expanding exploration and development moratoria on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and reductions in producer tax incentives, oil and natural gas exploration companies active in deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico recently won a significant legislative victory. On Nov. 28, 1995, President Clinton signed into law S.395, the Alaska Power Administration Sale Act. Title 3 of S.395 embodies the Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act. This landmark legislation provides substantial incentives for oil and natural gas production in the gulf of Mexico by temporarily eliminating royalties on certain deepwater leases. It is the first direct incentive for oil and gas production enacted at the federal level in many years. This paper reviews the elements used to arrive at this successful legislation including the congressional leadership. It describes debates, cabinet level discussions, and use of parlimentary procedures.

Davis, R.E. [Stuntz and Davis, Washington, DC (United States); Neff, S. [Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conjunction with falling natural gas prices, has spurred thesigni?cant fall in natural gas prices in 1985. Furthermore,attributable to a bump in natural gas prices during 1993. 29

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with falling natural gas prices, has spurred the developmentsigni?cant fall in natural gas prices in 1985. Furthermore,to a bump in natural gas prices during 1993. 29 In contrast,

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

GRR/Elements/3-FD-b.8 - Conduct Royalty Evaluation | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Roadmap Help List of Sections 3-FD-b.8 - Conduct Royalty Evaluation The Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR), formerly Minerals Management Service, reviews royalty rate...

19

Gas heat transfer in a heated vertical channel under deteriorated turbulent heat transfer regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive cooling via natural circulation of gas after a loss of coolant (LOCA) accident is one of the major goals of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Due to its high surface heat flux and low coolant velocities under ...

Lee, Jeongik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U.S. regulation and high natural gas prices. The returnregulation (PIFUA), motivated by foreign policy concerns surrounding the “Oil Crisis,” severely limited the use of natural gas

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gas Heat Transfer in a Heated Vertical Channel under Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer Regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive cooling via natural circulation of gas after a loss of coolant (LOCA) accident is one of the major goals of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Due to its high surface heat flux and low coolant velocities under ...

Lee, Jeongik

22

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of natural gas and the enactment of the Power Plant &Power Plant & Industrial Fuel Use Act and the natural gaspower plant emissions, created a premium for “clean-burning” technologies. With natural gas

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximate the seasonality trend in the futures price data. Meanwhile, the table reveals a strong annual-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model) to solve the gas storage pricing problem, essentially a stochastic control problem, and conduct

Forsyth, Peter A.

24

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feet (assuming the stable coal price of $1 per million Btu),for coal plants given current relative fuel prices (ranginga relative price of gas roughly twice that of coal, a modern

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A MOLECULAR STAR FORMATION LAW IN THE ATOMIC-GAS-DOMINATED REGIME IN NEARBY GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use the IRAM HERACLES survey to study CO emission from 33 nearby spiral galaxies down to very low intensities. Using 21 cm line atomic hydrogen (H I) data, mostly from THINGS, we predict the local mean CO velocity based on the mean H I velocity. By re-normalizing the CO velocity axis so that zero corresponds to the local mean H I velocity we are able to stack spectra coherently over large regions. This enables us to measure CO intensities with high significance as low as I{sub CO} {approx} 0.3 K km s{sup -1} ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}1 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}), an improvement of about one order of magnitude over previous studies. We detect CO out to galactocentric radii r{sub gal} {approx} r{sub 25} and find the CO radial profile to follow a remarkably uniform exponential decline with a scale length of {approx}0.2 r{sub 25}. Here we focus on stacking as a function of radius, comparing our sensitive CO profiles to matched profiles of H I, H{alpha}, far-UV (FUV), and Infrared (IR) emission at 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m. We observe a tight, roughly linear relationship between CO and IR intensity that does not show any notable break between regions that are dominated by molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}>{Sigma}{sub H{sub i}}) and those dominated by atomic gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}gas with little dependence on the local total gas surface density. While galaxies display small internal variations in the SFR-to-H{sub 2} ratio, we do observe systematic galaxy-to-galaxy variations. These galaxy-to-galaxy variations dominate the scatter in relationships between CO and SFR tracers measured at large scales. The variations have the sense that less massive galaxies exhibit larger ratios of SFR-to-CO than massive galaxies. Unlike the SFR-to-CO ratio, the balance between atomic and molecular gas depends strongly on the total gas surface density and galactocentric radius. It must also depend on additional parameters. Our results reinforce and extend to lower surface densities, a picture in which star formation in galaxies can be separated into two processes: the assembly of star-forming molecular clouds and the formation of stars from H{sub 2}. The interplay between these processes yields a total gas-SFR relation with a changing slope, which has previously been observed and identified as a star formation threshold.

Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Dumas, Gaelle; Sandstrom, Karin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Department of Astronomy, Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Kramer, Carsten [IRAM, Avenida Divina Pastora 7, 18012 Granada (Spain); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Schuster, Karl [IRAM, 300 rue de la Piscine, 38406 St. Martin d'Heres (France); Usero, Antonio [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, C/Alfonso XII, 3, 28014, Madrid (Spain); Weiss, Axel; Wiesemeyer, Helmut, E-mail: schruba@mpia.de [MPIfR, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Design of an experimental loop for post-LOCA heat transfer regimes in a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis is to design an experimental thermal-hydraulic loop capable of generating accurate, reliable data in various convection heat transfer regimes for use in the formulation of a comprehensive convection ...

Cochran, Peter A. (Peter Andrew)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SPR to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program SPR to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program October 10, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis Solicitation to Exchange Royalty Oil from Offshore U.S. Leases WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a solicitation seeking contracts to exchange up to approximately 13 million barrels from Federal leases in the Gulf of Mexico for crude oil that meets the specifications of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Bids are due by November 6, 2007. This action is taken in accordance with the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 which directs that the SPR fill to its authorized size of one billion barrels, and advances the President's agenda to increase the Nation's energy security. It allows for a modest fill rate of

28

Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for the SPR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for the SPR Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for the SPR November 8, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis Deliveries to Begin in January 2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded contracts to Shell Trading Company, Sunoco Logistics, and BP North America for exchange of 12.3 million barrels of royalty oil produced from the Gulf Coast for crude oil meeting the requirements of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Deliveries are expected to begin in January at a modest rate of approximately 70,000 barrels per day for a period of six months. The offers are in response to the Department's solicitation issued last month and represented the highest value of specification-grade oil for the

29

SPR to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

up to 13 million barrels of royalty oil from Federal leases in the Gulf of Mexico for crude oil that meets the specifications of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Bids are due...

30

Nuclear non-proliferation regime effectiveness : an integrated methodology for analyzing highly enriched uranium production scenarios at gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dramatic change in the international security environment after the collapse of the bipolar system has had a negative impact on the effectiveness of the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime. Furthermore, the success ...

Kwak, Taeshin (Taeshin S.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Valuing a gas-fired power plant: A comparison of ordinary linear models, regime-switching approaches, and models with stochastic volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and natural gas daily spot prices and suggests that with the aim of valuing a gas-fired power plant, there is limited information about modelling electricity and natural gas spot prices distinctly, i.e., taking-run evolution of energy prices, such as oil, coal, and natural gas, and suggests that although the long

32

Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offshore Natural Gas Royalty Regime (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Newfoundland and Labrador Utility Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial MunicipalPublic...

34

Royalties vs. upfront lump-sum fees in data communication environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile communications markets worldwide, today, are saturated, the number of mobile network operators (MNOs) in market is declining, mobile revenues are stagnant or falling, MNOs are becoming wireless Internet service providers, and economies of scope ... Keywords: Auction, Economies of scope, Lump-sum fee, Royalty, Spectrum

Youngsun Kwon; Buhm-Kyu Kim

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Geopressured geothermal resources of Texas: a report on legal ownership and royalty issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Legal issues affecting ownership of the geopressured resources were examined. It was concluded that consideration of royalty interests indicates that the greatest promise for geothermal resource development would be offered if the geopressured resources were held to be entirely mineral in character. Further, the energy of the geopressured water should be held to be embraced by the standard term other minerals. (MHR)

Oberbeck, A.W.

1977-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

36

Network simulation solutions for laminar radiating dissipative magneto-gas dynamic heat transfer over a wedge in non-Darcian porous regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the steady-state, magnetohydrodynamic, optically thick, dissipative gas boundary layer flow and heat transfer past a non-isothermal porous wedge embedded in a scattering, homogenous, isotropic Darcy-Forchheimer porous medium, with significant ... Keywords: Boundary layers, Hartmann number, Joule heating, Magneto-gas dynamics, Network simulation

JoaquíN Zueco; O. Anwar BéG

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Regimes in Simple Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamical systems possessing regimes are identified with those where the state space possesses two or more regions such that transitions of the state from either region to the other are rare. Systems with regimes are compared to those where ...

Edward N. Lorenz

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on Federal lands: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to predict the value of increased royalties that could be accrued through the year 2010 by the federal government as a result of the accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) geothermal research and development (RandD) program. The technology improvements considered in this study coincide with the major goals and objectives of the DOE program as set forth in Section 3.0 and will: allow the geothermal industry to maintain a long-term competitive posture in the more favorable fields; and permit it to become competitive where the resource is of lower quality. The study was confined to power generation from liquid-dominated hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. The technologies for exploiting the liquid-dominated, or hot water, fields for power generation are relatively new and still under development. Thus, each technology enhancement that permits greater economic use of the resource will potentially enhance royalty revenues. Potential royalty revenue from dry steam power production at The Geysers, direct use of geothermal fluids, and use of advanced geothermal technologies (i.e., hot dry rock, magma, and geopressured) has not been considered in this assessment. 12 refs.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Simulated Passage Through A Modified Kaplan Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The responses of fall Chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to these two stresses, both singly and in combination, were investigated in the laboratory. A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the ?worst case? pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more ?fish-friendly? mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas (TDG) levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa) or 30 ft (191 kPa) of pressure, then held at surface pressure at 100% saturation for a 48-hour observation period. Sensitivity of fall Chinook salmon to gas supersaturation was slightly higher than in the previous test series, with 15% mortality for surface-acclimated fish at 120% TDG, compared to 0% in the previous tests.

Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G. F.

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Category:Federal Oil and Gas Statutes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statutes Statutes Jump to: navigation, search Add a new Federal Oil and Gas Statute You need to have JavaScript enabled to view the interactive timeline. Further results for this query.DECADEFederal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 19961996-01-010Year: 1996 Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA)1987-01-010Year: 1987 Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Indian Mineral Development Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 19761976-01-010Year: 1976 Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 19701970-01-010Year: 1970 Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 19471947-01-010Year: 1947 Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 19381938-01-010Year: 1938 Mineral Leasing Act of 19201920-01-010Year: 1920

43

TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical cloud properties as a function of regime Regimes? Monsoon versus Break * Different synoptic vertical velocity profiles - Changes convective inhibition, corresponding...

44

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605­616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and Energy Use J. MICHAEL MACDONALD Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge of Commercial Energy Use 3. Measuring Energy Performance 4. Performance Rating Systems 5. Energy Efficiency

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

45

Implication of a covenant to diligently develop and mine in hard mineral leases that provide for minimum rents or royalties  

SciTech Connect

An examination of the status of the implied covenant to develop in hard mineral leases which contain minimum royalty provisions discusses the rationale for the implied development covenant, restrictions on its use, and scenarios under which mining delays occur. Later sections delineate the rules of construction and interpretative tests used in various mining jurisdictions. The author then analyzes the logic of these tests in light of the regulatory and economic climate of today's mining industry. He finds that this climate forces prudent mining companies to delay mine development in many instances. The substantial relation test considers all factors that are indicative of the original parties expectations; the demand for development rule does not.

Bender, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Exploration & Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploration & Reserves Exploration & Reserves 2009 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2008 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Released, 10/29/2009, PDF, XLS, and HTML formats) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2007 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Released, 2/10/2009, PDF, XLS, and HTML formats) 2007 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2006 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Publication, Dec. 2007, PDF and HTML formats) 2006 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2005 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Publication, Dec. 2006, PDF and HTML formats) Overview of the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program

47

Perturbations That Optimally Trigger Weather Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the onset of two weather regimes with respect to initial conditions is studied. The weather regimes are a Euro–Atlantic blocking regime and a Euro–Atlantic strong zonal flow regime. Both regimes are characterized by the same ...

Jeroen Oortwijn; Jan Barkmeijer

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Dynamics of Crime Regimes ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crimes have many features, and the mix of those features can change over time and space. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a crime regime to provide some theoretical leverage on collections of crime features and how the collection of features can change. Key tools include the use of principal components analysis to determine the dimensions of crime regimes, visualization methods to help reveal the role of time, summary statistics to quantify crime regime patterns, and permutation procedures to examine the role of chance. Our approach is used to analyze temporal and spatial crime patterns for the City of Los Angeles over an 8 year period. We focus on the number of violent crimes over time and their potential lethality.

Richard Berk; John Macdonald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Onset of a Pseudogap Regime in Ultracold Fermi Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show, using an ab initio approach based on Quantum Monte Carlo technique, that the pseudogap regime emerges in ultracold Fermi gases close to the unitary point. We locate the onset of this regime at a value of the interaction strength corresponding to (k{sub F}a){sup -1}{approx_equal}-0.05 (a--scattering length). We determine the evolution of the gap as a function of temperature and interaction strength in the Fermi gas around the unitary limit and show that our results exhibit a remarkable agreement with the recent wave-vector resolved radio frequency spectroscopy data. Our results indicate that a finite temperature structure of the Fermi gas around unitarity is more complicated and involves the presence of the phase with preformed Cooper pairs, which, however, do not contribute to the long range order.

Magierski, Piotr [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ulica Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Wlazlowski, Gabriel [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ulica Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Bulgac, Aurel [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program The Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program, launched by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), is a public/private partnership valued at $400 million over eight years that is designed to benefit consumers by developing technologies to increase America's domestic oil and gas production and reduce the Nation's dependency on foreign imports. Key aspects of the program include utilizing a non-profit consortium to manage the research, establishing two federal advisory committees, and funding of $50 million per year derived from royalties, rents, and bonuses from federal onshore

51

Nuclear Suppliers Group & Regimes | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of changes to help strengthen the NSG and the Zangger Committee over time and have led various efforts within the regimes to make the controls, guidelines, and outreach...

52

Annual committee reports in 1983: Natural Gas Committee  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Committee reports two significant state laws in 1983: a West Virginia bill that declared take-or-pay clauses against public policy and an Oklahoma statute protecting small producers. The Supreme Court, in several decisions, dealt with pipeline production, contract rights, royalties, and the constitutionality of state energy laws. Rulemaking included sellers' recovery of production-related costs, defining categories of high-cost gas, and simplifying well application and filing requirements. The Pipeline Subcommittee reports on West Virginia's legislature utilities reform bill, several court case, and policy statements concerning off-system sales and production-related costs. Judicial developments of concern to the Distribution subcommittee cover incremental pricing and cogeneration, while administrative developments include challenges to pipeline minimum bills, incentive rates for industry, self-help transportation services, rate design, and liquefied natural gas imports. 104 references.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction  

SciTech Connect

Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?{omega}{sub pe}: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany) and University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

Post 2012 Climate Regime | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Post 2012 Climate Regime Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Post 2012 Climate Regime: How Industrial and Developing Nations Can Help to Reduce Emissions- Assessing Emission Trends, Reduction Potentials, Incentive Systems and Negotiation Options Agency/Company /Organization: Umwelt Bundes Amt Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.umweltdaten.de/publikationen/fpdf-l/3954.pdf Post 2012 Climate Regime: How Industrial and Developing Nations Can Help to Reduce Emissions- Assessing Emission Trends, Reduction Potentials, Incentive Systems and Negotiation Options Screenshot

55

Piecewise Tendency Diagnosis of Weather Regime Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Piecewise tendency diagnosis (PTD) is extended and employed to study the dynamics of weather regime transitions. Originally developed for adiabatic and inviscid quasigeostrophic flow on a beta plane, PTD partitions local geopotential tendencies ...

Katherine J. Evans; Robert X. Black

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

He Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang Yi [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Beijing (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University and Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University and Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Climatic regimes of tropical convection and rainfall  

SciTech Connect

Annual distribution and phase propagation of tropical convection are delineated using harmonic and amplitude-phase characteristics analysis of climatological pentad mean outgoing longwave radiation and monthly frequencies of highly reflective cloud. An annual eastward propagation of peak rainy season along the equator from the central Indian Ocean (60[degrees]E) to Arafura Sea (130[degrees]E) is revealed. This indicates a transition from the withdrawal of the Indian summer monsoon to the onset of the Australian summer monsoon. Significant bimodal variations are found around major summer monsoon regions. These variations originate from the interference of two adjacent regimes. The convergence zones over the eastern North Pacific, the South Pacific, and the southwest Indian Ocean are identified as a marine monsoon regime that is characterized by a unimodal variation with a concentrated summer rainfall associated with the development of surface westerlies equatorward of a monsoon trough. Conversely, the central North Pacific and North Atlantic convergence zones between persistent northeast and southeast trades are classified as trade-wind convergence zones; which differ from the marine monsoon regime by their persistent rainy season and characteristic bimodal variation with peak rainy seasons occurring in late spring and fall. The roles of the annual march of sea surface temperature in the phase propagation and formation of various climatic regimes of tropical convection are also discussed. 34 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Wang, Bin (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

FLAMELESS COMBUSTION APPLICATION FOR GAS TURBINE ENGINES IN THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to review the potential application of flameless combustion technology in aerospace gas turbine engines. Flameless combustion is a regime… (more)

OVERMAN, NICHOLAS

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

On the different regimes of subaqueous transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review different aspects of subaqueous sediment transport. We discuss the static threshold and its dependency with longitudinal and transverse slopes, as well as cohesion. We describe the different regimes of transport: erosion and momentum limited bed load, and suspended load. In all these cases, we derive the expressions of the saturation flux $q_{\\rm sat}$ and the saturation length $L_{\\rm sat}$ and discuss their dependencies.

B. Andreotti; P. Claudin

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Three-dimensional null point reconnection regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in theory and computational experiments have shown the need to refine the previous categorization of magnetic reconnection at three-dimensional null points--points at which the magnetic field vanishes. We propose here a division into three different types, depending on the nature of the flow near the spine and fan of the null. The spine is an isolated field line which approaches the null (or recedes from it), while the fan is a surface of field lines which recede from it (or approach it). So-called torsional spine reconnection occurs when field lines in the vicinity of the fan rotate, with current becoming concentrated along the spine so that nearby field lines undergo rotational slippage. In torsional fan reconnection field lines near the spine rotate and create a current that is concentrated in the fan with a rotational flux mismatch and rotational slippage. In both of these regimes, the spine and fan are perpendicular and there is no flux transfer across spine or fan. The third regime, called spine-fan reconnection, is the most common in practice and combines elements of the previous spine and fan models. In this case, in response to a generic shearing motion, the null point collapses to form a current sheet that is focused at the null itself, in a sheet that locally spans both the spine and fan. In this regime the spine and fan are no longer perpendicular and there is flux transfer across both of them.

Priest, E. R. [Mathematics Institute, St. Andrews University, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Pontin, D. I. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Regime for a Self-ionizing Raman Laser Amplifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Backward Raman amplification and compression at high power might occur if a long pumping laser pulse is passed through a plasma to interact resonantly with a counter-propagating short seed pulse [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 4448-4451]. One critical issue, however, is that the pump may be unacceptably depleted due to spontaneous Raman backscatter from intrinsic fluctuations in the amplifying plasma medium prior to its useful interaction with the seed. Premature backscatter may be avoided, however, by employing a gaseous medium with pump intensities too low to ionize the medium, and using the intense seed to produce the plasma by rapid photoionization as it is being amplified [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Plasmas (2001)]. In addition to allowing that only rather low power pumps be used, photoionization introduces a damping of the short pulse which must be overcome by the Raman growth rate for net amplification to occur. The parameter space of gas densities, laser wavelengths, and laser intensities is surveyed to identify favorable regimes for this effect. Output laser intensities of 10(superscript ''17'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') for 0.5 mm radiation are found to be feasible for such a scheme using a pump of 10(superscript ''13'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') and an initial seed of 5 x 10(superscript ''14'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') over an amplification length of 5.6 cm in hydrogen gas.

D.S. Clark; N.J. Fisch

2001-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tropical Convection and Precipitation Regimes in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have documented the relationship between tropical convection and precipitation regimes in the western United States. Circulation patterns associated with precipitation regimes are described and physical mechanisms are proposed. ...

Kingtse C. Mo; R. W. Higgins

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Circulation Regimes due to Attractor Merging in Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a dynamical systems theory perspective, the mechanisms of atmospheric regime behavior in a barotropic model, a pseudobarotropic model, and a baroclinic three-level model, where all of them show quite realistic regimes, are unveiled. Along ...

Mario Sempf; Klaus Dethloff; Dörthe Handorf; Michael V. Kurgansky

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Low-Frequency Current Regimes over the Bering Sea Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using direct current measurements made during the period 1975–81, we describe the general circulation over the southeastern Bering Sea and differentiate it by regimes related to depth and forcing mechanisms. Three regimes are present, delineated ...

James D. Schumacher; Thomas H. Kinder

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Regime Transitions and Heteroclinic Connections in a Barotropic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By interpreting transitions between atmospheric flow regimes as a deterministic rather than a stochastic phenomenon, new insight is gained into the phase-space characteristics of these transitions. The identification of regimes with steady states ...

D. T. Crommelin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Predictability Associated with Nonlinear Regimes in an Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric regimes are midlatitude flow patterns that persist for periods of time exceeding a few days. Here, the authors analyzed the output of an idealized atmospheric model (QG3) to examine the relationship between regimes and predictability.

John M. Peters; Sergey Kravtsov; Nicholas T. Schwartz

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Liquid-solid impacts with compressible gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Liquid-solid impacts with compressible gas: The role played by gas compressibility in gas cushioned liquid-solid impacts is investigated within a viscous gas and inviscid liquid regime. A full analysis of the en- ergy conservation in the gas

Purvis, Richard

68

Nonequilibrium mesoscopic superconductors in a fluctuational regime.  

SciTech Connect

We develop a non-equilibrium Ginzburg-Landau-type theory of the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of superconductors in a fluctuational regime and apply our approach to quantitative description of a superconductor island in a stationary nonequilibrium state. We derive the effective temperature of the nonequilibrium state and find fluctuational contributions to the magnetic susceptibility showing that it becomes a singular function of {radical}V-V{sub c}, where V is the external drive and V{sub c} is its 'critical' value at which the nonequilibrium phase transition takes place.

Chtchelkatchev, N.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Persistent Circulation Regimes and Preferred Regime Transitions in the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The persistent regime behavior of the eddy-driven jet stream over the North Atlantic is investigated. The North Atlantic jet stream variability is characterized by the latitude of the maximum lower tropospheric wind speed of the 40-yr ECMWF Re-...

Christian Franzke; Tim Woollings; Olivia Martius

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

slow conduction process (the main heat transfer mechanism)Heat transfer and gas relative permeability are challenged by the processestransfers. The resulting thermal regime involves heat addition to the dissociation process

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

High-temperature superfluidity in an ultracold Fermi gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents experiments in which a strongly interacting gas of fermions was brought into the superfluid regime. The strong interactions are induced by a Feshbach scattering resonance that allows to tune the ...

Zwierlein, Martin W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessing the Institution of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear nonproliferation regime is facing a crisis of effectiveness. During the Cold War, the regime was relatively effective in stemming the proliferation of nuclear weapons and building an institutional structure that could, under certain conditions, ensure continued success. However, in the evolving global context, the traditional approaches are becoming less appropriate. Globalization has introduced new sets of stresses on the nonproliferation regime, such as the rise of non-state actors, broadening extensity and intensity of supply chains, and the multipolarization of power. This evolving global context demands an analytical and political flexibility in order to meet future threats. Current institutional capabilities established during the Cold War are now insufficient to meet the nonproliferation regime’s current and future needs. The research was based on information gathered through interviews and reviews of the relevant literature, and two dominant themes emerged. First, that human security should be integrated into the regime to account for the rise of non-state actors and networked violence. Second, confidence in the regime’s overall effectiveness has eroded at a time where verification-based confidence is becoming more essential. The research postulates that a critical analysis of the regime that fully utilizes institutional theory, with its focus on rules, normative structures, and procedures will be essential to adapting the regime to the current global context, building mechanisms for generating trust, creating better enforcement, and providing flexibility for the future.

Toomey, Christopher

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effect of regimes of hot plastic deformation on the structure and properties of stamped billets  

SciTech Connect

One way of increasing the service life and reliability of gas-turbine engines is to raise the endurance limit of compressor blades by improving the manufacturing technology. The endurance limit of the blades depends on many factors, the most important of which is the structural state of the material for blade billets. A stable, high endurance limit can be attained if the whole complex of technological effects, beginning with the hot deformation and ending with the surface treatment of ready parts, is optimized. The regimes of hot deformation which creates the initial structure mainly determines the endurance limit. In this paper the influence of the regimes of hot deformation on the structure and endurance limit of stamped billets imitating compressor blades is investigated for KhN45MVTYuBR-ID (EP718-ID) alloy.

Maslenkov, S.B.; Larkin, V.A.; Zhebyneva, N.F. [Scientific-Research Inst. of Engines, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Heat flow...

76

Cluster Analysis of Cloud Regimes and Characteristic Dynamics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and still physically based, and that it concentrates on the dynamics and thermodynamics that are important for cloud development. The cloud regimes that are picked out by...

77

Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment PowerPoint presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee by Charles Whitmore, Senior Market Advisor at the Federal...

78

Canadian incentives for oil and gas exploration. [Applicability to USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1970s a number of different exploration and production incentive programs were put in place in Canada, in particular in the Province of Alberta, Canada's principal oil- and gas-producing province. The DOE/RA is evaluating Canadian incentives for oil and gas exploration, and this study is intended to provide information that will help guide DOE/RA in determining the applicability of Canadian incentive programs in US energy policy. The study describes and documents the fiscal structure in which the Canadian oil industry operates. The incentive features of pricing policy, taxation policy, and provincial royalty systems are discussed. A principal focus of the study is on one of the most important of Canada's specific incentive programs, the Alberta Exploratory Drilling Incentive Credit Program (EDICP). The study describes and evaluates the effect of the EDICP on increased oil and gas exploration activity. Similarly, the study also reviews and evaluates other specific incentive programs such as the Alberta Geophysical Incentive Program, Frontier Exploration Allowances, and various tar sand and heavy oil development incentives. Finally the study evaluates the applicability of Canadian incentives to US energy policy.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Rapidly Sheared Compressible Turbulence: Characterization of Different Pressure Regimes and Effect of Thermodynamic Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid distortion theory (RDT) is applied to compressible ideal-gas turbulence subjected to homogeneous shear flow. The study examines the linear or rapid processes present in turbulence evolution. Specific areas of investigation include:(i) characterization of the multi-stage flow behavior,(ii) changing role of pressure in the three-regime evolution and (iii) influence of thermodynamic fluctuations on the different regimes. Preliminary investigations utilizing the more accurate Favre-averaged RDT approach show promise however, this approach requires careful validation and testing. In this study the Favre-averaged RDT approach is validated against Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Reynolds-averaged RDT results. The three-stage growth of the flow field statistics is first confirmed. The three regime evolution of turbulence is then examined in three different timescales and the physics associated with each regime is discussed in depth. The changing role of pressure in compressible turbulence evolution shows three distinct stages. The physics of each stage is clearly explained. Next, the influence of initial velocity and thermodynamic fluctuations on the flow field are investigated. The evolution of turbulence is shown to be strongly dependent on the initial gradient Mach number and initial temperature fluctuations which tend to delay the onset of the second regime of evolution. The initial turbulent Mach number, which quantifies velocity fluctuations in the flow, influences turbulence evolution only weakly. Comparison of Reynolds-averaged RDT against Favre-averaged RDT for simulations of nonzero initial flow field fluctuations shows the higher fidelity of the latter approach.

Bertsch, Rebecca Lynne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Automatic Exploration of Datacenter performance Regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontally scalable Internet services present an opportunity to use automatic resource allocation strategies for system management in the datacenter. In most of the previous work, a controller employs a performance model of the system to make decisions about the optimal allocation of resources. However, these models are usually trained offline or on a small-scale deployment and will not accurately capture the performance of the controlled application. To achieve accurate control of the web application, the models need to be trained directly on the production system and adapted to changes in workload and performance of the application. In this paper we propose to train the performance model using an exploration policy that quickly collects data from different performance regimes of the application. The goal of our approach for managing the exploration process is to strike a balance between not violating the performance SLAs and the need to collect sufficient data to train an accurate performance model, which requires pushing the system close to its capacity. We show that by using our exploration policy, we can train a performance model of a Web 2.0 application in less than an hour and then immediately use the model in a resource allocation controller.

Peter Bodík; Rean Griffith; Charles Sutton; O Fox; Michael I. Jordan; David A. Patterson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermal regimes of Malaysian sedimentary basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly corrected and calibrated thermal data are important in estimating source-rock maturation, diagenetics, evolution of reservoirs, pressure regimes, and hydrodynamics. Geothermal gradient, thermal conductivity, and heat flow have been determined for the sedimentary succession penetrated by exploratory wells in Malaysia. Geothermal gradient and heat-flow maps show that the highest average values are in the Malay Basin. The values in the Sarawak basin are intermediate between those of the Malay basin and the Sabah Basin, which contains the lowest average values. Temperature data were analyzed from more than 400 wells. An important parameter that was studied in detail is the circulation time. The correct circulation time is essential in determining the correct geothermal gradient of a well. It was found that the most suitable circulation time for the Sabah Basin is 20 hr, 30 hr for the Sarawak Basin and 40 hr for the Malay Basin. Values of thermal conductivity, determined from measurement and calibrated calculations, were grouped according to depositional units and cycles in each basin.

Abdul Halim, M.F. (Petronas Research and Scientific Services, Selangor (Malaysia))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

How to estimate worth of minor value oil, gas producing properties at public auction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the divestiture of minor value working and royalty interests (worth less than $20,000) in producing oil and gas properties through the transaction medium of no-minimum, English open outcry public auctions. Specifically, the paper seeks to answer the question, What can the seller expect to receive for his minor value properties at a public auction, knowing only how he values those properties to himself To answer this question, a mathematical model that predicts the seller's expected present worth (EPW) as a function of the seller's Securities and Exchange Commission-case book value (X{sub s}), and the winning bid value (X{sub B}) is derived from classical auction theory.

Randall, B.L. (Unit Corp., Tulsa, OK (US))

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Bit-Interleaved Coded Modulation in the Wideband Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wideband regime of bit-interleaved coded modulation (BICM) in Gaussian channels is studied. The Taylor expansion of the coded modulation capacity for generic signal constellations at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived and used to determine ... Keywords: Additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel, Rayleigh fading channel, bit-interleaved coded modulation, coded modulation, wideband regime

A. Martinez; A. Guillen i Fabregas; G. Caire; F. Willems

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Methods for Pricing American Options under Regime Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze a number of techniques for pricing American options under a regime switching stochastic process. The techniques analyzed include both explicit and implicit discretizations with the focus being on methods which are unconditionally stable. In ... Keywords: American options, iterative methods, regime switching

Y. Huang; P. A. Forsyth; G. Labahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Systematic Metastable Atmospheric Regime Identification in an AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the authors apply a recently developed clustering method for the systematic identification of metastable atmospheric regimes in high-dimensional datasets generated by atmospheric models. The novelty of this approach is that it ...

Christian Franzke; Illia Horenko; Andrew J. Majda; Rupert Klein

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Two Dynamic Regimes of Finite Amplitude Charney and Green Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear evolutions of the Green and Charney waves are compared for two regimes: (1) when internal dissipation is the dominant dissipation; (2) when Ekman friction is the dominant dissipation.

Bin Wang; Albert Barcilon

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of enhanced carbon biomass and export at 55 degrees S duringHigh Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean PhoebeSurface waters with high biomass levels and high proportion

Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Summer Wind Flow Regimes over the Sacramento Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study utilized conditional sampling to identify three frequent wind regimes in the lower Sacramento Valley. The major flow features of the mean diurnal wind patterns in the southern Sacramento Valley and surrounding areas were analyzed for ...

Laura L. Zaremba; John J. Carroll

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Migrant Remittances and Exchange Rate Regimes in the Developing World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article argues that the international financial consequences of immigration exert a substantial influence on the choice of exchange rate regimes in the developing world. Over the past two decades, migrant remittances ...

Singer, David Andrew

91

Multiple Weather Regimes and Baroclinically Forced Spherical Resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematically recurrent, geographically fixed weather regimes forced by a single isolated mountain in a two-layer, high-resolution, quasigeostrophic model modified for the sphere are found to be robust phenomena. While the climatological ...

Shuting Yang; Brian Reinhold; Erland Källén

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Shock-Induced Flows through Packed Beds: Transient Regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early stage of the transient regimes in the shock-induced flows within solid-packed beds are investigated in the linear longwave and high-frequency approximation. The transient resistance law is refined as the Duhameltime integral that follows from the general concept of dynamic tortuosity and compressibility of the packed beds. A closed-form solution is expected to describe accurately the early stage of the transient regime flow and is in qualitative agreement with available experimental data.

Yuri M. Shtemler; Isaac R. Shreiber; Alex Britan

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Order Code RL31559 Proliferation Control Regimes: Background and Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weapons of mass destruction (WMD), especially in the hands of radical states and terrorists, represent a major threat to U.S. national security interests. Multilateral regimes were established to restrict trade in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and missile technologies, and to monitor their civil applications. Congress may consider the efficacy of these regimes in considering the potential renewal of the Export Administration Act, as well as other proliferation-specific legislation in the 110 th Congress. This report provides background and current status information on the regimes. The nuclear nonproliferation regime encompasses several treaties, extensive multilateral and bilateral diplomatic agreements, multilateral organizations and domestic agencies, and the domestic laws of participating countries. Since the dawn of the nuclear age, U.S. leadership has been crucial in developing the regime. While there is almost universal international agreement opposing the further spread of nuclear weapons, several challenges to the regime have arisen in recent years: India and Pakistan tested nuclear weapons in 1998, North Korea withdrew from the

Mary Beth Nikitin; Paul Kerr; Steve Bowman; Steven A. Hildreth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

BC gas takes new approach to gas supply optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-ranging changes have taken place in the US and Canada since the mid-1980s in the way that local gas distribution utilities and large industrial customers contract for their gas supplies. This paper reports that these changes have been brought about by open-access policies, the intent of which was to allow customers more latitude to make their gas purchase and transportation arrangements and to improve the access of shippers to available gas transmission capacity. The effects of the new open-access regime have been profound on both sides of the border. More than 70% of North American gas supplies are now sold under unbundled arrangements in which gas supply is contracted under separate commodity and transportation agreements. For local distribution utilities, the numbers of potential supply options have become extremely large. Analysis of these options has become increasingly complex with the need to take account of complicated contract provisions, a wider range of storage options and swap arrangements with other utilities, opportunities for some customers to purchase gas directly and uncertainty about future demand, prices and supplier reliability.

Cawdery, J.; Swoveland, C. (Quantalytics Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia (CA))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Role of Molecular Level Modeling in Natural Gas Hydrates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7a base case, heterogeneous 7a, 7b, and 7c reservoir conditions Based on 7MCF wellhead price neglecting transportation costs Includes well cost, O&M, royalties, taxes, lease...

96

Turbulence Regimes and Turbulence Intermittency in the Stable Boundary Layer during CASES-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of nocturnal intermittent turbulence during the Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface Exchange Study in 1999 (CASES-99) revealed three turbulence regimes at each observation height: 1) regime 1, a weak turbulence regime when the wind ...

Jielun Sun; Larry Mahrt; Robert M. Banta; Yelena L. Pichugina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Knowledge-Led Accumulation Regime: A Theory of Contemporary Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knowledge-Led Accumulation Regime: A Theory ofBerkeley The Knowledge-Led Accumulation Regime: A Theory ofKorea) Abstract The knowledge-led accumulation regime (KLAR)

Kim, Hyungkee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submitted manuscript has been submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- AC05-96OR22464. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non- exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." ORNL/TM-1999/258 AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION David L. Greene Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory November 1999 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . .

99

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

102

Study of a liquid-gas mixing layer: Shear instability and size of produced drops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of a liquid-gas mixing layer: Shear instability and size of produced drops Sylvain Marty +++++ Presented by £££££ Abstract We study experimentally the atomization of a liquid sheet by a parallel gas flow creation. We study in particular the regimes at low M (ratio of gas/liquid dynamic pressures), to test

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

103

Insulating Behavior of a Trapped Ideal Fermi Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate theoretically and experimentally the center-of-mass motion of an ideal Fermi gas in a combined periodic and harmonic potential. We find a crossover from a conducting to an insulating regime as the Fermi energy moves from the first Bloch band into the bandgap of the lattice. The conducting regime is characterized by an oscillation of the cloud about the potential minimum, while in the insulating case the center of mass remains on one side of the potential.

L. Pezze'; L. Pitaevskii; A. Smerzi; S. Stringari; G. Modugno; E. DeMirandes; F. Ferlaino; H. Ott; G. Roati; M. Inguscio

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

THE IMPACT OF THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR SAFETY REGIME IN BRAZIL  

SciTech Connect

A turning point of the world nuclear industry with respect to safety occurred due to the accident at Chernobyl, in 1986. A side from the tragic personal losses and the enormous financial damage, the Chernobyl accident has literally demonstrated that ''a nuclear accident anywhere is an accident everywhere''. The impact was felt immediately by the nuclear industry, with plant cancellations (e.g. Austria), elimination of national programs (e.g. Italy) and general construction delays. However, the reaction of the nuclear industry was equally immediate, which led to the proposal and establishment of a Global Nuclear Safety Regime. This regime is composed of biding international safety conventions, globally accepted safety standard, and a voluntary peer review system. In a previous work, the author has presented in detail the components of this Regime, and briefly discussed its impact in the Brazilian nuclear power organizations, including the Regulatory Body. This work, on the opposite, briefly reviews the Global Nuclear Safety Regime, and concentrates in detail in the discussion of its impact in Brazil, showing how it has produced some changes, and where the peer pressure regime has failed to produce real results.

Almeida, C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

106

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

107

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

108

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

109

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

110

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

111

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

112

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

113

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

114

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

115

The development of a UK natural gas spot market  

SciTech Connect

The growth of a natural gas spot market in the United Kingdom (UK) is a radical innovation for the industry. Spot markets turned the oil industry inside out, and will do the same for gas. Such a development seemed all but impossible to gas industry experts three years ago. The role and likely form of a spot market are now at the center of current industry debate about the designing of a daily balancing regime to replace unitary management by British Gas. This paper examines parallels between the evolution of spot markets for oil in the 1980`s and the current UK gas industry. 12 refs., 1 fig.

Roeber, J. [Joe Roeber Associates, London (United Kingdom)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Geothermal regimes at Clearlake California: A preliminary review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three distinct geothermal regimes are inferred in the vicinity of the city of Clearlake, California. The first is a conductive heat flow regime, the second is a fault-controlled hot spring flow of ``magmatic`` fluids, and the third is a resurgent flow of meteoric warm water. The conductive heat flow results in flat, horizontal isotherms. The hot spring generates a localized spike in the isotherms. The advective disturbance carries heat laterally to a fault-line resurgence, lowering the apparent heat flow at the surface.

Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.; Zyvoloski, G.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Thermal regimes of high burn-up nuclear fuel rod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in the nuclear fuel rods for high burn-up is studied. We use the numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the time taken to have the stationary thermal regime of nuclear fuel rod is less than one minute. We can make the inference that the behavior of the nuclear fuel rod can be considered as a stationary task. Exact solutions of the temperature distribution in the fuel rods in the stationary case are found. Thermal regimes of high burn-up the nuclear fuel rods are analyzed.

Kudryashov, Nikolai A; Chmykhov, Mikhail A; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2009.05.063

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Geothermal regimes at Clearlake California: A preliminary review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three distinct geothermal regimes are inferred in the vicinity of the city of Clearlake, California. The first is a conductive heat flow regime, the second is a fault-controlled hot spring flow of magmatic'' fluids, and the third is a resurgent flow of meteoric warm water. The conductive heat flow results in flat, horizontal isotherms. The hot spring generates a localized spike in the isotherms. The advective disturbance carries heat laterally to a fault-line resurgence, lowering the apparent heat flow at the surface.

Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.; Zyvoloski, G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the “ prices” for heat rate and capacity seem stable,cients before heat rate and capacity neither substantiallythat the yearly heat rate and capacity coe?cient values are

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to drive a secondary steam turbine – thus increasing theW501G turbines – incorporating closed-loop steam cooling –turbine cost for the MS7001FA stems from the additional cost of heat recovery steam

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supercritical coal-?red steam generators. Additionally, thecost of heat recovery steam generator(s) (HSRG) necessarythe primary generator is used to drive a secondary steam

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GER) Document 4206, “Combined Cycle Development: EvolutionCombustion Turbines / Combined Cycles,” Presentation for thewell suited for combined cycle, baseload applications. This

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the US Electricity Industry,” October mimeo.deregulation” of the electricity industry in the U.S. hasreg- ulation in the electricity industry has attracted

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Towards a legal regime for limiting ship-source greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the 55th meeting of the International Maritime Organisationâs (IMO) Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) in October 2006, the Committee noted that the impact of… (more)

Paul, Daniel Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suited for combined cycle, baseload applications. This sug-for the provision of baseload power in a combined cycle set-generators: provision of baseload power using a combined

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Environment,” Handbook of Environmental Economics.and Market Structure,” Handbook of Industrial Organization.publication issues an annual “Handbook” that contains, among

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

CSEM WP 128 Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales reflect a "pent-up" demand for natural gas capacity, held in check during earlier years surrounding 4 #12;the "Oil Crisis," severely limited the use of natural gas fuelled generators by electric-burning" technologies. With natural gas turbines less polluting than generators driven by coal boilers, the Clean Air

California at Berkeley. University of

128

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

129

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

Weather Regimes in the Pacific from a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather regimes have been sought by examining the 500-mb streamfunction of the UGAMP GCM run for 10 yr at T42 resolution with perpetual January forcing. Five-day low-pass EOFs provide a low-order phase space in which to study dynamical aspects of ...

K. Haines; A. Hannachi

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Regime Transitions in a Stochastically Forced Double-Gyre Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reduced-gravity double-gyre ocean model is used to study the influence of an additive stochastic wind stress component on the regime behavior of the wind-driven circulation. The variance of the stochastic component (spatially coherent white ...

Philip Sura; Klaus Fraedrich; Frank Lunkeit

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Circulation Regimes: Chaotic Variability versus SST-Forced Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The circulation regimes in the Pacific–North American region are studied using the NCEP–NCAR reanalyses for the 18-winter period (1981/82–1998/99; NCEP18) and for the 54-winter period (1948/49–2001/02; NCEP54). The sampling properties of the ...

David M. Straus; Susanna Corti; Franco Molteni

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Detecting and Forecasting Economic Regimes in Automated Exchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting and Forecasting Economic Regimes in Automated Exchanges Wolfgang Ketter , John Collins. The agent can use this information to make both tactical decisions such as pricing and strategic decisions, such as over- supply or scarcity, from historical data using computational methods to construct price density

Ketter, Wolfgang

134

Detecting and Forecasting Economic Regimes in Automated Exchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting and Forecasting Economic Regimes in Automated Exchanges Wolfgang Ketter # , John Collins tactical decisions such as pricing and strategic decisions such as product mix and production planning. We historical data using computational methods to construct price density functions. We discuss how

Ketter, Wolfgang

135

The Link between Rossby Wave Breakings and Weather Regime Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The link between Rossby wave breaking (RWB) and the four wintertime weather regimes over the North Atlantic domain is studied in this paper. Using the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) data, frequencies of occurrence of anticyclonic and cyclonic ...

Clio Michel; Gwendal Rivière

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Chemical nonequilibrium for interacting bosons: applications to the pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an interacting pion gas in the regime where thermal but not chemical equilibrium has been reached. Approximate particle number conservation is implemented by a nonvanishing pion chemical potential $\\mu_\\pi$ within a diagrammatic thermal field theory approach, valid in principle for any bosonic field theory in this regime. The resulting Feynman rules are then applied within the context of Chiral Perturbation Theory to discuss thermodynamical quantities of interest for the pion gas such as the free energy, the quark condensate and thermal self-energy. In particular, we derive the $\\mu_\\pi\

Fernandez-Fraile, D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chemical nonequilibrium for interacting bosons: applications to the pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an interacting pion gas in the regime where thermal but not chemical equilibrium has been reached. Approximate particle number conservation is implemented by a nonvanishing pion chemical potential $\\mu_\\pi$ within a diagrammatic thermal field theory approach, valid in principle for any bosonic field theory in this regime. The resulting Feynman rules are then applied within the context of Chiral Perturbation Theory to discuss thermodynamical quantities of interest for the pion gas such as the free energy, the quark condensate and thermal self-energy. In particular, we derive the $\\mu_\\pi\

D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

139

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

140

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Risky Human Capital and Alternative Bankruptcy Regimes for Student Loans ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the implications of various bankruptcy regimes for student loans on college investment, human capital accumulation, and earnings in a heterogeneous life-cycle economy with risky human capital investment. The option to discharge one’s debt under a liquidation regime helps alleviate some of the risk of investing in human capital. However, dischargeability triggers exclusion from borrowing and wage garnishment. Replacing liquidation with reorganization induces significant allocational consequences across education groups. Poor high school graduates with low levels of college preparedness are better off under liquidation, whereas high school graduates with high levels of assets and college preparedness are better off under reorganization. Overall, reorganization improves welfare by 1.2 % relative to liquidation. However, an economy with partial dischargeability is desirable on welfare grounds.

Felicia Ionescu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Multifractal regime transition in a modified minority game model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search for more realistic modeling of financial time series reviews several stylized facts of real markets. In this work we focus on the multifractal properties found in price and index signals. Although the usual Minority Game (MG) models do not exhibit multifractality, we study here one of its variants that does. We show that the nonsynchronous MG models in the nonergodic phase is multifractal and in this sense, together with other stylized facts, constitute a better modeling tool. Using the Structure Function (SF) approach we detected the stationary and the scaling range of the time series generated by the MG model and, from the linear (nonlinear) behavior of the SF we identified the fractal (multifractal) regimes. Finally, using the Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM) technique we obtained its multifractal spectrum width for different dynamical regimes.

Crepaldi, Antonio F; Ferreira, Fernando F; Francisco, Gerson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME  

SciTech Connect

The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

HUGHES, H. GRADY [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

ECONOMIC REFORM AND COMMUNIST REGIME SURVIVABILTY: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the collapse of communist rule and process of transitioning to democracy in the former-Soviet Union and its numerous satellite states certainly warrants the wealth of attention received, by no means does this signal that the history of communist state rule is ended. Contrary to popular belief—and even belief in academe it sometimes seems—Communism still survives. In fact, a number of Asian states still claim to follow the path to a promised societal utopia under the guidance of their respective Politburos and may be described as not only ‘surviving’ but thriving, experiencing economic stability and enjoying high rates of growth. This study examines the ramifications of economic and political reform policies implemented by four collapsed communist regimes which have transitioned to democratic governance—the former-Soviet Union, Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia—as well as two surviving Asian communist regimes—Vietnam and China—in identifying characteristic patterns of reform that are conducive to regime survival and/or collapse. The end objective herein is to provide projections for the future of the Castro regime in Cuba, which faces a critical juncture in the future with the impending death of its charismatic leader. I hypothesize that economic reform, through consistent implementation, generates credibility for both Communist Party elites and their future reform endeavors. Additionally, reform packages that manage to successfully stabilize the economy bestow an increased measure of legitimacy to the political elite, allowing the Communist Party to maintain political control, thereby avoiding collapse and the transition to democracy. The third and final section contains general discussion and what conclusions can be drawn from the results, as well as analysis of the history of reform efforts to present in the Caribbean island state of Cuba.

Nelson, John

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Weak and Strong coupling regimes in plasmonic-QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a quantum theory for the interaction of a two level emitter with surface plasmon polaritons confined in single-mode waveguide resonators. Based on the Green's function approach, we develop the conditions for the weak and strong coupling regimes by taking into account the sources of dissipation and decoherence: radiative and non-radiative decays, internal loss processes in the emitter, as well as propagation and leakage losses of the plasmons in the resonator. The theory is supported by numerical calculations for several quantum emitters, GaAs and CdSe quantum dots and NV centers together with different types of resonators constructed of hybrid, cylindrical or wedge waveguides. We further study the role of temperature and resonator length. Assuming realistic leakage rates, we find the existence of an optimal length at which strong coupling is possible. Our calculations show that the strong coupling regime in plasmonic resonators is accessible within current technology when working at very low temperatures (<4K). In the weak coupling regime our theory accounts for recent experimental results. By further optimization we find highly enhanced spontaneous emission with Purcell factors over 1000 at room temperature for NV-centers. We finally discuss more applications for quantum nonlinear optics and plasmon-plasmon interactions.

T. Hümmer; F. J. García-Vidal; L. Martín-Moreno; D. Zueco

2012-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

Environmental sampling: Issues for the cut-off regime  

SciTech Connect

The fissile material cut-off treaty (FMCT) initiative under the Conference on Disarmament mandate is envisioned to include certain aspects of environmental sampling and monitoring. One of the intents of this treaty is to bring certain non-NPT signatories (e.g., threshold states) under this treaty agreement along with the nuclear weapon states (NWSs). This paper provides a brief overview of some of the relevant issues that may be involved in the implementation and use of environmental monitoring for (1) verification of the cut-off regime declarations, (2) the detection of undeclared activities, and, (3) application in non-routine inspections. The intent is to provide backstopping information important for treaty negotiators. Specific issues addressed within this paper include signature sampling, differences in the proposed detection regime, potential signature integrators, specific examples and spoofing concerns. Many of these issues must be carefully considered and weighed in order to create a credibly verifiable inspection regime. Importantly, the cut-off treaty must enable nondiscriminatory implementation, while carefully assuring that nonproliferation treaty requirements are maintained (i.e., preventing unintentional release of critical weapons design information--potentially through environmental sampling and analysis).

Fearey, B.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

148

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

149

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

150

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

151

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

152

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

153

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

154

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

155

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

156

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

157

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

158

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

159

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

160

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

162

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

164

INTERFACIAL AREA TRANSPORT AND REGIME TRANSITION IN COMBINATORIAL CHANNELS  

SciTech Connect

. This study investigates the geometric effects of 90-degree vertical elbows and flow configurations in two-phase flow. The study shows that the elbows make a significant effect on the transport characteristics of two-phase flow, which includes the changes in interfacial structures, bubble interaction mechanisms and flow regime transition. The effect of the elbows is characterized for global and local two-phase flow parameters. The global two-phase flow parameters include two-phase pressure, interfacial structures and flow regime transition. In order to characterize the frictional pressure drop and minor loss across the vertical elbows, pressure measurements are obtained across the test section over a wide range of flow conditions in both single-phase and two-phase flow conditions. A two-phase pressure drop correlation analogous to Lockhart-Martinelli correlation is proposed to predict the minor loss across the elbows. A high speed camera is employed to perform extensive flow visualization studies across the elbows in vertical upward, horizontal and vertical downward sections and modified flow regime maps are proposed. It is found that modified flow regime maps immediately downstream of the vertical upward elbow deviate significantly from the conventional flow regime map. A qualitative assessment of the counter-current flow limitation characteristics specific to the current experimental facility is performed. A multi-sensor conductivity probe is used to measure local two-phase flow parameters such as: void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency. The local measurements are obtained for six different flow conditions at ten measurement locations along axial direction of the test section. Both the vertical-upward and vertical-downward elbows have a significant impact on bubble distribution, resulting in, a bimodal distribution along the horizontal radius of the tube cross-section and migration of bubbles towards the inside of the elbow curvatures immediately downstream of the vertical-upward and vertical-downward elbows, respectively. The elbow effect decays further downstream of the elbow and bubbles migrate to more conventional distribution patterns. The axial transport of void fraction and interfacial area concentration shows that the elbows promote bubble disintegration. Preliminary comparisons between the interfacial area transport model and the experimental data for verticalupward and vertical downward section are also presented.

Seugjin Kim

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Multiphase imaging of gas flow in a nanoporous material using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and transport, filtering or as reactors. We report a model study on silica aerogel using a time of the aerogel. The asymmetrical nature of the dispersion pattern alludes to the existence of a stationary and a flow regime in the aerogel. An exchange time constant is determined to characterize the gas transfer

Pines, Alexander

166

Large-Scale Weather Regimes and Local Climate over the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather regimes are used to determine changes in the statistical distribution of winter precipitation and temperature at eight locations within the western United States. Six regimes are identified from daily 700-mb heights during 46 winters (...

Andrew W. Robertson; Michael Ghil

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Multiple-Regime Approach to Atmospheric Zonal-Flow Vacillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the multiple-regimes concept that originated in the work of Charney and DeVore (1979). Several attempts have on visual inspection of the zonal jet's position, Yoden et al. (1987) found two distinct flow regimes during

Ghil, Michael

168

Initial Tendencies of Cloud Regimes in the Met Office Unified Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Met Office unified forecast–climate model is used to compare the properties of simulated climatological cloud regimes with those produced in short-range forecasts initialized from operational analyses. The regimes are defined as principal ...

K. D. Williams; M. E. Brooks

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Regime legitimacy and military resilience : lessons from World War II and Yugoslavia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis argues that regime legitimacy creates military resilience. A regime is legitimate when its constituents believe-whether because of ideological solidarity, patriotism, nationalism, or good governance-that a ...

Russell, Jacob Hale

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Statistics and Horizontal Structure of Anomalous Weather Regimes in the Community Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistics, horizontal structure, and linear barotropic dynamics of anomalous weather regimes are evaluated in a 15-winter integration of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2). Statistical and ensemble analyses of simulated regimes are ...

Robert X. Black; Katherine J. Evans

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

On the Identification of the Large-Scale Properties of Tropical Convection using Cloud Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of cloud regimes in identifying tropical convection and the associated large-scale atmospheric properties is investigated. The regimes are derived by applying cluster analysis to satellite retrievals of daytime-averaged frequency ...

Jackson Tan; Christian Jakob; Todd P. Lane

172

Detecting, Characterizing and Determining the Biological Response to Regime Shifts off the California Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power point presentation on regime shifts to the RAP, which represents the research arm of the Monterey Bay National Marine

Breaker, Laurence C.; Welschmeyer, Nicholas A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

174

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Plasma outflow from a corrugated trap in the kinetic regime  

SciTech Connect

The problem of stationary plasma outflow from an open corrugated trap in the kinetic regime is considered with allowance for pair collisions in the framework of a kinetic equation with the Landau collision integral. The distribution function is studied in the limit of small-scale corrugation and a large mirror ratio. In considering a single corrugation cell, a correction for the distribution function is calculated analytically. An equation describing variations of the distribution function along the system is derived and used to study the problem of plasma outflow into vacuum.

Skovorodin, D. I.; Beklemishev, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

178

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

179

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

182

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

186

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

187

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

188

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

189

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

190

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

191

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

192

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

193

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

194

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

195

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

196

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

197

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

198

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

199

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

200

Compton scattering in the Klein-Nishina Regime Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In blazars such as 3C 279, GeV gamma-rays are thought to be produced by inverse Compton scattering of soft photons injected from external sources into the jet. Because of the large bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, the energy of soft photons is Doppler shifted in the comoving frame of the jet, and the scattering is likely to occur in the Klein-Nishina regime. Although the Klein-Nishina effects are well known, the properties of the electron and emission spectra have not been studied in detail in the environment of blazars. We solve the kinetic equation of electrons with the spatial escape term of the electrons to obtain the electron energy spectrum in the jet and calculated the observed emission spectrum. In calculations of the Compton losses in the Klein-Nishina regime, we use the discrete loss formalism to take into account the significant energy loss in a single scattering. Although the scattering cross section decreases because of the Klein-Nishina effects, ample gamma rays are emitted by inverse Compton scattering. When the injection spectrum of electrons obeys a power law, the electron spectrum does not follow a broken power law, as a result of the Klein-Nishina effects, and a large number of high-energy electrons remain in the emitting region.

Masaaki Kusunose; Fumio Takahara

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Includes those quantities for which royalties were paid based on the value of the natural gas plant liquids produced. Additional quantities of natural gas plant ...

202

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

203

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

204

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

205

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

206

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

207

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

208

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

209

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

210

Non-equilibrium Lorentz gas on a curved space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The periodic Lorentz gas with external field and iso-kinetic thermostat is equivalent, by conformal transformation, to a billiard with expanding phase-space and slightly distorted scatterers, for which the trajectories are straight lines. A further time rescaling allows to keep the speed constant in that new geometry. In the hyperbolic regime, the stationary state of this billiard is characterized by a phase-space contraction rate, equal to that of the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas. In contrast to the iso-kinetic Lorentz gas where phase-space contraction occurs in the bulk, the phase-space contraction rate here takes place at the periodic boundaries.

Felipe Barra; Thomas Gilbert

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gas permeability of carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect

Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and subsequent pyrolysis at 1050 [degree]C. As a result of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications such as supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, the permeability of carbon aerogels was calculated from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have permeabilities on the order of 10[sup [minus]12] to 10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 2] over the density range from 0.05--0.44 g/cm[sup 3]. Like many other aerogel properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density, reflecting differences in the average mesopore size. Comparing the results from this study with the permeability of silica aerogels reported by other workers, we found that the permeability of aerogels is governed by a simple universal flow equation. This paper discusses the relationship between permeability, pore size, and density in carbon aerogels.

Kong, F.; LeMay, J.D.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

214

Universal conductivity of graphene in the ultra-relativistic regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the zero temperature dc conductivity in graphene in the ultimate low-energy regime, when retardation effects of the electromagnetic interaction become important and when the full Lorentz symmetry emerges. In contrast to what happens with the short range or with the Coulomb long-range instantaneous interactions, the dc conductivity is now no longer equal to its non interacting value, but acquires universal corrections in powers of the fine structure constant. The coefficient of the first order correction is computed, and found to be of order one. We also present the result for the conductivity in the large-N limit, with $N$ as the number of Dirac fermions species, to the order $1/N^2$.

Herbut, Igor F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Strangeness Production at RHIC in the Perturbative Regim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate strange quark production in Au-Au collisions at RHIC in the framework of the Parton Cascade Model(PCM). The yields of (anti-) strange quarks for three production scenarios -- primary-primary scattering, full scattering, and full production -- are compared to a proton-proton baseline. Enhancement of strange quark yields in central Au-Au collisions compared to scaled p-p collisions increases with the number of secondary interactions. The centrality dependence of strangeness production for the three production scenarios is studied as well. For all production mechanisms, the strangeness yield increases with $(N_{\\rm part})^{4/3}$. The perturbative QCD regime described by the PCM is able to account for up to 50% of the observed strangeness at RHIC.

Daphne Y. Chang; Steffen A. Bass; Dinesh K. Srivastava

2004-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

Enhanced Heat Flow in the Hydrodynamic Collisionless Regime  

SciTech Connect

We study the heat conduction of a cold, thermal cloud in a highly asymmetric trap. The cloud is axially hydrodynamic, but due to the asymmetric trap radially collisionless. By locally heating the cloud we excite a thermal dipole mode and measure its oscillation frequency and damping rate. We find an unexpectedly large heat conduction compared to the homogeneous case. The enhanced heat conduction in this regime is partially caused by atoms with a high angular momentum spiraling in trajectories around the core of the cloud. Since atoms in these trajectories are almost collisionless they strongly contribute to the heat transfer. We observe a second, oscillating hydrodynamic mode, which we identify as a standing wave sound mode.

Meppelink, R.; Rooij, R. van; Vogels, J. M.; Straten, P. van der [Atom Optics and Ultrafast Dynamics, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

218

On burning regimes and long duration X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen and helium accreted onto a neutron star undergo thermonuclear burning. Explosive burning is observed as a type I X-ray burst. We describe the different burning regimes and focus on some of the current inconsistencies between theory and observations. Of special interest are the rare kinds of X-ray bursts such as carbon-fueled superbursts and helium-fueled intermediately long X-ray bursts. These bursts are thought to originate deeper in the neutron star envelope, such that they are probes of the thermal properties of the crust. We investigate the possibility of observing superbursts with the wide-field instruments INTEGRAL-ISGRI and Swift-BAT. We find that only the brightest bursts are detectable.

L. Keek; J. J. M. in 't Zand

2008-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chiral Effective Field Theory Beyond the Power-Counting Regime  

SciTech Connect

Novel techniques are presented, which identify the chiral power-counting regime (PCR), and realize the existence of an intrinsic energy scale embedded in lattice QCD results that extend outside the PCR. The nucleon mass is considered as a benchmark for illustrating this new approach. Using finite-range regularization, an optimal regularization scale can be extracted from lattice simulation results by analyzing the renormalization of the low energy coefficients. The optimal scale allows a description of lattice simulation results that extend beyond the PCR by quantifying and thus handling any scheme-dependence. Preliminary results for the nucleon magnetic moment are also examined, and a consistent optimal regularization scale is obtained. This indicates the existence of an intrinsic scale corresponding to the finite size of the source of the pion cloud.

Hall, Jonathan M. M.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Young, Ross D. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM), School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the use of alternative fuels and combustion regimes is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO{sub 2} emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher noise. Noise and PM have traditionally been the obstacles toward consumer acceptance of Diesel passenger cars in North America, while NOx (a key component in photochemical smog) has been more of an engineering challenge. Diesels are lean burning (combustion with excess oxygen) and reducing NOx to N2 in an oxygen rich environment is difficult. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions, but relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K prevents NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to validate combustion modeling.

Mack, J H; Flowers, D L; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Transport in the plateau regime in a tokamak pedestal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a tokamak H-mode, a strong E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear is generated during the L-H transition. Turbulence in a pedestal is suppressed significantly by this E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. In this case, neoclassical transport may become important. The neoclassical fluxes are calculated in the plateau regime with the parallel plasma flow using their kinetic definitions. In an axisymmetric tokamak, the neoclassical particles fluxes can be decomposed into the banana-plateau flux and the Pfirsch-Schlueter flux. The banana-plateau particle flux is driven by the parallel viscous force and the Pfirsch-Schlueter flux by the poloidal variation of the friction force. The combined quantity of the radial electric field and the parallel flow is determined by the flux surface averaged parallel momentum balance equation rather than requiring the ambipolarity of the total particle fluxes. In this process, the Pfirsch-Schlueter flux does not appear in the flux surface averaged parallel momentum equation. Only the banana-plateau flux is used to determine the parallel flow in the form of the flux surface averaged parallel viscosity. The heat flux, obtained using the solution of the parallel momentum balance equation, decreases exponentially in the presence of sonic M{sub p} without any enhancement over that in the standard neoclassical theory. Here, M{sub p} is a combination of the poloidal E Multiplication-Sign B flow and the parallel mass flow. The neoclassical bootstrap current in the plateau regime is presented. It indicates that the neoclassical bootstrap current also is related only to the banana-plateau fluxes. Finally, transport fluxes are calculated when M{sub p} is large enough to make the parallel electron viscosity comparable with the parallel ion viscosity. It is found that the bootstrap current has a finite value regardless of the magnitude of M{sub p}.

Seol, J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shaing, K. C. [Institute for Space, Astrophysical and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China) and Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Creation of Exotic Features in Metal Oxides by Surface Treatment for Enhanced Gas Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

followed by oxidation in a well-defined pO2 regime near the M-MOx proximity line by a suitable buffer gas Model. Fig. 4. Thermodynamic criteria for several M/MOx coexistence and practical pO2 regimes for phase as a function of temperature for several M-MOx pairs. By manipulating the ambient pO2 across these lines, one

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

223

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

224

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

225

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

226

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

227

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

228

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

229

Lattice Boltzmann modeling of microchannel flow in slip flow regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with multiple relaxation times (MRT) to simulate pressure-driven gaseous flow in a long microchannel. We obtain analytic solutions of the MRT-LBE with various boundary conditions for the incompressible ... Keywords: Gas flow through microchannel, Lattice Boltzmann equation with multiple relaxation times, Slip flow

Frederik Verhaeghe; Li-Shi Luo; Bart Blanpain

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent … more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

231

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Authors R. G. Allis, Stuart D. Johnson, Gregory D. Nash and Dick Benoit Published Journal TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Citation R. G. Allis,Stuart D. Johnson,Gregory D. Nash,Dick Benoit. 1999. A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field. TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL. 23:493-498. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_model_for_the_shallow_thermal_regime_at_Dixie_Valley_geothermal_field&oldid=682587"

232

GAS CONDENSATION IN THE GALACTIC HALO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamic simulations of vertically stratified hot halo gas, we examine the conditions under which clouds can form and condense out of the hot halo medium to potentially fuel star formation in the gaseous disk. We find that halo clouds do not develop from linear isobaric perturbations. This is a regime where the cooling time is longer than the Brunt-Vaeisaelae time, confirming previous linear analysis. We extend the analysis into the nonlinear regime by considering mildly or strongly nonlinear perturbations with overdensities up to 100, also varying the initial height, the cloud size, and the metallicity of the gas. Here, the result depends on the ratio of cooling time to the time required to accelerate the cloud to the sound speed (similar to the dynamical time). If the ratio exceeds a critical value near unity, the cloud is accelerated without further cooling and gets disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz and/or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. If it is less than the critical value, the cloud cools and condenses before disruption. Accreting gas with overdensities of 10-20 is expected to be marginally unstable; the cooling fraction will depend on the metallicity, the size of the incoming cloud, and the distance to the galaxy. Locally enhanced overdensities within cold streams have a higher likelihood of cooling out. Our results have implications on the evolution of clouds seeded by cold accretion that are barely resolved in current cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and absorption line systems detected in galaxy halos.

Joung, M. Ryan; Bryan, Greg L.; Putman, Mary E., E-mail: moo@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Collective excitation frequencies and stationary states of trapped dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates in the Thomas-Fermi regime  

SciTech Connect

We present a general method for obtaining the exact static solutions and collective excitation frequencies of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with dipolar atomic interactions in the Thomas-Fermi regime. The method incorporates analytic expressions for the dipolar potential of an arbitrary polynomial density profile, thereby reducing the problem of handling nonlocal dipolar interactions to the solution of algebraic equations. We comprehensively map out the static solutions and excitation modes, including non-cylindrically-symmetric traps, and also the case of negative scattering length where dipolar interactions stabilize an otherwise unstable condensate. The dynamical stability of the excitation modes gives insight into the onset of collapse of a dipolar BEC. We find that global collapse is consistently mediated by an anisotropic quadrupolar collective mode, although there are two trapping regimes in which the BEC is stable against quadrupole fluctuations even as the ratio of the dipolar to s-wave interactions becomes infinite. Motivated by the possibility of a fragmented condensate in a dipolar Bose gas due to the partially attractive interactions, we pay special attention to the scissors modes, which can provide a signature of superfluidity, and identify a long-range restoring force which is peculiar to dipolar systems. As part of the supporting material for this paper we provide the computer program used to make the calculations, including a graphical user interface.

Bijnen, R. M. W. van [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NE-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Parker, N. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); School of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Kokkelmans, S. J. J. M. F. [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NE-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Martin, A. M. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); O'Dell, D. H. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal...

235

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

Hermance, J.F.

1989-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Power counting regime of chiral effective field theory and beyond.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT) complements numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) on a space-time lattice. It provides a model-independent formalism for connecting lattice simulation results at finite volume and a variety of quark masses to the physical world. The asymptotic nature of the chiral expansion places the focus on the first few terms of the expansion. Thus, knowledge of the power-counting regime (PCR) of {chi}EFT, where higher-order terms of the expansion may be regarded as negligible, is as important as knowledge of the expansion itself. Through the consideration of a variety of renormalization schemes and associated parameters, techniques to identify the PCR where results are independent of the renormalization scheme are established. The nucleon mass is considered as a benchmark for illustrating this general approach. Because the PCR is small, the numerical simulation results are also examined to search for the possible presence of an intrinsic scale which may be used in a nonperturbative manner to describe lattice simulation results outside of the PCR. Positive results that improve on the current optimistic application of chiral perturbation theory ({chi}PT) beyond the PCR are reported.

Hall, J. M.M.; Leinweber, D. B.; Young, R. D.; Physics; Univ. of Adelaide

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Power counting regime of chiral effective field theory and beyond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT) complements numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) on a space-time lattice. It provides a model-independent formalism for connecting lattice simulation results at finite volume and a variety of quark masses to the physical world. The asymptotic nature of the chiral expansion places the focus on the first few terms of the expansion. Thus, knowledge of the power-counting regime (PCR) of {chi}EFT, where higher-order terms of the expansion may be regarded as negligible, is as important as knowledge of the expansion itself. Through the consideration of a variety of renormalization schemes and associated parameters, techniques to identify the PCR where results are independent of the renormalization scheme are established. The nucleon mass is considered as a benchmark for illustrating this general approach. Because the PCR is small, the numerical simulation results are also examined to search for the possible presence of an intrinsic scale which may be used in a nonperturbative manner to describe lattice simulation results outside of the PCR. Positive results that improve on the current optimistic application of chiral perturbation theory ({chi}PT) beyond the PCR are reported.

Hall, J. M. M.; Leinweber, D. B. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM), School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Young, R. D. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM), School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}

Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, 1066 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Smithe, D. N. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis was updated for AEO2009: Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental ShelfThe OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, Federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the States of Alaska and Virginia have asked the Federal Government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Numerical Modeling of Fractured Shale-Gas and Tight-Gas Reservoirs Using Unstructured Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various models featuring horizontal wells with multiple induced fractures have been proposed to characterize flow behavior over time in tight gas and shale gas systems. Currently, there is little consensus regarding the effects of non-ideal fracture geometries and coupled primary-secondary fracture interactions on reservoir performance in these unconventional gas reservoirs. This thesis provides a grid construction tool to generate high-resolution unstructured meshes using Voronoi grids, which provides the flexibility required to accurately represent complex geologic domains and fractures in three dimensions. Using these Voronoi grids, the interaction between propped hydraulic fractures and secondary "stress-release" fractures were evaluated. Additionally, various primary fracture configurations were examined, where the fractures may be non-planar or non-orthogonal. For this study, a numerical model was developed to assess the potential performance of tight gas and shale gas reservoirs. These simulations utilized up to a half-million grid-blocks and consider a period of up to 3,000 years in some cases. The aim is to provide very high-definition reference numerical solutions that will exhibit virtually all flow regimes we can expect in these unconventional gas reservoirs. The simulation results are analyzed to identify production signatures and flow regimes using diagnostic plots, and these interpretations are confirmed using pressure maps where useful. The coupled primary-secondary fracture systems with the largest fracture surface areas are shown to give the highest production in the traditional "linear flow" regime (which occurs for very high conductivity vertical fracture cases). The non-ideal hydraulic fracture geometries are shown to yield progressively lower production as the angularity of these fractures increases. Hence, to design optimum fracture completions, we should endeavor to keep the fractures as orthogonal to the horizontal well as possible. This work expands the current understanding of flow behavior in fractured tight-gas and shale-gas systems and may be used to optimize fracture and completion design, to validate analytical models and to facilitate more accurate reserves estimation.

Olorode, Olufemi Morounfopefoluwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Efficient Retail Pricing in Electricity and Natural Gas Markets: A Familiar Problem with New Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A long line of research investigates whether the retail prices of electricity and natural gas send proper signals about scarcity in order to induce efficient consumption. Historically, regulated utilities have not designed tariffs that set marginal prices equal to marginal costs. Currently, some jurisdictions are opening the retail sectors of the gas and electricity industry to competition via “retail choice”. These new regimes replace imperfect regulation with imperfect competition as the process by which retail tariffs are formed. We discuss the challenges in evaluating the efficiency of these new pricing regimes and present descriptive evidence of how pricing has changed in markets with retail choice.

Steven L. Puller; Jeremy West

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Dipolar collisions of polar molecules in the quantum regime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultracold polar molecules offer the possibility of exploring quantum gases with interparticle interactions that are strong, long-range, and spatially anisotropic. This is in stark contrast to the dilute gases of ultracold atoms, which have isotropic and extremely short-range, or "contact", interactions. The large electric dipole moment of polar molecules can be tuned with an external electric field; this provides unique opportunities such as control of ultracold chemical reactions, quantum information processing, and the realization of novel quantum many-body systems. In spite of intense experimental efforts aimed at observing the influence of dipoles on ultracold molecules, only recently have sufficiently high densities been achieved. Here, we report the observation of dipolar collisions in an ultracold molecular gas prepared close to quantum degeneracy. For modest values of an applied electric field, we observe a dramatic increase in the loss rate of fermionic KRb molecules due to ultrcold chemical reactions. We find that the loss rate has a steep power-law dependence on the induced electric dipole moment, and we show that this dependence can be understood with a relatively simple model based on quantum threshold laws for scattering of fermionic polar molecules. We directly observe the spatial anisotropy of the dipolar interaction as manifested in measurements of the thermodynamics of the dipolar gas. These results demonstrate how the long-range dipolar interaction can be used for electric-field control of chemical reaction rates in an ultracold polar molecule gas. The large loss rates in an applied electric field suggest that creating a long-lived ensemble of ultracold polar molecules may require confinement in a two-dimensional trap geometry to suppress the influence of the attractive dipolar interactions.

K. -K. Ni; S. Ospelkaus; D. Wang; G. Quemener; B. Neyenhuis; M. H. G. de Miranda; J. L. Bohn; J. Ye; D. S. Jin

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Democracy from Above: Regime Transition in the Kingdom of Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

85% 87.5% n/a 79% 75% Agricultural contribution to GDP 56% 45% 38% 27% 22% Manufacturing contribution to GDP 4% 6% 9% 6% n/a Primary energy consumption14 (quadrillion Btu) 0 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 Sources: Planning Commission of Bhutan, World... 14 Primary energy includes petroleum, dry natural gas and coal, and net hydroelectric, solar, geothermal, wind, and wood and waste electricity. Also includes net electricity imports. 15 Acemoglu, D & Robinson, J. A. (2005). Economic Origins of 28...

Sinpeng, Aim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geothermal regimes of the Clearlake region, northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first commercial production of power from geothermal energy, at The Geysers steamfield in northern California in June 1960, was a triumph for the geothermal exploration industry. Before and since, there has been a search for further sources of commercial geothermal power in The Geysers--Clear Lake geothermal area surrounding The Geysers. As with all exploration programs, these were driven by models. The models in this case were of geothermal regimes, that is, the geometric distribution of temperature and permeability at depth, and estimates of the physical conditions in subsurface fluids. Studies in microseismicity and heat flow, did yield geophysical information relevant to active geothermal systems. Studies in stable-element geochemistry found hiatuses or divides at the Stoney Creek Fault and at the Collayomi Fault. In the region between the two faults, early speculation as to the presence of steamfields was disproved from the geochemical data, and the potential existence of hot-water systems was predicted. Studies in isotope geochemistry found the region was characterized by an isotope mixing trend. The combined geochemical data have negative implications for the existence of extensive hydrothermal systems and imply that fluids of deep origin are confined to small, localized systems adjacent to faults that act as conduits. There are also shallow hot-water aquifers. Outside fault-localized systems and hot-water aquifers, the area is an expanse of impermeable rock. The extraction of energy from the impermeable rock will require the development and application of new methods of reservoir creation and heat extraction such as hot dry rock technology.

Amador, M. [ed.; Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Rainfall Regime of a Mountainous Mediterranean Region: Statistical Analysis at Short Time Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the rainfall regime of a Mediterranean mountainous region of southeastern France. The rainfall regime is studied on temporal scales from hourly to yearly using daily and hourly rain gauge data of 43 and 16 years, ...

Gilles Molinié; Davide Ceresetti; Sandrine Anquetin; Jean Dominique Creutin; Brice Boudevillain

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Does stock market volatility with regime shifts signal the business cycle in Taiwan?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a Switching Regime ARCH (SWARCH) model and other time series models, this paper sets out to investigate the volatility of Taiwan's monthly stock market returns, with the empirical results demonstrating that our SWARCH-L specification ... Keywords: Markov switching, Taiwan, business cycle, e-finance, electronic finance, regime shifts, stock market volatility, stock markets, stock volatility

Yih-Wen Shyu; Kuangyu Hsia

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Revised for J. Climate CCSM3 special issue Monsoon regimes in the CCSM3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revised for J. Climate CCSM3 special issue Monsoon regimes in the CCSM3 Gerald A Meehl1 , Julie M-497-1333 July 29, 2005 1 #12;Abstract: Simulations of regional monsoon regimes, including the Indian, Australian, West African, South American and North American monsoons, are described for the T85 version

249

Barotropic Beta-Plane Turbulence in a Regime with Strong Zonal Jets Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of quantification of barotropic beta-plane turbulence driven by small-scale stochastic forcing into regimes dominated by quasi-periodic zonal jets is revisited. It is shown that the large-scale relative vorticity in such regimes is ...

S. Danilov; V. M. Gryanik

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Boundary Layer, Cloud, and Drizzle Variability in the Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southeast Pacific stratocumulus regime is an important component of the earth’s climate system because of its substantial impact on albedo. Observational studies of this cloud regime have been limited, but during the past 5 yr, a series of ...

Efthymios Serpetzoglou; Bruce A. Albrecht; Pavlos Kollias; Christopher W. Fairall

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime-Switching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at a wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime. Geographically dispersed was applied to 2-hour-ahead forecasts of hourly average wind speed near the Stateline wind energy center

Genton, Marc G.

252

INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT, helium data covered the mixed convection laminar, acceleration driven DTHT and the laminar to turbulent transition regimes and carbon dioxide data covered the returbulizing buoyancy driven DTHT and non-returbulizing buoyancy induced DTHT. The validity of the data was established using the heat balance and the uncertainty analysis. Based on experimental data, the traditional threshold for the DTHT regime was updated to account for phenomena observed in the facility and a new heat transfer regime map was proposed. Overall, it can be stated that substantial reduction of heat transfer coefficient was observed in DTHT regime, which will have significant impact on the core and DHR design of passive GFR. The data were compared to the large number of existing correlations. None of the mixed convection laminar correlation agreed with the data. The forced turbulent and the DTHT regime, Celeta et al. correlation showed the best fit with the data. However, due to larger ratio of the MIT facility compared to the Celeta et al. facility and the returbuliziation due to the gas characteristics, the correlation sometimes under-predicts the heat transfer coefficient. Also, since Celeta et al. correlation requires the information of the wall temperature to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient, it is difficult to apply this correlation directly for predicting the wall temperature. Three new sets of correlation that cover all heat transfer regimes were developed. The bas

INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/500102034.pdf Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Screenshot References: Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime[1] Abstract "Low-carbon technology cooperation for climate change is needed to address the challenge of scaling up development and transfer of low-carbon technology, with the ultimate aim to reduce emissions globally. This was

254

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE The adoption of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Compensation Convention) opens a new chapter in international nuclear liability law. The Compensation Convention provides the world community with the opportunity to deal with legal liability and compensation for nuclear damage through a global regime that includes all countries that operate nuclear powerplants (nuclear power generating countries) and most countries that do not operate nuclear powerplants (nonnuclear power generating countries). Such a global regime can remove

255

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

256

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

257

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

258

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

259

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

260

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

262

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

263

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

264

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

265

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

266

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

267

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

268

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

269

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

270

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

271

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

272

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

273

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

274

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

275

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

276

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

277

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

278

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

279

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

280

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

282

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

283

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

284

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

Coalbed methane could cut India`s energy deficit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foreign interest in upcoming Indian coalbed methane (CBM) concession rounds will depend on prospect quality, fiscal regime attractiveness, and perceptions interested parties will have concerning the government`s willingness to promote development. The more liberal tax and royalty provisions for foreign producers announced by the ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas indicate that India is interested in attracting international CBM investments. This article examines the potential for developing the country`s large CBM resource base, estimated between 30 tcf (250 billion cu m) and 144 tcf (4 trillion cu m) of gas. It also provides an overview of the current contractual and regulatory framework governing CBM development.

Kelafant, J. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Stern, M. [MathTech International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1998-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

287

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

288

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

289

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

290

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

292

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

294

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service “Evolving Estimate” in Natural Gas Monthly.

295

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

296

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

297

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

298

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

299

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

300

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

302

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

303

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

304

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

306

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

307

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

308

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

309

Transition between breakdown regimes in a temperature-dependent mixture of argon and mercury using 100 kHz excitation  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the breakdown process at 100 kHz in a changing temperature-dependent mixture of Ar and Hg and the associated transitions between breakdown regimes. Each measurement series started at 1400 K, 10 bar of Hg, and 0.05% admixture of Ar and finished by natural cooling at room temperature, 150 mbar of Ar, and 0.01% admixture of Hg. The E/N at breakdown as a function of temperature and gas composition was found to have a particular shape with a peak at 600 K, when Hg makes up for 66% of the gaseous mixture and Ar 34%. This peak was found to be an effect of the mixture itself, not the temperature effects or the possible presence of electronegative species. The analysis has shown that at this frequency both streamer and diffuse breakdown can take place, depending on the temperature and gas composition. Streamer discharges during breakdown are present at high temperatures and high Hg pressure, while at room temperature in 150 mbar of Ar the breakdown has a diffuse nature. In between those two cases, the radius of the discharges during breakdown was found to change in a monotonic manner, covering one order of magnitude from the size typical for streamer discharges to a diffuse discharge comparable to the size of the reactor.

Sobota, A.; Bos, R. A. J. M. van den; Kroesen, G. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbus 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Manders, F. [Philips Innovative Applications, Steenweg op Gierle 417, B-2300 Turnhout (Belgium)

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Impingement starting and power boosting of small gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The technology of high-pressure air or hot-gas impingement from stationary shroud supplementary nozzles onto radial outflow compressors and radial inflow turbines to permit rapid gas turbine starting or power boosting is discussed. Data are presented on the equivalent turbine component performance for convergent/divergent shroud impingement nozzles, which reveal the sensitivity of nozzle velocity coefficient with Mach number and turbine efficiency with impingement nozzle admission arc. Compressor and turbine matching is addressed in the transient turbine start mode with the possibility of operating these components in braking or reverse flow regimes when impingement flow rates exceed design.

Rodgers, C.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

314

DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION IN TEST-PARTICLE REGIME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the test-particle solution for diffusive shock acceleration, based on simple models for thermal leakage injection and Alfvenic drift. The critical injection rate, {xi}{sub c}, above which the cosmic-ray (CR) pressure becomes dynamically significant depends mainly on the sonic shock Mach number, M, and preshock gas temperature, T{sub 1}. In the hot-phase interstellar medium (ISM) and intracluster medium, {xi}{sub c} {approx} 10. For T{sub 1} = 10{sup 6} K, for example, the test-particle solution would be valid if the injection momentum p{sub inj} >3.8p{sub th} (where p{sub th} is thermal momentum). This leads to a postshock CR pressure less than 10% of the shock ram pressure. If the Alfven speed is comparable to the sound speed in the preshock flow, as in the hot-phase ISM, the power-law slope of CR spectrum can be significantly softer than the canonical test-particle slope. Then, the CR spectrum at the shock can be approximated by the revised test-particle power law with an exponential cutoff at the highest accelerated momentum, p{sub max}(t). An analytic form of the exponential cutoff is also suggested.

Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.k, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.k [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Game-Dynamic Model of Gas Transportation Routes and Its Application . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to study an optimal structure of a system of international gas pipelines competing for a gas market. We develop a game-dynamic model of the operation of several interacting gas pipeline projects with project owners acting as players in the game. The model treats the projects' commercialization times as major players' controls. Current quantities of gas supply are modeled as approximations to Nash equilibrium points in instantaneous "gas supply games", in which each player maximizes his/her current netprofit due to the sales of gas. We use the model to analyze the Turkish gas market, on which gas routes originating from Russia, Turkmenistan and Iran are competing. The analysis is carried out in three steps. At step 1, we model the operation of the pipelines as planned and estimate the associated profits. At step 2, we optimize individual projects, with respect to their profits, assuming that the other pipelines operate as planned. At step 3, we find numerical Nash equilibrium commercialization policies for the entire group of the pipelines. The simulations show the degrees to which the planned regimes are not optimal compared to the Nash equilibrium ones. Another observation is that in equilibrium regimes the pipelines are not always being run at their full capacities, which implies that the proposed pipeline capacities might not be optimal. The simulation results turn out to be moderately sensitive to changes in the discount rate and highly sensitive to changes in the price elasticity of gas demand.

Ger Klaassen; Ivan Matrosov; Alexander Roehrl; Alexander Tarasyev; Arkadii Kryazhimskii

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flowfields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations lose accuracy. For the high speed diatomic molecular flow in the transitional regime, the inaccuracies are partially ... Keywords: Gas-kinetic method, Hypersonic and rarefied flows, Multiple temperature kinetic model

Kun Xu; Xin He; Chunpei Cai

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Gasifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, coal supplies over 55% of the electricity consumed in the United States and will continue to do so well into the next century. One of the technologies being developed for advanced electric power generation is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system that converts coal to a combustible gas, cleans the gas of pollutants, and combusts the gas in a gas turbine to generate electricity. The hot exhaust from the gas turbine is used to produce steam to generate more electricity from a steam turbine cycle. The utilization of advanced hot-gas particulate and sulfur control technologies together with the combined power generation cycles make IGCC one of the cleanest and most efficient ways available to generate electric power from coal. One of the strategic objectives for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) IGCC research and development program is to develop and demonstrate advanced gasifiers and second-generation IGCC systems. Another objective is to develop advanced hot-gas cleanup and trace contaminant control technologies. One of the more recent gasification concepts to be investigated is that of the transport reactor gasifier, which functions as a circulating fluid-bed gasifier while operating in the pneumatic transport regime of solid particle flow. This gasifier concept provides excellent solid-gas contacting of relatively small particles to promote high gasification rates and also provides the highest coal throughput per unit cross-sectional area of any other gasifier, thereby reducing capital cost of the gasification island.

Swanson, M.L.; Hajicek, D.R.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

319

Tuning p-Wave Interactions in an Ultracold Fermi Gas of Atoms C. A. Regal, C. Ticknor, J. L. Bohn, and D. S. Jin*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tuning p-Wave Interactions in an Ultracold Fermi Gas of Atoms C. A. Regal, C. Ticknor, J. L. Bohn have measured a p-wave Feshbach resonance in a single-component, ultracold Fermi gas of 40K atoms. We temperature regime accessible in atomic physics is characterized by collision energies so low that centrifugal

Jin, Deborah

320

Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Obvious surface manifestations of an anomalous concentration of geothermal energy at the Coso Geothermal Area, California, include fumarolic activity, active hot springs, and associated hydrothermally altered rocks. Abundant Pleistocene volcanic rocks, including a cluster of thirty-seven rhyolite domes, occupy a north-trending structural and topographic ridge near the center of an oval-shaped zone of late Cenozoic ring faulting. In an investigation of the thermal regime of the geothermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? Â… An ISCCP Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

322

The Regime Dependence of Degree Day Forecast Technique, Skill, and Value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation into the manner in which forecasters adjust their reliance on particular pieces of forecast information as the large-scale flow pattern evolves into different regimes, and the relationship between those adjustments and forecast ...

Paul J. Roebber

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Vickers microindentation toughness of a sintered SiC in the median-crack regime  

SciTech Connect

The Vickers microindentation method for the determination of the fracture toughness of ceramics was investigated in the median crack regime for a sintered alpha SiC. The results are compared with fracture toughness measurements by conventional fracture mechanics technique and also with the reported indentation toughness for the low-load Palmqvist crack regime. Indentation toughnesses in the median crack regime vary widely depending on the choice of the specific equation which is applied. The indentation toughnesses are also load (crack length) dependent. A decreasing R-curve trend results, in contradiction to the flat R-curve that has been observed with conventional fracture mechanics techniques. It is concluded that the Vickers microindentation method is not a reliable technique for the determination of the fracture toughness of ceramics in the median crack regime.

Ghosh, Asish; Kobayashi, A.S. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Coll. of Engineering); Li, Zhuang (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Henager, C.H. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Bradt, R.C. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Hidden Markov Model Perspective on Regimes and Metastability in Atmospheric Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, data from three atmospheric models are analyzed to investigate the existence of atmospheric flow regimes despite nearly Gaussian statistics of the planetary waves in these models. A hierarchy of models is used, which describes the ...

Christian Franzke; Daan Crommelin; Alexander Fischer; Andrew J. Majda

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Paleoclimatic Analogs to Twentieth-Century Moisture Regimes Across the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumental Palmer Drought Severity Indexes (PDSI) averaged over the western United States and Great Plains document three major decadal moisture regimes during the twentieth century: the early twentieth-century pluvial, the Dust Bowl drought, ...

Falko K. Fye; David W. Stahle; Edward R. Cook

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Simulation of Coherent Doppler Lidar Performance in the Weak-Signal Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of coherent Doppler lidar in the weak-signal regime is investigated by computer simulations of velocity estimators that accumulate the signal from N pulses of zero-mean complex Gaussian stationary lidar data described by a ...

Rod Frehlich

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Observed and Modeled Global Ocean Turbulence Regimes as Deduced from Surface Trajectory Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale tool for systematic analyses of the dispersal and turbulent properties of ocean currents and the subsequent separation of dynamical regimes according to the prevailing trajectories taxonomy in a certain area was proposed by Rupolo. ...

Jenny A. U. Nilsson; Kristofer Döös; Paolo M. Ruti; Vincenzo Artale; Andrew Coward; Laurent Brodeau

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tropical Climate Regimes and Global Climate Sensitivity in a Simple Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple tropical climate regimes are found in an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) coupled to a global slab ocean when the model is forced by different values of globally uniform insolation. Even in this simple setting, convection ...

Joseph Barsugli; Sang-Ik Shin; Prashant D. Sardeshmukh

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Observed Self-Similarity of Precipitation Regimes over the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A K-means clustering algorithm was used to classify Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) scenes within 1° square patches over the tropical (15°S–15°N) oceans. Three cluster centroids or “regimes” that minimize the ...

Gregory S. Elsaesser; Christian D. Kummerow; Tristan S. L’Ecuyer; Yukari N. Takayabu; Shoichi Shige

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

North Atlantic Winter Climate Regimes: Spatial Asymmetry, Stationarity with Time, and Oceanic Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed low-frequency winter atmospheric variability of the North Atlantic–European region and its relationship with global surface oceanic conditions is investigated based on the climate and weather regimes paradigm.

Christophe Cassou; Laurent Terray; James W. Hurrell; Clara Deser

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Relationships of Fire and Precipitation Regimes in Temperate Forests of the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fire affects virtually all terrestrial ecosystems but occurs more commonly in some than in others. This paper investigates how climate, specifically the moisture regime, influences the flammability of different landscapes in the eastern United ...

Charles W. Lafon; Steven M. Quiring

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Precipitation and Latent Heating Characteristics of the Major Tropical Western Pacific Cloud Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective tropical cloud regime classification based on daytime averaged cloud-top pressure and optical thickness information from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is combined with precipitation and latent heating ...

Christian Jakob; Courtney Schumacher

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

An Indicator of the Multiple Equilibria Regime of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent model results have suggested that there may be a scalar indicator ? monitoring whether the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is in a multiple equilibrium regime. The quantity ? is based on the net freshwater transport by ...

Selma E. Huisman; Matthijs den Toom; Henk A. Dijkstra; Sybren Drijfhout

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

An Application of Model Output Statistics to the Development of a Local Wind Regime Forecast Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Output Statistics (MOS) approach is used to develop a procedure for forecasting the occurrence of a local wind regime at Rota, Spain known as the levante. Variables derived solely from surface pressure and 500 mb height forecast fields ...

Robert A. Godfrey

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Generalized Stability of Nongeostrophic Baroclinic Shear Flow. Part II: Intermediate Richardson Number Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work continues the generalized stability theory (GST) analysis of baroclinic shear flow in the primitive equations (PE), focusing on the regime in which the mean baroclinic shear and the stratification are of the same order. The Eady model ...

Eyal Heifetz; Brian F. Farrell

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Influence of the North American Monsoon System on the U.S. Summer Precipitation Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key features of the U.S. summer precipitation regime are examined within the context of the evolving North American monsoon system. The focus is on the antecedent and subsequent atmospheric conditions over the conterminous United States relative ...

R. W. Higgins; Y. Yao; X. L. Wang

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Multiplicative Noise and Non-Gaussianity: A Paradigm for Atmospheric Regimes?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric circulation statistics are not strictly Gaussian. Small bumps and other deviations from Gaussian probability distributions are often interpreted as implying the existence of distinct and persistent nonlinear circulation regimes ...

Philip Sura; Matthew Newman; Cécile Penland; Prashant Sardeshmukh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Local Regimes of Atmospheric Variability: A Case Study of Southern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary regimes of local atmospheric variability are examined in a 6-km regional atmospheric model of the southern third of California, an area of significant land surface heterogeneity, intense topography, and climate diversity. The model ...

Sebastien Conil; Alex Hall

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Observed and modeled global-ocean turbulence regimes as deduced from surface trajectory data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale tool for systematic analyses of the dispersal and turbulent properties of ocean currents and the subsequent separation of dynamical regimes according to the prevailing trajectories taxonomy in a certain area was proposed by Rupolo (...

Jenny A. U. Nilsson; Kristofer Döös; Paolo M. Ruti; Vincenzo Artale; Andrew Coward; Laurent Brodeau

340

Regime-Dependent Autoregressive Time Series Modeling of the Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The class of “regime dependent autoregressive” time series models (RAMs) is introduced. These nonlinear models describe variations of the moments of nonstationary time series by allowing parameter values to change with the state of an ancillary ...

Francis Zwiers; Hans Von Storch

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

On the Source of Midlatitude Low-Frequency Variability. Part II: Nonlinear Equilibration of Weather Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new statistical-dynamical approach to the concept of weather regimes, including the effect of tralisients, without any assumption other than scale separation. The method is applied to a quasi-geostrophic channel model without ...

Robert Vautard; Bernard Legras

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Radiative, Cloud, and Thermodynamic Properties of the Major Tropical Western Pacific Cloud Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the radiative, cloud, and thermodynamic characteristics of the atmosphere separated into objectively defined cloud regimes in the tropical western Pacific (TWP). A cluster analysis is applied to 2 yr of daytime-only data ...

Christian Jakob; George Tselioudis; Timothy Hume

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Objective Classification of Precipitating Convective Regimes Using a Weather Radar in Darwin, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clustering algorithm was applied to Frequency with Altitude Diagrams (FADs) derived from 4 yr of hourly radar data to objectively define four tropical precipitation regimes that occur during the wet season over Darwin Australia. The ...

Simon Caine; Christian Jakob; Steven Siems; Peter May

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Observations with Moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers in the Convection Regime in the Golfe du Lion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Golfe du Lion, south of France, favorable conditions for deep winter convection exist and were documented by the MEDOC experiments during 1969–75. A renewed investigation of that regime with upward-looking moored acoustic Doppler current ...

Friedrich Schott; Kevin D. Leaman

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Mesoscale Simulations of the Land Surface Effects of Historical Logging in a Moist Continental Climate Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An enhanced knowledge of the feedbacks from land surface changes on regional climates is of great importance in the attribution of climate change. To explore the effects of deforestation on a midlatitude climate regime, two sets of two five-...

Nicholas P. Klingaman; Jason Butke; Daniel J. Leathers; Kevin R. Brinson; Elsa Nickl

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Flow Regimes and Transient Dynamics of Two-Dimensional Stratified Flow over an Isolated Mountain Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four regimes are identified for two-dimensional, unstructured, nonrotating, continuously stratified, hydrostatic, uniform Boussinesq flow over an isolated mountain ridge: (I) flow with neither wave breaking aloft nor upstream blocking (F?1.12, ...

Yuh-Lang Lin; Ting-An Wang

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Monsoon Regimes and Processes in CCSM4. Part II: African and American Monsoon Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second part of a two part series studying simulation characteristics of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) for various monsoon regimes around the global tropics. Here, the West African, East African, North American, ...

Kerry H. Cook; Gerald A. Meehl; Julie M. Arblaster

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Statistical Characteristics of Convective Cells in a Monsoon Regime (Darwin, Northern Australia)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A season of operational cell and track data from Darwin, Australia, has been analyzed to explore the statistical characteristics of the convective cell heights. The statistics for the monsoon and break regimes are significantly different with the ...

Peter T. May; Andrew Ballinger

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Weather Regimes and Preferred Transition Paths in a Three-Level Quasigeostrophic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple flow regimes are reexamined in a global, three-level, quasigeostrophic (QG3) model with realistic topography in spherical geometry. This QG3 model, using a T21 triangular truncation in the horizontal, has a fairly realistic climatology ...

D. Kondrashov; K. Ide; M. Ghil

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

351

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

352

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

353

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

354

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

355

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

356

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

357

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

358

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

359

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

360

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

362

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

363

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

364

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

366

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

367

New regime of single-pulse lasing in fibre lasers with mode locking by nonlinear polarisation evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new lasing regime has been obtained experimentally and as a result of numerical simulation of fibre lasers with mode locking by nonlinear polarisation evolution. This regime differs radically from the previously known regimes of stable single-pulse lasing and generation of wave packets with quasi-stochastic filling. The spectral and temporal features of the pulses generated in the new regime, as well as the possibilities of pulse compression, have been investigated. Simple criteria are formulated, which make it possible to identify rapidly the new lasing regime in experiment. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

Smirnov, Sergei V; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Kukarin, S V; Ivanenko, A V [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Exploring the Possible Use of Information Barriers for future Biological Weapons Verification Regimes  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a path forward for implementing information barriers in a future generic biological arms-control verification regime. Information barriers have become a staple of discussion in the area of arms control verification approaches for nuclear weapons and components. Information barriers when used with a measurement system allow for the determination that an item has sensitive characteristics without releasing any of the sensitive information. Over the last 15 years the United States (with the Russian Federation) has led on the development of information barriers in the area of the verification of nuclear weapons and nuclear components. The work of the US and the Russian Federation has prompted other states (e.g., UK and Norway) to consider the merits of information barriers for possible verification regimes. In the context of a biological weapons control verification regime, the dual-use nature of the biotechnology will require protection of sensitive information while allowing for the verification of treaty commitments. A major question that has arisen is whether - in a biological weapons verification regime - the presence or absence of a weapon pathogen can be determined without revealing any information about possible sensitive or proprietary information contained in the genetic materials being declared under a verification regime. This study indicates that a verification regime could be constructed using a small number of pathogens that spans the range of known biological weapons agents. Since the number of possible pathogens is small it is possible and prudent to treat these pathogens as analogies to attributes in a nuclear verification regime. This study has determined that there may be some information that needs to be protected in a biological weapons control verification regime. To protect this information, the study concludes that the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array may be a suitable technology for the detection of the genetic information associated with the various pathogens. In addition, it has been determined that a suitable information barrier could be applied to this technology when the verification regime has been defined. Finally, the report posits a path forward for additional development of information barriers in a biological weapons verification regime. This path forward has shown that a new analysis approach coined as Information Loss Analysis might need to be pursued so that a numerical understanding of how information can be lost in specific measurement systems can be achieved.

Luke, S J

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements… (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

371

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

372

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

373

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

374

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

375

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

376

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

377

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

378

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

379

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

382

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

383

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

384

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

385

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

386

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

388

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

389

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

390

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

391

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

392

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

393

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

394

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

395

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association ConferenceMarch 12, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

397

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with active programs. More information is available at: http:www.eia.doe.govcneafelectricitypagerestructuringrestructureelect.html. Information about natural gas...

398

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

399

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Residual gas analysis device  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association Conference, March 12, 2004 Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, Administrator, Energy Information Administration

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

403

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

404

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves U.S. natural gas liquids proved reserves decreased 7 percent to 7,459 million ...

405

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

407

A statistical analysis of avalanching heat transport in stationary enhanced core confinement regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a statistical analysis of heat transport in stationary enhanced confinement regimes obtained from flux-driven gyrofluid simulations. The probability density functions of heat flux in improved confinement regimes, characterized by the Nusselt number, show significant deviation from Gaussian, with a markedly fat tail, implying the existence of heat avalanches. Two types of avalanching transport are found to be relevant to stationary states, depending on the degree of turbulence suppression. In the weakly suppressed regime, heat avalanches occur in the form of quasi-periodic (QP) heat pulses. Collisional relaxation of zonal flow is likely to be the origin of these QP heat pulses. This phenomenon is similar to transient limit cycle oscillations observed prior to edge pedestal formation in recent experiments. On the other hand, a spectral analysis of heat flux in the strongly suppressed regime shows the emergence of a 1/f (f is the frequency) band, suggesting the presence of self-organized criticality (SOC)-like episodic heat avalanches. This episodic 1/f heat avalanches have a long temporal correlation and constitute the dominant transport process in this regime.

Tokunaga, S.; Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52, Yeoeun-dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52, Yeoeun-dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Natural gas industry directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

410

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

412

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

415

Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming is one of the most active areas of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in the western United States. This resource provides clean energy but raises environmental concerns. Primary among these is the disposal of water that is co-produced with the gas during depressurization of the coal seam. Beginning with a few producing wells in Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) in 1987, CBNG well numbers in this area increased to over 13,600 in 2004, with projected growth to 20,900 producing wells in the PRB by 2010. CBNG development is continuing apace since 2004, and CBNG is now being produced or evaluated in four other Wyoming coal basins in addition to the PRB, with roughly 3500-4000 new CBNG wells permitted statewide each year since 2004. This is clearly a very valuable source of clean fuel for the nation, and for Wyoming the economic benefits are substantial. For instance, in 2003 alone the total value of Wyoming CBNG production was about $1.5 billion, with tax and royalty income of about $90 million to counties, $140 million to the state, and $27 million to the federal government. In Wyoming, cumulative CBNG water production from 1987 through December 2004 was just over 380,000 acre-feet (2.9 billion barrels), while producing almost 1.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of CBNG gas statewide. Annual Wyoming CBNG water production in 2003 was 74,457 acre-feet (577 million barrels). Total production of CBNG water across all Wyoming coal fields could total roughly 7 million acre-feet (55.5 billion barrels), if all of the recoverable CBNG in the projected reserves of 31.7 tcf were produced over the coming decades. Pumping water from coals to produce CBNG has been designated a beneficial water use by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office (SEO), though recently the SEO has limited this beneficial use designation by requiring a certain gas/water production ratio. In the eastern part of the PRB where CBNG water is generally of good quality, most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination of trace elements from CBNG disposal ponds; (4) use of environmental tracers in assessing wate

William Ruckelshaus

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

417

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

418

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

419

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

420

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

422

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

423

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

424

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

425

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

426

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

427

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

428

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

429

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

430

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

431

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

432

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

433

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

434

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

435

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

436

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

437

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

438

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

439

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

440

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

442

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

443

Experimental Study of Main Gas Ingestion and Purge Gas Egress Flow in Model Gas Turbine Stages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Efficient performance of gas turbines depends, among several parameters, on the mainstream gas entry temperature. At the same time, transport of this high temperature gas… (more)

Balasubramanian, Jagdish Harihara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: 350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: 500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas Furnace: 200 - 500...

445

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

446

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

447

NUCLEAR GAS ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study of the nuclear gas engine, consisting of a gas-cooled reactor directly coupled to a reciprocating engine, is presented. The principles of operation of the proposed gas engine are outlined and typical variations anre discussed. The nuclear gas engine is compared with other reciprocating engines and air compressors. A comparison between the ideal and actual cycles is made, with particular attention given to pumping, heat, and other losses to be expected. The applications and development of the nuclear gas engine are discussed. (W.D.M.)

Fraas, A.P.

1958-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76 Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600 km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~ 290 MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40 MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~ 80 cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most

449

The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been influenced by magmatic and volcanic activity in the San Juan Mountains-San Juan volcanic field located to the north of the Basin. Time-dependent isothermal step models indicate that the observed heat flow may be modelled by a (near) steadystate isothermal step extending from 30-98 km depth whose edge underlies the northern San Juan

450

On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes Under the Cumulus Cloudiness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes Under the Cumulus Cloudiness B. M. Koprov, V. M. Koprov, G. S. Golitsyn A.M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Moscow, Russia E. N. Kadygrov, A. V. Koldaev Central Aerological Observatory Dolgoprudny, Russia Introduction The study of instant temperature field transformation, convective and radiative regime perturbation within the layer of 0 to 650 m was fulfilled as caused by cloud modulation of solar radiation flux. It was made within the scope of Zvenigorod Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) experiments in 2001 and 2002. Instrumentation The equipment used: 1. Microwave temperature profiler designed in Central Aerological Observatory (CAO) and manufactured by Russian company ATTEX (Kadygrov and Pick 1998).

451

Plasma wakefields in the quasi-nonlinear regime: Experiments at ATF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we present details of planned experiments to investigate certain aspects of the quasi non linear regime (QNL) of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). In the QNL regime it is, in principal, possible to combine the benefits of both nonlinear and linear PWFA. That is, beams of high quality can be maintained through acceleration due to the complete ejection of plasma electrons from beam occupied region, while large energy gains can be achieved through use of transformer ratio increasing schemes, such as ramped bunch trains. With the addition of an short focal length PMQ triplet capable of focusing beams to the few micron scale and the ability to generate tunable bunch trains, the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Lab offers the unique capabilities to probe these characteristics of the QNL regime.

Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Barber, S.; Ferrario, M.; Muggli, P.; O'Shea, B.; Sakai, Y.; Valloni, A.; Williams, O.; Xi, Y.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave. Los Angeles, CA, 90095 (United States); Accelerator Division, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati , Via E. Fermi 40, Frascati (RM) 00044 (Italy); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 405 Hilgard Ave. Los Angeles, CA, 90095 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Greece poised for oil and gas development  

SciTech Connect

The first indigenous crude oil in Greece will be produced by late 1980, and commercial operations are expected to start in early 1981 from the offshore oil and gas field in the North Aegean Sea. The discovery of oil in Greek waters started a new era in the economic development of Greece and could be considered a milestone in the development of the country. The discovery also had international political implications. Many analysts consider it as the main cause of the dispute between Greece and Turkey over the delineation of the continental shelf of the Aegean Sea. The Greek Government, after the collapse of the dictatorial regime in 1974, has enacted new legislation regarding oil exploration and exploitation activities in Greece. Oil found so far amounts to 12% of present domestic consumption, and there is hope of more as the Public Petroleum Corporation turns its attention westward.

Vougaris, C.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Gas lasers with wave-chaotic resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiclassical multimode laser theory is extended to gas lasers with open two-dimensional resonators of arbitrary shape. The Doppler frequency shift of the linear-gain coefficient leads to an additional linear coupling between the modes, which, however, is shown to be negligible. The nonlinear laser equations simplify in the special case of wave-chaotic resonators. In the single-mode regime, the intensity of a chaotic laser, as a function of the mode frequency, displays a local minimum at the frequency of the atomic transition. The width of the minimum scales with the inhomogeneous linewidth, in contrast to the Lamb dip in uniaxial resonators whose width is given by the homogeneous linewidth.

Oleg Zaitsev

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Southwest Gas Corporation - Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation: 0.15sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.30sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: 450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: 450 Attic Insulation: 0.15sq ft Equipment...

455

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

456

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural gas sdtrategic plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s natural gas program is aimed at meeting simultaneously our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy The Natural Gas Strategic Plan for 1995 represents a Department-wide effort to articulate the key issues related to the expanded development and utilization of natural gas, and defines the roles of the federal government and US industry in partnering to accomplish the strategic goals defined. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Strategic Plan are to: foster the development of advanced natural gas technologies; encourage the adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets; support the removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets; and foster technologies and policies to maximize the environmental benefits of natural gas use. DOE`s proposed fiscal year (FY) 1996 budget represents a commitment to natural gas research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from reservoir to end use. DOE has redirected and increased funding for its natural gas exploration, production, delivery and storage, processing, and utilization RD&D programs, shifting funds from other energy programs to programs that will enhance efficiency and advance the role of natural gas in our domestic energy resources portfolio.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Trade balance instability and the optimal exchange rate regime: The case of OPEC countries  

SciTech Connect

The OPEC members have experienced wide fluctuations in their trade balances. This can be attributed to several factors: (1) heavy dependence of national income and export earnings on a single primary export-oil; (2) instability of price and world demand for oil; and (3) the exchange rate regime practiced in recent years. An exchange rate policy can be used to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance, given the changes in exchange rates of major international currencies. The purpose of this study is two fold; first, examine the effects of fluctuations in trade balance on the OPEC economies, and second, propose appropriate exchange rate regime for selected OPEC members. The study is divided into two parts. The first part demonstrates the impact of trade balance changes on national income and other macroeconomic variables using a Keynesian framework. The second part involves using conventional trade models to search for the appropriate exchange rate regime to minimize the fluctuations in trade balance of each selective country. The study's findings are: first, fluctuations in trade balances had negative effects on the economics of Algeria, Kuwait, Libya, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Second, the current exchange rate regime of no sample country is optimal in minimizing trade balance fluctuations. Third, in contrast to expectations, U.S. dollar peg did not stabilize the trade balance of any OPEC member. Finally, the results show that the sample OPEC economies could have enjoyed faster - though with different degree - economic growth if they had pegged their currencies to the derived optimal exchange rate regime. These optimal exchange rate regimes are: the SDR for Algeria and the United Arab Emirates, the purchasing power parity for Libya and Saudi Arabia, and the real Yen for Kuwait.

Aljerrah, M.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

462

Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalytic gasification of coal to produce H{sub 2}- and CH{sub 4}-rich gases for consumption in molten carbonate fuel cells is currently under development; however, to optimize the fuel cell performance and extend its operating life, it is desired to separate as much of the inerts (i.e., CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and impurities (i.e., H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}) as possible from the fuel gas before they enter the fuel cell. In addition, the economics of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) can be improved by separating as much of the hydrogen as possible from the fuel, since hydrogen is a high-value product. One process currently under development by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) for accomplishing this gas separation and hot-gas cleanup involves gas separation membranes. These membranes are operated at temperatures as high as 800 C and pressures up to 300 psig. Some of these membranes can have very small pores (30-50 {angstrom}), which inefficiently separate the undesired gases by operating in the Knudsen diffusion region of mass transport. Other membranes with smaller pore sizes (<5 {angstrom}) operate in the molecular sieving region of mass transport phenomena, Dissolution of atomic hydrogen into thin metallic membranes made of platinum and palladium alloys is also being developed. Technological and economic issues that must be resolved before gas separation membranes are commercially viable include improved gas separation efficiency, membrane optimization, sealing of membranes in pressure vessels, high burst strength of the ceramic material, pore thermal stability, and material chemical stability. Hydrogen separation is dependent on the temperature, pressure, pressure ratio across the membrane, and ratio of permeate flow to total flow. For gas separation under Knudsen diffusion, increasing feed pressure and pressure ratio across the membrane should increase gas permeability; decreasing the temperature and the permeate-to-total flow ratio should also increase gas permeability. In the molecular sieving regime of mass transport, the inlet pressure and pressure ratio should have no effect on gas permeability, while increasing temperature should increase permeability.

Swanson, Michael L.; Ness Jr., Robert O.; Hurley, John P.; McCollor, Donald P.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

464

Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs? Gas pipelines attract substantial reseach to improve safety and cut costs. They operate ...

465

Natural Gas 1995: Preliminary Highlights  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Monthly April 1996 1. ... Widespread economic growth ... Growth in electric utility gas con-

466

Mercantilist Development in Russia: The Legitimacy of State Power, State Identity, and the Energy Charter Regime (1990 - 2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pricing Mechanisms for Oil and Gas (Brussels: Energy Charterof high prices for oil and gas, reflecting competition for2004). Y. Bobylev, “Russian oil and gas sector: Trends and

Barkanov, Boris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Mercantilist Development in Russia: The Legitimacy of State Power, State Identity, and the Energy Charter Regime (1990 - 2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Restrictions on Natural Gas Imports from Russia,” Paperand dependency on oil and gas imports growing and suppliesreductions in natural gas imports were 54% for Bulgaria, 86%

Barkanov, Boris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

469

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

470

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

471

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

472

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

473

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

474

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

476

Robust incentives and the design of a climate change governance regime Gregory F. Nemet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are converted into equivalent physical units (tcf of natural gas) and further adjusted for the fact that coal of 1.25. Fig. 2 shows energy prices for natural gas for three geographies as well as for Asian coal in North America and Europe, and assigns the regional price of coal (in natural gas equivalents) to China

Sheridan, Jennifer

477

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A model of plasma discharges in pre-arcing regime for water treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is presented a simulation study of a water treatment system based upon 1 kHz frequency plasma discharges in the pre-arcing regime produced within a coaxial cylinder reactor. The proposed computational model takes into consideration the three main ... Keywords: modelling, pulsed corona discharges, simulation, streamers

B. G. Rodríguez-Méndez; R. López-Callejas; R. Peña-Eguiluz; A. Mercado-Cabrera; R. Valencia-Alvarado; S. R. Barocio; A. de la Piedad-Beneitez; J. S. Benítez-Read; J. O. Pacheco-Sotelo

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Dispersive regime of circuit QED: photon-dependent qubit dephasing and relaxation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting electrical circuits can be used to study the physics of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) in new regimes, therefore realizing circuit QED. For quantum information processing and quantum optics, an interesting regime of circuit QED is the dispersive regime, where the detuning between the qubit transition frequency and the resonator frequency is much larger than the interaction strength. In this paper, we investigate how non-linear corrections to the dispersive regime affect the measurement process. We find that in the presence of pure qubit dephasing, photon population of the resonator used for the measurement of the qubit act as an effective heat bath, inducing incoherent relaxation and excitation of the qubit. Measurement thus induces both dephasing and mixing of the qubit, something that can reduce the quantum non-demolition aspect of the readout. Using quantum trajectory theory, we show that this heat bath can induce quantum jumps in the qubit state and reduce the achievable signal-to-noise ratio of a homodyne measurement of the voltage.

Maxime Boissonneault; J. M. Gambetta; Alexandre Blais

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

480

Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1lambda. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

Wang, L. F. [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Ye, W. H. [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Y. J. [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Monsoons as eddy-mediated regime transitions of the tropical overturning circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monsoons as eddy-mediated regime transitions of the tropical overturning circulation Simona Bordoni National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA Monsoons are generally viewed as planetary with the seasons, the onset of monsoon precipitation is rapid and accompanied by rapid circulation changes

Heaton, Thomas H.

482

Change in regime and transfer function models of global solar radiation in Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the models for global solar radiation in Kuwait is based on removing the annual periodicity and seasonal variation. The first methodology used here is the change in regime technique that relies on dividing the observations into two ... Keywords: ARMA model, Harmonic analysis, Solar radiation, Transfer function

S. A. Al-Awadhi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Pricing and Resource Allocation for Intelligent Trading Agents using Economic Regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pricing and Resource Allocation for Intelligent Trading Agents using Economic Regimes Wolfgang that describes and predicts pricing behaviors in a market envi­ ronment using a Gaussian mixture model and a Markov process. We show how the model can be used to guide resource allocation and pricing decisions

Ketter, Wolfgang

484

Pricing and Resource Allocation for Intelligent Trading Agents using Economic Regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pricing and Resource Allocation for Intelligent Trading Agents using Economic Regimes Wolfgang that describes and predicts pricing behaviors in a market envi- ronment using a Gaussian mixture model and a Markov process. We show how the model can be used to guide resource allocation and pricing decisions

Ketter, Wolfgang

485

Instrumented Aircraft Observations of the Katabatic Wind Regime Near Terra Nova Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two aircraft missions to sample the boundary layer dynamics associated with the intense katabatic wind regime at Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica were flown on successive days in early November 1987. Light winds averaging 5 m s?1 were monitored at the ...

Thomas R. Parish; David H. Bromwich

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

487

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

488

GAS METERING PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

George, C.M.

1957-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The construction of gas discharge devices where the object is to provide a gas discharge device having a high dark current and stabilized striking voltage is described. The inventors have discovered that the introduction of tritium gas into a discharge device with a subsequent electrical discharge in the device will deposit tritium on the inside of the chamber. The tritium acts to emit beta rays amd is an effective and non-hazardous way of improving the abovementioned discharge tube characteristics

Arrol, W.J.; Jefferson, S.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

490

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

491

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Myung, Yun Soo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Pulsed gas laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

Anderson, Louis W. (Madison, WI); Fitzsimmons, William A. (Madison, WI)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose an integrated study method for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. This method combines analyses of geology, seismology, and geochemistry. First, geological analysis is made using data of material sources, structures, sediments, and geothermal regimes to determine the hydrocarbon-formation conditions of gas hydrate in marine areas. Then analyses of seismic attributes,such as BSR, AVO, and BZ as well as forward modeling are conducted to predict the potential

495

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

each of the consumption sectors, excluding the industrial sector, according to BENTEK Energy Services, LLC. Moderating temperatures likely contributed to lower natural gas...

496

4. Natural Gas Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

hydraulic fracturing, including shales and low permeability (tight) formations. Total U.S. dry natural gas reserves additions replaced 237 percent of 2007 dry

497

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

498

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013"...

499

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

500

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...