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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Federal and Indian oil and gas royalty valuation and management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book covers: Royalty management-an M.M.S. overview; Payor/operator/lessee royalty liability; Royalty issues for OCS lessees; Royalty valuation procedures; Gas marketing royalty issues - industry perspective; Gas marketing royalty issues - M.M.S. perspective; Settlements of gas contract disputes Royalty reporting issues; Production reporting issues; Indian royalty issues; Litigation/regulatory updates; Over/under production on federal leases, units, and communitized areas; Audit program; and M.M.S. Reference Handbook.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Royalty.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Mitt syfte med uppsatsen är att beskriva kriterierna för begreppet royalty, och att beskriva hur royalty är reglerat i Sveriges dubbelbeskattningsavtal med olika länder.… (more)

Sahlin, Jon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Should You Join a Landowner Group? Gas Royalties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Should You Join a Landowner Group? Gas Royalties Penn State is committed to affirmative action will sign for the exact same rental fees and royalties, landowners in the bargaining unit will receive with this group. It could be an up-front fee per acre or a per- centage of the royalty, or both. What are other

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

4

Royalty break eyed for U. S. deepwater oil, gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Sen. Bennett Johnston (D-La.) wants to amend the U.S. omnibus energy bill to waive initial royalties for deepwater production. Johnston recently introduced the bill and is pressing for the bush administration's support. Johnston's bill would defer federal oil and gas royalty on leases in 200 m or more of water until payout of development costs. Producers would pay full royalty if the price of oil topped $34/bbl for 6 months.

Not Available

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act Year 1996 Url Royaltysimplact.jpg Description To improve the management of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases References Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996[1] The Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 was created to improve the management of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. References ↑ "Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Federal_Oil_and_Gas_Royalty_Simplification_and_Fairness_Act_of_1996&oldid=334637

6

Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of 1982 of 1982 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 Year 1982 Url RoyaltyAct.jpg Description The Royalty Management Act affirmed the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to administer and enforce all rules and regulations governing oil and gas leases on Federal or Indian Land References Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982[1] The Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 (30 U.S.C. § 1701 et seq.) - The Royalty Management Act affirmed the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to administer and enforce all rules and regulations governing oil and gas leases on Federal or Indian Land, and established a policy aimed at developing a comprehensive system to manage royalties derived from leased oil and gas operations. Typically, oil and

7

A royalty pain in the gas: What costs may be properly deducted from a gas royalty interest?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is emphasized that parties contracting for oil and gas leases are always free to allocate the costs of compression, transportation and processing in their agreements, thereby avoiding many potential problems. However, it must be recognized that all too often lease agreements fail to apportion expenses that may be incurred after the discovery of oil or gas. In the likely event that the West Virginia courts are faced with this issue, they would be wise to adopt the implied duty to market theory, thereby, putting the onus on the lessee to either provide up front in the lease for the apportionment of costs after the discovery of the gas, or in those instances where the lease is silent as to who will incur the cost, to place the burden on the lessee to cover those costs. Regarding transportation costs, even in jurisdictions such as Oklahoma, where the lessee is obligated to develop the gas he has found so that it will bring the highest possible market value, the lessee is not required to provide for pipeline facilities beyond the lease premises. Kansas courts have also held that the lessee has a general duty to see that the gas is marketed, but that it is not required to pay the lessor`s share of transportation charges form the well to some distant place. Thus, in West Virginia when a gas lease is silent as what costs a lessee may properly deduct from a lessor`s royalty payment, the lessee should bear the costs under the implied duty to market theory if those costs do not involve enhancing the product or transporting it to some place of sale off the leased premises.

Raynes, R.S. Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Alberta royalty structure changes seen lacking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Canadian petroleum companies have welcomed a revamp of Alberta's royalty structure but say it falls short of what is needed to revitalize activity in the province. The changes will give producers a cut in royalties of at least $170 million (Canadian)/year, offer incentives for new drilling, and index royalty levels to prices. The new royalty plan also will reward companies that funnel more capital into increased exploration programs. The industry association the new royalty rates tied to prices could increase royalties if prices rise above $26 (Canadian)/bbl for oil and $1.70 (Canadian)/Mcf for natural gas. Royalty take would decline below these prices. Oil prices currently are near the $26/bbl level. CAPP the it is difficult to assess the effects of the royalty changes in reactivating shut-in wells and increasing production from marginal wells.

Not Available

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

9

Providing for adjustments of royalty payments under certain Federal onshore and Indian oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 15, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The House report on H.R. 3479 adjusting royalty payments on oil and gas leases recommends passage with certain amendments. The recommended title for the Act is The Notice to Lessees No. 5 (NTL-5) Gas Royalty Act of 1987. The Act addresses problems involving some onshore and Indian leases, and redefines the procedures for determining the value of the lease. The report summarizes the purpose and need for the legislation, analyzes it by section, and concludes with communications between the committee and the Interior Department. A minority view argues in favor of placing the highest possible value on leases in order to be fair to taxpayers.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Alcances Constitucionales del Royalty.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??La discusión acerca del royalty al cobre genera distintas sensibilidades, a favor y en contra de este derecho, básicamente por considerarlo, algunos, como un tributo… (more)

Graig Palacios, Claudia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculated. Patent Hold-Up and Royalty Stacking, Page 51336, 347 (2005) (“If a royalty is based on the whole productpart, the appropriate royalty rate should be correspondingly

Lemley, Mark A; Shapiro, Carl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Overview of the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program This report provides a brief overview of the offshore royalty relief program operated by the Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service. It describes the basics of revenue collection and royalty payments as well as provisions under which certain oil and natural gas leases are exempt from royalty obligations. Questions or comments on this article may be directed to Erin Mastrangelo at Erin.Mastrangelo@eia.doe.gov or (202)586-6201. In order to explore and develop offshore oil and natural gas resources, the Department of Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS) awards leases to interested parties through a competitive bidding process. The high bidders must pay a cash bonus bid and

13

ASU Homecoming 2013 Royalty Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASU Homecoming 2013 Royalty Manual This manual was created by the Arizona State University Programming and Activities Board to provide homecoming royalty participants with the information needed Royalty will represent the University at a variety of events such as the Homecoming Parade, Athletic

Hall, Sharon J.

14

Injunctions, Hold-Up, and Patent Royalties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factor 1/(1 ? T ) . Page 33 Figure 1: Negotiated RoyaltiesRoyalty Rate:r Negotiated Royalty Rate: r* ?v + ?F/X + ?(m-v)L ?v + ?F/X

Shapiro, Carl

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4. Royalties: The fight for municipalcommunity where the gas royalty revenues they receive from16 Figure 4.1. First Gas Royalty Check paid to the City of

Gbedema, Tometi Koku

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Corporate greenhouse gas management in the context of emissions trading regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article analyses the impact greenhouse gas emissions trading (GHG-ET) regimes have on companies ... The main consequences of the European Union’s emissions trading scheme (which, albeit limited to CO2 emissio...

Ralf Antes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The dark side of royalty and good will  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the natural gas business, the word ``royalty`` usually brings to mind the fee producers pay on each unit of gas they produce from wells drilled on acreage leased from the government. This production-oriented word now is taking on added meaning and quickly becoming part of the gas utility lexicon. If organizations representing appliance-sales and service companies have their way, the local gas company will soon be paying an annual royalty to its customers as compensation for what these groups allege is the ``free`` use of the utility name and reputation -- also known as its ``good will`` -- by its unregulated business units that sell, install and repair appliances. This royalty would be returned to gas customers through an equivalent reduction in a utility`s base rate -- the revenue it requires each year to cover expenses and provide a return on its investment. Resolution of the issue is pending in three state: State courts in New York and Minnesota are reviewing regulatory orders instituting the royalty, and regulators in Maryland are debating the question. Legal aspects of these pending regulations are discussed.

Ryan, K.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

MMS establishes team to resolve royalty disputes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the U.S. Minerals Management Service has set up a permanent negotiating team to resolve royalty disputes with producers. MMS plans to use the team approach to negotiate multiple settlements in single, marathon negotiations covering issues such as production monitoring, production valuation, royalty reporting, and royalty payments.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY ROYALTY DISTRIBUTION POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY ROYALTY DISTRIBUTION POLICY On April 2, 2001, the Johns Hopkins University Board of Trustees approved a revision to the distribution formula for royalty and equity from derived from inventions and to be performed by faculty inventors who receive royalty for sales

Ghosh, Somnath

20

DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in which flow regime transition occurs.

X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Using Stock and Stock Options to Minimize Patent Royalty Payment Risks after Medimmune v. Genentech  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an accounting for payment of royalties that would have beenmachines, while paying royalties as per the injunction orderfrom the first suit. The royalties must have been inadequate

O'Connor, Sean

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Safety management in the Dutch oil and gas industry: the effect on the technological regime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the recent trend in Europe, from the formulation of detailed instructions and specifications with respect to the safety of industrial installations by governments, towards regulation on the level of safety management systems and risk analyses. The development sketched is studied with respect to the offshore oil and gas industry in the Netherlands. The government inspectorate responsible for this industry, the Staatstoezicht op de Mijnen (SodM), has, since the early 1990s, changed its approach from hardware-based inspections to inspection at the level of management systems. To assess the effects of this change in approach on industry practice the concept of ''technological regime'' is employed.

I.R. van de Poel; A.R. Hale; L.H.J. Goossens

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

[Rev. 03/14/06] UNLV ROYALTY SHARING AGREEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Rev. 03/14/06] UNLV ROYALTY SHARING AGREEMENT The undersigned agree to the percentage distribution of net income royalties from patents or sales of the copyrighted works as identified in this agreement

Hemmers, Oliver

24

Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reply Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley** & Carl Shapiro*** We argued in our article, Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking,1 that the threat to obtain a permanent injunction can greatly enhance a patent holder's negotiating power, leading to royalty rates that exceed a benchmark level based

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

25

Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley** & Carl Shapiro*** We study several. Our analysis applies to cases involving reasonable royalties but not lost profits. First, we show holder's negotiating power, leading to royalty rates that exceed a natural benchmark range based

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

26

UW POLICIES UW Administrative Policy Statements on Royalties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UW POLICIES UW Administrative Policy Statements on Royalties Read UW's policy statement on License prior to distributions. A link to the C4C Royalty Distribution Formulas is listed below. C4C has developed a number of innovative programs for faculty to support ongoing projects with their Royalty

Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

27

Oil and Gas General Provisions (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter describes general provisions for the exploration and development of oil and gas resources in Montana. The chapter addresses royalty interests, regulations for the lease of local...

28

MMS to redefine deep water, trim royalty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the Minerals Management Service plans to make several administrative and regulatory changes, including changing its definition of deepwater leases, in a program designed to help bolster US production. The new definition means MMS will reduce its royalty rate to 12.5% from 16% on fields in 200-400 m of water. It currently collects a 16% royalty on production in less than 400 m of water and 12.5% on production in water deeper than 400 m.

Not Available

1992-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

S.1930: Royalty Enhancement Act of 1998, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 2, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this bill is to provide certainty for, reduce administrative and compliance burdens associated with, and streamline and improve the collection of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. Sections of the Bill describe: definitions; rights, obligations and responsibilities; costs responsibility; transporter charges; imbalances; royalty-in-kind for trucked, tankered, or barged oil or gas; limitations on application; reporting; audit; lease terms not affected; eligible and small refiners; applicable laws; indian lands; effective; and regulations.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scheibel (1997) “Current Gas Turbine Developments and Futurefor Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines,” October 2000. Available onlineNext Evolution of the F Gas Turbine,” April 2001. Available

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Royalty Payments & Tax Treaty Procedures Information and IRS forms for MIT Press authors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Royalty Payments & Tax Treaty Procedures Information and IRS forms for MIT Press authors Forms the forms. Royalty Payment Schedule Royalty statements and payments will be made for each royalty year will not be returned. Please see page 3 of the W-7 application for complete details. Tax Treaty Claim on Royalty

Jackson, Daniel

32

Deepwater royalty relief product of 3 1/2 year U.S. political effort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Against the backdrop of more than 20 years of increasingly stringent environmental regulation, ever-expanding exploration and development moratoria on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and reductions in producer tax incentives, oil and natural gas exploration companies active in deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico recently won a significant legislative victory. On Nov. 28, 1995, President Clinton signed into law S.395, the Alaska Power Administration Sale Act. Title 3 of S.395 embodies the Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act. This landmark legislation provides substantial incentives for oil and natural gas production in the gulf of Mexico by temporarily eliminating royalties on certain deepwater leases. It is the first direct incentive for oil and gas production enacted at the federal level in many years. This paper reviews the elements used to arrive at this successful legislation including the congressional leadership. It describes debates, cabinet level discussions, and use of parlimentary procedures.

Davis, R.E. [Stuntz and Davis, Washington, DC (United States); Neff, S. [Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

An analysis of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Royalty Act .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lyn Bourne (n.d.) once wrote "The concept of royalties evolved from a time when the government owned all of the land, including mines, to the… (more)

Visagie, Karin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Coal royalty valuation: The federal perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MMS has embarked upon an aggressive coal royalty valuation odyssey, for which there is no common law mandated statutory basis. Accordingly, any form of deference to MMS interpretations, policy pronouncements and even regulatory rulemaking is tantamount to feeding steroids to King Kong. The coal industry must be vigilant first and pro-active second. The stark issue is {open_quotes}what we will yet permit the Federal Coal Valuation Program to become?{close_quotes}

McGee, B.E. [Parcel, Mauro, Hultin & Spaanstra, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Natural Gas Income: Year-end strategies that can reduce the tax bite. Robin L. Kuleck, MSEd, CFCS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas bonus payments, lease payments or royalty payments in 2008, this year's tax return payments and or royalty payments do you expect to receive by December 31, 2008? · Did you and/or your did you make? #12;Signing bonuses and lease payments receive different tax treatment from the royalty

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

36

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3 Desorption parameters for the Billi coalbed methane reservoir correspond to within an acceptable range with those of the Barnett shale. For the initial reservoir pressure used in this study these values correspond to an initial methane storage of 344 scf... media has been studied extensively in coalbed methane reservoirs , where adsorption can be the primary mode of gas storage. Many analytic and semi-analytic models have been developed from the study of gas desorption from coalbed methane reservoirs...

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

Magnetotransport in Zener tunneling regime in a high-mobility two-dimensional hole gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a high-mobility two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in C-doped (001) GaAs/Al0.4Ga0.6As quantum wells, we observe sharp features in the differential magnetoresistance, which we interpret as the Zener-tunneling peak and valley associated with the commensuration transition of Landau orbits. Comparison of data with that in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As 2D electron gas suggests that the amplitude of Zener oscillations in a 2DHG is strongly damped. The data indicate the significant role of band structures in nonlinear transport in 2D electronic systems.

Yanhua Dai; Z. Q. Yuan; C. L. Yang; R. R. Du; M. J. Manfra; L. N. Pfeiffer; K. W. West

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Effects of stomatal delays on the economics of leaf gas exchange under intermittent light regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Department, Duke University, Box 90287, Durham, NC 27708-0287, USA; 2 Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708-0328, USA Author for correspondence: Giulia Vico Tel to highly intermittent light availability and their leaf gas exchanges are mediated by delayed responses

Katul, Gabriel

39

Federal royalty oil eligibility requirements: the plateau legacy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The courts ruled in the 1979 Plateau decision that the Secretary of the Interior is obligated to allocate federal royalty oil among all refineries not having their own crude oil source of supply, and can not impose Small Business Administration (SBA) eligibility requirements on potential purchasers of federal royalty oil. The effects of this decision was to derail the government's attempt to make royalty oil produced from Outer Continental Shelf leases and onshore sites available to the same refiners. The Minerals Management Service has yet to adopt final regulations harmonizing the court's ruling with applicable statutory requirements, resulting in actions of dubious legality. 75 references.

Zimmerman, J.J.; Bullerdick, K.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of Conventional Oil and Gas Terms of Alberta?, JulyOffice (GAO), 2007, ?Oil and Gas Royalties: A Comparison ofRevenue Received from Oil and Gas Production by the Federal

Carnall, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Is Dissipative Granular Gas in Knudsen Regime Excited by Vibration Biphasic ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compatibility between a recent model (Poudres & Grains 15, 1-17, (2005)) of vibrated granular dissipative gas and recent experimental results in micro-gravity is investigated. It is found a good agreement for the distribution of impacts, which is found to vary exponentially as P(mv) = exp-(v/vo), both experimentally and theoretically; hence it confirms the distribution f(v) of speeds varying as (1/v) exp(-v/vo). However, some discrepancy is found for the variation of the total number of impacts with the number of balls contained in the cell. This is attributed to the existence of a second phase of balls "nearly at rest". Compatibility between results from granular gas experiments in micro-gravity and experiments on Maxwell's demon in 1-g is also discussed. The main idea, which allows understanding these results is to consider the piston as playing the role of an impact generator or of a "velostat" instead of a thermostat. It is shown also that the model predicts completely different behaviours in 1g and in 0g. Pacs # : 05.45.-a, 45.50.-j, 45.70.-n, 81.70.Bt, 81.70.Ha, 83.10.Pp

P. Evesque

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cornell University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action educator and employer CALS ROYALTY DISTRIBUTION POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cornell University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action educator and employer CALS ROYALTY of this policy. CALS ROYALTY DISTRIBUTION POLICY All CALS staff and faculty are subject to the above listed

Keinan, Alon

43

Resolution On The Assignment of Materials From Which Faculty Derive Royalties April 27, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resolution On The Assignment of Materials From Which Faculty Derive Royalties April 27, 2005 assigning class materials from which a faculty member derives royalties. In light of these principles, faculty who choose to assign materials from which they incidentally derive royalties should: Consider

Swaddle, John

44

Injunctions, Hold-Up, and Patent Royalties Carl Shapiro, University of California at Berkeley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injunctions, Hold-Up, and Patent Royalties Carl Shapiro, University of California at Berkeley Send royalty negotiations between a patent holder and a downstream firm whose product is more valuable-up component of the negotiated royalties is greatest for weak patents covering a minor feature of a product

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

45

Licensing Uncertain Patents: Per-Unit Royalty vs. Up-Front Fee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Licensing Uncertain Patents: Per-Unit Royalty vs. Up-Front Fee David Encaouay and Yassine Lefouiliz schemes are investigated: the per-unit royalty rate and the up-front fee. We provide conditions under-unit royalty scheme, the opportunity to do so does not exist under the up-front fee scheme. We also establish

Boyer, Edmond

46

B.C. Invention Disclosure Guidelines Do you want to get royalty money from your research?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B.C. Invention Disclosure Guidelines Do you want to get royalty money from your research, and bring in licensing royalty sharing with inventors. If you feel your research has any commercial value royalty! Please contact OTTL Director Dr. Jason Wen at jason.wen@bc.edu or (617) 552-1682 and Dr. Jill

Huang, Jianyu

47

Per-Unit Royalty vs Fixed Fee: The Case of Weak Patents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Per-Unit Royalty vs Fixed Fee: The Case of Weak Patents Rabah Amiry David Encaouaz Yassine a per-unit royalty or a ...xed fee when her innovation is covered by a weak patent, i.e. a patent of competition is not speci...ed, we show that the patent holder prefers to use a per-unit royalty scheme

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Exhibit 2D -Refund of Royalties UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhibit 2D - Refund of Royalties UT-B Contracts Div Dec 2005 Page 1 of 1 ex2D-dec05.doc Exhibit 2D Ref: DEAR 970.5227-8 REFUND OF ROYALTIES (Dec 2005) (a) During performance of this subcontract, if any royalties are proposed to be charged to the Company as costs under this subcontract, the Seller agrees

Pennycook, Steve

49

International Natural Gas Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administrat...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

U.S. Congress and in 16 states and Ontario on the direction of the gas industry, gas contracting, purchase and sales prices, royalty valuations, market value, hedging and risk...

50

Need for guidance and controls on royalty rate reductions for federal coal leases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of the Interior has used his authority to reduce royalty rates on eight Federal coal leases - amounting to $12 million in reduced Federal revenues. Requests for royalty rate reductions were precipitated by recent legislative enactments and a 2-year departmental experiment that raised royalty rates on coal leases to significantly higher levels. Because the Secretary is authorized to readjust the royalty rates on 438 leases by 1990 more requests for royalty reductions are likely in the future. The Interior Department has not clearly defined its policy and procedures on royalty rate reductions. The approval process is inconsistent, and accounting and auditing expertise needed to evaluate reduction requests have not been used adequately. GAO recommends that Interior develop a more clearly defined policy and accompanying regulations on royalty rate reductions, determine when audits of applicants' financial statements are needed, and better use existing financial expertise in its evaluations of reduction requests.

Not Available

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Staging Tudor Royalty: Religious Politics in Stuart Historical Drama (1603-1607).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Staging Tudor Royalty: Religious Politics in Stuart Historical Drama (1603–1607) examines the plays and pageantry about the Tudor royals in the context of three major… (more)

Schofield, Scott James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Royalties From Anesthesiology Research Fund 4 Chairs In the early 1980s, Theodore "Ted" H. Stanley, M.D.,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Royalties From Anesthesiology Research Fund 4 Chairs In the early 1980s, Theodore "Ted" H. Stanley--Actiq and Oralet--have generated royalties of more than $75 million to the U, $6 million of which is funding four

Capecchi, Mario R.

53

The licensing of patents in return for a fee or royalties has a key role in drug discovery.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The licensing of patents in return for a fee or royalties has a key role in drug discovery. Now the licensee brings out a new product, it may be unclear whether they need to pay royalty fees to the patentee patents in exchange for royalty payments; however, they disputed whether the licence of two patents

Cai, Long

54

ROYALTY DISTRIBUTION POLICY The University at Buffalo uses a single uniform structure to distribute proceeds derived from the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROYALTY DISTRIBUTION POLICY Summary The University at Buffalo uses a single uniform structure, staff, and students. When those innovations are licensed and generate royalty income for the University, that royalty income is shared with those who made the innovation. This revised policy supersedes all prior

Krovi, Venkat

55

LABORATORY ROYALTY USE PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory was established in 1947 on the site of the former Army Camp Upton. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. Associated Universities, Inc. managed the Laboratory, under contract with the US Department of Energy until April 30, 1998. On March 1, 1998, Brookhaven Science Associates LLC (BSA) was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy to manage the Laboratory. Brookhaven Science Associates has taken responsibility for all aspects of the existing Royalty Use Program from the prior contractor, AUI. This report is limited to FY 1998 activities of the Royalty Use Program that were funded by royalty income from prior fiscal years. Any FY 1998 royalty income allocated in FY 1998 shall be reported in the FY 1999 Royalty Use Program Report.

OGEKA,G.J.; FOX,K.J.

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reasons and current outlook for the sale of federal royalty oil to small and independent refiners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Interior receives a royalty from oil production on federal lands. Interior can take the royalty as a cash payment or a portion of the oil itself, which it can then sell to small and independent refiners who are determined to be in need of crude oil supplies. Sales of this so-called royalty oil have been held about every 3 years since 1970. In early 1985, Interior announced its intention to terminate the program because of its declining importance and proposed legislation to that effect. While GAO sees no compelling need to legislatively restrict Interior's ability to hold future royalty oil sales now or in the future, it has identified several ways to improve the program's effectiveness. This report examines Interior's basis for the most recent sales and the current status and need for the royalty oil program and discusses ways in which its administration might be improved if future sales are held.

Not Available

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

S.1919: Federal Oil and Gas Stripper Well Preservation Act of 1998, introduced in the US Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 2, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this bill is to provide for the energy security of the Nation through encouraging the production of domestic oil and gas resources from stripper wells on Federal lands, and for other purposes. The law would authorize reduction of royalty rates for stripper wells on federal lands and suspend minimum royalty and per acre rental fees.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A., E-mail: anouar.soufiani@ecp.fr [CNRS, UPR 288, Laboratoire EM2C, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); École Centrale Paris, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France)] [France; Xin, S. [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)] [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Le Quéré, P. [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)] [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Computational and experimental test of self starting regimes for the in-house needs of the PGU-450 steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Power Plant during supply disruptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major stages of a computational test of the self starting regimes for the in-house needs of unit No. 1 of the 450 MW steam-gas unit at the Kaliningrad TÉTs-2 Heating and Electric Power Plant during supply ...

S. N. Sakharov; V. A. Kuz’michev

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

SPR to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program SPR to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program October 10, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis Solicitation to Exchange Royalty Oil from Offshore U.S. Leases WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a solicitation seeking contracts to exchange up to approximately 13 million barrels from Federal leases in the Gulf of Mexico for crude oil that meets the specifications of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Bids are due by November 6, 2007. This action is taken in accordance with the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 which directs that the SPR fill to its authorized size of one billion barrels, and advances the President's agenda to increase the Nation's energy security. It allows for a modest fill rate of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for the SPR  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for the SPR Three Companies Awarded Contracts for Royalty-in-Kind Exchanges for the SPR November 8, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis Deliveries to Begin in January 2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded contracts to Shell Trading Company, Sunoco Logistics, and BP North America for exchange of 12.3 million barrels of royalty oil produced from the Gulf Coast for crude oil meeting the requirements of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Deliveries are expected to begin in January at a modest rate of approximately 70,000 barrels per day for a period of six months. The offers are in response to the Department's solicitation issued last month and represented the highest value of specification-grade oil for the

62

I.C. 47-1605 - Geothermal Resources - Leases--Rental and Royalty...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1605 - Geothermal Resources - Leases--Rental and Royalty Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 47-1605 -...

63

SPR to Continue Royalty-in-Kind Fill Program | Department of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

April 4, 2008 - 2:47pm Addthis Solicitation to Exchange Royalty Oil from Offshore U.S. Leases WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a solicitation...

64

UNL POLICY FOR DIVISION OF NET ROYALTY AND PROCEEDS Section 5 of the RP-4.4.2 Regents' Patent and Technology Transfer Policy includes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL POLICY FOR DIVISION OF NET ROYALTY AND PROCEEDS Section 5 of the RP-4.4.2 Regents' Patent and Technology Transfer Policy includes information on the division of net royalties and proceeds: "With respect by the University associated with such action. After such expenses are reimbursed, royalties and other proceeds from

Logan, David

65

XII.A.3. Binghamton University Royalty Distribution Plan The State University of New York patent policy provides for sharing between the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XII.A.3. Binghamton University Royalty Distribution Plan The State University of New York patent policy provides for sharing between the inventor and the University of gross royalty income from licensing of inventions. The patent policy requires 40% of the gross royalty must be provided

Suzuki, Masatsugu

66

Royalty relief, leasing, exploration may help maintain Cook Inlet production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cook Inlet production largely held its own in 1995 while Alaska`s overall oil production fell 4%. The Inlet`s seven oil fields produced 15.5 million bbl of oil, or a decline of only 0.6% from 1994`s 15.6 million bbl. Fields and their average production in 1995 compared with 1994 in parentheses, are McArthur River 18,142 b/d (19,427); Middle Ground Shoal 7.753 b/d (7,577); Granite Point 7,069 b/d (6,053); Swanson River 4,738 b/d (4,645); West McArthur River 2,526 b/d (2,522); Trading Bay 1,979 b/d (2,037); and Beaver Creek 362 b/d (383). The paper discusses Unocal`s plans, royalty relief, ARCO`s outlook, sales of Shell, explorations by Marathon, drilling by Stewart, reserves and production, and Cook Inlet leases.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nuclear non-proliferation regime effectiveness : an integrated methodology for analyzing highly enriched uranium production scenarios at gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dramatic change in the international security environment after the collapse of the bipolar system has had a negative impact on the effectiveness of the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime. Furthermore, the success ...

Kwak, Taeshin (Taeshin S.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

CSEM WP 128 Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of technology adoption and development. We focus on three major attributes of gas turbines - capacity, heat rateCSEM WP 128 Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbine Electricity Generators from Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbine

California at Berkeley. University of

71

Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on Federal lands: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to predict the value of increased royalties that could be accrued through the year 2010 by the federal government as a result of the accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) geothermal research and development (RandD) program. The technology improvements considered in this study coincide with the major goals and objectives of the DOE program as set forth in Section 3.0 and will: allow the geothermal industry to maintain a long-term competitive posture in the more favorable fields; and permit it to become competitive where the resource is of lower quality. The study was confined to power generation from liquid-dominated hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. The technologies for exploiting the liquid-dominated, or hot water, fields for power generation are relatively new and still under development. Thus, each technology enhancement that permits greater economic use of the resource will potentially enhance royalty revenues. Potential royalty revenue from dry steam power production at The Geysers, direct use of geothermal fluids, and use of advanced geothermal technologies (i.e., hot dry rock, magma, and geopressured) has not been considered in this assessment. 12 refs.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Regimes and Social Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Has the proliferation and strengthening of regimes in recent decades begun to have measurable consequences, not just in the specific arena of individual regimes, but more broadly? A premise of this book is tha...

Barry B. Hughes

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Category:Federal Oil and Gas Statutes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statutes Statutes Jump to: navigation, search Add a new Federal Oil and Gas Statute You need to have JavaScript enabled to view the interactive timeline. Further results for this query.DECADEFederal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 19961996-01-010Year: 1996 Federal Onshore Oil and Gas Leasing Reform Act of 1987 (FOOGLRA)1987-01-010Year: 1987 Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Indian Mineral Development Act of 19821982-01-010Year: 1982 Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 19761976-01-010Year: 1976 Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 19701970-01-010Year: 1970 Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 19471947-01-010Year: 1947 Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 19381938-01-010Year: 1938 Mineral Leasing Act of 19201920-01-010Year: 1920

74

H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Energy Use 3. Measuring Energy Performance 4. Performance Rating Systems 5. Energy Efficiency used from all sources in a year. British thermal unit (Btu) Generically, the amount of energy or heatEncyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605­616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

76

TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical cloud properties as a function of regime Regimes? Monsoon versus Break * Different synoptic vertical velocity profiles - Changes convective inhibition, corresponding...

77

Defining a royalty from a South African perspective for the purposes of the South African Income Tax Act and the South African application of its Double Tax Treaty network.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. Inludes bibliographical references. The word “royalty” is used in South Africa’s Income Tax Act No. 58 of 1962 (“ITA”) at various points. Although… (more)

Buckley, Ryan.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The eLog is a vital part of your licence with Access Copyright. It is your tool for reporting everything that is copied into coursepacks at your institution. The eLog spreadsheet will even automatically calculate the royalties payable just enter in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculate the royalties payable ­ just enter in the relevant information. Based on your feedback, we have refined the eLog to make it more user-friendly. This will help us ensure the appropriate royalties charged the appropriate royalty during each reporting period. The eLog contains a feature

Boonstra, Rudy

79

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Exploration & Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploration & Reserves Exploration & Reserves 2009 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2008 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Released, 10/29/2009, PDF, XLS, and HTML formats) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2007 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Released, 2/10/2009, PDF, XLS, and HTML formats) 2007 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2006 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Publication, Dec. 2007, PDF and HTML formats) 2006 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2005 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Publication, Dec. 2006, PDF and HTML formats) Overview of the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program

80

The chemical weapons prohibition regime.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Frage, unter welchen Voraussetzungen multilaterale Abrüstungsregime erfolgreich operieren können. Als Beispiel hierfür wird das internationale Chemiewaffenverbot-Regime, welches von… (more)

Kröll, Patricia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Is the Ozone Depletion Regime a Model for an Emerging Regime on Global Warming?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the for- mation of a global warming regime produces a highlydepletion and the global warming regimes was recognized byan Emerging Regime on Global Warming? by Winfried Lang I.

Lang, Winfried

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Why Enable Litigation?: A Positive Externalities Theory of the Small Claims Class Action  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on overdue natural gas royalty payments. With the value ofexample, in one class, 2,653 royalty owners in Oklahoma wereowed $83,711 in royalties, or about $32 per royalty owner.

Rubenstein, William B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ultra-Deepwater and Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program The Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program, launched by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), is a public/private partnership valued at $400 million over eight years that is designed to benefit consumers by developing technologies to increase America's domestic oil and gas production and reduce the Nation's dependency on foreign imports. Key aspects of the program include utilizing a non-profit consortium to manage the research, establishing two federal advisory committees, and funding of $50 million per year derived from royalties, rents, and bonuses from federal onshore

84

Microgravity Flow Regime Transition Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apparatus have been used in past flow regime mapping experiments such as Venturi, perforated pipe, annular, and t-junction mixers. The mixing apparatus used in a particular experiment determines the bubble size distribution at the inlet... pressure of 80 kPa was reported, however, the temperature was not. The orientation and location of the test section with respect to the aircraft are unknown. The mixing apparatus used in the experiment was a Venturi mixer. This data set does...

Shephard, Adam M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Observation of neutral modes in the fractional quantum Hall regime , H. Inoue1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional-electron gas under strong magnetic field, currents flow along the edges of the sample. For some particle, Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel 2 Department (FQHE) [1] regime along the edges of a two-dimensional- electron gas (2DEG) via edge modes

Kane, Charles

86

PENNSYLVANIA NATURAL GAS SUMMIT December 10, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the lease by stating that it would never pay more than $25 per acre. b) The royalty provision of the lease agreement violates Pennsylvania's Minimum Royalty Act, 58 P.S. § 33. 58 P.S. § 33 ­ "A lease or other to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not guarantee the lessor at least one-eighth royalty of all

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

87

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine Hydrate Deposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sands interlayered with silts and clays, a regime that is not conducive to significant free gas and/or hydrate

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol, Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fuel Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? Fuel Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

89

Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?{omega}{sub pe}: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany) and University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Viscosity model for gases in the transition regime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied a model of tangential viscosity of a fluid in which high-order spatial derivatives of the velocity are taken into account. The model indicates that for a gas in the transition regime, and within a range of boundary conditions, the tangential stress presents an oscillatory dependence on the density. An experiment designed to detect these oscillations was done with helium at constant temperature T=294°K and varying the pressure within the range 0.5-50 mTorr. The results were found to be in good agreement with the oscillations predicted by our model when the spatial derivative of the fluid velocity near the boundaries was close to zero. From the separation in density between these oscillations, it is possible to obtain an independent measurement of the atomic mean cross section for helium. This method makes specific use of the way the viscosity oscillates with the density in the transition regime instead of using the value that the viscosity takes in the continuous regime. The good agreement between our measurements of the cross section and the values that have been obtained by other methods gives an indication of the validity of the proposed model.

D. Moronta and M. García-Sucre

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Post 2012 Climate Regime | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Post 2012 Climate Regime Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Post 2012 Climate Regime: How Industrial and Developing Nations Can Help to Reduce Emissions- Assessing Emission Trends, Reduction Potentials, Incentive Systems and Negotiation Options Agency/Company /Organization: Umwelt Bundes Amt Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.umweltdaten.de/publikationen/fpdf-l/3954.pdf Post 2012 Climate Regime: How Industrial and Developing Nations Can Help to Reduce Emissions- Assessing Emission Trends, Reduction Potentials, Incentive Systems and Negotiation Options Screenshot

92

Ultrashort Pulse Propagation in the Linear Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First, we investigate the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer (BLB) law as applied to the transmission of ultrashort pulses through water in the linear absorption regime. We present a linear theory for propagation of ultrashort laser pulses, and related...

Wang, Jieyu

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

The New Regime for Ocean Governance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This means two things. First, the military concept of sea power and the high seas regime of “freedom ... . Second, all maritime nations, including great powers and medium powers, need to individually and/or in co...

Manoj Gupta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Regimes | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Regimes Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Regimes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

95

Gasoline-like fuel effects on advanced combustion regimes | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

regimes Gasoline-like fuel effects on advanced combustion regimes 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

96

Statistical regimes of random laser fluctuations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statistical fluctuations of the light emitted from amplifying random media are studied theoretically and numerically. The characteristic scales of the diffusive motion of light lead to Gaussian or power-law (Levy) distributed fluctuations depending on external control parameters. In the Levy regime, the output pulse is highly irregular leading to huge deviations from a mean-field description. Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified model which includes the population of the medium demonstrate the two statistical regimes and provide a comparison with dynamical rate equations. Different statistics of the fluctuations helps to explain recent experimental observations reported in the literature.

Lepri, Stefano [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Cavalieri, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Laboratory for Non-linear Spectroscopy, via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Oppo, Gian-Luca [SUPA and Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow, G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wiersma, Diederik S. [European Laboratory for Non-linear Spectroscopy, via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); BEC-INFM Center, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Thermal emission in the ultrastrong coupling regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study thermal emission of a cavity quantum electrodynamic system in the ultrastrong-coupling regime where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable the cavity resonance frequency. In this regime, the standard descriptions of photodetection and dissipation fail. Following an approach that was recently put forward by Ridolfo et al.[arXiv:1206.0944], we are able to calculate the emission of systems with arbitrary strength of light matter interaction, by expressing the electric field operator in the cavity-emitter dressed basis. Here we present thermal photoluminescence spectra, calculated for given temperatures and for different couplings in particular for available circuit QED parameters.

A. Ridolfo; M. Leib; S. Savasta; M. J. Hartmann

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

COMMODITY PRICE VOLATILITY ACROSS EXCHANGE RATE REGIMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMMODITY PRICE VOLATILITY ACROSS EXCHANGE RATE REGIMES John T. Cuddington* and Hong Liang** March 10, 2003 ABSTRACT This paper documents a new "stylized fact" regarding the relative price 1880 to 1996, this key relative price among two categories of tradable goods is shown to exhibit

99

ccsd00000886 Super uidity of the 1D Bose gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00000886 (version 2) : 22 Mar 2004 Super uidity of the 1D Bose gas Super uidit#19;e du gaz de and degenerate 1D Bose gas at thermal equilibrium with a rotating vessel. The conventional de#12;nition of super uidity predicts that the gas has a signi#12;cant super uid fraction only in the Bose condensed regime

100

METEOROLOGY OF SO CLOUD REGIMES WORKSHOP ON SOUTHERN OCEAN CLOUDS & AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regimes Regime meteorology Vertical pressure velocity Potential temperature Relative humidity Wind speed regimes Regime meteorology Vertical pressure velocity Potential temperature Relative humidity Wind speed Regime meteorology Vertical pressure velocity Potential temperature Relative humidity Wind speed

Jakob, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

Aeration efficiency over stepped cascades: Better predictions from flow regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Stepped cascades are recognized as high potential air–water gas exchangers. In natural rivers, these structures enhance oxygen transfer to water by creating turbulence at interface with increasing air entrainment in water and air–water surface exchange. Stepped cascades could be really useful to improve the natural self-purification process by providing oxygen to aerobic micro-organisms. The aeration performance of these structures depends on several operating and geometrical parameters. In the literature, several empirical correlations for aeration efficiency prediction on stepped cascades exist. Most of these correlations are only applicable for operating and geometrical parameters in the range of which they have been developed. In this paper, 398 experimental sets of data (from our experiments and collected from literature) were used to develop a correlation for aeration prediction over stepped cascades derived from dimensional analysis and parameterized for each individual flow regime in order to consider change in flow regime effect on oxygen transfer. This new correlation allowed calculating the whole set of data obtained for cascades with steps heights between 0.05 m and 0.254 m, cascade total height between 0.25 m and 2.5 m, for discharges per unit of width ranging from 0.28 10?3 m2/s to 600 10?3 m2/s and for cascade steps number between 3 and 25. In these ranges of parameters, standard deviation for aeration efficiency estimation was found to be less than 17%. Finally, advices were proposed to help and improve the structure design in order to improve aeration.

Hatem Khdhiri; Olivier Potier; Jean-Pierre Leclerc

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS Wuyin Lin1 , Yangang Liu1 of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 ABSTRACT Distinct cloud regimes exist locally and globally helps identify the meteorological conditions that are closely associated with specific cloud regimes

104

Supplementary Method The weather regime paradigm: description and properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Method The weather regime paradigm: description and properties Weather regimes the satellite-data period for Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) further analysed in the course of the paper. Weather regimes should be understood as "envelops" for daily variability and would correspond

Cai, Long

105

Persistent Circulation Regimes and Preferred Regime Transitions in the North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The persistent regime behavior of the eddy-driven jet stream over the North Atlantic is investigated. The North Atlantic jet stream variability is characterized by the latitude of the maximum lower tropospheric wind speed of the 40-yr ECMWF Re-...

Christian Franzke; Tim Woollings; Olivia Martius

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relation- ship. 1. Royalty Interest:Inoiland gas terms, royalty interest means theright of lessor under." A royalty interest does notinclude the right toexplore, drill foror produce oil andgas, therightto lease may beconveyedin whole orfractional part. 3. Overriding Royalty Interest: An interest which

108

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

Regimes At Work: The Nonproliferation Order And Indian Nuclear Policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis claims that by constituting a certain range of possible identities for countries, the nuclear nonproliferation regime facilitated India's forging of non-weaponized nuclear deterrence… (more)

Sasikumar, Karthika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Exploring Advanced Combustion Regimes for Efficiency and Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regimes for Efficiency and Emissions Robert Wagner, Scott Sluder, John Storey, Sam Lewis Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy, OFCVT Program Manager:...

112

Cluster Analysis of Cloud Regimes and Characteristic Dynamics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cluster Analysis of Cloud Regimes and Characteristic Dynamics of Mid-Latitude Synoptic Systems N. D. Gordon and J. R. Norris Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of...

113

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

114

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

115

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

116

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

117

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

118

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

119

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

120

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

122

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

123

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

124

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

125

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

126

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

127

Detecting and Forecasting Economic Regimes in Automated Exchanges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as over- supply or scarcity, from historical data using computational methods to construct price density. The agent can use this information to make both tactical decisions such as pricing and strategic decisions historical data and identified from observable data. We outline how to identify regimes and forecast regime

Ketter, Wolfgang

128

Parallel Imaging and Acceleration in the Johnson Noise Dominated Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Imaging and Acceleration in the Johnson Noise Dominated Regime Cristen D. LaPierre1 receive coil in the parallel array. At low field, uncorrelated Johnson noise dominates, providing in the Johnson noise dominated regime. With the eight channel array, SENSE acceleration can be implemented

Rosen, Matthew S

129

Magnetised Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the intermediate regime between subsonic and supersonic regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding of the dynamics at play at the Earth's Magnetopause, the boundary separating the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind plasmas, is of primary importance for space plasma modeling. We focus our attention on the low latitude flank of the magnetosphere where the velocity shear between the magnetosheath and the magnetospheric plasmas is the energetic source of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. On the shoulder of the resulting vortex chain, different secondary instabilities are at play depending on the local plasma parameters and compete with the vortex pairing process. Most important, secondary instabilities, among other magnetic reconnection, control the plasma mixing as well as the entry of solar wind plasma in the magnetosphere. We make use of a two-fluid model, including the Hall term and the electron mass in the generalized Ohm's law, to study the 2D non-linear evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetosheath-magnetosphere interface, in the intermediate regime between subsonic and supersonic regimes. We study the saturation mechanisms, depending on the density jump across the shear layer and the magnetic field strength in the plane. In the presence of a weak in-plane magnetic field, the dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz rolled-up vortices self-consistently generates thin current sheets where reconnection instability eventually enables fast reconnection to develop. Such a system enables to study guide field multiple-island collisionless magnetic reconnection as embedded in a large-scale dynamic system, unlike the classical static, ad hoc reconnection setups. In this regime, reconnection is shown to inhibit the vortex pairing process. This study provides a clear example of nonlinear, cross-scale, collisionless plasma dynamics.

Henri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F. [Dip. Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Faganello, M. [International Institute for Fusion Science/PIIM, UMR 7345 CNRS Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

submitted manuscript has been submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- AC05-96OR22464. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non- exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." ORNL/TM-1999/258 AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION David L. Greene Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory November 1999 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . .

131

Constraints on flow regimes in wide-aperture fractures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the complex flow processes in individual fractures, aided by flow visualization experiments and conceptual modeling efforts. These advances have led to the recognition of several flow regimes in individual fractures subjected to different initial and boundary conditions. Of these, the most important regimes are film flow, rivulet flow, and sliding of droplets. The existence of such significantly dissimilar flow regimes has been a major hindrance in the development of self-consistent conceptual models of flow for single fractures that encompass all the flow regimes. The objective of this study is to delineate the existence of the different flow regimes in individual fractures. For steady-state flow conditions, we developed physical constraints on the different flow regimes that satisfy minimum energy configurations, which enabled us to segregate the wide range of fracture transmissivity (volumetric flow rate per fracture width) into several flow regimes. These are, in increasing order of flow rate, flow of adsorbed films, flow of sliding drops, rivulet flow, stable film flow, and unstable (turbulent) film flow. The scope of this study is limited to wide-aperture fractures with the flow on the opposing sides of fracture being independent.

Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

133

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

134

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient...

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Quantum model of an autonomous oscillator in hard excitation regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose the simple quantum model of nonlinear autonomous oscillator in hard excitation regime. We originate from classical equations of motion for similar oscillator and quantize them using the Lindblad master equation for the density matrix of this system. The solution for the populations of the stationary states of such oscillator may be explicitly found in the case when nonlinearity parameters of the problem are small. It was shown that in this situation there are three distinct regimes of behavior of the model. We compare properties of this model with corresponding ones of close open system, namely quantum oscillator in soft excitation regime. We discuss a possible applications of the results obtained.

E. D. Vol; M. A. Ialovega

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Arguments Pro and Against Shale Gas Exploitation Worldwide and in Romania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shale gas emerges as a new and important source of energy for the post - industrial world. It is assumed that countries that have considerable shale deposits will be better placed in the 21st century competition between states. The United States have one of biggest deposits of shale gas, underscores a domestic production “boom” and is on the verge of becoming a gas exporter in Western Europe. The United States still has few capabilities to export shale gas to Europe. It would have to build new liquefaction facilities to do that. On the other side, Russia is, for the moment, the energy giant of Europe, its massive exports of natural gas to the area, acting as a powerful political leverage especially on the eastern and central European space. But in Europe, at least 10 countries are believed to hold significant shale gas reserves; among them, Romania is assumed to have huge unconventional gas reserves, whose exploitation could ensure its medium-term energy independence, and combined with newly discovered gas in the Black Sea, and energy efficiency improvement measures, provide not only the energy independence but transform Romania into a regional power pole. The interesting fact is how each country in Europe, will choose to convert resources in shale gas reserves and to exploit them to the benefit of the economy, the society and the environment. Besides some clear positive effects (decreasing energy imports, creating a stronger negotiating position against external (fossil fuel) suppliers and diversifying Europe's energy mix) will shale gas extraction succeed to decrease gas bill for population, by reducing prices, or will it stick only to royalties and fees collection, as well as with some local social and economic effects, with the consequence of prolonged pollution or even potentially devastating effects on the environment? In order that gas-gas competition begins to act effectively and exert a strong competitive pressure on gas import prices in Europe (by changing their base and weaken the link with oil prices, up to a possible decoupling of it) it is necessary that Europe will benefit from a big inflow of gas supplies, shale gas included, from different sources than

Mariana Papatulica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Inhomogeneous Cooling of the Rough Granular Gas in Two Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the inhomogeneous clustered regime of a freely cooling granular gas of rough particles in two dimensions using large-scale event driven simulations and scaling arguments. During collisions, rough particles dissipate energy in both the normal and tangential directions of collision. In the inhomogeneous regime, translational kinetic energy and the rotational energy decay with time $t$ as power-laws $t^{-\\theta_T}$ and $t^{-\\theta_R}$. We numerically determine $\\theta_T \\approx 1$ and $\\theta_R \\approx 1.6$, independent of the coefficients of restitution. The inhomogeneous regime of the granular gas has been argued to be describable by the ballistic aggregation problem, where particles coalesce on contact. Using scaling arguments, we predict $\\theta_T=1$ and $\\theta_R=1$ for ballistic aggregation, $\\theta_R$ being different from that obtained for the rough granular gas. Simulations of ballistic aggregation with rotational degrees of freedom are consistent with these exponents.

Sudhir N. Pathak; Dibyendu Das; R. Rajesh

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Migrant Remittances and Exchange Rate Regimes in the Developing World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article argues that the international financial consequences of immigration exert a substantial influence on the choice of exchange rate regimes in the developing world. Over the past two decades, migrant remittances ...

Singer, David Andrew

139

Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...into fisheries management. regime shifts|precautionary approach|fisheries management|management strategy...years, fisheries science and management...The current approach in fisheries science and management couples risk management...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of enhanced carbon biomass and export at 55 degrees S duringHigh Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean PhoebeSurface waters with high biomass levels and high proportion

Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A study of boiling water flow regimes at low pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"A comprehensive experimental program to examine flow regimes at pressures below 100 psia for boiling of water in tubes was carried out. An electrical probe, which measures the resistance of the fluid between the centerline ...

Fiori, Mario P.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple “weather regimes.” To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, “bred vectors” and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemble forecasts issued from “clouds” (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.

Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United Staes). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Marine regime shifts: drivers and impacts on ecosystems services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...function of marine ecosystems [1,2]. A regime...of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, including lakes...on European marine ecosystems: observations, expectations...Threshold models in restoration and conservation...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

145

Low cost methodologies to analyze and correct abnormal production decline in stripper gas wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This first quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to establish a study group of stripper gas wells in which Artex Oil Company or its affiliate, Arloma Corporation, own a working or royalty interest. The report describes the procedures to define wells exhibiting abnormal decline and identify the associated problem. Finally, the report discusses initial development of diagnostic procedures to evaluate the cause of abnormal production declines.

James, J.; Huck, G.; Knobloch, T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

O-regime dynamics and modeling in Tore Supra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regime of nonlinear temperature oscillations (O-regime), characteristic of noninductive discharges on Tore Supra [Equipe Tore Supra, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Nice, France, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 9], is investigated in its triggering and suppressing mechanism. This regime can be described by two nonlinearly coupled equations for the current density j(r) and the electron temperature T{sub e}(r) where the equation coefficients are functions of j and T{sub e} themselves. Both the integrated modeling code CRONOS[V. Basiuk et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 822 (2003)] and a two-patch predator-prey system with diffusion and noise have been used and results have been compared to the experimental observations of the O-regime. A database of discharges is analyzed which features monotonic, flat, and reversed safety factor (q) profiles in order to characterize the action of external actuators on the regime dynamics with the widest generality. Electron cyclotron current drive and neutral beam injections have been used in order to induce localized perturbations in the total current profile j(r) as well as to change the plasma confinement conditions in the central region. Magnetic shear perturbations and modifications of the heat transport turn out to be the central parameters governing the dynamics of the O-regime.

Turco, F.; Giruzzi, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Udintsev, V. S.; Artaud, J. F.; Barana, O.; Dumont, R.; Mazon, D.; Segui, J.-L. [CEA-IRFM, 13108 St. Paul-les-Durance (France)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

148

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

149

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

150

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

151

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

152

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

153

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

154

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

155

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

156

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

157

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

158

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

159

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

160

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

162

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

164

Modeling long-term fire regimes of southern California shrublands1 (Suggested running head: "Modeling fire regimes with HFire")3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of three fire regime metrics (fire size24 distributions, fire return interval maps, cumulative total area pattern of ignitions, fuels, weather,38 and topography, and describes the size, spatial pattern

Carlson, Jean

165

Dynamically strained ferroelastics: Statistical behavior in elastic and plastic regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamic evolution in ferroelastic crystals under external shear is explored by computer simulation of a two-dimensional model. The characteristic geometrical patterns obtained during shear deformation include dynamic tweed in the elastic regime as well as interpenetrating needle domains in the plastic regime. As a result, the statistics of jerk energy differ in the elastic and plastic regimes. In the elastic regime the distributions of jerk energy are sensitive to temperature and initial configurations. However, in the plastic regime the jerk distributions are rather robust and do not depend much on the details of the configurations, although the geometrical pattern formed after yield is strongly influenced by the elastic constants of the materials and the configurations we used. Specifically, for all geometrical configurations we studied, the energy distribution of jerks shows a power-law noise pattern P(E)?E?(??1)(??1=1.3?2) at low temperatures and a Vogel-Fulcher distribution P(E)???exp-(E/E0) at high temperatures. More complex behavior occurs at the crossover between these two regimes where our simulated jerk distributions are very well described by a generalized Poisson distributions P(E)?E?(??1) exp-(E/E0)n with n = 0.4–0.5 and ??1 ? 0 (Kohlrausch law). The geometrical mechanisms for the evolution of the ferroelastic microstructure under strain deformation remain similar in all thermal regimes, whereas their thermodynamic behavior differs dramatically: on heating, from power-law statistics via the Kohlrausch law to a Vogel-Fulcher law. There is hence no simple way to predict the local evolution of the twin microstructure from just the observed statistical behavior of a ferroelastic crystal. It is shown that the Poisson distribution is a convenient way to describe the crossover behavior contained in all the experimental data without recourse to specific scaling functions or temperature-dependent cutoff lengths.

X. Ding; T. Lookman; Z. Zhao; A. Saxena; J. Sun; E. K. H. Salje

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - anglo-american liberal regime Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre and Politics and International Studies Program Present CONFLICT, SECURITY AND POLITICAL REGIMES IN ASIA Summary: CONFLICT, SECURITY AND POLITICAL REGIMES IN ASIA A Public...

167

THE IMPACT OF THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR SAFETY REGIME IN BRAZIL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A turning point of the world nuclear industry with respect to safety occurred due to the accident at Chernobyl, in 1986. A side from the tragic personal losses and the enormous financial damage, the Chernobyl accident has literally demonstrated that ''a nuclear accident anywhere is an accident everywhere''. The impact was felt immediately by the nuclear industry, with plant cancellations (e.g. Austria), elimination of national programs (e.g. Italy) and general construction delays. However, the reaction of the nuclear industry was equally immediate, which led to the proposal and establishment of a Global Nuclear Safety Regime. This regime is composed of biding international safety conventions, globally accepted safety standard, and a voluntary peer review system. In a previous work, the author has presented in detail the components of this Regime, and briefly discussed its impact in the Brazilian nuclear power organizations, including the Regulatory Body. This work, on the opposite, briefly reviews the Global Nuclear Safety Regime, and concentrates in detail in the discussion of its impact in Brazil, showing how it has produced some changes, and where the peer pressure regime has failed to produce real results.

Almeida, C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

169

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

170

Universal diagram for regimes of Z-pinch stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The regimes for the applicability of various theoretical models for the stability of a Z pinch under pressure balance are shown to be clearly delineated in a diagram of ln(I4a) vs lnN, where I, a, and N are the current, pinch radius, and line density, respectively. In particular, the most unstable regime where ideal magnetohydrodynamics applies is shown to be restricted to a small-wedge-shaped region bounded by resistive, viscous, anisotropic, and finite Larmor radius effects. Recent experimental results of anomalous stability can be interpreted in terms of resistive or large-ion Larmor-radius effects.

M. G. Haines and M. Coppins

1991-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

172

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

173

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

174

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

175

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

176

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

177

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

178

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

179

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

182

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

186

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

189

Enrichment of the dust-to-gas mass ratio in Bondi/Jeans accretion/cloud systems due to unequal changes in dust and gas incoming velocities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ratio of the Bondi and Jeans lengths is used to develop a cloud-accretion model that describes both an inner Bondi-type regime where gas pressure is balanced by the gravity of a central star and an outer Jeans-type regime where gas pressure is balanced by gas self-gravity. The gas density profile provided by this model makes a smooth transition from a wind-type inner solution to a Bonnor-Ebert type outer solution. It is shown that high-velocity dust impinging on this cloud will tend to pile-up due to having a different velocity profile than gas so that the dust-to-gas ratio is substantially enriched above the 1% ISM level.

P. M. Bellan

2008-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of the temperature fields in an electric arc struck on a point electrode in a homogeneous gas stream  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study is made of the problem of a point electric source in a homogeneous gas stream and operating in the arc discharge regime. The development of an electric arc struck on a point cathode in a ... . The station...

A. B. Vatazhin

191

Humidity-independent portable air-hydrogen fuel cells with slotted silicon based gas-distributing plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the characteristics of small-scale air-hydrogen fuel cells (FCs) operating in a free-breathing cathode regime. The cells are provided with a new gas-distributing element on the cathode side, wh...

E. V. Astrova; D. A. Andronikov; M. V. Gorokhov…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lattice Boltzmann simulation of rarefied gas flows in microchannels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For gas flows in microchannels, slip motion at the solid surface can occur even if the Mach number is negligibly small. Since the Knudsen number of the gas flow in a long microchannel can vary widely and the Navier-Stokes equations are not valid for Knudsen numbers beyond 0.1, an alternative method that can be applicable to continuum, slip and transition flow regimes is highly desirable. The lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) approach has recently been expected to have such potential. However, some hurdles need to be overcome before it can be applied to simulate rarefied gas flows. The first major hurdle is to accurately model the gas molecule and wall surface interactions. In addition, the Knudsen number needs to be clearly defined in terms of LBE properties to ensure that the LBE simulation results can be checked against experimental measurements and other simulation results. In this paper, the Maxwellian scattering kernel is adopted to address the gas molecule and surface interactions with an accommodation coefficient (in addition to the Knudsen number) controlling the amount of slip motion. The Knudsen number is derived consistently with the macroscopic property based definition. The simulation results of the present LBE model are in quantitative agreement with the established theory in the slip flow regime. In the transition flow regime, the model captures the Knudsen minimum phenomenon qualitatively. Therefore, the LBE can be a competitive method for simulation of rarefied gas flows in microdevices.

Yonghao Zhang; Rongshan Qin; David R. Emerson

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

A multiple temperature kinetic model and its application to micro-scale gas flow simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multiple temperature kinetic model and its application to micro-scale gas flow simulations model, micro-scale flows. 1. Introduction Gas flows can be classified according to the flow regimes_pku@yahoo.com.cn Abstract This paper presents a numerical approach to solve the multiple temperature kinetic model (MTKM

Xu, Kun

195

Solutions to the Boltzmann equation in the Boussinesq regime.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions to the Boltzmann equation in the Boussinesq regime. R. Esposito 1 , R. Marra 2 and J. L to the density, velocity and temperature obtained from the smooth solution of the Oberbeck­Boussinesq equations of temperature and density are small and the system is described in the Boussinesq approximation under which

196

Detecting and Forecasting Economic Regimes in Automated Exchanges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

historical data using computational methods to construct price density functions. We discuss how tactical decisions such as pricing and strategic decisions such as product mix and production planning. We call these patterns economic regimes. We show how such patterns can be learned from historical data

Ketter, Wolfgang

197

ORBIT -Operating-Regime-Based Modeling and Identi cation Toolkit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projects. The MATLAB-based software tool is called ORBIT (Operating-Regime-Based modeling and Identi cation, Norway. ORBIT is a MATLAB-based toolkit for black-box and grey-box mod- eling of non-linear dynamic feature of ORBIT, compared for example to the MATLAB Fuzzy Logic Toolbox, is the strong focus

Foss, Bjarne A.

198

Contrasting convective regimes over the Amazon: Implications for cloud electrification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flash rate, lightning yield per unit rainfall) between aerosol-rich October and aerosol-poor November the easterly and westerly wind regimes of the wet season, the lightning yield per unit of rainfall a major continent with minimum aerosol concentration, minimum CAPE, and little if any lightning. INDEX

Daniel, Rosenfeld

199

Thermodynamic control and dynamical regimes in protein folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monte Carlo simulations of a simple lattice model of protein folding show two distinct regimes depending on the chain length. The first regime well describes the folding of small protein sequences and its kinetic counterpart appears to be single exponential in nature, while the second regime is typical of sequences longer than 80 amino acids and the folding performance achievable is sensitive to target conformation. The extent to which stability, as measured by the energy of a sequence in the target, is an essential requirement and affects the folding dynamics of protein molecules in the first regime is investigated. The folding dynamics of sequences whose design stage was restricted to a certain fraction of randomly selected amino acids shows that while some degree of stability is a necessary and sufficient condition for successful folding, designing sequences that provide the lowest energy in the target seems to be a superfluous constraint. By studying the dynamics of under annealed but otherwise freely designed sequences we explore the relation between stability and kinetic accessibility. We find that there is no one-to-one correspondence between having low energy and folding quickly to the target, as only a small fraction of the most stable sequences were also found to fold relatively quickly.

P. F. N. Faisca; R. C. Ball

2001-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Conditional Markov regime switching model applied to economic modelling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Brent oil price) to show that this modelling well identifies both mean reverting and volatility regimes times series data as business cycle, economic growth or unemployment is not new. In his seminal paper [7 to reproduce the different phase of the business cycles and captures the cyclical behavior of the U.S. GDP

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Origins of Pulsing Regime in Cocurrent Packed-Bed Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with surface tension which had been used in previous studies. Consistent with the present experiments the dispersed bubble flow regime, except that pulses form as the flowrates are adjusted to become less severe is the regularization (i.e., stabilization) force. Reexamination of this issue suggests some mechanistic inconsistencies

McCready, Mark J.

202

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

203

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

204

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

205

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

206

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

209

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

Quantum thermodynamic fluctuations of a chaotic Fermi-gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the thermodynamics of a Fermi gas whose single-particle energy levels are given by the complex zeros of the Riemann zeta function. This is a model for a gas, and in particular for an atomic nucleus, with an underlying fully chaotic classical dynamics. The probability distributions of the quantum fluctuations of the grand potential and entropy of the gas are computed as a function of temperature and compared, with good agreement, with general predictions obtained from random matrix theory and periodic orbit theory (based on prime numbers). In each case the universal and non--universal regimes are identified.

P. Leboeuf; A. G. Monastra

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Equilibrium and eigenfunctions estimates in the semiclassical regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We establish eigenfunctions estimates, in the semiclassical regime, for critical energy levels associated to an isolated singularity. For Schroedinger operators, the asymptotic repartition of eigenvectors is the same as in the regular case, excepted in dimension one where a concentration at the critical point occurs. This principle extends to pseudo-differential operators and the limit measure is the Liouville measure as long as the singularity remains integrable.

Camus, Brice [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Mathematik, Universitaetsstr. 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Power Counting Regime of Chiral Extrapolation and Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite-range regularised (FRR) chiral effective field theory is presented in the context of approximation schemes ubiquitous in modern lattice QCD calculations. Using FRR techniques, the power-counting regime (PCR) of chiral perturbation theory can be estimated. To fourth-order in the expansion at the 1% tolerance level, we find m_\\pi < 180 MeV for the PCR, extending only a small distance beyond the physical pion mass.

Derek B. Leinweber; Anthony W. Thomas; Ross D. Young

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

HUGHES, H. GRADY [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

Combustion regimes of particle-laden gaseous flames: influences of radiation, molecular transports, kinetic-quenching, stoichiometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study flat flames propagating steadily in a reactive gaseous premixture which is seeded with an inert solid suspension. Our main assumptions are: (i) the two-reactant, one-step overall reaction we choose as the combustion process has a rate which vanishes at and below a prescribed temperature (Tc) and resumes the Arrhenius form at higher temperatures; (ii) both phases are considered as continua and have the same local speed and temperature; (iii) radiation among the particles follows the Eddington approximation specialized to a grey medium and the attenuation length markedly exceeds the conduction - convection length in the gas; (iv) the activation energy is large. The first regimes we consider comprise a thin flame front (dominated by molecular transports, convection and chemistry) embedded in much thicker radiation - convection zones. Jump conditions across the former are derived analytically and then used as targets in a shooting method to analyse the thickest zones and compute the burning speed (U). Such regimes only exist for equivalence ratios () above a load-dependent critical value which corresponds to a turning point of the U() curve. This turning point is due to radiative heat losses from the thin flame front to the cooler adjacent zones, which lead to extinction. Over restricted, well defined ranges of composition other regimes may also exist, which have monotonic temperature profiles culminating slightly above Tc. When they are too thick to be affected by molecular transports and are thus similar to coal-dust -air flames, their structure, domain of existence and speed are investigated analytically and numerically. The corresponding U() curve exhibits an upper limit equivalence ratio * characterized by an end-point, beyond which such regimes cannot exist. The influence of molecular diffusion is then accounted for and shown to modify the results only slightly.

Rodolphe Blouquin; Guy Joulin; Younès Merhari

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Strong drive compression of a gas-cooled positron plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of rotating electric fields to control plasmas has found numerous applications in the manipulation and storage of antimatter. When used in strong magnetic fields plasma heating caused by the applied field is mitigated by cyclotron cooling, leading to an efficient broadband mode of compression known as the strong drive regime. We have found that it is possible to access the strong drive regime in a low field trap where cyclotron cooling is negligible and a gas is used for cooling, and we have been able to compress positron plasmas to more than 10% of the Brillouin density limit.

Cassidy, D. B.; Mills, A. P. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521-0413 (United States); Greaves, R. G. [First Point Scientific, Inc., 5330 Derry Avenue, Suite J, Agoura Hills, California 91301 (United States); Meligne, V. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521-0413 (United States); First Point Scientific, Inc., 5330 Derry Avenue, Suite J, Agoura Hills, California 91301 (United States)

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

217

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chinaâs Response to the Global IPR Regime: Resistance, Compromise or Compliance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chinaâs behavior towards the intellectual property rights (IPR) regime is a reflection of the tug-of-war between regime and national interest. IPR, a concept foreign to… (more)

Liao, Chia-yueh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced tokamak regimes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

regimes Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced tokamak regimes Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 THE U.S. ADVANCED TOKAMAK FUSION...

220

Justifying power : ruling group dominance and regime justification in multi-ethnic states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current but inconsistent upheaval in the Middle East suggests variations in what will topple regimes, and thus in how regimes have laid the groundwork to remain in power. This thesis examines variation in a social ...

Berman, Deborah Rachel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Supra-bubble regime for laser acceleration of cold electron beams in tenuous plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supra-bubble regime for laser acceleration of cold electron beams in tenuous plasma V. I. Geyko,1 I 2010 Relativistic electrons can be accelerated by an ultraintense laser pulse in the "supra-bubble" regime, that is, in the blow-out regime ahead of the plasma bubble as opposed to the conventional method

222

Spin dynamics in the strong spin-orbit coupling regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 035318 (2011) Spin dynamics in the strong spin-orbit coupling regime Xin Liu,1 Xiong-Jun Liu,1 and Jairo Sinova1,2 1Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242, USA 2Institute of Physics... frequency #2;so take the form: H so = (?1 ? 2?3 cos 2? )kx?y + (?2 + 2?3 cos 2? )ky?x, (5) where ?1 = ? + ?1 and ?2 = ?1 ? ?. 035318-11098-0121/2011/84(3)/035318(8) 2011 American Physical Society XIN LIU, XIONG-JUN LIU, AND JAIRO SINOVA PHYSICAL REVIEW B...

Liu, Xin; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Sinova, Jairo.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

226

Proper design hikes gas-lift system efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proper design of gas-lift pumping systems, used for pumping corrosive or erosive fluids, involves the correct selection of submergence ratio, flow regime, pipe diameter, and physical properties of the fluid. Correlations for maximum lifting efficiency on a friction-free basis vs. submergence ratio have been developed based on experimental data. The Oshinowo and Charles flow map for vertical upward flow has been chosen for determining the two-phase flow regimes. For large-diameter gas-lifting systems, the effects of fluid physical properties on the maximum lifting efficiency become diminished. Gas-lift pumping systems are widely used in the process industry as well as in oil and gas production. In an ethylene dichloride/vinyl chloride monomer (EDC/VCM) plant, quench column bottoms are recirculated back to the column by gas lift of the EDC/VCM stream from the EDC pyrolysis furnace. Gas lift is utilized instead of pumps to alleviate the plugging and erosion problems caused by the presence of coke/tar particulates. Other process applications include those where pumps suffer severe corrosion from the fluids pumped.

Tsai, T.C.

1986-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

THE TWO REGIMES OF PHOTOSPHERIC MOTIONS IN {alpha} HYDRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution spectroscopic observations of {alpha} Hya were acquired between 2003 and 2010. Analysis of line shifts, differential shifts, line widths, and line bisectors points to two regimes of velocity fields in the photosphere of {alpha} Hya: (1) normal granulation embedded in (2) large convection cells. Variations occur on a wide range of timescales, from several years on down. Radial velocity variations, which are irregular and span 786 m s{sup -1}, have a distribution consistent with a true mean rise velocity of the large cells of {approx}725 m s{sup -1} and a dispersion of {approx}220 m s{sup -1}. The distribution of granulation velocities, as measured from the widths of spectral lines, shows only small variations, consistent with the two regime concepts. On the multi-year timescale, radial velocity changes, small temperature variations ({approx}10 K), and small line-width variations ({approx}<0.8%) track each other, possibly with phase shifts. The granulation velocity gradient for {alpha} Hya is about half as large as the Sun's and no variation with time was seen, implying that any variation in velocity gradient from one large cell to the next must be less than a few percent. The asymmetry in the granulation velocity distribution, as specified in the flux deficit, is smaller than expected for {alpha} Hya's position in the HR diagram and appears to be variable.

Gray, David F., E-mail: dfgray@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

MHD stability regimes for steady state and pulsed reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tokamak reactor will operate at the maximum value of {beta}{equivalent_to}2{mu}{sub 0} < p >/B{sup 2} that is compatible with MHD stability. This value depends upon the plasma current and pressure profiles, the plasma shape and aspect ratio, and the location of nearby conducting structures. In addition, a steady state reactor will minimize its external current drive requirements and thus achieve its maximum economic benefit with a bootstrap fraction near one, I{sub bs}/I{sub p} {approximately} 1, which constrains the product of the inverse aspect ratio and the plasma poloidal beta to be near unity, {epsilon} {beta}{sub p} {approximately} 1. An inductively driven pulsed reactor has different constraints set by the steady-state Ohm`s law which relates the plasma temperature and density profiles to the parallel current density. We present the results obtained during the ARIES I, II/IV, and III and the PULSAR reactor studies where these quantities were optimized subject to different design philosophies. The ARIES-II/IV and ARIES-III designs are both in the second stability regime, but differ in requirements on the form of the profiles at the plasma edge, and in the location of the conducting wall. The relation between these, as well as new attractive MHD regimes not utilized in the ARIES or PULSAR studies is also discussed.

Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Pomphrey, N.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

Pregenzer, Arian L. [Senior Scientist, Retired, Sandia National Laboratories, 13013 Arroyo de Vista NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

International low carbon technology transfer: Do intellectual property regimes matter?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Transfer of low carbon technologies to developing countries has been recognized as important in global efforts to limit climate change. Yet the mechanics of international technology transfer, especially around intellectual property rights, have remained a controversial issue in international negotiations. Using a new dataset on international partnerships in China and India in three key low carbon technologies—solar photovoltaics, electric vehicles, and coal gasification/integrated gasification combined cycle—and complementary expert interviews we study the dynamics of the transfer of intellectual property and the underlying drivers that guide the development of business strategies and partnerships in the context of transitioning intellectual property regimes in emerging markets. We find that weak intellectual property regimes are indeed a hindrance to the diffusion of certain classes of low carbon technologies: (i) for cutting-edge technologies, (ii) for fully-embodied (explicitly codified) technologies, and (iii) for small firms. However, we also find that intellectual property issues do not represent a barrier to the diffusion of the relatively mature and low to medium cost low carbon technologies that are materially (at scale) most important for carbon dioxide emissions reduction in the short to medium term. Competitive technology supply, shifting market dynamics, and increasingly vigorous domestic innovation coupled with mechanisms and opportunities to structure credible intellectual property deals allow for the diffusion of key low carbon technologies to occur within the context of existing business, political, and institutional structures.

Varun Rai; Kaye Schultz; Erik Funkhouser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Comment on Energy Level Statistics in the Mixed Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We comment on the recent paper by Abul-Magd (J.Phys.A: Math.Gen. 29 (1996) 1) concerning the energy level statistics in the mixed regime, i.e. such having the mixed classical dynamics where regular and chaotic regions coexist in the phase space. We point out that his basic assumption on the additive property of the level-repulsion function $r(S)$ (conditional probability density) in the sense of dividing it linearly into the regular and chaotic part in proportion to the classical fractional phase space volumes $\\rho_1$ and $\\rho_2=q$ is not justified, since among other things, it relies on the type of Berry's ergodic assumption, which however is right only in a homogeneous ensemble of ergodic systems, but not in the neighbourhood of an integrable system. Thus his resulting distribution cannot be regarded as a theoretically well founded object. We point out that the semiclassical limiting energy level spacing distribution must be of Berry-Robnik (1984) type, and explain what transitional behaviour of the Brody-type (with fractional power-law energy level repulsion) we observe in the near semiclassical regime where effective $\\hbar$ is not yet small enough. Thus we refer to the derivation, arguments and conclusions in our paper (Prosen and Robnik, J.Phys.A: Math.Gen. 26 (1994) 8059), and explain again the behaviour in this double transition region.

Marko Robnik; Tomaz Prosen

1997-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Minimum variance hedging with bivariate regime-switching model for WTI crude oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a four-regime bivariate Markov regime-switching model to estimate the daily time-varying minimum variance hedge ratios for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, and evaluates its in- and out-of-sample hedging performances with two-regime model, CC-GARCH, TVC-GARCH, and OLS models. Empirical results reveal that the four-regime Markov switching model outperforms the other models for both in- and out-of-sample hedging performance. Based on Hansen’s SPA test (2005), the four-regime model significantly outperforms the other models for only in-sample hedging.

Jui-Cheng Hung; Yi-Hsien Wang; Matthew C. Chang; Kuang-Hsun Shih; Hsiu-Hsueh Kao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Numerical Study of Convective Heat Transfer in Flat Tube Heat Exchangers Operating in Self-Sustained Oscillatory Flow Regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laminar, two-dimensional, constant-property numerical simulations of flat tube heat exchanger devices operating in flow regimes in which self-sustained oscillations occur were performed. The unsteady flow regimes were transition flow regimes...

Fullerton, Tracy

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thermogenic and secondary biogenic gases, San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico - Implications for coalbed gas producibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to (1) describe the types and the major components of coalbed gases, (2) evaluate the variability of Fruitland coalbed gas composition across the basin, (3) assess factors affecting coalbed gas origin and composition, (4) determine the timing and extent of gas migration and entrapment, and (5) suggest application of these results to coalbed gas producibility. Data from more than 750 Fruitland coalbed gas wells were used to make gas-composition maps and to evaluate factors controlling gas origin. The gas data were divided into overpressured, underpressured, and transitional categories based on regional pressure regime. Also, [delta][sup 13]C isotopic values from 41 methane, 7 ethane and propane, 13 carbon dioxide, and 10 formation-water bicarbonate samples were evaluated to interpret gas origin. The data suggests that only 25-50% of the gas produced in the high-productivity fairway was generated in situ during coalification. 82 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Ayers, W.B. Jr. (Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

236

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

237

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

238

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

239

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

240

Experimental study of linear and nonlinear regimes of density-driven instabilities induced by CO{sub 2} dissolution in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density driven instabilities produced by CO{sub 2} (gas) dissolution in water containing a color indicator were studied in a Hele Shaw cell. The images were analyzed and instability patterns were characterized by mixing zone temporal evolution, dispersion curves, and the growth rate for different CO{sub 2} pressures and different color indicator concentrations. The results obtained from an exhaustive analysis of experimental data show that this system has a different behaviour in the linear regime of the instabilities (when the growth rate has a linear dependence with time), from the nonlinear regime at longer times. At short times using a color indicator to see the evolution of the pattern, the images show that the effects of both the color indicator and CO{sub 2} pressure are of the same order of magnitude: The growth rates are similar and the wave numbers are in the same range (0–30?cm{sup ?1}) when the system is unstable. Although in the linear regime the dynamics is affected similarly by the presence of the indicator and CO{sub 2} pressure, in the nonlinear regime, the influence of the latter is clearly more pronounced than the effects of the color indicator.

Outeda, R.; D'Onofrio, A. [Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colón 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colón 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); El Hasi, C.; Zalts, A. [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional General Sarmiento, J. M. Gutiérrez 1150, B1613GSX, Los Polvorines, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional General Sarmiento, J. M. Gutiérrez 1150, B1613GSX, Los Polvorines, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nondestructive imaging of an ultracold lattice gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the nondestructive imaging of a lattice gas of ultracold bosons. Atomic fluorescence is induced in the simultaneous presence of degenerate Raman sideband cooling. The combined influence of these processes controllably cycles an atom between a dark state and a fluorescing state while eliminating heating and loss. Through spatially resolved sideband spectroscopy following the imaging sequence, we demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging technique in various regimes of lattice depth and fluorescence acquisition rate. Our work provides an important extension of quantum gas imaging to the nondestructive detection, control and manipulation of atoms in optical lattices. In addition, our technique can also be extended to atomic species that are less amenable to molasses-based lattice imaging.

Y. S. Patil; L. M. Aycock; S. Chakram; M. Vengalattore

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

PROJECTIONS OF POTENTIAL FLOOD REGIME CHANGES IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to benefit California's electricity and natural gas ratepayers. The PIER Program strives to conduct the most on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy-Related Environmental Research · Energy Systems Integration · Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation · Industrial

243

Magnetic reconnection with radiative cooling. I. Optically thin regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic reconnection processes in many high-energy-density astrophysical and laboratory plasma systems are significantly affected by radiation; hence traditional, nonradiative reconnection models are not applicable to these systems. Motivated by this observation, the present paper develops a Sweet-Parker-like theory of resistive magnetic reconnection with strong radiative cooling. It is found that, in the case with zero guide field, intense radiative cooling leads to a strong plasma compression, resulting in a higher reconnection rate. The compression ratio and the reconnection layer temperature are determined by the balance between ohmic heating and radiative cooling. The lower temperature in a radiatively cooled layer leads to a higher Spitzer resistivity and, hence, a higher reconnection rate. Several specific radiative processes (bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and inverse Compton) in the optically thin regime are considered for both the zero- and strong-guide-field cases, and concrete expressions for the reconnection parameters are derived, along with the applicability conditions.

Uzdensky, Dmitri A. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, UCB-390, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); McKinney, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4060 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

247

Gas-chromatographic analysis of straight-run gasolines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed for the gas chromatographic determination of the individual hydrocarbons in a wide fraction of straight-run gasoline, using a simple chromatograph equipped with two capillary columns coated with stationary phases of differing polarity in conjunction with a system for the automated treatment of the data. About 150 hydrocarbons present in straight-run gasolines were identified; their retention indices were calculated for a linear temperature programmed regime.

Kvasova, V.A.; Leont'eva, S.A.; Grinberg, A.A.; Rabinovich, A.B.; Shurygina, N.N.

1986-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lattice Boltzmann models for nonequilibrium gas flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to its computational efficiency, the kinetic-based lattice Boltzmann method has recently been used to model nonequilibrium gas dynamics. With appropriate boundary conditions, lattice Boltzmann models have been able to capture both velocity slip and temperature jump at a solid surface. To enable these models to simulate flows in the transition regime, both high-order and modified lattice Boltzmann models have been proposed. In this paper, we demonstrate the advantages of the standard lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model in predicting high-order rarefaction phenomenon. In addition, we show that current high-order lattice Boltzmann models are not yet able to capture the nonlinear constitutive relation for the stress in the Knudsen layer, despite the improved predictions of the wall slip-velocity, especially for Poiseuille flow. By considering how the wall affects the gas mean free path, we present a simplified high-order lattice Boltzmann model that can predict flow in the transition regime and is also able to capture the essential characteristics of the Knudsen layer.

Gui-Hua Tang; Yong-Hao Zhang; David R. Emerson

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

250

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Authors R. G. Allis, Stuart D. Johnson, Gregory D. Nash and Dick Benoit Published Journal TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Citation R. G. Allis,Stuart D. Johnson,Gregory D. Nash,Dick Benoit. 1999. A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field. TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL. 23:493-498. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_model_for_the_shallow_thermal_regime_at_Dixie_Valley_geothermal_field&oldid=682587"

251

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

252

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

253

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

254

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

255

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

256

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

257

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

258

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

259

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

260

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

262

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

263

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

264

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

265

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

266

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

267

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

268

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, coal supplies over 55% of the electricity consumed in the United States and will continue to do so well into the next century. One of the technologies being developed for advanced electric power generation is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system that converts coal to a combustible gas, cleans the gas of pollutants, and combusts the gas in a gas turbine to generate electricity. The hot exhaust from the gas turbine is used to produce steam to generate more electricity from a steam turbine cycle. The utilization of advanced hot-gas particulate and sulfur control technologies together with the combined power generation cycles make IGCC one of the cleanest and most efficient ways available to generate electric power from coal. One of the strategic objectives for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) IGCC research and development program is to develop and demonstrate advanced gasifiers and second-generation IGCC systems. Another objective is to develop advanced hot-gas cleanup and trace contaminant control technologies. One of the more recent gasification concepts to be investigated is that of the transport reactor gasifier, which functions as a circulating fluid-bed gasifier while operating in the pneumatic transport regime of solid particle flow. This gasifier concept provides excellent solid-gas contacting of relatively small particles to promote high gasification rates and also provides the highest coal throughput per unit cross-sectional area of any other gasifier, thereby reducing capital cost of the gasification island.

Swanson, M.L.; Hajicek, D.R.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

269

Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Comparison of regime-dependent capacities of wind-driven power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operational regimes of wind-driven power plants developed in Russia are analyzed taking into account the aerodynamic characteristics of the wind wheel.

R. S. Tsgoev

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Can sustainable development be facilitated through regime-based preventative technology transfer?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This International Relations study examines the relationship between sustainable development and preventative technology transfer. Specifically, the focus is on whether preventative environmental regimes (facilitating organisations)… (more)

Valentin, Jorg D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Alliance risk tolerance and regime type: determinants of alliance textual commitments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis explores the relationship between state regime type and observations of risk in alliance textual commitments between 1950 and 1992 (most of the Cold… (more)

Shelton, Allison Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Hybrid Planar FEM in Magnetoresonance Regime: Control of Dynamical Chaos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We establish the influence of nonlinear electron dynamics in the magnetostatic field of a hybrid planar free-electron maser on its gain and interaction efficiency. Even for the `ideal' undulator magnetic field the presence of uniform longitudinal (guide) magnetic field potentially leads to the existence of chaotic zone around certain (magnetoresonant) value of the guide magnetic field. The width of the chaotic zone is given by the Chirikov resonance-overlap criterion applied to the normal undulator and cyclotron frequencies with respect to the coupling induced by the undulator magnetic field. Using analytical asymptotically exact solutions for trajectories of individual test electrons, we show that the magnetoresonant multiplier in electron trajectories is also present in the expression for the gain. The same Chirikov resonance-overlap criterion allows us to estimate analytically the maximal magnetoresonant gain of a hybrid planar free-electron maser showing that, in spite of the well-known drop in the gain for the exact magnetoresonance, the operation regime in the zone of regular dynamics slightly above the magnetoresonant value of the guide magnetic field is the preferable one.

Vitaliy A. Goryashko; Kostyantyn Ilyenko; Anatoliy Opanasenko

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}

Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, 1066 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Smithe, D. N. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Scaling properties of the gravitational clustering in the nonlinear regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growth of density perturbations in an expanding universe in the non-linear regime is investigated. The underlying equations of motion are cast in a suggestive form, and motivate a conjecture that the scaled pair velocity, $h(a,x)\\equiv -[v/(\\dot{a}x)]$ depends on the expansion factor $a$ and comoving coordinate $x$ only through the density contrast $\\sigma(a,x)$. This leads to the result that the true, non-linear, density contrast $^{1/2}=\\sigma(a,x)$ is a universal function of the density contrast $\\sigma_L(a,l)$, computed in the linear theory and evaluated at a scale $l$ where $l=x(1+\\sigma^2)^{1/3}$. This universality is supported by existing numerical simulations with scale-invariant initial conditions having different power laws. We discuss a physically motivated ansatz $h(a,x)=h[\\sigma^2(a,x)]$ and use it to compute the non-linear density contrast at any given scale analytically. This provides a promising method for analysing the non-linear evolution of density perturbations in the universe and for interpreting numerical simulations.

R. Nityananda; T. Padmanabhan

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

279

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

280

Preliminary analysis of fission gas behavior and fuel response during an LMFBR operational transient  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary presents results obtained from a preliminary analysis of gas behavior and oxide fuel response during an LMFBR operational transient. The DiMelfi and Deitrich model is extrapolated to operational transient regimes to delineate brittle versus ductile fuel response modes. All pertinent parameters necessary for application of the DiMelfi and Deitrich model were obtained from the LIFE-3 code.

Liu, Y.Y.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The problem of the burning of an electric arc in a stream of gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A one-dimensional heat-conduction equation is analyzed for the positive column of an arc discharge in a lateral gas flow (V?J). Two discharge burning regimes are found for the same parameters (E and V). The cr...

V. L. Goryachev; A. D. Lebedev

1967-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Characterization of Gas?Liquid Flows in Stirred Vessels Using Pressure and Torque Fluctuations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas?liquid flows in a stirred vessel exhibit different flow regimes and demonstrate complex interaction of transport processes with varying spatio-temporal scales. The knowledge of key space and time scales of fluid dynamics is important for designing and ...

A. R. Khopkar; S. S. Panaskar; A. B. Pandit; V. V. Ranade

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Inner-shell excitation of gas phase carbonates and a,c-dicarbonyl compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlation of the C 1s ! p� C@O transition energy and the relative oxidation at the carbonyl car- bon and dimethyldicarbonate ­ have been recorded in the gas phase with inner shell electron energy loss spectroscopy in the scattering regime dominated by electric dipole transitions. All spectra are presented on absolute oscillator

Hitchcock, Adam P.

284

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

285

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

286

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

287

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

293

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

294

Natural Gas in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a recent meeting of the Institution of Gas Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe ... Engineers, Sir Harold Smith, chairman ofthe Gas Council, stated that an intensive, large-scale search for ...

1953-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

295

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

296

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage rack, a wall mounted cylinder rack, anchored to a fixed bench top, vented gas cabinet, or other

299

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

300

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Residual gas analysis device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Natural Gas Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

304

Fuel: Bargain Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council has done well to agree on low prices for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The ... for North Sea Gas with the Shell and Esso companies. The price finally agreed is both much less than the two companies wanted and much less than ...

1968-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gas Cylinders: Proper Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

306

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

307

Static gas expansion cooler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

309

A diffusion-controlled regime of cylindrical inductive discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fluid-plasma model of diffusion-controlled cylindrical inductive discharges in an argon gas is presented. The plasma-field structure of the discharge obtained is completed by the interrelated behaviour of concentrations of charged particles, electron temperature, power absorbed on average by an electron, radial distribution of the components of the high-frequency field, of the Joule heating and of the high-frequency current density in the plasma. The self-consistency of the model and its validity over a wide pressure range (p = (0.05–5)?Torr) is reached by involving detailed treatment of the electron energy balance, of the nonlinear processes in the charged particle balance and of the momentum equations. By accounting for the velocity dependence of the elastic electron–neutral collision frequency, concepts from the kinetic plasma theory are introduced in a fluid-plasma description of the discharge. The analysis of the results is in terms of changing gas pressure, power and frequency of the maintenance field. The changes of the parameters of the external coil due to the plasma loading in the coil are also discussed.

St Kolev; H Schlüter; A Shivarova; Kh Tarnev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

eLISA: Astrophysics and cosmology in the millihertz regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document introduces the exciting and fundamentally new science and astronomy that the European New Gravitational Wave Observatory (NGO) mission (derived from the previous LISA proposal) will deliver. The mission (which we will refer to by its informal name "eLISA") will survey for the first time the low-frequency gravitational wave band (about 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), with sufficient sensitivity to detect interesting individual astrophysical sources out to z = 15. The eLISA mission will discover and study a variety of cosmic events and systems with high sensitivity: coalescences of massive black holes binaries, brought together by galaxy mergers; mergers of earlier, less-massive black holes during the epoch of hierarchical galaxy and black-hole growth; stellar-mass black holes and compact stars in orbits just skimming the horizons of massive black holes in galactic nuclei of the present era; extremely compact white dwarf binaries in our Galaxy, a rich source of information about binary evolution and about future Type Ia supernovae; and possibly most interesting of all, the uncertain and unpredicted sources, for example relics of inflation and of the symmetry-breaking epoch directly after the Big Bang. eLISA's measurements will allow detailed studies of these signals with high signal-to-noise ratio, addressing most of the key scientific questions raised by ESA's Cosmic Vision programme in the areas of astrophysics and cosmology. They will also provide stringent tests of general relativity in the strong-field dynamical regime, which cannot be probed in any other way. This document not only describes the science but also gives an overview on the mission design and orbits.

Pau Amaro-Seoane; Sofiane Aoudia; Stanislav Babak; Pierre Binétruy; Emanuele Berti; Alejandro Bohé; Chiara Caprini; Monica Colpi; Neil J. Cornish; Karsten Danzmann; Jean-François Dufaux; Jonathan Gair; Oliver Jennrich; Philippe Jetzer; Antoine Klein; Ryan N. Lang; Alberto Lobo; Tyson Littenberg; Sean T. McWilliams; Gijs Nelemans; Antoine Petiteau; Edward K. Porter; Bernard F. Schutz; Alberto Sesana; Robin Stebbins; Tim Sumner; Michele Vallisneri; Stefano Vitale; Marta Volonteri; Henry Ward

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

311

Geothermal regimes of the Clearlake region, northern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first commercial production of power from geothermal energy, at The Geysers steamfield in northern California in June 1960, was a triumph for the geothermal exploration industry. Before and since, there has been a search for further sources of commercial geothermal power in The Geysers--Clear Lake geothermal area surrounding The Geysers. As with all exploration programs, these were driven by models. The models in this case were of geothermal regimes, that is, the geometric distribution of temperature and permeability at depth, and estimates of the physical conditions in subsurface fluids. Studies in microseismicity and heat flow, did yield geophysical information relevant to active geothermal systems. Studies in stable-element geochemistry found hiatuses or divides at the Stoney Creek Fault and at the Collayomi Fault. In the region between the two faults, early speculation as to the presence of steamfields was disproved from the geochemical data, and the potential existence of hot-water systems was predicted. Studies in isotope geochemistry found the region was characterized by an isotope mixing trend. The combined geochemical data have negative implications for the existence of extensive hydrothermal systems and imply that fluids of deep origin are confined to small, localized systems adjacent to faults that act as conduits. There are also shallow hot-water aquifers. Outside fault-localized systems and hot-water aquifers, the area is an expanse of impermeable rock. The extraction of energy from the impermeable rock will require the development and application of new methods of reservoir creation and heat extraction such as hot dry rock technology.

Amador, M. [ed.; Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

VONEX: A Novel Approach to Establishing Open Virtual Money Exchange Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VONEX: A Novel Approach to Establishing Open Virtual Money Exchange Regime Angelina Chow Department Establishing an open virtual money exchange regime is a novel idea but rarely discussed. This paper provides a pioneer research on virtual money exchange (VONEX) approach, aiming to facilitate the exchange of virtual

Guo, Jingzhi

313

Detonation loading of tubes in the modified shear wave speed regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detonation loading of tubes in the modified shear wave speed regime T. Chao and J. E. Shepherd detonation loading in the modified shear wave speed regime. Strain gauges were used to determine the time and numerical simulations with explicit finite element computation treating the detonation as a traveling load

314

Nine Regimes of Radio Spectrum Management: A 4-Step Decision Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nine Regimes of Radio Spectrum Management: A 4-Step Decision Guide Gérard POGOREL Ecole Nationale N°65 April 2007 Summary Diverse radio spectrum management regimes are defined according to 4 levels in the next decade. The generally accepted view is that this will provoke an increased need for radio spectrum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Marine ecosystem regime shifts: challenges and opportunities for ecosystem-based management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National...and Fisheries Science, Center for...regime shifts in management clearly requires...management (EBM) approaches. EBM has emerged...regime-shift management to IEA steps...methodological approaches (bottom grey...transitions. Science 338, 344-348...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Spatial and temporal variation of re regimes in a mixed conifer forest landscape, Southern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial and temporal variation of ®re regimes in a mixed conifer forest landscape, Southern mosaic of a mixed conifer forest landscape by testing the hypothesis that pre-®re suppression ®re regime as that for FRI. Fires in CCRNA mixed conifer forests occurred mainly (90%) in the dormant season. Size of burns

Taylor, Alan

317

Forest Management Regime and Species choice options in a changing environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Management Regime and Species choice ­ options in a changing environment Bill Mason, Forest.mason@forestry.gsi.gov.uk May 18 2010 #12;2 Talk Structure 1. Introduction; 2. Species 3. Forest types; 4. Management regime; 5 in 2050. #12;10 Alternative species? [Read report Table 9.1] Broadleaf species Conifer species Acer

318

Rapidly Sheared Compressible Turbulence: Characterization of Different Pressure Regimes and Effect of Thermodynamic Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:(i) characterization of the multi-stage flow behavior,(ii) changing role of pressure in the three-regime evolution and (iii) influence of thermodynamic fluctuations on the different regimes. Preliminary investigations utilizing the more accurate Favre-averaged RDT...

Bertsch, Rebecca Lynne

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime-Switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at a wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime. Geographically dispersed was applied to 2-hour-ahead forecasts of hourly average wind speed near the Stateline wind energy center

Genton, Marc G.

320

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

322

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

323

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

324

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

325

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

326

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

327

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

328

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

329

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

330

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

331

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

332

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

333

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

334

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

335

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

336

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

337

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

338

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

339

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

340

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

342

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

343

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

344

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

345

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

346

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

347

Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/500102034.pdf Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime Screenshot References: Low-Carbon Technology Cooperation in the Climate Regime[1] Abstract "Low-carbon technology cooperation for climate change is needed to address the challenge of scaling up development and transfer of low-carbon technology, with the ultimate aim to reduce emissions globally. This was

348

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE The adoption of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Compensation Convention) opens a new chapter in international nuclear liability law. The Compensation Convention provides the world community with the opportunity to deal with legal liability and compensation for nuclear damage through a global regime that includes all countries that operate nuclear powerplants (nuclear power generating countries) and most countries that do not operate nuclear powerplants (nonnuclear power generating countries). Such a global regime can remove

349

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

350

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

351

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

353

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

354

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electron source and acceleration regime of a picosecond electron beam in a gas-filled diode with inhomogeneous field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is experimentally demonstrated that, upon the application of a subnanosecond high-voltage pulse to the gap of a diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure, a bunch of runaway electrons is formed in a sha...

G. A. Mesyats; V. G. Shpak; S. A. Shunailov; M. I. Yalandin

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming is one of the most active areas of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in the western United States. This resource provides clean energy but raises environmental concerns. Primary among these is the disposal of water that is co-produced with the gas during depressurization of the coal seam. Beginning with a few producing wells in Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) in 1987, CBNG well numbers in this area increased to over 13,600 in 2004, with projected growth to 20,900 producing wells in the PRB by 2010. CBNG development is continuing apace since 2004, and CBNG is now being produced or evaluated in four other Wyoming coal basins in addition to the PRB, with roughly 3500-4000 new CBNG wells permitted statewide each year since 2004. This is clearly a very valuable source of clean fuel for the nation, and for Wyoming the economic benefits are substantial. For instance, in 2003 alone the total value of Wyoming CBNG production was about $1.5 billion, with tax and royalty income of about $90 million to counties, $140 million to the state, and $27 million to the federal government. In Wyoming, cumulative CBNG water production from 1987 through December 2004 was just over 380,000 acre-feet (2.9 billion barrels), while producing almost 1.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of CBNG gas statewide. Annual Wyoming CBNG water production in 2003 was 74,457 acre-feet (577 million barrels). Total production of CBNG water across all Wyoming coal fields could total roughly 7 million acre-feet (55.5 billion barrels), if all of the recoverable CBNG in the projected reserves of 31.7 tcf were produced over the coming decades. Pumping water from coals to produce CBNG has been designated a beneficial water use by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office (SEO), though recently the SEO has limited this beneficial use designation by requiring a certain gas/water production ratio. In the eastern part of the PRB where CBNG water is generally of good quality, most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination of trace elements from CBNG disposal ponds; (4) use of environmental tracers in assessing wate

William Ruckelshaus

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

358

Crossover from 2D to 3D in a Weakly Interacting Fermi Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the transition from two to three dimensions in a low temperature weakly interacting Li6 Fermi gas. Below a critical atom number N2D only the lowest transverse vibrational state of a highly anisotropic oblate trapping potential is occupied and the gas is two dimensional. Above N2D the Fermi gas enters the quasi-2D regime where shell structure associated with the filling of individual transverse oscillator states is apparent. This dimensional crossover is demonstrated through measurements of the cloud size and aspect ratio versus atom number.

P. Dyke; E. D. Kuhnle; S. Whitlock; H. Hu; M. Mark; S. Hoinka; M. Lingham; P. Hannaford; C. J. Vale

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

360

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Refinery Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

362

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

363

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

364

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

365

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

366

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

367

Developing economies in the current climate regime; New prospects for resilienceDeveloping economies in the current climate regime; New prospects for resilienceDeveloping economies in the current climate regime; New prospects for resilienceDeveloping econ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ with reference to their GHG emissions and national energy profiles (calculation from Enerdata source and IEA offers a review of the current position of developing countries in the climate regime and international will place emphasis on changes in national policies to accommodate CDM projects, focussing on the scope

Boyer, Edmond

368

Gas lasers with wave-chaotic resonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semiclassical multimode laser theory is extended to gas lasers with open two-dimensional resonators of arbitrary shape. The Doppler frequency shift of the linear-gain coefficient leads to an additional linear coupling between the modes, which, however, is shown to be negligible. The nonlinear laser equations simplify in the special case of wave-chaotic resonators. In the single-mode regime, the intensity of a chaotic laser, as a function of the mode frequency, displays a local minimum at the frequency of the atomic transition. The width of the minimum scales with the inhomogeneous linewidth, in contrast to the Lamb dip in uniaxial resonators whose width is given by the homogeneous linewidth.

Oleg Zaitsev

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

370

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

371

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Gas shielding apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

Brandt, D.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Gas Filter Testing Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas filtration of air in the cleanroom is carried out with HEPA (high- ... filter. The ambient air filters for the cleanroom are relatively fragile and require great care...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

376

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

377

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

378

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

379

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

380

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",1,"Annual",2013,"6302012" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

382

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

383

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

384

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

385

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

386

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

387

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

388

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

389

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

390

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

391

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

392

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

393

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

394

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

395

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2013,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

396

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

397

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

398

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

399

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

400

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

402

Unconventional Natural Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(NETL) Anthony Zammerilli General Engineer Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Robert C. Murray, Thomas Davis, and James...

403

Oil and Gas Outlook  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Outlook For Independent Petroleum Association of America November 13, 2014 | Palm Beach, FL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Recent...

404

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ammonia synthesis gas purification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes the purification of a reformed gas mixture following water gas shift conversion to produce a purified ammonia synthesis gas stream. The improved processing sequence consisting essentially of: (A) Selectively catalytically oxidizing the residual carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to carbon dioxide so as to reduce the carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to less than about 20 ppm, the selective catalytic oxidation being carried out with an excess of air, with the excess oxygen being catalytically reacted with a small amount of hydrogen so that the residual oxygen level is reduced to less than about 3 ppm; (B) removing the bulk of the carbon dioxide content of the gas mixture by liquid absorption; (C) Removing residual amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water by selective adsorption on the fixed beds of a thermal swing adsorption system, a dry, purified ammonia ammonia synthesis gas stream containing less than a total of 10 ppm of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide being recovered from the thermal swing adsorption system; (D) Passing the resulting dry, purified ammonia synthesis gas stream having a low content of methane to an ammonia production operation without intermediate passage of the ammonia synthesis gas stream to a methanation unit or to a cryogenic unit for removal of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide therefrom; whereby the efficiency of the overall purification operation and the effective utilization of hydrogen are enhanced.

Fuderer, A.

1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312014"...

407

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data collected on Form EIA-914 (Monthly Natural Gas Production Report) for Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Other States...

408

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

409

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

force majeure declared December 17 at its Totem storage field, Colorado Interstate Gas Pipeline (CIG) reported that it anticipates repair work to be complete around February 12,...

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imbalances. Northern Natural Gas Company declared a force majeure after an unplanned repair issue at the Spearman Compressor Station in Ochiltree County, Texas, on Friday,...

412

String Gas Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

G. L. Alberghi

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

Home Safety: Radon Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Interstate Gas Company (CIG) declared force majeure as a result of an unforeseen mechanical outage at the Morton compressor station in Colorado on pipeline segment 118....

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Columbia Gas Transmission, LLC on March 16 began planned maintenance on its pipeline in Green County, Pennsylvania. The maintenance will reduce capacity at an interconnect...

416

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

NETL: Oil & Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources...

419

Barriers to the development of China's shale gas industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shale gas has become a promising onshore energy prospect in China. As much as the country aspires for greater energy independence through the use of its shale gas reserves, this process is slowed down by the combined weight of relative inexperience, lack of technology, geographical complexity, a hostile economic environment, a disincentive pipeline regime, and a complex land ownership system. To foster a better understanding of the current circumstances of the country's shale gas sector, a panel of scholars and experts shared their perspectives and insider knowledge on China's shale gas industry. It was found that some of the country's man-made institutional barriers are factors that have been hindering shale gas development in China, in addition to natural conditions such as water concerns and the complex geography of shale fields. Resolving this situation necessitates breaking the monopoly that major state-owned oil companies have over high-quality shale gas resources, opening pipeline network access, providing geological data, developing the domestic oil service market, creating conditions for fair competition between service providers, and improving the water management system.

Zheng Wan; Tao Huang; Brian Craig

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

422

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

423

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

424

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

425

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

426

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

427

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

428

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

429

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

430

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

431

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

432

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

433

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

434

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

435

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

436

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

437

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

438

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

439

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (Replacement): $200 Dryer (Replacement): $100 Natural Gas Range/Cooktop (Replacement): $100 Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Tankless Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Provider Alabama Gas Corporation Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment. All equipment

440

Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Obvious surface manifestations of an anomalous concentration of geothermal energy at the Coso Geothermal Area, California, include fumarolic activity, active hot springs, and associated hydrothermally altered rocks. Abundant Pleistocene volcanic rocks, including a cluster of thirty-seven rhyolite domes, occupy a north-trending structural and topographic ridge near the center of an oval-shaped zone of late Cenozoic ring faulting. In an investigation of the thermal regime of the geothermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? Â… An ISCCP Perspective  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

442

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This study was conducted to understand how to increase engine efficiency by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while maintaining engine durability.

443

Computer simulation of optimal functioning regimes with minimum fuel consumption for automotives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with computer simulation that allows the calculus of operating regimes with minimum fuel consumption for road vehicles, using engine’s mechanical characteristics for power and consumption, charact...

Salvadore Mugurel Burciu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Hidden Markov Model Perspective on Regimes and Metastability in Atmospheric Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, data from three atmospheric models are analyzed to investigate the existence of atmospheric flow regimes despite nearly Gaussian statistics of the planetary waves in these models. A hierarchy of models is used, which describes the ...

Christian Franzke; Daan Crommelin; Alexander Fischer; Andrew J. Majda

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

On the Source of Midlatitude Low-Frequency Variability. Part II: Nonlinear Equilibration of Weather Regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new statistical-dynamical approach to the concept of weather regimes, including the effect of tralisients, without any assumption other than scale separation. The method is applied to a quasi-geostrophic channel model without ...

Robert Vautard; Bernard Legras

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The transition zone between the oceanic and shelf regimes around Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To better understand and describe the Antarctic Slope Front at the Antarctic continental slope, the water masses near Antarctica are examined and their spatial distributions are described. Antarctic Surface Water over the Antarctic shelf regime...

Kim, Seong-Joong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

Modelling long-term fire regimes of southern California Seth H. PetersonA,F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the response of three fire regime metrics (fire size distributions, fire return interval maps, cumulative total the spatiotemporal pattern of ignitions, fuels, weather and topography, and describes the size, spatial pattern

Carlson, Jean

448

The effect of regimes and methods of glass forming on the tin content in float glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the tin content in glass is derived as a function of the iron oxidecontent in the glass composition, regimes and methods of forming, ... The ways of reducing the tin content in glass in the cour...

V. I. Kondrashov; V. S. Bezlyudnaya; Yu. V. Zverev

449

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

450

GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 GasTIPS 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 · GasTIPS 5 T he prediction of reservoir parameters such as gas or oil, but is particularly challenging in the case of gas exploration. Current seismic imaging technol- ogy cannot accurately discriminate between economic and non-eco- nomic concentrations of gas. This is primarily because

Rubin, Yoram

451

Population dynamical behavior of Lotka-Volterra system under regime switching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate a Lotka-Volterra system under regime switching dx(t)=diag(x"1(t),...,x"n(t))[(b(r(t))+A(r(t))x(t))dt+@s(r(t))dB(t)], where B(t) is a standard Brownian motion. The aim here is to find out what happens under regime switching. ... Keywords: 34F05, 60H10, 92B05, Brownian motion, Generalized Itô's formula, Markov chain, Stochastic differential equation, Stochastic permanence

Xiaoyue Li; Daqing Jiang; Xuerong Mao

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Lessons from post-war Iraq for the international full-scope safeguards regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery after the Gulf War of the extensive Iraqi nuclear weapon program severely shook public confidence in the nuclear non-proliferation regime in general, and the safeguards program of the IAEA under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, in particular. Iraq provided the justification for evaluating the safeguards regime under new political circumstances, so that appropriate corrective measures could be taken when necessary. It is now up to the individual states within the international system to take advantage of this opportunity.

Scheinman, L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Tree performance and soil moisture relationships on reclaimed mine sites utilizing three topsoiling regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TREE PERFORMANCE AND SOIL MOISTURE RELATIONSHIPS ON RECLAIMED MINE SITES UTILIZING THREE TOPSOILING REGIMES A Thesis by NESLIHAN MUTIA BILIR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Forestry TREE PERFORMANCE AND SOIL MOISTURE RELATIONSHIPS ON RECLAIMED MINE SITES UTILIZING THREE TOPSOILING REGIMES A Thesis by NESLIHAN MUTIA BILIR Approved as to style and content by...

Bilir, Neslihan Mutia

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

455

The Gas Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the total output of towns' gas in Great Britain, distributes annually approximately as much energy as the whole of the electrical undertakings in the country. The industry has reason ... any actual thermal process, and the operations of the gas industry are not outside the ambit of the second law of thermodynamics, high though the efficiency of the carbonising process ...

J. S. G. THOMAS

1924-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S3","N3050KS3","N3010KS3","N3020KS3","N3035KS3","NA1570SKS3","N3045KS3" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline...

457

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050WY3","N3010WY3","N3020WY3","N3035WY3","NA1570SWY3","N3045WY3" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Natural Gas...

458

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MT3","N3010MT3","N3020MT3","N3035MT3","NA1570SMT3","N3045MT3" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports...

459

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","NA1570SOK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Natural Gas...

460

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","NA1570SMI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

,"Vermont Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","NA1480SVT3","N3050VT3","N3010VT3","N3020VT3","N3035VT3","N3045VT3" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline...

462

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050FL3","N3010FL3","N3020FL3","N3035FL3","NA1570SFL3","N3045FL3" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Florida Natural Gas...

463

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","NA1570SKY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Natural Gas...

464

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SOH3","N3050OH3","N3010OH3","N3020OH3","N3035OH3","NA1570SOH3","N3045OH3" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline...

465

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SUT3","N3050UT3","N3010UT3","N3020UT3","N3035UT3","NA1570SUT3","N3045UT3" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Utah Natural Gas Pipeline...

466

Shale Gas 101  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webpage has been developed to answer the many questions that people have about shale gas and hydraulic fracturing (or fracking). The information provided below explains the basics, including what shale gas is, where it’s found, why it’s important, how it’s produced, and challenges associated with production.

467

EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION (EGR) COOLER TESTING Southwest Research Institute® #12;overnment environmental regulations for diesel engine emissions are becoming increas- ingly stringent, and are driving) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). The use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers is considered

Chapman, Clark R.

468

Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In order to help modernize the nation’s natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions through common-sense standards, smart investments, and innovative research to advance the state of the art in natural gas system performance, the Department of Energy has launched several new initiatives and enhanced existing programs.

469

VALUING FLARED NATURAL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LAST YEAR , enough natural gas to supply 27% of U.S. needs was burned off as waste around the world, according to a new report by the World Bank. Flared natural gas is a by-product of petroleum production and is not generally considered worth capture and ...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

Modern Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE published information on gas turbines is both voluminous and widely dispersed, a considerable part of the technical literature of ... hands of students whose imagination has been fired by the rapid development of the gas turbine, and whose knowledge of thermodynamics may not be sufficient to detect such errors. There ...

E. G. STERLAND

1948-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

The gas surge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...S. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION SINCE 2007 40...TOTAL U.S. PRODUCTION 47—PERCENT INCREASE IN U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATED USING...dusty gas drilling site in southwestern Kansas to try an experiment...40% of U.S. production, up from less...

David Malakoff

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

472

Landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas recovery ... However, by referring to landfills as dumps, the article creates a misimpression. ... The answers revolve around the relative emissions from composting facilities and landfills and the degree to which either finished compost or landfill gas is used beneficially. ...

Morton A. Barlaz

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

473

Regimes of nonlinear depletion and regularity in the 3D Navier-Stokes equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The periodic $3D$ Navier-Stokes equations are analyzed in terms of dimensionless, scaled, $L^{2m}$-norms of vorticity $D_{m}$ ($1 \\leq m < \\infty$). The first in this hierarchy, $D_{1}$, is the global enstrophy. Three regimes naturally occur in the $D_{1}-D_{m}$ plane. Solutions in the first regime, which lie between two concave curves, are shown to be regular, owing to strong nonlinear depletion. Moreover, numerical experiments have suggested, so far, that all dynamics lie in this heavily depleted regime \\cite{DGGKPV13}\\,; new numerical evidence for this is presented. Estimates for the dimension of a global attractor and a corresponding inertial range are given for this regime. However, two more regimes can theoretically exist. In the second, which lies between the upper concave curve and a line, the depletion is insufficient to regularize solutions, so no more than Leray's weak solutions exist. In the third, which lies above this line, solutions are regular, but correspond to extreme initial conditions. The paper ends with a discussion on the possibility of transition between these regimes.

John D. Gibbon; Diego A. Donzis; Anupam Gupta; Robert M. Kerr; Rahul Pandit; Dario Vincenzi

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

474

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

475

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

477

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

478

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

479

Renewable Natural Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

480

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas royalty regime" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Beam-Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

483

Supersonic gas compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

484

Cryogenic treatment of gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

485

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose an integrated study method for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. This method combines analyses of geology, seismology, and geochemistry. First, geological analysis is made using data of material sources, structures, sediments, and geothermal regimes to determine the hydrocarbon-formation conditions of gas hydrate in marine areas. Then analyses of seismic attributes,such as BSR, AVO, and BZ as well as forward modeling are conducted to predict the potential

486

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

487

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

488

Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1990 39,062 39,062...

489

Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 40 37 39 38 37 36 35...

490

California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

491

Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

492

Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

493

Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

494

Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

495

Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

496

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

497

What is shale gas? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

What is shale gas? What is shale gas? What is shale gas? More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary How is shale gas produced?...

498

Dark Energy - Dark Matter Unification: Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the main features of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) proposal for unification of dark energy and dark matter and discuss how it admits an unique decomposition into dark energy and dark matter components once phantom-like dark energy is excluded. In the context of this approach we consider structure formation and show that unphysical oscillations or blow-up in the matter power spectrum are not present. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dominance of dark energy occurs about the time when energy density fluctuations start evolving away from the linear regime.

Orfeu Bertolami

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

499

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

500

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...