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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

2

Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Feasibility of Natural Gas as a Fuel Source for Modern Land-Based Drilling Rigs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of replacing diesel with natural gas as a fuel source for modern drilling rigs. More specifically, this thesis (1) establishes a control baseline by examining operational characteristics (response, fuel usage, and cost) of an existing diesel-powered land rig during the drilling of a well in the Haynesville Shale; (2) estimates operational characteristics of a natural gas engine under identical conditions; and (3) draws a comparison between diesel and natural gas engines, determining the advantages and disadvantages of those fuel sources in drilling applications. Results suggest that diesel engines respond to transient loads very effectively because of their inherently higher torque, especially when compared with natural gas engines of a similar power rating. Regarding fuel consumption, the engines running on diesel for this study were more efficient than on natural gas. On a per-Btu basis, the natural gas engines consumed nearly twice as much energy in drilling the same well. However, because of the low price of natural gas, the total cost of fuel to drill the well was lowered by approximately 54%, or 37,000 USD. Based on the results, it is possible to infer that the use of natural gas engines in drilling environments is feasible, and in most cases, an economical and environmental advantage. First, when compared with diesel, natural gas is a cleaner fuel with less negative impact on the environment. Second, fuel cost can be reduced by approximately half with a natural gas engine. On the other hand, natural gas as a fuel becomes less practical because of challenges associated with transporting and storing a gas. In fact, this difficulty is the main obstacle for the use of natural gas in drilling environments. In conclusion, because of its minimal drawback on operations, it is recommended that in situations where natural gas is readily available near current market prices, natural gas engines should be utilized because of the cost savings and reduced environmental impact. In all other cases, particularly where transport and storage costs encroach on the cost benefit, it may still be advantageous to continue powering rigs with diesel because of its ease of use.

Nunn, Andrew Howard

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Rigs Drilling Gas Wells Are At - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The increasing number of resulting gas well completions have been expanding production in major producing States, such as Texas. For the year 2000, ...

5

Slant rigs offer big payoffs in shallow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slant hole drilling technology can result in considerable savings over conventionally drilled deviated holes because mud motors and deviation control with measurement while drilling tools are usually unnecessary. The benefits of using slant hole rigs for development drilling improve after the bit walk tendencies and the correct bottom hole assemblies have been determined for a particular area. This article discusses three recent drilling operations that successfully used slant drilling technology on land-based projects: drilling for heavy oil in Alberta, drilling for gas in Alberta, and drilling a river crossing for a gas pipeline in British Columbia. These examples demonstrate the flexibility of slant drilling technology.

Smith, J. (George E. Failing Co., Enid, OK (US)); Edwards, B. (Sierra Drilling Co., Calgary (CA))

1992-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Rig scarcity prompts innovative drilling solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unable to locate a shallow-water offshore rig for its program in Indonesia, British Gas International developed an innovative pad/ballasted barge configuration to utilize a land rig, which was available. Many non-typical problems were encountered and solved to establish the drilling location 600 m (2,000 ft) from the shore in Bintuni Bay in Irian Jaya, eastern Indonesia. The final hybrid configuration has sparked interesting debate as to whether the operation should be designated as onshore or offshore. The paper discusses the project overview, concept development, construction, and operations.

Lattimore, G.M.; Gott, T.; Feagin, J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Study on an Electric Drilling Rig with Hydraulic Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric drilling rig with hydraulic energy storage is researched. This rig can recover the potential energy of the drill stem lowered and owns remarkable energy-saving effect. The mathematical model of the new rig lifting the drill stem was deduced ... Keywords: electric drilling rig, energy-recovering, energy-saving

Zhang Lujun

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Self propelled drilling rig starts offshore exploration  

SciTech Connect

Ocean Drilling and Exploration Co. recently commissioned its new $12 million self-propelled, semisubmersible drilling rig, Ocean Prospector, at Mitsubishi Shipyard, Japan, where the rig was built. Initial trail runs completed adjacent to the shipyard indicated that the ship has a speed of 7 kn ahead and 3 kn astern. Steering also is reported to be excellent. The rig has a minimum turning radius of approx. 2 barge lengths and shows instant response. This rig is powered by 4 Fairbanks Morse, 10-cylinder opposed piston, model 38D8-1/8 diesel engines. Each engine is rated at 1,600 hp at 720 rpm and they drive eight 1,600 kw, traction type D-C generators and two 1,000 kw A-C generators. The rated operating depth of the unit afloat is 600 ft of water. The overall length of Ocean Prospector is just over 344 ft, with the beam measuring 263-1/2 ft. During transit, when the rig will be completely deballasted, it will have a draft of approx. 20 ft. When it reaches the drilling site, ballast water will be pumped into the 18 ballast tanks until the draft is increased to 70 ft. At this point, the underside of the main deck will be 50 ft above the mean surface of the sea. Drilling operations will be conducted while the rig is at the 70 ft draft. The mooring system will consist of eight 2-3/4 in. chains, each measuring 3,300 ft in length and connected to a 15-ton anchor.

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NETL: News Release - DOE-Funded 'Microhole' Drilling Rig Demonstrated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rig Demonstrated Successfully in Midcontinent New Technology Initiative Slashes Drilling Costs, Benefits Environment, Energy Security WASHINGTON, DC - A U.S. Department of...

10

Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling [Laser Applications Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Today, a typical land-based oil or gas well costs around 400,000 to drill, while costs for an offshore well average...

11

Pad drilling and rig mobility lead to more efficient drilling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Pad drilling allows producers to target a significant area of underground resources while minimizing impact on the surface.

12

Technical and economic evaluation of selected compact drill rigs for drilling 10,000 foot geothermal production wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the investigation and evaluation of several {open_quotes}compact{close_quotes} drill rigs which could be used for drilling geothermal production wells. Use of these smaller rigs would save money by reducing mobilization costs, fuel consumption, crew sizes, and environmental impact. Advantages and disadvantages of currently-manufactured rigs are identified, and desirable characteristics for the {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} compact rig are defined. The report includes a detailed cost estimate of a specific rig, and an evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio of using this rig. Industry contacts for further information are given.

Huttrer, G.W. [Geothermal Management Company, Inc., Frisco, CO (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Joint venture builds new rigs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent emphasis on increasing drilling efficiency and avoiding additional environmental damage has led Russian operator Gazprom to specify a new generation drilling rig for exploratory and development drilling in the Astrakhan gas/condensate field in southwestern Russia. The two rigs on order combine Russian and American technology and include a unique system for processing contaminated drill cuttings. The article describes the rig package and cuttings treatment system.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Design and Analysis of a Test Rig for Modeling the Bit/Formation Interface in Petroleum Drilling Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment failure and well deviations are prevailing contributors to production delays within the petroleum industry. Particular monetary focus is given to the drilling operations of wells to overcome these deficits, in order to extract natural resources as efficiently, and as safely, as possible. The research presented here focuses on minimizing vibrations of the drill string near the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) by identifying the cause of external forcing on the drillstring in vertical and horizontal wells and measuring the effects of various factors on the stability of perturbations on the system. A test rig concept has been developed to accurately measure the interaction forces and torques between the bit, formation and fluids during drilling in order to clearly define a bit/formation interface law (BFIL) for the purpose vibrational analysis. As a secondary function, the rig will be able to measure the potential inputs to a drilling simulation code that can be used to model drillstring vibrations. All notable quantities will be measured including torque on bit (TOB), weight on bit (WOB), lateral impact loads (LIL), formation stiffness, bit specific properties, fluid damping coefficients and rate of penetration (ROP). The conceptual design has been analyzed and refined, in detail, to verify its operational integrity and range of measurement error. The operational envelope of the rig is such that a drill bit of up to 8 ˝ inches in diameter can be effectively tested at desired operational parameters (WOB: 0-55,000 lbf, RPM: 60-200) with various rock formations and multiple fluid types. Future use and design possibilities are also discussed to enhance the functionality of the rig and the potential for further research in the area of oil and gas drilling and vibrational modeling.

Wilson, Joshua Kyle

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Drill string gas data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data and supporting documentation were compiled and analyzed for 26 cases of gas grab samples taken during waste-tank core sampling activities between September 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997. These cases were tested against specific criteria to reduce uncertainties associated with in-tank sampling location and conditions. Of the 26 possible cases, 16 qualified as drill-string grab samples most likely to represent recently released waste gases. The data from these 16 ``confirmed`` cases were adjusted to remove non-waste gas contributions from core-sampling activities (argon or nitrogen purge), the atmospheric background, and laboratory sampler preparation (helium). The procedure for subtracting atmospheric, laboratory, and argon purge gases was unambiguous. No reliable method for determining the exact amount of nitrogen purge gas was established. Thus, the final set of ``Adjusted`` drill string gas data for the 6 nitrogen-purged cases had a greater degree of uncertainty than the final results for the 10 argon-purged cases. Including the appropriate amounts of uncertainty, this final set of data was added to the set of high-quality results from the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), and good agreement was found for the N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mole fractions sampled from common tanks. These results indicate that under favorable sampling conditions, Drill-String (DS) grab samples can provide reasonably accurate information about the dominant species of released gas. One conclusion from this set of total gas data is that the distribution of the H{sub 2} mole fractions is bimodal in shape, with an upper bound of 78%.

Siciliano, E.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel engines operating the rig pose the problems of low efficiency and large amount of emissions. In addition the rig power requirements vary a lot with time and ongoing operation. Therefore it is in the best interest of operators to research on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations. There are various sources of alternate energy storage/reuse. A quantitative comparison of physical size and economics shows that rigs powered by the electrical grid can provide lower cost operations, emit fewer emissions, are quieter, and have a smaller surface footprint than conventional diesel powered drilling. This thesis describes a study to evaluate the feasibility of adopting technology to reduce the size of the power generating equipment on drilling rigs and to provide ?peak shaving? energy through the new energy generating and energy storage devices such as flywheels. An energy audit was conducted on a new generation light weight Huisman LOC 250 rig drilling in South Texas to gather comprehensive time stamped drilling data. A study of emissions while drilling operation was also conducted during the audit. The data was analyzed using MATLAB and compared to a theoretical energy audit. The study showed that it is possible to remove peaks of rig power requirement by a flywheel kinetic energy recovery and storage (KERS) system and that linking to the electrical grid would supply sufficient power to operate the rig normally. Both the link to the grid and the KERS system would fit within a standard ISO container. A cost benefit analysis of the containerized system to transfer grid power to a rig, coupled with the KERS indicated that such a design had the potential to save more than $10,000 per week of drilling operations with significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, and smaller size well pad.

Verma, Ankit

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Drilling through gas hydrates formations: possible problems and suggested solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate research in the last two decades has taken various directions ranging from ways to understand the safe and economical production of this enormous resource to drilling problems. as more rigs and production platforms move into deeper waters to its environmental impact on global warming and cooling. Gas hydrates are ice-like structures of a water lattice with cavities, which contain guest gases. Gas hydrates are stable at low temperatures and high pressures. The amount of energy trapped in gas hydrates all over the world is about twice the amount found in all recoverable fossil fuels today. This research identifies the problems facing the oil and gas industry as it drills in deeper waters where gas hydrates are present and suggests solutions to some of the problems. The problems considered in this research have been approached from a drilling point of view. Hence, the parameters investigated and discussed are drilling controlled parameters. They include rate of penetration, circulation rate and drilling fluid density. The rate of penetration in offshore wells contributes largely to the final cost of the drilling process. These 3 parameters have been linked in the course of this research in order to suggest an optimum rate of penetration. The results show the rate of penetration is directly proportional to the amount of gas released when drilling through gas hydrate. As the volume of gas released increases, the problems facing the drilling rigs, drilling crew and environment is seen to increase. The results also show the extent of risk to be expected while drilling through gas hydrate formations. A chart relating the rate of penetration, circulation rate and effective mud weight was used to select the optimum drilling rate within the drilling safety window. Finally, future considerations and recommendations in order to improve the analyses presented in this work are presented. Other drilling parameters proposed for future analysis include drill bit analysis with respect to heat transfer and the impact of dissociation of gas hydrate around the wellbore and seafloor stability.

Amodu, Afolabi Ayoola

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Table 4.4 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 4.4 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation, 1949-2011 (Number of Rigs) Year: By Site : By Type: Total 1: Onshore

19

rig_specs.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RIG SPECIFICATIONS R MOTC Rig No. 1 is a 2005 Crown (Calgary, Canada) trailer-mounted drilling rig. It incor- porates several features found desirable over numerous drilling tests...

20

Natural Gas for the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green) the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green) JOHN DAVIS: No one has been hit harder by rising fuel prices than America's long-haul commercial truckers. A big rig can easily burn 20,000 gallons of fuel a year, and with diesel prices projected to keep rising, this not only pinches the trucker's bottom line, but that extra cost is passed on to American consumers. Meanwhile, natural gas prices have remained stable and are forecast to stay that way for years to come. Up to now, demand for natural gas as a transportation fuel has been mostly for compressed natural gas used by light and medium-duty vehicles. City buses, refuse haulers, utilities, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

December 2013 December 2013 Explanatory notes Drilling Productivity Report The Drilling Productivity Report uses recent data on the total number of drilling rigs in operation along with estimates of drilling productivity and estimated changes in production from existing oil and natural gas wells to provide estimated changes in oil and natural gas production for six key fields. EIA's approach does not distinguish between oil-directed rigs and gas-directed rigs because once a well is completed it may produce both oil and gas; more than half of the wells do that. Monthly additions from one average rig Monthly additions from one average rig represent EIA's estimate of an average rig's

22

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity Period: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Data Series: Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 ...

23

Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit Records This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas...

24

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Eligibility...

25

Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

26

Loads on Tie-Down Systems for Floating Drilling Rigs during Hurricane Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tie-down systems are used to fasten drilling rigs to the deck of offshore structures during harsh environmental conditions such as hurricanes. During Hurricane Ivan (2004) and Katrina (2005), a number of offshore structures were moved and several tie-down systems were damaged. In the present study, the reaction force and connection capacity of tie-down systems for a TLP and SPAR are investigated. The environmental conditions are taken from the API Bulletin 2INT-MET which has been updated after several major storms during 2004-2005. The hydrodynamic coefficients of the TLP and SPAR are obtained using a 3D diffraction/radiation panel method. The motions of the TLP and SPAR are then simulated in the time domain by using the hull-mooring-riser coupled dynamic analysis tool CHARM3D. Based on the simulated motion and acceleration time series, the inertial and gravity loads on derrick and skid base footing are calculated. In addition to the inertial-gravity loads, wind forces exerted on the derrick are also calculated. All the external forces and resultant hull motions are simulated for 100-year, 200-year and 1000-year storms to observe the derrick structural integrity with increasing environmental intensity. Various environmental headings are also considered to find the maximum reaction forces. In the present method, the phase differences between gravity-inertia forces and wind forces are taken into consideration to obtain more realistic loads on derrick and skid base footings. This research shows that the maximum and minimum load values are appreciably higher for the SPAR. In addition, the direction of external forces is also important to determine maximum reaction forces on footings. The capacities of the clamps in slip, bolt tension, and bolt shear can be also analyzed using the resultant data to provide guidance on appropriate design values.

Bae, Yoon Hyeok

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology  

SciTech Connect

The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of time is divided among the remaining four functions of rig up/rig down, logging, lay down bottomhole assembly, and pick up bottomhole assembly. Observations made during all phases of CT rig operation at each of the project well installations have verified a number of characteristics of the technology that represent advantages that can produce significant savings of 25-35 percent per well. Attributes of the CT rig performance include: (1) Excellent hole quality with hole deviation amounting to 1-2 degrees; (2) Reduced need for auxiliary equipment; (3) Efficient rig mobilization requiring only four trailers; (4) Capability of ''Zero Discharge'' operation; (5) Improved safety; and, (6) Measurement while drilling capability. In addition, commercial cost data indicates that the CT rig reduces drilling costs by 25 to 35% compared to conventional drilling technology. Widespread commercial use of the Microhole Coiled Tubing technology in the United States for onshore Lower-48 drilling has the potential of achieving substantially positive impacts in terms of savings to the industry and resource expansion. Successfully commercialized Microhole CT Rig Technology is projected to achieve cumulative savings in Lower-48 onshore drilling expenditures of approximately 6.8 billion dollars by 2025. The reduced cost of CT microhole drilling is projected to enable the development of gas resources that would not have been economic with conventional methods. Because of the reduced cost of drilling achieved with CT rig technology, it is estimated that an additional 22 Tcf of gas resource will become economic to develop. In the future, the Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig represents an important platform for the continued improvement of drilling that draws on a new generation of various technologies to achieve goals of improved drilling cost and reduced impact to the environment.

Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modular designs highlight several new rigs  

SciTech Connect

A new platform drilling rig for offshore Trinidad and two new land rigs for the former Soviet Union feature the latest in drilling and construction technology and modular components for quick rig up/rig down. The Sundowner 801 was mock-up tested in Galveston, TX, a few weeks ago in preparation for its load-out to the Dolphin field offshore Trinidad. Two other new units, UNOC 500 DE series land rigs, were recently constructed and mock-up tested in Ekaterinburg, Russia, for upcoming exploratory work for RAO Gazprom, a large natural gas producer in Russia. These rigs are unique in that they were constructed from new components made both in the US and in Russia. The paper describes all three units.

Rappold, K.

1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Testing and Controlling System for the Combustion Test Rig of Gas Turbine Combustor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a testing and controlling system is designed for the test rig of gas turbine combustor by using VXi bus and PLC technology. The system is composed of two subsystems: the data acquisition subsystem and the control subsystem. The data acquisition ... Keywords: combustion test rig, VXi bus, PLC control, Modbus agreement, data acquisition

Nihui Xie; Hua Song; Hongzhuan Qiu

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 99: 89: 90: 79: 72 ...

31

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Offshore Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

32

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Active Well Service Rigs in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Active Well Service Rigs in operation (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

33

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 1,219: 1,126: 1,049: 993 ...

34

Oil and Gas Well Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Well Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Oil and Gas Well Drilling Author Jeff Tester Published NA, 2011 DOI Not...

35

Horizontal drilling boosts Pennsylvania’s natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Between 2009 and 2011, Pennsylvania's natural gas production more than quadrupled due to expanded horizontal drilling combined with hydraulic fracturing.

36

U.S. oil rig count overtakes natural gas rig count - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

37

Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States 1985...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration, Office of Oil and Gas; and IHS Energy. Well Completions Forecast: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, Drilling Rig Model; and Model...

38

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Rotary rigs in operation ...

39

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Activity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Rotary rigs in ...

40

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas in the Marcellus shale natural gas industry in the Mid-Atlantic region. Using publicly available information, we

Maranas, Costas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chesapeake Bay, Drilling for Oil or Gas Prohibited (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Drilling for oil or gas in the waters or within 500 hundred feet from the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay or any of its tributaries is prohibited.

42

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling & production of oil & gas in wetland areas. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, incorporating milestone schedule/status, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a progress report on a planned program falling under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During this period, task 5, subscale tests, and task 7, environmental impacts, were completed. Work was continued on task 10, technology transfer, and the preparation of the final report as part of task 11.

Eggington, W.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Drill report  

SciTech Connect

North Slope drilling activity is described. As of November 14, 1984, four rigs were actively drilling in the Kuparuk River field with another two doing workovers. Only one rig was drilling in the Prudhoe Bay field, with another doing workovers and one on standby.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the California Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

005 "Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling Among theSupport for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among theSupport for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the

Smith, Eric R.A.N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009 "Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’sPublic Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’sPublic Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’s

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) Georgia Oil and Gas Deep Drilling act of 1975 (Georgia) Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General...

47

Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) Oil and Gas Exploration, Drilling, Transportation, and Production (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control This legislation prohibits the waste of oil or gas and the pollution of water, air, or land. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to implement regulations designed to prevent the waste of oil and gas, promote environmental stewardship, and regulate the exploration,

48

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009 "Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California’s5180 www.ucei.org Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling inAbstract: Offshore oil drilling has been controversial in

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Horizontal underbalanced drilling of gas wells with coiled tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coiled tubing drilling technology is gaining popularity and momentum as a significant and reliable method of drilling horizontal underbalanced wells. It is quickly moving into new frontiers. To this point, most efforts in the Western Canadian Basin have been focused towards sweet oil reservoirs in the 900--1300 m true vertical depth (TVD) range, however there is an ever-increasing interest in deeper and gas-producing formations. Significant design challenges on both conventional and coiled tubing drilling operations are imposed when attempting to drill these formations underbalanced. Coiled tubing is an ideal technology for underbalanced drilling due to its absence of drillstring connections resulting in continuous underbalanced capabilities. This also makes it suitable for sour well drilling and live well intervention without the risk of surface releases of reservoir gas. Through the use of pressure deployment procedures it is possible to complete the drilling operation without need to kill the well, thereby maintaining underbalanced conditions right through to the production phase. The use of coiled tubing also provides a means for continuous wireline communication with downhole steering, logging and pressure recording devices.

Cox, R.J.; Li, J.; Lupick, G.S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Numerical simulation of transient gas flow during underbalanced drilling into a gas sand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow gas drilling has long been recognized as a serious problem in offshore operations. Low fracture gradients and shallow casing do not permit shutting- in the well. Computer simulations of gas kicks during drilling require accurate description of the gas flow rate from the formation into the wellbore. The problem is complicated by the fact that during drilling into a gas sand the effective wellbore area exposed to flow is continually changing until the formation has been completely drilled. This paper describes a numerical model developed to calculate gas flow into the wellbore while drilling underbalanced into a gas sand. A two-dimensional finite difference model of transient flow from the reservoir has been coupled with a one-dimensional finite element model of two-phase flow in the wellbore.

Berg, K.A.; Skalle, P. (Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Trondheim (NO)); Podio, A.L. (Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Drilling Through Gas Hydrates Formations: Managing Wellbore Stability Risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As hydrocarbon exploration and development moves into deeper water and onshore arctic environments, it becomes increasingly important to quantify the drilling hazards posed by gas hydrates. To address these concerns, a 1D semi-analytical model for heat and fluid transport in the reservoir was coupled with a numerical model for temperature distribution along the wellbore. This combination allowed the estimation of the dimensions of the hydratebearing layer where the initial pressure and temperature can dynamically change while drilling. These dimensions were then used to build a numerical reservoir model for the simulation of the dissociation of gas hydrate in the layer. The bottomhole pressure (BHP) and formation properties used in this workflow were based on a real field case. The results provide an understanding of the effects of drilling through hydratebearing sediments and of the impact of drilling fluid temperature and BHP on changes in temperature and pore pressure within the surrounding sediments. It was found that the amount of gas hydrate that can dissociate will depend significantly on both initial formation characteristics and bottomhole conditions, namely mud temperature and pressure. The procedure outlined suggested in this work can provide quantitative results of the impact of hydrate dissociation on wellbore stability, which can help better design drilling muds for ultra deep water operations.

Khabibullin, Tagir R.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system: Hot End Simulation Rig  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Hot End Simulation Rig (HESR) was an integral part of the overall Solar/METC program chartered to prove the technical, economic, an environmental feasibility of a coal-fueled gas turbine, for cogeneration applications. The program was to culminate in a test of a Solar Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal slurry fuel throughput the engine design operating range. This particular activity was designed to verify the performance of the Centaur Type H engine hot section materials in a coal-fired environment varying the amounts of alkali, ash, and sulfur in the coal to assess the material corrosion. Success in the program was dependent upon the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Included was the control of hot end corrosion and erosion, necessary to ensure adequate operating life. The Hot End Simulation Rig addressed this important issue by exposing currently used hot section turbine alloys, alternate alloys, and commercially available advanced protective coating systems to a representative coal-fueled environment at turbine inlet temperatures typical of Solar`s Centaur Type H. Turbine hot end components which would experience material degradation include the transition duct from the combustor outlet to the turbine inlet, the shroud, nozzles, and blades. A ceramic candle filter vessel was included in the system as the particulate removal device for the HESR. In addition to turbine material testing, the candle material was exposed and evaluated. Long-term testing was intended to sufficiently characterize the performance of these materials for the turbine.

Galica, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Real Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

55

U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Natural Gas Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

56

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Natural Gas Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

57

U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0...

58

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)

59

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling Methane, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting methane and, in some cases detail within the context of shale gas drilling activities in New York, as well as their uses

Wang, Z. Jane

60

34th annual reed rotary rig census  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that the number of rigs active according to the 1986 census is 1052, which represents a decline of 1573 rigs from 1985 figures. This 60 percent decrease is the largest decline of active rigs in the 34-year history of the census. The 1986 census takers found 3993 rigs are available with the capacity to drill deeper than 3000 ft. The count has thus declined by 416 rigs (9 percent) from the 1985 total of 4409. Rig availability declined for the fourth consecutive year following nine straight years of fleet expansion (1974-1982). During the past four years, 1651 rigs have been removed from the drilling fleet representing a 29 percent decline from the record high number of rigs available in 1982. The 1986 decline in the available U.S. fleet is considerably less than what many industry observers had been anticipating. A larger decrease in the rig fleet has not been realized for a number of reasons.

Hutchinson, D.L.; Pastusek, P.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, Second quarter, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the second quarter of 1993 was focussed on completion of Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. Also during the report period, Task 6, Ground Support, was completed and a report containing the results was submitted to DOE. This task addressed the complete H.1 Cyclocraft system, i.e. it included the need personnel, facilities and equipment to support cyclocraft operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Third quarterly technical progress report, First quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the report period was focussed on Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. The preliminary design work was based on the results of the three preceding tasks. A report was initiated that contains descriptions of the H.1 Cyclocraft and its subsystems; options available for the final aircraft design process; performance, geometry, weights and power data; logistics and considerations relating to cyclocraft operations in wetlands.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. In 1992, Task 1, Environmental Considerations, and Task 2, Transport Requirements, were completed. In the first two quarters of 1993, Task 3, Parametric Analysis, Task 4, Preliminary Design, and Task 6, Ground Support, were completed. Individual reports containing results obtained from each of these tasks were submitted to DOE. In addition, through June 30, 1993, a Subscale Test Plan was prepared under Task 5, Subscale Tests, and work was initiated on Task 7, Environmental Impacts, Task 8, Development Plan, Task 9, Operating Costs, and Task 10, Technology Transfer.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the California Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Public Opinion on Offshore Oil Development in California.and Economics 005 "Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drillingdirectly. Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among

Smith, Eric R.A.N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Drilling in the Rockies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite rugged drilling conditions and high drilling costs, rig employment and drilling operations in the Rocky Mountain region of the Overthrust Belt have increased significantly since 1979. Rate of rig employment, well depths, and number of operating companies and contractors in the area are reported. By October 1980, more than 500 active rigs were working in the region, 30% more than were working during the entirety of 1979. (3 photos)

Peacock, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

67

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

68

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offshore Oil Parkland Oil Price of Gas Figure 2 also revealsTrends in Support for Oil Drilling and the Price of Gasolineincreased oil drilling should cut the price of gasoline, so

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Footage Drilled for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Thousand Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 176,867 203,997 240,969 285,398 308,210 331,740 1949-2008 Crude Oil 38,495 42,032 51,511 63,649 66,527 88,382 1949-2008 Natural Gas 115,833 138,503 164,353 193,595 212,753 212,079 1949-2008 Dry Holes 22,539 23,462 25,104 28,154 28,931 31,280 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 17,785 22,382 25,955 29,630 36,534 35,585 1949-2008 Crude Oil 2,453 3,141 4,262 4,998 6,271 7,389 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,569 9,998 12,347 14,945 19,982 17,066 1949-2008 Dry Holes

70

Innovative techniques cut costs in wetlands drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an approach to drilling oil and gas wells in sensitive wetlands areas contributed to a savings of over $1.2 million on a three-well, $3 million drilling project in south Louisiana. ARCO Oil and Gas Co. drilled a three-well project in the Bayou Sale field with a truck-mounted workover rig and a modified solids-control system. This smaller equipment eliminated the need to build a large location in the marsh. Traditional drilling techniques require a large drillsite to accommodate all the equipment of a modern drilling complex. However, recently imposed environmental regulations substantially limit, and in some cases prohibit, the use of these conventional techniques for drilling wells in wetlands areas. Based on the potentially huge economic and operational impact on the drilling industry because of these stricter regulations, alternatives to these traditional practices are essential.

Navarro, A.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Lafayette, LA (US))

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

71

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Costs of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Drilled Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Thousand Dollars per Well All (Real*) 1,011.9 1,127.4 1,528.5 1,522.3 1,801.3 3,481.8 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 1,054.2 1,199.5 1,673.1 1,720.7 2,101.7 4,171.7 1960-2007 Crude Oil (Nominal) 882.8 1,037.3 1,441.8 1,920.4 2,238.6 4,000.4 1960-2007 Natural Gas (Nominal) 991.9 1,106.0 1,716.4 1,497.6 1,936.2 3,906.9 1960-2007 Dry Holes (Nominal) 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9 2,664.6 6,131.2 1960-2007 Dollars per Foot All (Real*) 187.46 203.25 267.28 271.16 324.00 574.46 1960-2007 All (Nominal) 195.31 216.27 292.57 306.50 378.03 688.30 1960-2007

72

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

73

Drilling efficiency is a key driver of oil and natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increases in drilling efficiency have contributed to the breakdown of traditional methods that seek to estimate oil and natural gas production based principally on ...

74

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in Wetland Areas. Fourth quarterly report, [October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During the.reporting period, a report that contained the results of each of the five subtasks that comprise Task 1, Environmental Considerations, was prepared and submitted to DOE. The subtasks were an overview of oil and gas activities in wetlands; a review of present wetland access practices; identification of past environmental impacts experienced; definition of marsh habitat considerations and discussion of forested wetland considerations. In Task 2, Transport Requirements, a report on the acquisition of data on the transport requirements to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in Wetland Areas was prepared and submitted to DOE. Task 3, Parametric Analysis, was completed during the reporting period. The analysis showed that a cyclocraft, having a payload capacity of 45 tons, was the most economic and would be able to transport all of the required equipment and materials. The final report on the parametric analysis was to be submitted in January, 1993.

Eggington, W.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

www.myresources.com.au OIL & GAS BULLETIN VOL. 15, NO. 11 PAGE 9 Safety first: Oil rigs off the north west shelf will be studied for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.myresources.com.au OIL & GAS BULLETIN VOL. 15, NO. 11 PAGE 9 NEWS Safety first: Oil rigs off for future successful tight gas exploration projects in Western Australia has been set up and studies the tight gas sand field at its exploration permit in the South Perth Basin. Professor Rezaee said

76

A rigged market  

SciTech Connect

The mobile rig market remains a unique sector of the global upstream oil and gas industry. Big oil is continuing to emerge blinking from the darkness of its recent cash-starved existence to bask in the glory of a resurgent oil price. But the rig sector is once again lagging behind the pace being set by operators as they open up their wallets for new or delayed exploration and production projects. This paper gives statistics on worldwide count and contracts.

Thomas, M.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit Oil and Gas Conservation Commission: February 2011 Drilling & Permit Records Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly

78

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling for oil in parks and forest reserves, or off theoil and gas wells on government parklands and forest reservesoil and gas wells on government parklands and forest reserves”

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Rig upkeep vital in the downturn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As operations came to a close in 1982, many oil and gas contractors were facing the door of no return - subsequent years worsened matters. Drilling and workover units were returned to the lender and left stacked on and off location. Lending institutions began to weaken and, in some cases, collapse. However, many of the contractors with time and grade in providing contract drilling or workover services have had no desires or options other than to continue to operate in a downward spiraling market, much as they had done in the 50s and 60s. Operating under these circumstances requires a lot less flare and flame, and careful rearrangement of financial obligations. Contractors with equipment overloads reduced inventories and stacked the leftovers. This article shows that stacking or immobilizing a modern drilling rig or workover unit can be achieved economically. A sound preventive maintenance schedule can put the equipment on the stand-by board-ready to work. Several articles have been written on the ''new way to stack rigs.'' Most of these are simply a sensible realistic approach to maintaining a corporation's assets until they can be returned to the work force.

Leabo, J.H.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief ... Btu = British thermal units. ... A future Today in Energy article will focus on how drilling efficiency relates to ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated June 23, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/EPreports/Shale_Gas_Primer_2009.pdf Good of shale gas drilling in New York State, as well as the most comprehensive collection of data and consultant-supplied analyses Addressing the Environmental Risks from Shale Gas Development (2010) Worldwatch

82

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

84

U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

85

U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

86

U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's...

87

U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Natural Gas Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

88

The Framing of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling Issues in Pennsylvania Newspapers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thousands of articles on Marcellus Shale gas drilling and development were written in Pennsylvania newspapers from 2008-2012 (NewsBank, 2013). These stories can have an influence… (more)

Brown, Elise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Value of Hurricane Forecasts to Oil and Gas Producers in the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The threat of hurricanes often forces producers of crude oil and natural gas in the Gulf of Mexico to evacuate offshore drilling rigs and temporarily to cease production. More accurate hurricane forecasts would result in fewer false alarms, ...

Timothy J. Considine; Christopher Jablonowski; Barry Posner; Craig H. Bishop

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Toolpusher is key to efficient rig operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toolpushers earn a higher salary, control more personnel, and are responsible for a more expensive operation than many graduate MBAs. As a result, toolpushers are key to improved rig efficiencies and reduced crew turnover. For example, by having its toolpushers in Libya implement a new managerial approach, Santa Fe Drilling Co. reduced labor turnover 30%, reduced the number of lost-time accidents 58%, and increased average rig inspection scores 6%. During the boom years of drilling, toolpushers complained often about the poor quality of roustabouts and roughnecks assigned to them. Many toolpushers held poor screening of personnel responsible, and felt justified in firing those who were slow to adapt. Few of them considered that they were directly responsible. Today's toolpusher must realize that he is responsible not only for the rig, its maintenance, and its drilling performance, but for training and development of the rig's personnel as well.

Fortney, K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other analyses.

Hutchinson, D.R. (USGS); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger, Houston, TX); Dai, J. (Schlumberger, Hoston, TX); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics, Inc., Houston, TX); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Boswell, R.; Jones, E. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX); Collett, T.S. (USGS); Rose, K.; Dugan, B. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX); Wood, W. (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory); Latham, T. (Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING  

SciTech Connect

Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube drilling offers the opportunity to dramatically cut producers' exploration risk to a level comparable to that of drilling development wells. Together, such efforts hold great promise for economically recovering a sizeable portion of the estimated remaining shallow (less than 5,000 feet subsurface) oil resource in the United States. The DOE estimates this U.S. targeted shallow resource at 218 billion barrels. Furthermore, the smaller 'footprint' of the lightweight rigs utilized for microhole drilling and the accompanying reduced drilling waste disposal volumes offer the bonus of added environmental benefits. DOE analysis shows that microhole technology has the potential to cut exploratory drilling costs by at least a third and to slash development drilling costs in half.

Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2012 | Release Date: May 31, 30, 2012 | Release Date: May 31, 2012 | Next Release: June 7, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural Gas Rigs Decline in Key Areas Active natural gas rotary rigs currently total 594, according to the latest weekly data released by Baker Hughes Incorporated. According to Baker Hughes data, natural gas-directed horizontal rigs have driven the decline in total natural gas rigs over the past several months. Horizontal-directed natural gas rig counts have fallen to 411, from levels in the low-600s a year ago. Declines have occurred in key areas of dry shale gas production, particularly in Louisiana, where the Haynesville Shale is located. The number of horizontal natural gas rigs drilling in Louisiana has fallen from

96

Unique rig designed for northern areas  

SciTech Connect

The development of a new generation of drilling and support vessels specially designed to allow year-round drilling off the northern coast of Norway is discussed. New and better equipment is necessary so year-round operations can be done safely and without danger to the environment. To achieve that, a specially designed drilling rig, as well as support and standby vessels are being developed. A quantitative safety analysis of the rig is presently being carried out. The rig will be highly computerized. The computer software will contain programs for stability calculation, ballast recommendation, automatic trim, automatic ballast, automatic mud mix, strain/stress monitoring, dynamic stability, warehouse/maintenance and drilling data acquisition.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells in an H/sub 2/S environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are covered: facts about hydrogen sulfides; drilling and operating oil, gas, and geothermal wells; detection devices and protective equipment; hazard levels and safety procedures; first aid; and H/sub 2/S in California oil, gas, and geothermal fields. (MHR)

Dosch, M.W.; Hodgson, S.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2011 and 2012, more than 50% of new wells produced both oil and natural gas. Despite this phenomenon, many traditional methods for estimating oil and natural gas ...

99

Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity mirrors development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

100

ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG  

SciTech Connect

The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

Scott Reome; Dan Davies

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Today in Energy - Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... (from green to red), the more gas is being produced.

102

Bakken formation oil and gas drilling activity mirrors development ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data Tools & Models ... Oil production growth in the Bakken shale play mirrors somewhat the growth in natural gas production ... U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov

103

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12-i Chapter 12 Rigging Hardware CHAPTER 12 RIGGING HARDWARE This chapter provides requirements for rigging accessories used in hoisting and rigging - shackles, eyebolts, eye nuts, links, rings, swivels, wire-rope clips, turnbuckles, rigging hooks, and load-indicating devices and implements the requirements of ANSI/ASME B30.26, "Rigging Hardware" (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 12.1 GENERAL..................................................................................................................................12-1 12.1.1 Good and Bad Rigging Practices ...................................................................................12-1 12.2 RIGGING HOOKS.....................................................................................................................12-5

104

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of liquid lift approach to dual gradient drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past, the oil and gas industry has typically used the single gradient system to drill wells offshore. With this system the bottom hole pressure was controlled by a mud column extending from the drilling rig to the bottom of the wellbore. This mud column was used to achieve the required bottom hole pressure. But, as the demand for oil and gas increased, the industry started exploring for oil and gas in deep waters. Because of the narrow margin between the pore and fracture pressures it is somewhat difficult to reach total depth with the single gradient system. This led to the invention of the dual gradient system. In the dual gradient method, heavy density fluid runs from the bottom hole to the mudline and a low density fluid from the mudline to the rig floor so as to maintain the bottom hole pressure. Several methods have been developed to achieve the dual gradient drilling principle. For this research project, we paid more attention to the liquid lift, dual gradient drilling (riser dilution method). This method of achieving dual gradient drilling was somewhat different from the others, because it does not utilize elaborate equipment and no major changes are made on the existing drilling rigs. In this thesis the technical feasibility of using the liquid lift method over the other methods of achieving dual gradient drilling was determined. A computer program was developed to simulate the wellbore hydraulics under static and dynamic conditions, injection rate and base fluid density required to dilute the riser fluid and finally, u-tubing phenomena. In this thesis we also identified some problems associated with the liquid lift method and recommendations were made on how these problems can be eliminated or reduced. Emphases were placed on the effect of u-tubing, injection rate of base fluid at the bottom of the riser and well control issues facing this system.

Okafor, Ugochukwu Nnamdi

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand-prone sedimentary section that rises stratigraphically across the base of the gas hydrate stability zone and that has seismic indicators of gas hydrate. Copyright 2008, Offshore Technology Conference

Jones, E. (Chevron); Latham, T. (Chevron); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Hunt, J. (Minerals Management Service); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger); Boswell, R.M. (NETL); Rose, K.K. (NETL); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Hutchinson, D. (USGS); Collett, T. (USGS); Dugan, B. (Rice University); Wood, W. (Naval Research Laboratory)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hoisting & Rigging Fundamentals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hoisting and Rigging Hoisting and Rigging Fundamentals for Riaaers and ODerators Pendant Control - Components TR244C, Rev. 5 December 2002 TR244C Rev . 5 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii HOISTING AND RIGGING OBJECTIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WIRE ROPE SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SYNTHETIC WEBBING SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I O CHAINSLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 METAL MESH SLINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 SPREADER BEAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 RIGGING HARDWARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

108

Public Support for Oil and Gas Drilling in California's Forests and Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kmichaud@umail.ucsb.edu Abstract: Offshore oil drilling hasto attitudes toward offshore oil drilling. This implies thats Forests and Parks 1 Offshore oil drilling has been a

Smith, Eric R.A.N.; Carlisle, Juliet; Michaud, Kristy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Planning and scheduling a fleet of rigs using simulation-optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the most important and expensive activities in the oil field development and production phases relate to using rigs. These can be used for drilling wells, or for maintenance activities. As rigs are usually scarce compared to the number of wells ... Keywords: Planning, Rigs, Scheduling, Simulation-optimization

Hugo ViníCius Bassi; VirgíLio Jose Martins Ferreira Filho; Laura Bahiense

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

rig upgrades2.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D E T I N U S O F A M E R I C A E A s the oil and gas industry continues to drill in more remote areas, at deeper depths, and in more challenging environments, the advancement of...

112

Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Power Industry Development Paths and Natural Gas Market Risks: Cycles of Markets, Drilling, and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current natural gas market is depressed by a combination of unusual factorsa great excess of supply and weak demand. Excess supply comes from the momentum of exploration and production (EP) to the new U.S. gas shale plays, a phenomenon barely 18 months old and a game-changing event in the industry. Weak demand comes from the "Great Recession." The seeds for correcting this imbalance would appear to be a dramatic cutback in drilling, which has collapsed over the past year and which is a principal focu...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

114

Becker, K., Malone, M.J., et al., 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 174B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(drill-pipe measurement from rig floor, mbrf): 4457.1 Total depth (drill-pipe measurement from rig floor, mbrf): 4526.6 Distance between rig floor and sea level (m): 11.6 Water depth (drill-pipe measurement Unit II (63.5-69.5 mbsf): Aphyric basalt Principal results: Sixty-four meters of sediment and 0.58 m

115

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC PROPPANTS FROM GAS SHALE WELL DRILL CUTTINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of converting drill cuttings from gas shale wells into high strength proppants via flame spheroidization and devitrification processing. Conversion of drill cuttings to spherical particles was only possible for small particle sizes (< 53 {micro}m) using a flame former after a homogenizing melting step. This size limitation is likely to be impractical for application as conventional proppants due to particle packing characteristics. In an attempt to overcome the particle size limitation, sodium and calcium were added to the drill cuttings to act as fluxes during the spheroidization process. However, the flame former remained unable to form spheres from the fluxed material at the relatively large diameters (0.5 - 2 mm) targeted for proppants. For future work, the flame former could be modified to operate at higher temperature or longer residence time in order to produce larger, spherical materials. Post spheroidization heat treatments should be investigated to tailor the final phase assemblage for high strength and sufficient chemical durability.

Johnson, F.; Fox, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

116

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

Kenneth Oglesby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Onsite Burial (Pits, Landfills...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management. During most U.S. onshore drilling operations, the cuttings separated by the shale shaker are sent to a pit called the reserve pit located near the drill rig. The pit is...

118

Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig  

SciTech Connect

The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

Dan Davies

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Drill Rig Safety Topics of the Presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Check oil level daily -engine oil & coolant -compressor air/oil tank -hydraulic tank -pump oil (water injection, mud, etc.) -pump drive gearboxes · Grease daily (must purge dirt) ­ Floating Sub ­ Rollers ­ Air · Fuel and Oil Leaks · Hose Leaks and Failures · Electrical · Smoking #12;Schramm Electrical Safety

120

Somebody better find some rigs  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries of the Middle East. Field development projects abound, as the larger exporting nations pursue ambitious policies of production expansion. However, their plans may be hampered by the growing worldwide shortage of rigs. Separate evaluations are given for Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Yemen, Syria, Dubai, Turkey, Sharjah, and briefly for Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, UAE-Ajman, and UAE-Ras al-Khaimah.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorized Personnel (attach more sheets if necessary) Printed name Signature Date SSRL Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory May 16, 2005...

122

Reconnaissance for mercury over geothermal areas of the Imperial Valley, California. [Analysis of samples of soil gas and gas from drill holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine samples of soil gas and gas from drill holes were collected over and near two geothermal anomalies in the Imperial Valley, California, to measure the possible presence of mercury. With the instrumentation used, the smallest quantity of mercury that could be detected was 2 nanograms. No mercury was detected in any sample.

Hinkle, M.E.; Vaughn, W.W.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling Using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Improved Tubulars for Better Economics in Deep Gas Well Drilling using Microwave Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the entire research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Based on the results of the Phase I and insurmountable difficulties faced in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program was slightly changed in the Phase II in which an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) has been adopted. This process can be developed into a semicontinuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. The main objective of the Phase II research program is to demonstrate the potential to economically manufacture microwave processed coiled tubing with improved performance for extended useful life under hostile coiled tubing drilling conditions. After the completion of the Phase II, it is concluded that scale up and sintering of a thin wall common O.D. size tubing that is widely used in the market is still to be proved and further experimentation and refinement of the sintering process is needed in Phase III. Actual manufacturing capability of microwave sintered, industrial quality, full length tubing will most likely require several million dollars of investment.

Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mark Hunt; Mahlon Dennis

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Pad drilling and rig mobility lead to more efficient drilling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All Reports ... weather; gasoline; capacity; nuclear; exports; forecast; View All Tags ...

126

Generation of hydrogen gas as a result of percussion drilling within an unconfined aquifer, south-central Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 240-m deep borehole (Yakima Barricade borehole), located on the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site, was drilled as part of a DOE research program to investigate microbial processes in deep subsurface environments and to evaluate geochemical and geohydrological controls on subsurface microorganisms. A combustible gas was detected during drilling of the Yakima Barricade borehole (YBB). Once it was established that the major combustible gas was H{sub 2}, a series of tests were performed to evaluate the process by which H{sub 2} occurred within the borehole. This paper presents evidence for the generation of H{sub 2} in boreholes during percussion drilling below the water table and discusses mechanism of H{sub 2} generation and their implications for subsurface microbial processes.

Bjornstad, B.N.; Stevens, T.O.; Fredrickson, J.K.; McKinley, J.P.; Rawson, S.A.; Long, P.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

u' m .,. . Society of Petroleum Engineers u I SPE 49259 StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells R.M. Graves, SPE, Colorado School of Mines; and D.G. O'Brien, PE, SPE, Solutions Engineering Copyr@ht 1998, Scdety of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prapared for presentation at the 1998 SPE Annual Technicar Conference and Exhibition bald in New Orteans, Lcuisiana, 27-30 September 1998, This paper waa selected for presentation by en SPE Program Commiftee folrowing review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(a). Contents of the paper, as prasented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The materiar, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the .%ciety of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers prasented at SPE meetings

128

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Properly designed underbalanced drilling fluids can limit formation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling fluids for underbalanced operations require careful design and testing to ensure they do not damage sensitive formations. In addition to hole cleaning and lubrication functions, these fluids may be needed as kill fluids during emergencies. PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. used a systematic approach in developing and field testing a nondamaging drilling fluid. It was for use in underbalanced operations in the Glauconitic sandstone in the Westerose gas field in Alberta. A lab study was initiated to develop and test a non-damaging water-based drilling fluid for the horizontal well pilot project. The need to develop an inexpensive, nondamaging drilling fluid was previously identified during underbalanced drilling operations in the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan. A non-damaging fluid is required for hole cleaning, for lubrication of the mud motor, and for use as a kill fluid during emergencies. In addition, a nondamaging fluid is required when drilling with a conventional rig because pressure surges during connections and trips may result in the well being exposed to short periods of near balanced or overbalanced conditions. Without the protection of a filter cake, the drilling fluid will leak off into the formation, causing damage. The amount of damage is related to the rate of leak off and depth of invasion, which are directly proportional to the permeability to the fluid.

Churcher, P.L.; Yurkiw, F.J. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

130

Drilling for energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is integral to the exploration, development, and production of most energy resources. Oil and natural gas, which are dependent on drilling technology, together account for about 77% of the energy sources consumed in the US. Thus, the limitations of current drilling technology also restrict the rate at which new energy supplies can be found, extracted, and brought to the marketplace. The purpose of the study reported was to examine current drilling technology, suggest areas where additional research and development (R and D) might significantly increase drilling rates and capabilities, and suggest a strategy for improving drilling technology. An overview is provided of the US drilling industry. The drilling equipment and techniques now used for finding and recovering oil, natural gas, coal, shale oil, nuclear fuels, and geothermal energy are described. Although by no means exhaustive, these descriptions provide the background necessary to adequately understand the problems inherent in attempts to increase instantaneous and overall drilling rates.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Research projects needed for expediting development of domestic oil and gas resources through arctic, offshore, and drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the research projects which were identified at an industry-government workshop on Arctic, Offshore, and Drilling Technology (AODT) held at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, January 5-7, 1981. The purpose of the workshop was to identify those problem areas where government research could provide technology advancement that would assist industry in accelerating the discovery and development of US oil and gas resouces. The workshop results are to be used to guide an effective research program. The workshop identified and prioritized the tasks that need to be implemented. All of the projects listed in the Arctic and Offshore sections were selected as appropriate for a Department of Energy (DOE) research role. The drilling projects identified as appropriate only for industry research have been separated in the Drilling section of this report.

Canja, S.; Williams, C.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Application Research of AC Frequency Conversion Technique in Transmission Control System of Oil Rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper mainly introduced the basic structure and work principle of transmission agent on electric drilling rig, meanwhile the frequency control and parallel operation of motors used in the transmission agent were analyzed and designed. Using parallel ... Keywords: Rig, Transmission, Frequency control, Parallel Operation Control

Ruifan Yang; Yong Peng

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

Dan Davis

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG  

SciTech Connect

The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program initiated this quarter, provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principle activity during this first reporting period were preparing for and conducting a project kick-off meeting, working through plans for the project implementation, and beginning the conceptual design of the test section.

Scott Reome; Dan Davies

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Liner Drilling Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liner Drilling Date: Liner Drilling Date: 4-5-10 DOE Code: 71092 Cont ractor Code: 8067-766 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview Nothing out of the ordinary for drilling an existing location 1. What are the environmental impacts? NE SW Sec 21 , T39N, R78W (45-3-X-21 well) 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately a week 4 . What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, Drilling Rig etc.)? Will Drill out of 9 5/8 caslng with liner drillng assembly. After drilling approximately 750 to 1000 ft, will test liner hanging assembly set and retrieve multiple times. The table b elow is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialis t and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey a

137

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE COMBUSTION HAZARD TO THE EXPERIMENTAL GAS- COOLED REACTOR-PRELIMINARY BURNING RIG EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

>An assembly was constructed which simulated the moderator coolant annulus in the Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor. This assembly was preheated to various temperatures and air was passed through the coolant annulus. Under certain conditions it was demonstrated that self-sustained combustion of the graphite could occur. Rates of temperature rise were generally less than 1 deg C/ min until the graphite temperature exceeded 700 deg C and then rise rates became very high. In these cxperimcnts, the assembly was not operated in such a manner as to give ignition temperatures eharaeteristic of the EGCR. These tests were designed only to investigate the effects of changing such parameters as the rate of coolant flow, air humidity, prior oxidation on the graphite, and air inlet temperature. A later series of experiments to more closely duplicate the EGCR operating conditions was completed and will be reported in a second report, HW- 71182. (auth)

Dahl, R.E.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) Released: April 16, 2013 Background The Form EIA-23L, "Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, " is used to collect data on reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are used to develop national and regional estimates of proved reserves of domestic crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids, and to facilitate national energy policy decisions. Reporting on the Form EIA-23L is mandatory. Reserves Information Gathering System The Form EIA-23L Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS), provides respondents with an efficient and effective means for filing the form using a personal computer (PC). Hardware / Software Requirements The minimum hardware requirements needed to install and use RIGS are:

139

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1090-2011 DOE-STD-1090-2011 September 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1090-2007 August 2007 DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. INCH-POUND INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1090-2011 iii Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hoisting and Rigging Standard is intended to be used by supervisors, line managers, safety personnel, equipment operators, riggers and other personnel responsible for the safety of hoisting and rigging operations at DOE sites. It may be used as either contract document or as a best practices guide at the site's or program office's discretion. The standard invokes applicable OSHA and national consensus standards but also delineates

140

IMPROVED TUBULARS FOR BETTER ECONOMICS IN DEEP GAS WELL DRILLING USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the research program has been to improve the rate-of-penetration in deep hostile environments by improving the life cycle and performance of coiled-tubing, an important component of a deep well drilling system for oil and gas exploration, by utilizing the latest developments in the microwave materials technology. Originally, it was proposed to accomplish this by developing an efficient and economically viable continuous microwave process to sinter continuously formed/extruded steel powder for the manufacture of seamless coiled tubing and other tubular products. However, based on the results and faced with insurmountable difficulties in the extrusion and de-waxing processes, the approach of achieving the goals of the program has been slightly changed. In the continuation proposal an approach of microwave sintering combined with Cold Isostatic Press (CIP) and joining (by induction or microwave) is adopted. This process can be developed into a semi-continuous sintering process if the CIP can produce parts fast enough to match the microwave sintering rates. Originally, the entire program was spread over three phases with the following goals: Phase I: Demonstration of the feasibility concept of continuous microwave sintering process for tubular steel products. Phase II: Design, building and testing of a prototype microwave system which shall be combined with a continuous extruder for steel tubular objects. Phase III: Execution of the plan for commercialization of the technology by one of the industrial partners. However, since some of the goals of the phase I were not completed, an extension of nine months was granted and we continued extrusion experiments, designed and built semicontinuous microwave sintering unit.

Dinesh Agrawal; Paul Gigl; Mahlon Dennis; Roderic Stanley

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13-i CHAPTER 13 LOAD HOOKS This chapter provides safety standards for the inspection, testing, and maintenance of load hooks installed on cranes or hoists and implements the requirements of ASME B30.10, Chapter 10-1, "Hooks." See Chapter 12, "Rigging Accessories," for rigging hook requirements (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). 13.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.1 Marking......................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.2 Attachments ...............................................................................................................13-1

142

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State. Volume III. Experience of drilling five shale-gas wells in New York State  

SciTech Connect

Five shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the South-Central areas of New York State as part of this program. The program was undertaken by Arlington Exploration Company (AEC) during 1981 and 1982. The wells were drilled on educational properties in an attempt to demonstrate the economic prospect of natural gas for institutional and small commercial consumers to develop their own source of energy. All five wells were completed in the Marcellus section of the Devonian shale. Each of the five wells was connected to an appropriate heat load for the purpose of production testing. The project supports the theory that a well drilled anywhere in South-Central New York and completed in the Marcellus Shale using modern fracturing techniques (i.e. nitrogen foam) is likely to produce some gas. Important factors not yet predictable are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the volume of recoverable reserves. Depths to the Marcellus Shale generally increase from north (i.e. Houghton College) to south (i.e. Portville Central School).

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Rig count in Utica Shale doubles from year ago - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The number of active oil and natural gas rigs in the Appalachian Basin's Utica Shale formation for the last week of October 2012 (ending October 26) ...

144

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: continue both screening and high pressure experiments to determine optimum inhibitors; investigate molecular mechanisms of hydrate formation/inhibition, through microscopic and macroscopic experiments; begin controlled tests on the Exxon pilot plant loop at their Houston facility; and continue to act as a forum for the sharing of field test results. Progress on these objectives are described in this report.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Drilling Practices That Minimize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Practices Drilling Practices Fact Sheet - Drilling Practices That Minimize Generation of Drilling Wastes How Are Wells Typically Drilled? The conventional process of drilling oil and gas wells uses a rotary drill bit that is lubricated by drilling fluids or muds. As the drill bit grinds downward through the rock layers, it generates large amounts of ground-up rock known as drill cuttings. This section of the Drilling Waste Management Information System website discusses several alternative drilling practices that result in a lower volume of waste being generated. Oil and gas wells are constructed with multiple layers of pipe known as casing. Traditional wells are not drilled from top to bottom at the same diameter but rather in a series of progressively smaller-diameter intervals. The top interval is drilled starting at the surface and has the largest diameter hole. Drill bits are available in many sizes to drill different diameter holes. The hole diameter can be 20" or larger for the uppermost sections of the well, followed by different combinations of progressively smaller diameters. Some of the common hole diameters are: 17.5", 14.75", 12.25", 8.5", 7.875", and 6.5".

146

Advanced Drilling through Diagnostics-White-Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-speed data link that would provide dramatically faster communication from downhole instruments to the surface and back again has the potential to revolutionize deep drilling for geothermal resources through Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD). Many aspects of the drilling process would significantly improve if downhole and surface data were acquired and processed in real-time at the surface, and used to guide the drilling operation. Such a closed-loop, driller-in-the-loop DWD system, would complete the loop between information and control, and greatly improve the performance of drilling systems. The main focus of this program is to demonstrate the value of real-time data for improving drilling. While high-rate transfer of down-hole data to the surface has been accomplished before, insufficient emphasis has been placed on utilization of the data to tune the drilling process to demonstrate the true merit of the concept. Consequently, there has been a lack of incentive on the part of industry to develop a simple, low-cost, effective high-speed data link. Demonstration of the benefits of DWD based on a high-speed data link will convince the drilling industry and stimulate the flow of private resources into the development of an economical high-speed data link for geothermal drilling applications. Such a downhole communication system would then make possible the development of surface data acquisition and expert systems that would greatly enhance drilling operations. Further, it would foster the development of downhole equipment that could be controlled from the surface to improve hole trajectory and drilling performance. Real-time data that would benefit drilling performance include: bit accelerations for use in controlling bit bounce and improving rock penetration rates and bit life; downhole fluid pressures for use in the management of drilling hydraulics and improved diagnosis of lost circulation and gas kicks; hole trajectory for use in reducing directional drilling costs; and downhole weight-on-bit and drilling torque for diagnosing drill bit performance. In general, any measurement that could shed light on the downhole environment would give us a better understanding of the drilling process and reduce drilling costs.

FINGER,JOHN T.; GLOWKA,DAVID ANTHONY; LIVESAY,BILLY JOE; MANSURE,ARTHUR J.; PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Program: Hoisting and Rigging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of these requirements is to ensure that hoisting and rigging (H&R) equipment is safe to operate. 2 Scope These requirements cover inspections and maintenance over the life of H&R equipment. Requirements are listed in terms of ? Types of inspection (initial, pre-use, frequent, periodic, and third party) and maintenance (preventative, operational testing, and load testing) Responsibilities (person who ensures that the inspection was performed and person performing the inspection) Documentation requirements – HRED refers to the H&R Equipment Database, which is maintained by the H&R inspector. Submit inspection and maintenance data to this inspector to stay in compliance. – CR refers to custodian records, which are maintained by the equipment custodian. Details on what to look for and how to conduct the inspection are listed in Department of Energy Standard 1090, “Hoisting and Rigging ” (DOE-STD-1090-2007).

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

149

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List Updated December 7, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.state.nj.us/drbc/ Hydrologic conditions #12; Policies & regulations Natural gas related water withdrawal information associated with the industry The Future of Natural Gas (2011) MIT http://web.mit.edu/mitei/research/studies/natural-gas-2011.shtml An analysis of the role of natural gas in our energy future under a variety of possible

Manning, Sturt

150

The Public Heath Implications of Unconventional Gas Drilling For presentation to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production of hydrocarbons from unconventional reservoirs (tight gas, shale oil/gas) has caused a largeApplications: Oil and gas production Geophysical exploration Benefits: Tracks the disposition material. The closed and unpropped fracture is then non-conductive to the flow of oil or gas

Sibille, Etienne

151

Advanced drilling systems study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

Pierce, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging

153

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING & RIGGING HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging

154

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State: Part II. Experience of locating and drilling four shale-gas wells in New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the south-central area of New York State as part of this project. The four wells that were drilled are: the Rathbone well, in Steuben County, was located on the north side of a graben, in an old shale-gas field; it penetrated the Rhinestreet, Geneseo and Marcellus shales. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Rhinestreet, without marked success, and in the Marcellus; the latter formation has a calculated open flow of 110 Mcf/day and appears capable of initial production of 100 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 500 psi. The Dansville well, in Livingston County, tested the Geneseo and Marcellus shales at shallower depth. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Marcellus. The calculated open flow is 95 Mcf/day, and the well appears capable of initial production of 70 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 300 psi. The Erwin and N. Corning wells, both near Corning in Steuben County, were designed to test the possibility of collecting gas from a fractured conduit layer connecting to other fracture systems in the Rhinestreet shale. The N. Corning well failed; the expected conduit was found to be only slightly fractured. The Erwin well encountered a good initial show of gas at the conduit, but the gas flow was not maintained; even after artificial stimulation the production is only 10 Mcf/day. The present conclusion is that the most likely source of shale gas in south-central New York is the Marcellus shale formation. Important factors not yet established are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the potential of the Geneseo after stimulation.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-i 1-i CHAPTER 11 WIRE ROPE AND SLINGS This chapter provides requirements for the fabrication and use of wire rope and slings used in hoisting and rigging and implements the requirements of ASME B30.9, Slings (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). . 11.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................11-1 11.2 WIRE ROPE ............................................................................................................................11-4 11.2.1 Wire-Rope Lays .........................................................................................................11-4 11.2.2 Wire-Rope Cores .......................................................................................................11-4

156

Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

Collett, T.S. (USGS); Riedel, M. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Cochran, J.R. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY); Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Navi Mumbai, India); Sathe, A.V. (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Uttaranchal, INDIA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

158

Indonesian drilling maintains steady pace  

SciTech Connect

Offshore drilling activity in Indonesia increased nominally the first quarter of 1985 to an average 29 rigs. Barring any further problems with oil prices and markets, operators are expected to maintain essentially the current general level of appraisal/development work for the rest of this year. There are still a number of prospective regions to be explored in Southeast Asia. Regional developments are described for the South China Sea area, the Java Sea, South Sumatra, Kalimantan, Irian Jaya and the Malacca Strait.

Not Available

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method for controlling directional drilling in response to horns detected by electromagnetic energy propagation resistivity measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For use in conjunction with an earth borehole drilling apparatus that includes: a drilling rig; a drill string operating from said drilling rig for drilling an earth borehole, said drill string including a bottom hole arrangement comprising a drill bit, a downhole resistivity measuring subsystem for measuring downhole formation resistivity near said bit by propagating electromagnetic energy into earth formations near said bit, receiving electromagnetic energy that has propagated through the formations and producing measurement signals that depend on the received signals; a method is described for directing the drilling of a well bore with respect to a geological bed boundary in said earth formations, comprising the steps of: producing from said measurement signals a recording of downhole formation resistivity as a function of borehole depth, determining the presence of a horn in said resistivity recording; and implementing a change in the drilling direction of said drill bit in response to said determination of the presence of a horn.

Luling, M.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

An evaluation of subsea pump technologies that can be used to achieve dual gradient drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dual Gradient Drilling is an exciting technology which promises to solve the current technical hurdles and economic risks of Deepwater Drilling. Several techniques for Dual Gradient Drilling have been proposed to the industry. One such method involves installing a subsea booster pump at the seafloor with the aim of returning the drilling fluid back to the rig. The pump will manage annular pressures in the wellbore as circulation rates and mud weights vary and will permit early detection of wellbore influxes. Any such pump chosen to achieve this objective will be subjected to very high differential pressures and will be faced with the onerous task of lifting very abrasive and viscous mud slurries from the sea floor back to the drilling rig. This distance in deep water may be well within the range of about 4, 000 – 12,000 feet depending on the operating water depth of the rig. Several pump technologies available to the industry were examined. Piston pumps are very efficient and can withstand the high differential pressures encountered in the Mudlift Drilling System. However, their drawbacks are their large size and weight and high initial capital cost and maintenance costs. Centrifugal pumps on the other hand are relatively smaller than piston and diaphragm pumps and are generally less expensive. Disc pumps, with their non-impingement design are able to handle solids and fluids with a high gas volume fraction but, like centrifugal pumps, are generally less efficient than reciprocating pumps. Diaphragm pumps are capable of maintaining a constant rate regardless of pressure fluctuations. They can handle very abrasive solids with limited wear on the pump. They also excel at handling very viscous fluids and they can be modified to handle up to 95% gas volume fraction. Like piston pumps, they have very high efficiencies. The potential of each of these pump technologies to meet the requirements for the Mudlift Drilling System was examined in this thesis. The benefits and drawbacks of each of these pump technologies were highlighted and modifications to meet the demands of the mudlift system evaluated.

Oluwadairo, Tolulope

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Silica Exposure Assessment of Oil And Gas Drilling Workers During Hydraulic Fracking Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The problem investigated in this study was that of identifying the silica exposure to the employees of an oil gas company during the fracking process… (more)

Li, Jigang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

An Advisory System For Selecting Drilling Technologies and Methods in Tight Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The supply and demand situation is crucial for the oil and gas industry during the first half of the 21st century. For the future, we… (more)

Pilisi, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Geothermal Well Costs and their Sensitivities to Changes in Drilling and Completion Operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. The basis for much of the analysis is a computer-simulation-based model which calculates and accrues operational costs involved in drilling and completing a well. Geothermal well costs are discussed in general, with special emphasis on variations among different geothermal areas in the United States, effects of escalation and inflation over the past few years, and comparisons of geothermal drilling costs with those for oil and gas wells. Cost differences between wells for direct use of geothermal energy and those for electric generation, are also indicated. In addition, a breakdown of total well cost into its components is presented. This provides an understanding of the relative contributions of different operations in drilling and completions. A major portion of the cost in many geothermal wells is from encountered troubles, such as lost circulation, cementing difficulties, and fishing. These trouble costs are considered through both specific examples and statistical treatment of drilling and completions problems. The sensitivities of well costs to variations in several drilling and completion parameters are presented. The mode1 makes it possible to easily vary parameters such as rates of penetration; bit lifetimes; bit rental, or rig costs; delay times; number of cement plugs; etc. are compared.

Carson, C. C.; Lin, Y.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Practical applications of a drilling data center  

SciTech Connect

Tenneco Oil is using a real-time drilling-data acquisition, telemetry, data base, and applications-program system for Gulf of Mexico operations. The system provides for data acquisition in real time from commercially available logging units. The data are transmitted into a central office onshore via microwave or satellite telemetry links. Up to 352 drilling parameters are transmitted from each computerized logging unit and archived in the data base every 20 sec. Parameters can include measurement-while-drilling (MWD) data as well as mud-logging data. Applications programs utilizing these parameters are available in the central site data center (CSDC) and in locations throughout Tenneco's facilities in Lafayette, La. Access to the CSDC and its computing power is also available on the offshore rig. Backup surveillance of critical drilling parameters is provided through alarms and continuous monitoring of the parameters, thus providing for a safer operation. Rig efficiency has also been improved through analysis of the data and comparison of the data between various rig operations and rigs. Both tangible and intangible cost savings are discussed.

Graff, R.L.; Segrest, R.P.

1986-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 BELOW-THE-HOOK LIFTING DEVICES 14-i This chapter provides the requirements for below-the-hook lifting devices used in hoisting and rigging, such as spreader bars, lifting yokes, and lift fixtures. This section implements the requirements of ASME B30.20, "Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices" (for latest ASME standards, see http://catalog.asme.org/home.cfm?Category=CS). NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10,000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials are governed by ANSI N14.6 ["Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 Pounds (4,500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials."] 14.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................14-1

166

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2006 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and the Average Number of Active Rotary Drilling Rigs, 1977-2006: PDF: 4: ... Glossary: A listing of terms used within the Reserves Report, and their ...

167

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and the Average Number of Active Rotary Drilling Rigs, 1977-2005: PDF: 4: ... Glossary: A listing of terms used within the Reserves Report, and their ...

168

Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

SciTech Connect

This standard is intended as a reference document to be used by supervisors, line managers, safety personnel, equipment operators, and any other personnel responsible for safety of hoisting and rigging operations at DOE sites. It quotes or paraphrases the US OSHA and ANSI requirements. It also encompasses, under one cover,hoisting and rigging requirements, codes, standards, and regulations, eliminating the need to maintain extensive (and often incomplete) libraries of hoisting and rigging standards throughout DOE. The standard occasionally goes beyond the minimum general industry standards established by OSHA and ANSI, and also delineates the more stringent requirements necessary to accomplish the complex, diversified, critical, and often hazardous hoisting and rigging work found with the DOE complex.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hoisting and Rigging: Inspection and Maintenance Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Devices, Slings, and Rigging Hardware and Accessories (SLAC-I-730-0A21S-036) Hoisting and Rigging: PreHoisting and Rigging: Inspection and Maintenance Requirements URL: http://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/eshmanual/references/hoisting Department: Field Safety and Building Inspection Program: Hoisting and Rigging Authority: ESH Manual, Chapter

Wechsler, Risa H.

170

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Advanced drilling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.

Pierce, K.G.; Finger, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced drilling systems study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis (Livesay Consultants, Encintas, CA)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Economic Impact of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling What Have We Learned? What are the Limitations?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: What is the issue? Several studies have projected large positive economic impacts of shale gas development in the Marcellus region. To make informed choices for their communities, policy makers need to understand the strengths and limitations of these studies. Most importantly, they need to understand that there is a tenuous relationship between positive economic impacts in the short run and long term economic development based on an extractive, exhaustible natural resource. In addressing the relationship, proactive policy can make a difference.

David Kay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells throughout the southwestern U.S. The small business has...

175

NETL: News Release - DOE-Industry Breakthrough Turns Drilling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2002 DOE-Industry Breakthrough Turns Drilling System Into Lightning Fast Computer Network Energy Department Cites Remarkable Advance In 'Smart' Oil, Gas Drilling SAN ANTONIO,...

176

A Built for Purpose Micro-Hole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will serve as the final report on the work performed from the contract period October 2005 thru April 2007. The project 'A Built for Purpose Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)' purpose was to upgrade an existing state-of-the-art Coiled Tubing Drilling Rig to a Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) capable of meeting the specifications and tasks of the Department of Energy. The individual tasks outlined to meet the Department of Energy's specifications are: (1) Concept and development of lubricator and tool deployment system; (2) Concept and development of process control and data acquisition; (3) Concept and development of safety and efficiency improvements; and (4) Final unit integration and testing. The end result of the MCTR upgrade has produced a unit capable of meeting the following requirements: (1) Capable of handling 1-inch through 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing (Currently dressed for 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing and capable of running up to 3-1/2-inch coiled tubing); (2) Capable of drilling and casing surface, intermediate, production and liner hole intervals; (3) Capable of drilling with coiled tubing and has all controls and installation piping for a top drive; (4) Rig is capable of running 7-5/8-inch range 2 casing; and (5) Capable of drilling 5,000 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 6,000 ft true measured depth (TMD).

Bart Patton

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-2004 9-2004 12-i Chapter 12 Rigging Accessories CHAPTER 12 RIGGING ACCESSORIES This chapter provides requirements for rigging accessories used in hoisting and rigging - shackles, eyebolts, rings, wire-rope clips, turnbuckles, rigging hooks, and load-indicating devices. 12.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................12-1 12.1.1 Inspections .................................................................................................................12-1 12.1.2 Testing .....................................................................................................................12-3 12.1.3 Good and Bad Rigging Practices ...............................................................................12-3

178

Underbalanced drilling guidelines improve safety, efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In underbalanced drilling, the primary means of well control, the hydrostatic head of the drilling fluid, is lost either unavoidably because of hole problems (such as abnormally high pressure or lost circulation) or intentionally because of economics or to prevent formation damage. Because of complications with underbalanced drilling, however, several rigs have been destroyed by fire. Operational guidelines are being developed in close cooperation with industry. The final guidelines will be consistent with the existing standards of well control practices in Alberta, yet applicable for underbalanced drilling operations world-wide. Until formal guidelines are completed in Alberta, operators interested in underbalanced drilling should work closely with the Energy Resources Conservation Board in preparing site-specific programs. Although underbalanced drilling is often associated with horizontal wells, the majority of underbalanced drilling operations in Alberta are conducted on vertical wells. The paper describes underbalanced drilling, blowout prevention, surface BOP equipment (stripper, annular pack off, rotating head, rotating BOP, coiled tubing), subsurface BOP, drilling fluids, nitrified drilling fluids, surface equipment, well-site supervision, well control equipment, and the surface handling of fluids.

Eresman, D. (Energy Resources Conservation Board, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Learning by Drilling: Inter-Firm Learning and Relationship Persistence in the Texas Oilpatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high-frequency data from oil and gas drilling. I find thatan examination of the oil and gas drilling industry. I findvertical integration. The oil and gas drilling industry is

KELLOGG, RYAN M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List This list is in no way exhaustive. Rather, it attempts to provide a set of primary references that offer key pieces of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development Impact Assessment of Natural Gas Production in the New York City Water Supply Watershed (2009). NYCDEP http://home2.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/news/natural_gas_drilling.shtml Review of water related and infiltration events Short Scholarly Features Natural Gas Plays in the Marcellus Shale: Challenges & Potential

Wang, Z. Jane

182

Hoisting and rigging manual: Uncontrolled document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a draft copy of a Hoisting and Rigging Manual for the Department of Energy. The manual is divided into ten chapters. The chapter titles follow: terminology and definitions; operator training and qualification; overhead and gantry cranes; mobile cranes; forklift trucks; hoists; hooks; wire rope, slings, and rigging accessories; construction hoisting and rigging equipment requirements; references.

NONE

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

PNNL Hoisting and Rigging Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual describes the safe and cost effective operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair requirements for cranes, hoists, fork trucks, slings, rigging hardware, and hoisting equipment. It is intended to be a user's guide to requirements, codes, laws, regulations, standards, and practices that apply to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its subcontractors.

Haynie, Todd O.; Fullmer, Michael W.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

shale oil and gas shale oil and gas IAEE/AEA Meeting January 4, 2014 | Philadelphia, PA By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Key insights on drilling productivity and production trends Adam Sieminski, IAEE/AEA January 4, 2014 2 * The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources * Six tight oil and shale gas plays taken together account for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth over the last 2 years * Higher drilling efficiency and new well productivity, rather than an increase in the rig count, have been the main drivers of recent production growth * Steep legacy production decline rates are being offset by growing

185

Use power factor correction to cut SCR rig fuel bills  

SciTech Connect

When drilling with SCR-powered drilling rigs, there are specific instances on every well when the kVA capacity of the AC generators prohibits efficient engine loading. It then becomes necessary to run another engine-generator set to provide sufficient kVA to power the load, even though the kW required by the load can be furnished by existing engine(s) on line. The practice of running one more engine than can be fully loaded causes all engines on line to run at a less efficient point on the brake specific fuel consumption curve (BSFC) and therefore costs more in terms of engine hours, fuel and maintenance costs. This article presents a study of the load represented by the mud pump and drawworks along with a graphical representation that shows the effect of these loads on the engine generator system both with and without a power factor correction device.

Logan, R.T.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Drilling of a 2000-metre (6562-FT) Borehole for Geothermal Steam in Iceland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling for geothermal heat has been carried out in Iceland since 1928, when hot water was obtained for district heating in Reykjavik. From that time, in particular in the sixties, extensive drilling has resulted in the annual utilization of 54 million tons of water and 2 million tons of steam. Five drilling rigs are used for geothermal drilling, with depth capacity ranging from 400 to 3,600 meters (1,312 to 11,812 feet). Drilling procedures vary extensively and depend on whether a high- or low-temperature field is being drilled, the main difference being the well-casing program and the blowout equipment used.

Ragnars, K.; Benediktsson, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Casing Drilling Test  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Casing Drilling Test Casing Drilling Test Date: 5-17-201 1 DOE Code: 6730-020-72000 Contractor Code: 8067-806 Project Lead: Marl< Duletsky Project Overview 1, Brief project description ~nclude The existing 13-1-SX-23 location and entry road will be reworldrilling rig (SST anything that could impact the rig #3). The two existing wells on the location will be capped at ground level, and a new well will be drilled environment] using water based mud. The existing rat I mouse hole on the site will be backfilled. A new 6700 ft3 reserve pit [80' long by 30' wide by 4' deep allowing for 2' of freeboard] will be constructed on location. and a 12 mm 2. Legal location liner will be installed. 3. Duration of the project 4. Major equipment to be used

188

Continental drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Continental Drilling was convened to prepare a report for submission to the US Geodynamics Committee with respect to the contribution that could be made by land drilling to resolve major problems of geodynamics and consider the mechanisms by which the responsibility for scientific planning, establishment of priorities, administration, and budgeting for a land-drilling program within the framework of the aims of the Geodynamics Project would best be established. A new and extensive program to study the continental crust is outlined in this report. The Workshop focused on the following topics: processes in the continental crust (mechanism of faulting and earthquakes, hydrothermal systems and active magma chambers); state and structure of the continental crust (heat flow and thermal structure of the crust; state of ambient stress in the North American plate; extent, regional structure, and evolution of crystalline continental crust); short hole investigations; present state and needs of drilling technology; drill hole experimentation and instrumentation; suggestions for organization and operation of drilling project; and suggested level of effort and funding. Four recommendations are set down. 8 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

Shoemaker, E.M. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Hoisting & Rigging Lift Plan Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory May 16, 2005 SSRL-HRLP-000-R0 Page 1 of 3 General Information Lift Plan Document # Plan prepared by: Describe the load or items to be lifted: Could the load, if dropped, release hazardous materials or radioactivity? No Yes (describe) Is the load irreplaceable or would it be very costly to replace if damaged? No Yes (describe) Brief description of lift activities (specify if rolling or flipping involved) Equipment Information Equipment ID: Equipment custodian: Rated capacity: Operator capacity : Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE) Steel-toed shoes Required for all personnel involved with lift activity to protect from crushing of feet/toes

190

Alloy Development for Measurement While Drilling Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, For oil and gas drilling applications, one of the giant technical ... of Type 2507 Duplex Stainless Steel in Synthetic Seawater and Hydraulic Fluids.

191

Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes

Z. Xu; C. B. Reed; G. Konercki; R. A. Parker; B. C. Gahan; S. Batarseh; R. M. Graves; H. Figueroa; N. Skinner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Underbalanced drilling in remedial operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators are finding additional applications for underbalanced drilling (UBD) technology that deliver benefits besides faster, more trouble-free drilling and improved well productivity. Underbalanced workovers, completions and re-drills are being performed with impressive results. This article will describe some of the jobs and applications, and detail the special surface equipment being used to make this a success. This is the fifth in a series of articles on UBD technology and its rapid development in this field. The paper discusses deep gas wells in the Texas Panhandle, gas and condensate wells near Mobile, Alabama, and the Austin Chalk wells in Texas and Louisiana.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

NETL: News Release - New Tools for Deep Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 29, 2003 May 29, 2003 New Tools for Deep Gas... DOE Adds Three New Projects to "Deep Trek" Program - Photo - Drill Rig MORGANTOWN, WV - The need to probe ever deeper to locate and produce the natural gas Americans will need in the future has led the Department of Energy to add three new research projects to its "Deep Trek" program. "Deep Trek" is a program being carried out by the Energy Department's Office of Fossil Energy to develop "smart" drilling systems tough enough to withstand the extreme conditions of deep reservoirs, yet economical enough to make the natural gas they encounter affordable to produce. Today, more than 70 percent of gas produced in the continental United States comes from wells 5,000 feet deep or shallower. But as America's

194

Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a revolutionary modification in recent history was the complete displacement of cable tool rigs by rotary drilling rigs in the late 1920s.

Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 171B PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at these adjacent holes. Well-developed ash zones in Core 136-842A-1H contain fresh glass as well as minerals of high-viscosity mud was pumped and circulated out. It was decided to trip the drill string and rig up

196

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

197

Middle East: Production expansion projects roar ahead. [Oil and gas industry statistics and outlooks in the Middle East  

SciTech Connect

In the Middle East, rig count is at its highest level since 1985. Every major producer in the region is working towards a goal of maximizing its sustainable producing rate, except Iraq which would if it could. Saudi Arabia may even reach its ambitious target a year early. This paper reviews the goals and forecasts for the oil and gas industry in the Middle East. It summarizes the exploration activity over the past year and includes information of geophysical methods used, numbers of wells drilling, types of well drilled, total footages, number of completions, and the political influence on all of these aspects. Both on and offshore sites are discussed.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Underbalanced drilling solves difficult drilling problems and enhances production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternate approach to drilling, completing and working over new and existing wells has dramatically improved the efficiency of these operations. This method is called underbalanced drilling (UBD). Improvements in both the equipment and technique during the past 5 years have made this process economical and necessary to solve many difficult drilling problems. Additionally, by reducing drilling or workover damage, dramatic improvements in oil and gas production rates and ultimate reserves are realized, resulting in extra profits for today`s operators. This article will detail the advantages of UBD and give specific examples of its applications, A series of related articles will follow, including: new UBD equipment, land and off-shore case histories, coiled tubing drilling, underbalanced workovers, software technology and subsea applications to examine the reality and future of this technology.

Cuthbertson, R.L.; Vozniak, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Drilling operations at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Operations Office (NV) is responsible for supporting the nuclear test programs of the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. This support includes the drilling of test holes for nuclear device testing a the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of this audit was to assess the effectiveness of the Department of Energy's management of test hole inventories at the NTS. Our audit disclosed that NV accumulated a large inventory of unused test holes and approved drilling additional holes for which neither laboratory (Los Alamos nor Livermore) had identified a need. The overdrilling of test holes occurred because NV did not comply with good inventory practices that would have had NV's approving official question the need for, and the timing of, the laboratories' drilling requests. Instead, NV gave perfunctory approval to the laboratories' work orders for drilling test holes, and emphasized keeping two drill rig crews busy and satisfying the laboratories' demands for dedicated drilling personnel. Although NV did not agree that overdrilling had occurred, it has cut back its drilling activities and estimated that this will save abut $7.6 million annually. NV agreed with the recommendations in the report and has taken corrective actions.

1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

200

Scheduling Workover Rigs for Onshore Oil Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available workover rigs, so as to minimize the production loss associated with the ... novic [5, 6, 7] is based on the exploration of a dynamic neighborhood model.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

An A-Z of offshore oil and gas. Second ed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an illustrated international glossary and reference guide to the offshore oil and gas industries, and their technology. It contains more than 4,000 terms in current use, with 20 full-page maps and 200 line drawings, plus extensive appendices. The new edition has been considerably expanded, revised and updated. There are new features on subjects such as: new drilling rigs, fire and gas detection, gas dehydration, accommodation platforms, new articulated loading platforms, acoustic enclosures, and more. There are additional tables and maps as well as many more terms which have now come into practical use.

Whitehead, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Definition: Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Drilling Techniques There are a variety of drilling techniques which can be used to sink a borehole into the ground. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, in terms of the depth to which it can drill, the type of sample returned, the costs involved and penetration rates achieved. There are two basic types of drills: drills which produce rock chips, and drills which produce core samples.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Well drilling is the process of drilling a hole in the ground for the extraction of a natural resource such as ground water, brine, natural gas, or petroleum, for the injection of a fluid from surface to a subsurface reservoir or for subsurface formations evaluation or monitoring.

203

Slim-hole Measurement While Drilling (MWD) system for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to make commercially available, wireless Measurement-while-drilling tools to reliably operate in air, air-mist, air-foam, and other unbalanced drilling environments during oil and gas directional drilling operations in conjunction with down-hole motors or other assemblies. Progress is described.

Harrison, W.H.; Harrison, J.D.; Rubin, L.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas  

SciTech Connect

The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Scheduling workover rigs for onshore oil production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many oil wells in Brazilian onshore fields rely on artificial lift methods. Maintenance services such as cleaning, reinstatement, stimulation and others are essential to these wells. These services are performed by workover rigs, which are available ... Keywords: Combinatorial optimization, Heuristics, Oil production, VNS, Workover rigs

Dario J. Aloise; Daniel Aloise; Caroline T. M. Rocha; Celso C. Ribeiro; José C. Ribeiro Filho; Luiz S. S. Moura

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Operators wary: Stack that rig correctly  

SciTech Connect

This article points out that reasons for planned, scheduled preservation of offshore rigs and equipment are as varied as the owner's interest in them. As a result, no single plan or procedure can meet the requirements of every rig owner. Each rig and its equipment must be treated individually for a number of reasons. The most effective and economical rig preservation program is the result of both the owner and preservation contractor understanding all the objectives and the time frame involved. Numerous questions should be answered up front. How long will preservation measures be required. Is the rig to be maintained in an operational state. Will there be frequent trips to the rig. Will the unit be kept intact, or equipment removed as needed for operation of other rigs. Is the whole unit or any of its components for sale. Will insurance and certifications be affected by the preservation methods used. Perhaps most important is the time period. If the rig is to be stacked for an extended length of time, the owner will likely opt for ''cold,'' or inoperable, preservation. In this condition, engines are treated to protect cylinders, cooling systems and drive components in a static condition.

Moriniere, J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Drilling optimization using drilling simulator software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drilling operations management will face hurdles to reduce costs and increase performance, and to do this with less experience and organizational drilling capacity. A technology called Drilling Simulators Software has shown an extraordinary potential to improve the drilling performance and reduce risk and cost. Different approaches have been made to develop drilling-simulator software. The Virtual Experience Simulator, geological drilling logs, and reconstructed lithology are some of the most successful. The drilling simulations can run multiple scenarios quickly and then update plans with new data to improve the results. Its storage capacity for retaining field drilling experience and knowledge add value to the program. This research shows the results of using drilling simulator software called Drilling Optimization Simulator (DROPS®) in the evaluation of the Aloctono block, in the Pirital field, eastern Venezuela. This formation is characterized by very complex geology, containing faulted restructures, large dips, and hard and abrasive rocks. The drilling performance in this section has a strong impact in the profitability of the field. A number of simulations using geological drilling logs and the concept of the learning curve defined the optimum drilling parameters for the block. The result shows that DROPS® has the capability to simulate the drilling performance of the area with reasonable accuracy. Thus, it is possible to predict the drilling performance using different bits and the learning-curve concept to obtain optimum drilling parameters. All of these allow a comprehensive and effective cost and drilling optimization.

Salas Safe, Jose Gregorio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

,,,,,"Rig: TOI Discoverer Enterprise"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Well: OCS-G 32306 002 ST00BP00",,,,"Flow Data" Well: OCS-G 32306 002 ST00BP00",,,,"Flow Data" ,,,,,"Field: Mississippi Canyon 252" ,,,,,"Rig: TOI Discoverer Enterprise" ,,,,,"Choke Manifold",,,,"Rates",,,,,,,,,"Ratio" "Date","Time","Choke A","Choke B","BSW","WHPres","WHTemp","WHDCP","WHDCTemp","Gas Rate","Gas Cum","Uncorrected ","Uncorrected ","Water Rate","Water Cum","Uncorrected ","Uncorrected ","Cumulative Oil ","GOR1","Comments" ,,,,,,,,,,,"Oil Rate","Oil Cum ",,,"Liquid Rate","Liquid Cum","from Cargo "

210

Turnkey drilling  

SciTech Connect

The recent surge in the popularity of turnkey drilling has produced a number of questions about turnkey operations from both operators and contractors. The International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) has no approved turnkey contract (although several of the member districts have printed one), leaving the parties participating in a turnkey well unsure of their responsibilities and obligations. Additionally, operators are finding liens filed against turnkey wells they thought were paid for. The term turnkey itself is often misunderstood and applied to a variety of guaranteed well commitments. Some turnkeys require the contractor to provide everything from location preparation to final production pipe or plugs. Others allow contingencies for stuck pipe, lost circulation, kicks and bad storms.

Pierce, D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Slimhole Drilling, Logging, and Completion Technology - An Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using slim holes (diameter < 15 cm) for geothermal exploration and small-scale power production can produce significant cost savings compared to conventional rotary-drilling methods. In addition, data obtained from slim holes can be used to lower the risks and costs associated with the drilling and completion of large-diameter geothermal wells. As a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories has worked with industry since 1992 to develop and promote drilling, testing, and logging technology for slim holes. This paper describes the current status of work done both in-house and contracted to industry. It focuses on drilling technology, case histories of slimhole drilling projects, data collection and rig instrumentation, and high-temperature logging tools.

FINGER,JOHN T.; JACOBSON,RONALD D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Illinois. The injection well is being drilled into a test area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

option for CO 2 storage. This is the first drilling into the Mount Simon Sandstone since oil and gas exploratory drilling was conducted some 15 to 40 years ago. Drilling...

213

Underbalanced drilling with air offers many pluses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressure overbalance during conventional drilling can cause significant fluid filtrate invasion and lost circulation. Fluid invasion into the formation can lead to formation damage, high mud costs, a need for expensive completions, and well productivity impairment. Because underbalanced drilling creates a natural tendency for fluid and gas to flow from the formation to the borehole, successful underbalanced drilling depends upon the appropriate selection of circulating fluid. The use of a compressible fluid in the circulating system, referred to as air drilling, lowers the downhole pressure, allowing drilling into and beyond these sensitive formations. The paper discusses the equipment needed; well control; downhole air requirements; air drilling techniques using dry air, air-mist, stable foam, stiff foam, and aerated-fluid; downhole fires; directional air drilling; and well completions.

Shale, L. [Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility.

Taguchi, Takeyoshi [X-ray Research Laboratory, RIGAKU Corporation, 3-9-12 Matsubara-cho, Akishima-shi, Tokyo 196-8666 (Japan); Yoshii, Mitsuru [Mud Technical Center, Telnite Co., Ltd., 1-2-14 Ohama, Sakata-shi, Yamagata 998-0064 (Japan); Shinoda, Kohzo [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

215

Exploration-production studies in newly drilled Devonian-Shale gas wells. Annual report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian shale has been recognized as an important source of gas in the Appalachian Basin. The program aids producers in the collection of reservoir data not normally collected and assists in the evaluation of the effectiveness of zone selection and stimulation designs and methods. The study should provide a fuller understanding of the relationships that affect productivity in the Devonian shale. The relationships between gas flows and geological features that control the production characteristics in the Devonian shale are being developed.

Graham, R.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 CONSTRUCTION HOISTING AND RIGGING EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 15-i Chapter 15 Construction Hoisting and Rigging Equipment Requirements This chapter outlines the requirements for the safe use of hoisting and rigging equipment on construction projects at DOE installations. 15.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................15-1 15.2 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS.........................................................................................15-2 15.2.1 Qualified Operators of Mobile Cranes.......................................................................15-2 15.2.2 Qualified Operators of Forklift Trucks ......................................................................15-3

217

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, Douglas K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kuhns, Douglass J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wiersholm, Otto (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Investigate Smart Drilling Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 20, 2004 February 20, 2004 New Projects to Investigate "Smart Drilling" Options Promise Lower Cost, More Reliable Gas Drilling Two additional projects have been selected under a Department of Energy solicitation designed to advance performance when drilling for natural gas. The projects are a key component of the Department's gas exploration and production research program, and support the President's National Energy Policy, which calls for boosting domestic production of natural gas to ensure an adequate future supply at reasonable prices. With shallow and conventional natural gas resources in the United States being depleted, drillers must reach for gas miles below the earth's surface, where temperatures run up to 450 EF and pressures are hundreds of times greater than atmospheric pressure. "Smart drilling" options can increase productivity, improve drilling safety, and lower costs when drilling for these hard-to-reach deep gas supplies.

220

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-03NT15401 Final Report Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling Submitted by: TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company 1935 Fremont Drive Salt Lake City, UT 84104 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 February 2010 Office of Fossil Energy Feasibility of Ultra-High Speed Diamond Drilling DE-FC26-03NT15401 ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Overview The natural gas industry in 2003 experienced sustained high prices, supported at least in part by pressure on supplies as gas in storage was rebuilt from historic lows in the early part of the year. The national annual average natural gas wellhead price was $4.88 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf), which is the highest wellhead price (based on 2003 constant dollars) in the Energy Information Administration's historical data series dating to 1930. U.S. marketed production was virtually unchanged compared with the previous year at 19.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), despite the high prices and an increased number of drilling rigs employed in the commercial development of gas deposits. Imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) mitigated supply declines, reaching a record

222

Handbook 1: Introduction to drilling mud systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first of the 11 handbook that make up the IADC Mud Equipment Manual. The manual is designed to provide information on all pieces of drilling rig equipment from the flow line to the mud pump section. This book focuses on drilling fluids and their properties and treatment, and thoroughly examines mud solid characteristics. Methods of controlling formation pore pressure, and cut points, as well as cuttings removal (viscosity, yield point, gel strengths, hole cleaning, etc.), are followed by a discussion of solid sizes and solid size distribution. Special features include a glossary of mud terms, a section on ''hard-to-find'' information such as gold concentration, wind forces, and AC motor current requirements, and a comprehensive index for all 11 handbooks.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Investigation of the feasibility of deep microborehole drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in sensor technology, microelectronics, and telemetry technology make it feasible to produce miniature wellbore logging tools and instrumentation. Microboreholes are proposed for subterranean telemetry installations, exploration, reservoir definition, and reservoir monitoring this assumes that very small diameter bores can be produced for significantly lower cost using very small rigs. A microborehole production concept based on small diameter hydraulic or pneumatic powered mechanical drilling, assemblies deployed on coiled tubing is introduced. The concept is evaluated using, basic mechanics and hydraulics, published theories on rock drilling, and commercial simulations. Small commercial drill bits and hydraulic motors were selected for laboratory scale demonstrations. The feasibility of drilling deep, directional, one to two-inch diameter microboreholes has not been challenged by the results to date. Shallow field testing of prototype systems is needed to continue the feasibility investigation.

Dreesen, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cohen, J.H. [Maurer Engineering, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

Judzis, Arnis (Salt Lake City, UT); Black, Alan D. (Coral Springs, FL); Green, Sidney J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Robertson, Homer A. (West Jordan, UT); Bland, Ronald G. (Houston, TX); Curry, David Alexander (The Woodlands, TX); Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W. (Cypress, TX)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Corrosion Resistant Metallic Materials for Ultra-deep Well Drilling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... corrosion fatigue, etc., can be a primary cause of catastrophic degradation of tubular components during ultra-deep drilling of oil and natural gas shale.

228

EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas and oil wells relative to total wells, improved greatly as early as 1986 as seen in the revised drilling statistics. The prior well data series did

229

Geothermal drilling technology update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Drill string enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a drill string enclosure which consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

lackouts, rising gas prices, changes to the Clean Air Act, proposals to open wilderness and protected offshore areas to gas drilling, and increasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and global oil peak. ("Peak" refers to a peak in extraction, followed by inexorable decline. Peak production you know that: · Natural Gas (NG) is the second most important energy source after oil; · In the U that of oil. To the extent that the so-called War on Terror is a cover for increasingly desper- ate moves

Keeling, Stephen L.

232

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Navigation drilling technology progresses  

SciTech Connect

This article reports that navigation drilling - an approach that combines advanced drill bit, downhole motor, measurement-while-drilling, and well planning technology into an integrated, steerable drilling system - has reduced drilling time for operating companies worldwide. A major operating advantage of navigation drilling is the ability to drill both straight and directional intervals with a single assembly. In conventional directional drilling, a bent sub and downhole motor (or a bent housing motor) are used to initiate kick-offs and make course corrections. The bent sub is made-up above the motor, tilting the motor's axis 1 to 3 degrees compared to the axis of the drill string. The assembly toolface can be aligned in the desired direction with a single-shot, a steering tool or an MWD system.

Bayne, R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DOE-STD-1090-99; DOE Standard Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TS TS INCH-POUND DOE-STD-1090-99 March 1999 Superseding DOE-STD-1090-96 September 1996 DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE STANDARD HOISTING AND RIGGING (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual) Summary of Changes as of March 1999

235

Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) Startup Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work accomplished to date to design, procure, assemble, authorize, and startup the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the reasons for establishing this capability, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, initial success, and plans for completing the initial 1,000 hour test.

Charles Park

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Well drilling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

Alvis, Robert L. (Albuquerque, NM); Newsom, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 CONSTRUCTION HOISTING AND RIGGING EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 15-i This chapter outlines the requirements for the safe use of hoisting and rigging equipment on construction projects at DOE installations. 15.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................15-1 15.2 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS.........................................................................................15-2 15.2.1 Qualified Operators of Mobile Cranes.......................................................................15-2 15.2.2 Qualified Operators of Forklift Trucks ......................................................................15-3 15.2.3 Qualified Riggers .......................................................................................................15-4

239

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 LOAD HOOKS 13-i Chapter 13 Load Hooks This chapter provides safety standards for the inspection, testing, and maintenance of load hooks installed on cranes or hoists and implements the requirements of ASME B30.10, Chapter 10-1, "Hooks." See Chapter 12, "Rigging Accessories," for rigging hook requirements. 13.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.1 Marking......................................................................................................................13-1 13.1.2 Attachments ...............................................................................................................13-1

240

Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 5 - System Evaluations. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is aimed at decreasing the costs and increasing the efficiency of drilling gas wells in excess of 15,000 feet. This volume presents a summary of an evaluation of various drilling techniques. Drilling solutions were compared quantitatively against typical penetration rates derived from conventional systems. A qualitative analysis measured the impact of a proposed system on the drilling industry. The evaluations determined that the best candidates f o r improving the speed and efficiency of drilling deep gas wells include: PDC/TSD bits, slim-hole drilling, roller-cone bits, downhole motors, top-driven systems, and coiled-tubing drilling.

None

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hoisting and Rigging: Pre-use Inspection Criteria for Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices, Slings, and Rigging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Rigging Hardware and Accessories URL: http://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/eshmanual/references/hoistingHoisting and Rigging: Pre-use Inspection Criteria for Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices, Slings Department: Field Safety and Building Inspection Program: Hoisting and Rigging Authority: ESH Manual, Chapter

Wechsler, Risa H.

242

DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies to obtain thermal energy (and other benefits) from a large body of water #12;Microgrid Customer ENERGY : Underground Technologies #12;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant;#12;Microgrid Customer Facilities Drilled Hydrothermal Energy Plant Cooling Power Biofuel / H2 Fresh Water

243

Monitoring downhole pressures and flow rates critical for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

True underbalanced drilling, and not just flow drilling, requires thorough engineering and monitoring of downhole pressures and flow rates to ensure the formations are drilled without formation damage. Underbalanced drilling involves intentionally manipulating the bottom hole circulating pressure so that it is less than static reservoir pressure. This underbalanced pressure condition allows reservoir fluids to enter the well bore while drilling continues, preventing fluid loss and many causes of formation damage. Applied correctly, this technology can address problems of formation damage, lost circulation, and poor penetration rates. Another important benefit of drilling underbalanced is the ability to investigate the reservoir in real time. The paper discusses the reasons for under balanced drilling, creating underbalance, well site engineering, fluids handling, rotating flow divertor injection gas, survey techniques, data acquisition, operations, maintaining under-balance, routine drilling, rate of penetration, misconceptions, and economics.

Butler, S.D.; Rashid, A.U.; Teichrob, R.R. [Flow Drilling Engineering Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Drilling Fluid Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart...Table 8 Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart Corrosion cause Primary source Identification Major corrosion forms Remedies Oxygen Atmosphere, mud conditioning, equipment, oxidizing

245

Hydromechanical drilling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydromechanical drilling tool which combines a high pressure water jet drill with a conventional roller cone type of drilling bit. The high pressure jet serves as a tap drill for cutting a relatively small diameter hole in advance of the conventional bit. Auxiliary laterally projecting jets also serve to partially cut rock and to remove debris from in front of the bit teeth thereby reducing significantly the thrust loading for driving the bit.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

State-of-the-art in coalbed methane drilling fluids  

SciTech Connect

The production of methane from wet coalbeds is often associated with the production of significant amounts of water. While producing water is necessary to desorb the methane from the coal, the damage from the drilling fluids used is difficult to assess, because the gas production follows weeks to months after the well is drilled. Commonly asked questions include the following: What are the important parameters for drilling an organic reservoir rock that is both the source and the trap for the methane? Has the drilling fluid affected the gas production? Are the cleats plugged? Does the 'filtercake' have an impact on the flow of water and gas? Are stimulation techniques compatible with the drilling fluids used? This paper describes the development of a unique drilling fluid to drill coalbed methane wells with a special emphasis on horizontal applications. The fluid design incorporates products to match the delicate surface chemistry on the coal, a matting system to provide both borehole stability and minimize fluid losses to the cleats, and a breaker method of removing the matting system once drilling is completed. This paper also discusses how coal geology impacts drilling planning, drilling practices, the choice of drilling fluid, and completion/stimulation techniques for Upper Cretaceous Mannville-type coals drilled within the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A focus on horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells is presented. Field results from three horizontal wells are discussed, two of which were drilled with the new drilling fluid system. The wells demonstrated exceptional stability in coal for lengths to 1000 m, controlled drilling rates and ease of running slotted liners. Methods for, and results of, placing the breaker in the horizontal wells are covered in depth.

Baltoiu, L.V.; Warren, B.K.; Natras, T.A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

HydroPulse Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

J.J. Kolle

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Test report for core drilling ignitability testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

Witwer, K.S.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development and testing of underbalanced drilling products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first objective of this project is to develop a user-friendly, PC, foam drilling computer model, FOAM, which will accurately predict frictional pressure drops, cuttings lifting velocity, foam quality, and other drilling variables. The model will allow operating and service companies to accurately predict pressures and flow rates required at the surface and downhole to efficiently drill oil and gas wells with foam systems. The second objective of this project is to develop a lightweight drilling fluid that utilizes hollow glass spheres to reduce the density of the fluid and allow drilling underbalanced in low-pressure reservoirs. Since the resulting fluid will be incompressible, hydraulics calculations are greatly simplified, and expensive air compressors and booster pumps are eliminated. This lightweight fluid will also eliminate corrosion and downhole fire problems encountered with aerated fluids. Many tight-gas reservoirs in the US are attractive targets for underbalanced drilling because they are located in hard-rock country where tight, low-permeability formations compound the effect of formation damage encountered with conventional drilling fluids.

Maurer, W.; Medley, G. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NETL: News Release - New 'Smart Drilling' Projects Promise Lower...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus is on Harder-to-Reach, Deeper Gas Supplies MORGANTOWN, WV - Drilling for natural gas is not as simple as digging a hole. It is a complex process that involves cutting rock,...

251

Challenges of deep drilling  

SciTech Connect

Deep drilling poses major problems when high temperatures, high pressures, and acid gases are encountered. A combination of these items usually requires extensive planning, exotic materials, long drilling times, and heavy expenditures. Only 2 wells have been drilled below 30,000 ft in the US, the deeper a 31,441-ft hole in 1974. The deepest well in the world is reported to be in the Soviet Union, recently drilled below 34,895 ft, with a target depth of 15,000 m (49,212 ft). A review of current deep drilling technology and its capabilities is given.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Underbalanced drilling: Praises and perils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling (UBD) has been used with increasing frequency to minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduce the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, particularly in openhole horizontal well applications. UBD, when properly designed and executed, minimizes or eliminates problems associated with the invasion of particulate matter into the formation as well as a multitude of other problems such as adverse clay reactions, phase trapping, precipitation, and emulsification, which can be caused by the invasion of incompatible mud filtrates in an overbalanced condition. In many UBD operations, additional benefits are seen because of a reduction in drilling time, greater rates of penetration, increased bit life, a rapid indication of productive reservoir zones, and the potential for dynamic flow testing while drilling. Potential downsides and damage mechanisms associated with UBD will be discussed. These include the following: (1) Increased cost and safety concerns; (2) Difficulty in maintaining a continuously underbalanced condition; (3) Spontaneous inhibition and countercurrent inhibition effects; (4) Glazing, mashing, and mechanically induced wellbore damage; (5) Macroporosity gravity-induced invasion; (6) Difficulty of application in zones of extreme pressure and permeability; and (7) Political/career risk associated with championing a new and potentially risky technology. The authors discuss reservoir parameters required to design an effective underbalanced or overbalanced drilling program, laboratory screening procedures to ascertain the effectiveness of UBD in a specific application and review the types of reservoirs that often present good applications for UBD technology.

Bennion, D.B.; Thomas, F.B.; Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.W. [Hycal Energy Research Labs., Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Bakken Bakken 0 50 100 Dec 1,000 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 1,025 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Bakken +88 -63 +25 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 50 100 Dec 1,092 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 1,119 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Bakken +83 -55 +28 0 50 100 150 200 250 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Bakken Rig count rigs (70) (60) (50) (40) (30) (20) (10) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change thousand barrels/day Bakken (60) (50) (40) (30) (20) (10) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy gas production change

254

Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger than that of slim holes. As a result, the research team decided to complete the project, document the tested designs and seek further support for the concept outside of the DOE.

Kent Perry

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

NETL: News Release - DOE Seeks "Small-Footprint" Oil and Gas Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 16, 2004 June 16, 2004 DOE Seeks "Small-Footprint" Oil and Gas Technologies Two-Inch "Microholes" Could Lessen Environmental Impacts, Costs The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a major new research and development initiative to develop "microhole" technologies - those that use portable drilling rigs with a smaller footprint and lower environmental impact. The program is designed to bring about faster, cheaper and safer oil and gas projects. "This is a major new research and development initiative that is aimed at reducing the environmental footprint of oil and gas operations at the same time it reduces costs and increases America's oil and gas production," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "It's clear this initiative will help meet President Bush's goals for energy and the environment."

256

Surveillance Guide - CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING AND RIGGING HOISTING AND RIGGING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to examine hoisting and rigging operations to ensure that safe equipment and work practices are being used. The surveillance includes verification that hoisting and rigging work is performed in accordance with DOE requirements and best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management For Doe Federal And Contractor Employees 2.2 DOE-RL-92-36, Hanford Site Hoisting and Rigging Manual NOTE The DOE Hoisting and Rigging Manual should be used as the primary reference for this surveillance. 1 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement the RL Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual (FRAM) item No. 2504. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

257

MHK Technologies/Ocean Energy Rig | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rig Rig < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Energy Rig.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Energy Rig is a hybrid concept harnessing tidal stream with increased velocity from venturi system wave and wind power The rig also uses solar panels to power computers and warning lights Other unique features include a water ballasting system with automatic self levelling and wave ramps to maximize FreeFlow 69 s new wave power device It is envisaged that the Ocean Energy Rig would be assembled and maintained in dry docks and would be towed out into position before being semi submerged and anchored for operation Power output of the production model would be at least 10MW

258

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

259

Method of deep drilling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Remote drill bit loader  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit loader is described for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned. In typical remote drilling operations, whether in hot cells or water pits, drill bits have been held using a collet or end mill type holder with set screws. In either case, to load or change a drill bit required the use master-slave manipulators to position the bits and tighten the collet or set screws. This requirement eliminated many otherwise useful work areas because they were not equipped with slaves, particularly in water pits.

Dokos, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optimization Online - Scheduling Workover Rigs for Onshore Oil ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 12, 2003 ... Scheduling Workover Rigs for Onshore Oil Production. Dario Aloise (dario ***at** * dimap.ufrn.br) Daniel Aloise (aloise ***at*** inf.puc-rio.br)

263

Underbalanced drilling benefits now available offshore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Offshore underbalanced drilling (UBD) is a reality. Applications in older, partially depleted fields and new fields are being considered. However, low productivity reservoirs and fields with sub normal pressures causing drilling problems are currently the main targets for offshore UBD. With proper planning and the correct technique, both jointed pipe and coiled tubing UBD drilling operations have been carried out offshore with success. The main concerns for offshore UBD have been altered drilling practices and surface production system operation. These issues have been examined and equipment has been designed and tested to address them. Environmental, safety and health issues are paramount and have been studied carefully. Detailed well planning, engineering, and flow modeling have proven critical for successful offshore UBD operations. Examples are given from oil and gas fields.

Vozniak, J.P.; Cuthbertson, B.; Nessa, D.O.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Drill Press Speed Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operating speeds (RPM) Accessory Softwood (Pine) Hardwood (Hard Maple) Acrylic Brass Aluminum Steel Shop Notes Twist drill bits 116" - 316" 14" - 38" 716"- 58" 11...

265

Drilling motor deviation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension for a down hole drilling motor is described, which adapts the motor for selective configuration for straight hole drilling or directional drilling, selectively. It consists of: an elongated generally tubular body, adapted at a first end to rigidly attach to the lower end of a down hole drilling motor housing, the body having an opening extending along the general centerline of the body; fluid channel means situated in the opening to conduct drilling fluid from the motor fluid output means to a downwardly continuing drill string element; output shaft means situated in the body and extending from a second end of the body, the output shaft adapted at the extended extreme for attachment to a downwardly continuing drill string element; selector valve means situated in the body, operatively associated with drilling fluid channels in the body, responsive to drilling fluid flow to produce a first output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a first characteristic and to produce a second output signal in response to fluid flow manipulations having a second characteristic; and driveshaft connector means in the opening, operatively associated with the output shaft of the motor and the output shaft means to connect the two for sympathetic rotation.

Falgout, T.E.; Schoeffler, W.N.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

266

Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The six regions analyzed in this report accounted for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-12. December 2013 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken 3 Eagle Ford 4 Haynesville 5 Marcellus 6 Niobrara 7 Permian 8 Explanatory notes 9 Sources 10 Bakken Marcellus Niobrara Haynesville Eagle Ford Permian U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville

267

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,600 1,600 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Permian 0 10 20 30 Dec 1,335 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 1,335 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Permian +37 -36 +1 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 20 40 60 80 Dec 5,046 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 5,046 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Permian +88 -88 +0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Permian Rig count rigs (40) (35) (30) (25) (20) (15) (10) (5) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change thousand barrels/day

268

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

barrels/day barrels/day 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Haynesville 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Dec 54 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 54 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Haynesville +2 -2 +0 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) -150 -50 50 150 250 350 Dec 6,492 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 6,361 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Haynesville +239 -370 -131 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Haynesville Rig count rigs (3) (2) (1) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change

269

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marcellus Marcellus 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Marcellus 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 Dec 39 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 41 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Marcellus +4 -2 +2 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 200 400 600 Dec 13,303 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 13,721 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Marcellus +612 -193 +419 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Marcellus Rig count rigs (3) (2) (1) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change

270

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development and Application of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project aimed to extend the insulated drill pipe (IDP) technology already demonstrated for geothermal drilling to HTHP drilling in deep gas reservoirs where temperatures are high enough to pose a threat to downhole equipment such as motors and electronics. The major components of the project were: a preliminary design; a market survey to assess industry needs and performance criteria; mechanical testing to verify strength and durability of IDP; and development of an inspection plan that would quantify the ability of various inspection techniques to detect flaws in assembled IDP. This report is a detailed description of those activities.

Tom Champness; Tony Worthen; John Finger

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Compendium of regulatory requirements governing underground injection of drilling waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of waste are produced when oil and gas wells are drilled. The two primary types of drilling wastes include used drilling fluids (commonly referred to as muds), which serve a variety of functions when wells are drilled, and drill cuttings (rock particles ground up by the drill bit). Some oil-based and synthetic-based muds are recycled; other such muds, however, and nearly all water-based muds, are disposed of. Numerous methods are employed to manage drilling wastes, including burial of drilling pit contents, land spreading, thermal processes, bioremediation, treatment and reuse, and several types of injection processes. This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies. The material included in the report was derived primarily from a review of state regulations and from interviews with state oil and gas regulatory officials.

Puder, M. G.; Bryson, B.; Veil, J. A.

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reducing the risk, complexity and cost of coiled tubing drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling vertical well extensions with coiled tubing, particularly in the underbalanced state, exploits the inherent strengths of coiled tubing including: The ability to enter slim holes against a live well head; The use of small equipment that is fast to rig up and down; and The ability to trip quickly and maintain a steady pressure downhole with continuous circulation. Coiled tubing has successfully been used to deepen hundreds of wells, yet this application has only received sporadic attention. There are some very important technical considerations when drilling non-directionally with coiled tubing that must be addressed to ensure a commercially successful job. A recent vertical drilling job carried out in Western Australia illustrates the critical engineering aspects of an underbalanced, non-directional, coiled tubing drilling job. This job was completed for Arc Energy in April 1999 and produced a well that stabilized at 1.1 MMcfd, where three other wells drilled conventionally into these zones had shown only trace amounts of hydrocarbon.

Portman, L. [BJ Services, Houston, TX (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Design and construction of rigs for studying surface condensation and creating anodized metal oxide surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the design and construction of a rig for studying surface condensation and a rig for creating anodized metal oxides (AMOs). The condensation rig characterizes condensation for different surfaces; this ...

Sun, Wei-Yang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

C:\Documents and Settings\jhr\My Documents\C_drive\RIGS\users 2013\rigs_usersApril2013.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23 23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) User's Guide Version 2013 For Report Year 2012 Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy April 2013 Form EIA-23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) User's Guide April 2013 EIA-23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) User's Guide Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hardware / Software Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Installing the RIGS Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Installation Error Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Using the EIA-23 Reserves Information Gathering System (RIGS) System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Initial Data Import from Last Year's RIGS Submission File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The RIGS Main Menu Screen.

276

Computers aid drilling planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that computers are rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the drilling engineer both in town and at the wellsite. Two factors have contributed to the sudden increase in their use. The first is the need to cut drilling costs. Engineers have been forced to take a more critical look at plans and past experience. The second is the falling price (and increased portability) of hardware and software. Several major operators have demonstrated that careful planning of drilling operations based on local knowledge and data from offset wells can reduce the drilling learning curve substantially. Computers make it possible to retrieve and process offset well data rapidly and efficiently. They also offer powerful mathematical models which describe complicated aspects of drilling.

Burgess, T.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New England and New York have largest natural gas price increases in 2013. ... Pad drilling and rig mobility lead to more efficient drilling. ...

278

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Drilling in 2000 taps technology explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While major oil and gas companies all but ended research and development programs, the burden for technological advancement fell to service companies. And service companies allotted their R and D investment to activities whose return they could fairly predict. But even as cost-cutting measured devastated engineering staffs, a profit-growth strategy was forming that understood that profit could be enhanced by not just cutting the per barrel cost to producers but by producing more barrels per investment dollar. In other words, get more oil and gas from the same well through applied drilling and production technology. In the drilling industry all things technical revolve around six areas of expertise: bits, rotation systems, tripping systems, control systems, information systems and direction drilling systems. The paper discusses these six technologies.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development of a portable grain mass flow sensor test rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable grain mass flow sensor test rig was built to measure the accuracy of a mass flow sensor with dual use in the field as well as in the lab. Concurrently, a synchronization method was developed that employs GPS timing data to synchronize the ... Keywords: Mass flow sensor, Test rig, Yield monitor accuracy, Yield monitor error

M. Loghavi; R. Ehsani; R. Reeder

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and Controversies Kyle J Ferrar;UNITED STATES SHALE BASINS Modern Shale Gas Development in the U.S.: A Primer, (2009) U.S. Dept of Energy Development http://www.secinfo.com/DB/SEC/2007 #12;Where to Drill? Harper, John A. (2008). The Marcellus Shale

Sibille, Etienne

282

Drill drive mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

Dressel, Michael O. (Englewood, CO)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2012 | Release Date: July 19, 8, 2012 | Release Date: July 19, 2012 | Next Release: July 26, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Marketed Production and Electric Power Generation Show Strong Growth in 2011. Marketed production of natural gas rose by 7.9% year over year in 2011, to an average of 66.2 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day, the largest year-over-year change since 1984, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's recently released Natural Gas Year in Review. Despite falling natural gas rig counts, continued improvements in drilling efficiencies helped generate further production growth. Increased production in 2011 contributed to strength in storage inventories, as

284

Noble Drilling DRILLING, COMPLETION AND STIMULATION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friendly Drilling Systems" Environmental issues are a significant part of every energy industry endeavor challenges facing the energy industry but also the considerable resources of the University and industry Petroleum and other industry sponsors from the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI) to identify

285

CRAD, Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan CRAD, Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Plan Performance Objective: To determine that hoisting and rigging operations are conducted according to "industry best standards" for increasing equipment reliability while assuring worker safety, and to verify issues being addressed in BN Hoisting assessment. Criteria: Lifts are identified and categorized appropriately for scheduled maintenance. DOE-STD-1090-2001 An integrated process ensures safety issues are identified and controls established. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Personnel operating and maintaining the hoisting equipment are trained; they understand their roles and responsibilities. DOE-STD-1090-2001 Maintenance conducts safety inspections of hoisting and rigging equipment on a scheduled basis, certifying that safe operations are in

286

Drilling Waste Management Technology Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skip navigation Drilling Waste Management Information System: The information resource for better management of drilling wastes DWM Logo Search Search you are in this section...

287

Drilling Waste Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Drilling Waste Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information on practices for managing drilling muds and cuttings, including...

288

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2012 | Release Date: May 24, 23, 2012 | Release Date: May 24, 2012 | Next Release: May 31, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural Gas Rig Count Briefly Drops Below 600. The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 2 this week to 600, after falling to a 10-year low of 598 last week. After increasing modestly to 936 active rigs in the fall of 2011, the natural gas rig count has dropped sharply. The oil rig count, currently at 1,382, has generally risen steadily since 2009, largely in response to increasing crude oil prices. Natural gas rigs are currently down about 31 percent from their level at the same time last year, while oil rigs have risen by 45 percent over the

289

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11-i Chapter 11 11-i Chapter 11 Wire Rope and Slings CHAPTER 11 WIRE ROPE AND SLINGS This chapter provides requirements for the fabrication and use of wire rope and slings used in hoisting and rigging. 11.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................11-1 11.2 WIRE ROPE ............................................................................................................................11-4 11.2.1 Wire-Rope Lays.........................................................................................................11-4 11.2.2 Wire-Rope Cores .......................................................................................................11-4 11.2.3 Wire Rope for General Purposes

290

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS 5-i Chapter 5 Hostile Environments This chapter describes provisions for hoisting and rigging operations in hostile work environments. 5.1 GENERAL ................................................................................................................................5-1 5.2 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN ......................................................................................5-2 5.2.1 Marking and Posting ....................................................................................................5-2 5.2.2 Inspection and Testing .................................................................................................5-2 EXHIBIT I Hostile Environment Plan ............................................................................................5-3

291

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS 5-i Chapter 5 Hostile Environments This chapter describes provisions for hoisting and rigging operations in hostile work environments. 5.1 GENERAL................................................................................................................................5-1 5.2 HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT PLAN ......................................................................................5-2 5.2.1 Marking and Posting ....................................................................................................5-2 5.2.2 Inspection and Testing .................................................................................................5-2 EXHIBIT I Hostile Environment Plan ............................................................................................5-3

292

Hoisting & Rigging ISMS Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in the

293

Hoisting & Rigging ISMS Assessment Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and Objective: Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in the

294

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Laser Rock Drilling Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demo A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam at Argonne's Laser Applications Lab is being shown in this movie to drill oil reservoir rock, a potential application in gas and oil well...

296

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Subsurface drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Update on slimhole drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories manages the US Department of Energy program for slimhole drilling. The principal objective of this program is to expand proven geothermal reserves through increased exploration made possible by lower-cost slimhole drilling. For this to be a valid exploration method, however, it is necessary to demonstrate that slimholes yield enough data to evaluate a geothermal reservoir, and that is the focus of Sandia`s current research.

Finger, J.T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology June 13, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology Directional drilling - the drilling of non-vertical wells that helped make the development of shale gas possible -- will continue to play a key role in energy development, and so will the technologies that make it possible. The benefits of directional drilling are tremendous. Think cleaner, cheaper electricity; local economy booms; and decreased dependence on foreign energy. The unconventional oil and gas resources that can be tapped through directional drilling benefit consumers, businesses, and even the transportation sector. So being recognized as an innovator in this area is

300

Learning by Drilling: Inter-Firm Learning and Relationship Persistence in the Texas Oilpatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drilling problem Oil and gas reserves are found in distinctreserves are typically buried under many layers of rock that do not contain oil

KELLOGG, RYAN M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coiled tubing drilling (CTD) moves to commercial viability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shell Western E and P, Inc. (SWEPI) California Drilling Operations was interested in coiled tubing (CT) for drilling slimhole steam injectors. A four-well pilot project at South Belridge field, Kern County, Calif., was targeted for immediate CT use. Well programs included completion, a goal not previously attempted on wells drilled from surface with CT. This paper reviews the primary project focus which was to develop slimhole steam injectors and improve injection profiles in lower Tulare formation E and G sands. Feasibility of drilling wells with CT and having CT crews run and cement completion tubulars in place was an issue to be determined. Conventional tubing installation is usually outside the scope of CT operations, so it was not known if this would be technically or economically feasible. Another goal was to refine personnel expertise to further develop CTD services as a successful business line. Other items targeted for investigation were: deviation control; lost circulation solutions; WOB optimization to obtain maximum ROP; potential steam blowout intervals; and high temperature. Finally, economic feasibility of using CTD as a rotary rig alternative for specific applications like slimhole wells on sites where surface location is limited was to be determined.

Romagno, R. (Shell Western E and P, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Walker, R. (Schlumberger Dowell, Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

JOINT-INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP TO DEVELOP A HOLLOW SPHERE DUAL-GRADIENT DRILLING SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI) formed a joint-industry partnership to fund the development of a hollow sphere dual-gradient drilling (DGD) system. Phase I consisted of collecting, compiling, analyzing, and distributing information and data regarding a new DGD system for use by the oil and gas industry. Near the end of Phase I, DOE provided funding to the project that was used to conduct a series of critical follow-on tests investigating sphere separation in weighted waterbase and oilbase muds. Drilling costs in deep water are high because seawater pressure on the ocean floor creates a situation where many strings of casing are required due to the relatively close spacing between fracture and pore pressure curves. Approximately $100 million have been spent during the past five years on DGD systems that place pumps on the seafloor to reduce these drilling problems by reducing the annulus fluid pressure at the bottom of the riser. BP estimates that a DGD system can save $9 million per well in the Thunderhorse Field and Conoco estimates it can save $5 to $15 million per well in its deepwater operations. Unfortunately, previous DGD development projects have been unsuccessful due to the high costs ($20 to $50 million) and reliability problems with seafloor pump systems. MTI has been developing a simple DGD system concept that would pump hollow glass spheres into the bottom of the riser to reduce density of the mud in the riser. This eliminates the requirement for seafloor pumps and replaces them with low cost mud pumps, shale shakers, and other oilfield equipment that can be operated on the rig by conventional crews. A $1.8 million Phase I joint-industry project funded by five service companies and three operators showed that hollow spheres could be pumped well, but difficulties were encountered in separating the spheres from a polymer mud supplied by Halliburton due to the high viscosity of this mud at the low shear rates encountered on oilfield shale shaker screens. As a result, an excessive amount of this polymer mud flowed across the screen with the beads instead of through the screen. At the completion of the Phase I project, it was concluded that the hollow sphere system would not work effectively with the polymer mud tested. ExxonMobil and Shell engineers proposed that additional sphere separation tests needed to be conducted with weighted oilfield waterbase and oilbase muds to determine if the DGD system would work with these muds. The DOE agreed to provide a $200,000 grant for these tests. The DOE-funded tests, described in this report, showed that the spheres could be pumped with conventional oilfield centrifugal and triplex mud pumps and separated effectively from both oilfield waterbase and oilbase muds using conventional oilfield shale shakers and hydrocyclones. As a result of the success of these DOE tests, this DGD system is ready for full-scale field testing, first on land wells and later in the offshore environment. Maurer Technology Inc. is currently proposing a Phase II project to oil companies to further develop this DGD concept. This project would be funded by four to eight operators. If Phase II tests are successful, Noble plans to commercialize this system with a service company partner that will market and operate the DGD system on Noble's and other drilling contractors' rigs.

William C. Maurer; Colin Ruan; Greg Deskins

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Natural Gas - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Drilling Productivity Report . Released: December 9, 2013. EIA’s new Drilling Productivity Report (DPR) takes a fresh look at oil and natural gas ...

304

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced geothermal foam drilling systems (AFS) -- Phase 1 final report, Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced coiled-tubing foam drilling system is being developed where two concentric strings of coiled tubing are used to convey water and air to the hole bottom where they are mixed together to produce foam for underbalanced drilling. This system has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs by increasing drilling rates (due to the motor being powered by water), and reducing compressor and nitrogen costs (due to lower gas pressures and volumes).

W. C. Maurer

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling  

SciTech Connect

The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Low-pressure reservoir drilled with air/N[sub 2] in a closed system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition tests on simulated produced fluids helped determine the ideal air/nitrogen mixture for an underbalanced drilling operation that used a closed surface system to process return fluids. The low-pressure, heavy-oil target reservoir required underbalanced drilling to minimize formation damage. Underbalanced or near-balanced drilling can improve production from pressure-depleted reservoirs by reducing the chance of formation damage from drilling fluid losses. Underbalanced drilling technology currently available includes the use of gas injection through parasite strings or through drilling tubulars. No one (to the author's knowledge) has combined concentric-string commingled gas injection with through-drilling-tubular commingled gas injection. The paper describes lab work, test results, surface returns, downhole design, operations, and field results.

Teichrob, R.R. (Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Hoisting & Rigging Assessment Form Assess the institutional and department/division hoisting and rigging (including forklift, overhead cranes small hoists, and mobile cranes) requirements, policies, procedures, and work practices for both professional and incidental activities. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are involved in these activities as well as the adequacy of compliance with institutional and/or Department/Division qualifications, training requirements, and inspection requirements. Assess the laboratory's process for understanding the causes and development of effective corrective actions for incidents/accidents. Review the roles and responsibilities of line managers, support personnel and workers who are

310

Guidelines for Using Synthetic Slings for Lifting and Rigging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Guidelines for Using Synthetic Slings for Lifting and Rigging" provides nuclear and fossil maintenance personnel with information on the use of synthetic slings. This information will assist personnel in the identification, protection, and inspection of synthetic slings.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS 1-1 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions The following are specialized terms commonly used when discussing hoisting and rigging operations. Many may not be used in this standard, but are included for general information. The terms are arranged in alphabetical order. Illustrations are included for clarity. ABRASION: Surface wear. ACCELERATION STRESS: Additional stress imposed due to increasing load velocity. ALTERNATE LAY: Lay of wire rope in which the strands are alternately regular and lang lay. ANSI: American National Standards Institute. APPOINTED: Assigned specific responsibilities by the employer or the employer's representative. AREA, METALLIC: Sum of the cross- sectional areas of individual wires in a wire rope

313

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES A-1 Appendix A Procurement Guidelines This appendix provides reference guidance in preparing purchase requisitions for hoisting and rigging materials and equipment. Nationally recognized standards and specifications are referenced for listed items. However, caution should be used prior to procurement of special items in order to verify appropriate specification or standard reference and requirements. Some specific requirements listed in this appendix are more restrictive than consensus standard requirements, but are recommended to ensure materials of adequate quality and workmanship are provided. Quality receipt inspections should be provided for all received materials in order to verify compliance of all

314

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A APPENDIX A PROCUREMENT GUIDELINES A-i Appendix A Procurement Guidelines This appendix provides reference guidance in preparing purchase requisitions for hoisting and rigging materials and equipment. Nationally recognized standards and specifications are referenced for listed items. However, caution should be used prior to procurement of special items in order to verify appropriate specification or standard reference and requirements. Some specific requirements listed in this appendix are more restrictive than consensus standard requirements, but are recommended to ensure materials of adequate quality and workmanship are provided. Quality receipt inspections should be provided for all received materials in order to verify compliance of all

315

DOE-STD-1090-2007; Hoisting and Rigging Standard (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS 1-1 Chapter 1 Terminology and Definitions The following are specialized terms commonly used when discussing hoisting and rigging operations. Many may not be used in this standard, but are included for general information. The terms are arranged in alphabetical order. Illustrations are included for clarity. ABRASION: Surface wear. ACCELERATION STRESS: Additional stress imposed due to increasing load velocity. ALTERNATE LAY: Lay of wire rope in which the strands are alternately regular and lang lay. ANSI: American National Standards Institute. APPOINTED: Assigned specific responsibilities by the employer or the employer's representative. AREA, METALLIC: Sum of the cross- sectional areas of individual wires in a wire rope

316

Drilling technology/GDO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy is sponsoring two programs related to drilling technology. The first is aimed at development of technology that will lead to reduced costs of drilling, completion, and logging of geothermal wells. This program has the official title ''Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics.'' The second program is intended to share with private industry the cost of development of technology that will result in solutions to the near term geothermal well problems. This program is referred to as the ''Geothermal Drilling Organization''. The Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics Program was funded at $2.65M in FY85 and the GDO was funded at $1.0M in FY85. This paper details the past year's activities and accomplishments and projects the plans for FY86 for these two programs.

Kelsey, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Interdependence of the Electricity Generation System and the Natural Gas System and Implications for Energy Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Lexington Massachusetts This page intentionally left blank. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Concern about energy security on domestic Department of Defense installations has led to the possibility of using natural gas-fired electricity generators to provide power in the event of electric grid failures. As natural gas is an increasingly base-load fuel for electricity generation in the United States, the electricity generation system has become increasingly dependent on the operation of the natural gas system. However, as the natural gas system is also partly dependent on electricity for its ability to deliver natural gas from the well-head to the consumer, the question arises of whether, in the event of an electric grid failure, the natural gas would continue to flow. As the natural gas transmission system largely uses natural gas from the pipelines as a source of power, once the gas has been extracted from the ground, the system is less dependent on the electric grid. However, some of the drilling rigs, processing units, and pipeline compressors do depend on electric power, making the vulnerability to the system to a disruption in the national electricity supply network vary depending on the cause, breadth, and geographic location of the disruption. This is due to the large numbers of players in the natural gas production and

N. Judson; N. Judson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Proper planning improves flow drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced operations reduce formation damage, especially in horizontal wells where zones are exposed to mud for longer time periods. Benefits, risks, well control concerns, equipment and issues associated with these operations are addressed in this paper. Flow drilling raises many concerns, but little has been published on horizontal well control and flow drilling operations. This article covers planning considerations for flow drilling, but does not address horizontal ''overbalanced'' drilling because considerations and equipment are the same as in vertical overbalanced drilling and many references address that subject. The difference in well control between vertical and horizontal overbalanced drilling is fluid influx behavior and how that behavior affects kill operations.

Collins, G.J. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mechanical drill string jar  

SciTech Connect

An improved mechanical drill string jar is described that allows uninhibited telescoping movement to the normal drilling condition. The drill string jar consists of: (a) an elongated, generally cylindrical, body usable as a drill string element; (b) axial motion resistance means situated in the annular opening; (c) bias means operatively associated with at least one element of the splined pair to rotate the pair out of alignment when the splined pair is rotationally disengaged; (d) opposed cooperating surfaces on at least two of the spline teeth situated such that forced axial relative motion of the splined pair will produce opposed radial forces on the teeth; (e) means intrinsic to at least one element of the splined pair to permit resisted radial displacement of the spline teeth when forced axial relative motion occurs, to permit one element to move axially through the other; (f) cam surfaces on at least one of the teeth situated to force rotational alignment of the splined pair when telescoping movement is from a jarring condition toward the normal drilling condition; (g) relative rotation resistance means situated in the annular opening, structurally engaged with the pair of telescoping members such that relative rotation therebetween will be resisted; (h) striker and anvil means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of elements, such that axial relative movement therebetween will be solidly stopped at the axial extreme condition; (i) a flow-through fluid channel means extending between the means to attach to the continuing drill string; and (j) seal means situated in the annular opening, operatively associated with the telescoping pair of members, to provide fluid tightness therebetween.

Buck, D.A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

Rethinking rig count as a predictor of natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, ... What is the role of coal in the United States? ... Using historical data ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rethinking rig count as a predictor of natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... ...

322

Critique of Drilling Research  

SciTech Connect

For a number of years the Department of Energy has been funding research to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells. Generally that research has been effective and helped to make geothermal energy economically attractive to developers. With the increased competition for the electrical market, geothermal energy needs every advantage it can acquire to allow it to continue as a viable force in the marketplace. In drilling related research, there is essentially continuous dialogue between industry and the national laboratories. Therefore, the projects presented in the Program Review are focused on subjects that were previously recommended or approved by industry.

Hamblin, Jerry

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

Deepwater drilling riser system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal focus of this paper is to discuss and summarize, from the manufacturer's perspective, the primary milestones in the development of the marine riser system used to drill in record water depths off the U.S. east coast. This riser system is unique in that it used advanced designs, material technology, and quality control to enable safe operation in water depths beyond the capability of conventional drilling riser systems. Experience and research have led to design improvements that are now being incorporated in new riser systems that have the potential of expanding the frontiers to increasingly deeper water.

Chastain, T.; Stone, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser compares with other lasers used in past experimental work, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. Variables investigated include laser power, beam intensity, external purging of cut materials, sample orientation, beam duration, beam shape, and beam frequency. The investigation also studied the thermal effects on the two sample rock types and their methods of destruction: spallation for sandstone, and thermal dissociation for limestone. Optimal operating conditions were identified for each rock type and condition. As a result of this experimental work, the HPFL has demonstrated a better capability of cutting and drilling limestone and sandstone when compared with other military and industrial lasers previously tested. Consideration should be given to the HPFL as the leading candidate for near term remote high power laser applications for well construction and completion.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force fields up to 74 kilohertz (KHz), a removable section of copper wire can be placed inside the composite pipe to short the tool joints electrically allowing electromagnetic signals inside the collar to induce and measure the same within the rock formation. By embedding a pair of wires in the composite section and using standard drill pipe box and pin ends equipped with a specially developed direct contact joint electrical interface, power can be supplied to measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling (LWD) bottom hole assemblies. Instantaneous high-speed data communications between near drill bit and the surface are obtainable utilizing this 'smart' drilling technology. The composite drill pipe developed by ACPT has been field tested successfully in several wells nationally and internationally. These tests were primarily for short radius and ultra short radius directional drilling. The CDP in most cases performed flawlessly with little or no appreciable wear. ACPT is currently marketing a complete line of composite drill collars, subs, isolators, casing, and drill pipe to meet the drilling industry's needs and tailored to replace metal for specific application requirements.

James C. Leslie

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Offsite Disposal at Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Disposal Facilities Commercial Disposal Facilities Fact Sheet - Commercial Disposal Facilities Although drilling wastes from many onshore wells are managed at the well site, some wastes cannot be managed onsite. Likewise, some types of offshore drilling wastes cannot be discharged, so they are either injected underground at the platform (not yet common in the United States) or are hauled back to shore for disposal. According to an American Petroleum Institute waste survey, the exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes in 1985. The report estimates that 28% of drilling wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal (Wakim 1987). A similar American Petroleum Institute study conducted ten years later found that the volume of drilling waste had declined substantially to about 150 million bbl.

327

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

328

Combination drilling and skiving tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Foam drilling simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the use of compressible drilling fluids is experiencing growth, the flow behavior and stability properties of drilling foams are more complicated than those of conventional fluids. In contrast with conventional mud, the physical properties of foam change along the wellbore. Foam physical and thermal properties are strongly affected by pressure and temperature. Many problems associated with field applications still exist, and a precise characterization of the rheological properties of these complex systems needs to be performed. The accurate determination of the foam properties in circulating wells helps to achieve better estimation of foam rheology and pressure. A computer code is developed to process the data and closely simulate the pressure during drilling a well. The model also offers a detailed discussion of many aspects of foam drilling operations and enables the user to generate many comparative graphs and tables. The effects of some important parameters such as: back-pressure, rate of penetration, cuttings concentration, cuttings size, and formation water influx on pressure, injection rate, and velocity are presented in tabular and graphical form. A discretized heat transfer model is formulated with an energy balance on a control volume in the flowing fluid. The finite difference model (FDM) is used to write the governing heat transfer equations in discretized form. A detailed discussion on the determination of heat transfer coefficients and the solution approach is presented. Additional research is required to analyze the foam heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity.

Paknejad, Amir Saman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Phase 1 drilling operations at the Magma Energy Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Phase 1 drilling operations for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. An important part of the Department of Energy's Magma Energy Program, this well is designed to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degree}C, whichever comes first. There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart, with scientific investigations in the borehole between the drilling intervals. Phase 1 of this project resulted in a 20 inch cased hole to 2558 feet, with 185 feet of coring beyond that. This document comprises a narrative of the daily activities, copies of the daily mud and lithologic reports, time breakdowns of rig activities, inventories of lost circulation materials, temperature logs of the cored hole, and a strip chart mud log. 2 figs.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

IADC mud equipment manual. Handbook 1: Introduction to Drilling Mud Systems  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of the 11 handbooks that make up the IADC Mud Equipment Manual. The manual is designed to provide information on all pieces of drilling rig equipment from the flow line to the mud pump section. Hanbook 1: Introduction to Drilling Mud Systems focuses on drilling fluids and their properties and treatment, and thoroughly examines mud solid characteristics. Methods of controlling formation pore pressure, and cut points, as well as cuttings removal (viscosity, yield point, gel strengths, hole cleaning, etc.), are followed by a discussion of solid sizes and solid size distribution. Special features include a glossary of mud terms, a section on ''hard-to-find'' information such as gold concentration, wind forces, and AC motor current requirements, and a comprehensive index for all 11 handbooks.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Pioneering work, economic factors provide insights into Russian drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Russia and America, individual ingenuity and economic forces have produced a variety of drilling technologies, resulting in the development of disparate drilling systems. Endeavors by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Sandia Laboratories, and private industry have promoted exchanges of knowledge since the 1980s, and now that the barriers to technology transfer are being lifted, engineers from both countries have the opportunity to exchange knowledge and incorporate the best of both. The Russian drilling industry, like the Russian space program, has achieved tremendous success in implementing product and process innovations including the first directional (1940s), horizontal (1950s), and multilateral (1950s) wells. In addition, Russian engineers built the first turbodrills, electrodrills, novel drills (lasers, explosives), aluminum drill pipe, downhole electric submersible pumps, and mud hammers. This first part of a two-part series describes the achievements of Russian engineers in horizontal and multilateral drilling technologies followed by a discussion of the economic differences that led Russian and American drillers to develop dissimilar drilling systems. The second part describes a variety of innovative Russian technologies and provides details on the technical advantages they offer for the drilling process.

Gaddy, D.E.

1998-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

335

Evaluation of slurry injection technology for management of drilling wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, thousands of new oil and gas wells are drilled in the United States and around the world. The drilling process generates millions of barrels of drilling waste each year, primarily used drilling fluids (also known as muds) and drill cuttings. The drilling wastes from most onshore U.S. wells are disposed of by removing the liquids from the drilling or reserve pits and then burying the remaining solids in place (called pit burial). This practice has low cost and the approval of most regulatory agencies. However, there are some environmental settings in which pit burial is not allowed, such as areas with high water tables. In the U.S. offshore environment, many water-based and synthetic-based muds and cuttings can be discharged to the ocean if discharge permit requirements are met, but oil-based muds cannot be discharged at all. At some offshore facilities, drilling wastes must be either hauled back to shore for disposal or disposed of onsite through an injection process.

Veil, J. A.; Dusseault, M. B.

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Potential impacts of artificial intelligence expert systems on geothermal well drilling costs:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal research Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as one of its goals to reduce the cost of drilling geothermal wells by 25 percent. To attain this goal, DOE continuously evaluates new technologies to determine their potential in contributing to the Program. One such technology is artifical intelligence (AI), a branch of computer science that, in recent years, has begun to impact the marketplace in a number of fields. Expert systems techniques can (and in some cases, already have) been applied to develop computer-based ''advisors'' to assist drilling personnel in areas such as designing mud systems, casing plans, and cement programs, optimizing drill bit selection and bottom hole asssembly (BHA) design, and alleviating lost circulation, stuck pipe, fishing, and cement problems. Intelligent machines with sensor and/or robotic directly linked to AI systems, have potential applications in areas of bit control, rig hydraulics, pipe handling, and pipe inspection. Using a well costing spreadsheet, the potential savings that could be attributed to each of these systems was calculated for three base cases: a dry steam well at The Geysers, a medium-depth Imerial Valley well, and a deep Imperial Valley well. Based on the average potential savings to be realized, expert systems for handling lost circulations problems and for BHA design are the most likely to produce significant results. Automated bit control and rig hydraulics also exhibit high potential savings, but these savings are extremely sensitive to the assumptions of improved drilling efficiency and the cost of these sytems at the rig. 50 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs.

Satrape, J.V.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

337

Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

Dillon, J.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by RIG-I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including RIG-I, MDA-5, and LGP2) recognize viral RNAs as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an antiviral immune response. To understand the molecular basis of this process, we determined the crystal structure of RIG-I in complex with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The dsRNA is sheathed within a network of protein domains that include a conserved 'helicase' domain (regions HEL1 and HEL2), a specialized insertion domain (HEL2i), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTD). A V-shaped pincer connects HEL2 and the CTD by gripping an {alpha}-helical shaft that extends from HEL1. In this way, the pincer coordinates functions of all the domains and couples RNA binding with ATP hydrolysis. RIG-I falls within the Dicer-RIG-I clade of the superfamily 2 helicases, and this structure reveals complex interplay between motor domains, accessory mechanical domains, and RNA that has implications for understanding the nanomechanical function of this protein family and other ATPases more broadly.

Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C.; Vela, Adriana; Kohlway, Andrew; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Pyle, Anna Marie (Yale)

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities and velocities during air drilling has been developed. The basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressures in typical air and mist drilling situations. 8 refs.

Mitchell, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and side tracking applications. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report has been prepared in two parts and each part may be treated as a stand-alone document. Part 1 (High Energy Laser Drilling) includes the general description of the concept and focuses on results from experiments under the ambient lab conditions. Part 2 (High Energy Laser Perforation and Completion Techniques) discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

DOE-STD-1090-2004; Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 BELOW-THE-HOOK LIFTING DEVICES 14-i Chapter 14 Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices This chapter provides the requirements for below-the-hook lifting devices used in hoisting and rigging, such as spreader bars, lifting yokes, and lift fixtures. This section implements the requirements of ASME B30.20, "Below-the-Hook Lifting Devices." NOTE: Special lifting devices for shipping containers weighing 10,000 lb or more that are used for radioactive materials may be governed by ANSI N14.6 ["Standard for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 Pounds (4,500 kg) or More for Nuclear Materials."] 14.1 GENERAL ...............................................................................................................................14-1

343

Development Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Development Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(9) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

344

Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Drilling Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling‎ Parent Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole

345

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Horizontal drilling method and apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for drilling a highly deviated well into a petroleum formation the apparatus comprising a drill pipe extending from a surface location to a down-hole drilling assembly through a curved wellbore. It comprises a down-hole motor attached to a bit at a first end, the down-hole motor having a bent housing; a bent sub in the down-hole drilling assembly located above the motor; and a pony collar located between the motor and the bent sub, the pony collar having sufficient mass to substantially hold the motor against a wellbore wall during drilling operations.

Rehm, W.A.; Trunk, T.D.; Baseflug, T.D.; Cromwell, S.L.; Hickman, G.A.; Nickel, R.D.; Lyons, M.S.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

347

Understanding the Impacts of Incremental Gas Supply on the Flow ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

High natural gas prices and sharply higher oil and natural gas field revenues are expected to drive a resurgence in natural gas-directed drilling activity this year ...

348

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

average $2.83 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2002). Average wellhead prices have increased by nearly 50 percent from $2.09 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $3.11 per MMBtu in May. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have also increased, rising more than $1.00 per MMBtu since early February. It is atypical to see higher spot gas prices in the cooling season than during the heating season, particularly when working gas in underground storage is at high levels, as it has been for the past several months. As of the end of May, working gas levels were more than 20 percent above the previous 5-year average for that month. Moreover, gas-directed drilling, while down sharply from summer 2001 levels, is still quite strong from a historical perspective. The gas rig count as of May 31 was up 22 percent from the recent low of 591 for the week ending April 5.

349

Production Optimization in Shale Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Natural gas from organic rich shales has become an important part of the supply of natural gas in the United States. Modern drilling and… (more)

Knudsen, Brage Rugstad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and Storage Oil & Gas Methane Hydrate LNG Offshore Drilling Enhanced Oil Recovery Shale Gas Section 999 Report to Congress DOE issues the 2013 annual plan for the...

351

Natural Gas from Shale | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas from Shale Natural Gas from Shale Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, protective...

352

Inventory management of steel plates at an oil rig construction company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keppel Fels produces make-to-order oil exploration rigs for the global market. Each rig requires close to 6000 metric tons of steel in the course of its production. Optimal management of this steel is very critical in this ...

Tan, Chien Yung

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

Glowka, David A. (Austin, TX); Raymond, David W. (Edgewood, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Feasibility of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide as a Drilling Fluid for Deep Underbalanced Drilling Operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide to serve the needs of deep underbalanced drilling operations has been analyzed. A case study involving underbalanced drilling… (more)

Gupta, Anamika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Application of high powered lasers to drilling and completing deep walls.  

SciTech Connect

High powered laser rock drilling was studied as a revolutionary method for drilling and completing deep gas and oil wells. The objectives of this 2002 to 2003 fiscal year research were to study the concept that large diameter holes can be created by multiple overlapping small beam spots, to determine the ability of lasers to drill rock submerged to some depth in water, to demonstrate the possibilities of lasers for perforating application, and to determine the wavelength effects on rock removal. Laser technology applied to well drilling and completion operations is attractive because it has the potential to reduce drilling time, create a ceramic lining that may eliminate the need for steel casing, provide additional monitor-on-drilling laser sensors and improve well performance through improved perforation. The results from this research will help engineering design on a laser-based well drilling system.

Reed, C. B.; Xu, Z.; Parker, R. A.; Gahan, B. C.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Deeg, W.

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

How borehole ballooning alters drilling responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From field observations of drilling and hole instability problems over a 30-year period, a new and more complete understanding of plastic well-bore behavior - under certain pressure imbalance conditions - is being developed and verified with detailed well histories. Rock mechanics theory, thus far primarily concerned with plastic behavior and borehole collapse on the underbalanced side, is in at least partial agreement with these observations. This article further elaborates on the pressure-responsive plastic behavior of shales under tremendous downhole stresses, particularly in the overbalanced, ballooning mode. The primary subject matter of the article is divided into the following areas: Stable operating margin; Plastic behavior region; Wellbore wall yields; Brittle sloughings; Loss of mud; Gain of mud; Shut-in pressure; Reflex gas; Charged RFT's; Preexisting balloon; Drilling rate.

Gill, J.A.

1989-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Mixed Stream Test Rig Winter FY-2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the data and analysis of the initial testing campaign of the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the test specimen selection, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, and data and analysis of specimens exposed in two environments designed to represent those expected for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE).

Chalres Park; Tedd Lister; Kevin DeWall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Diesel Rig Mechanical Peaking System Based on Flywheel Storage Technolgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheel energy storage technology is an emerging energy storage technology, there is a great development in recent years promising energy storage technology, with a large energy storage, high power, no pollution, use of broad, simple maintenance, enabling ... Keywords: Flywheel energy storage technology, mechanical peaking, diesel rig, peak motor

Shuguang Liu, Jia Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Drilling and general petroleum engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-nine papers are included in the Drilling and General Petroleum Engineering Volume of the SPE Annual Conference and Exhibition proceedings. The conference was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 25-28, 1994. The papers cover such topics as: extended reach well drilling, development of marginal satellite fields, slim hole drilling, pressure loss predictions, models for cuttings transport, ester-based drilling fluid systems, borehole stability, cementing, operations, bit failures, roller core bits, well tracking techniques, nitrogen drilling systems, plug failures, drill bit and drillstring dynamics, slim hole vibrations, reserve estimates, enhanced recovery methods, waste disposal, and engineering salary trends. A separate abstract and indexing was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Apparatus in a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable spirally welded metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Alpine, UT); Hall, Jr., Tracy H. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Lehi, UT); Pixton, David S. (Provo, UT)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High speed drilling research advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that the Amoco Production Company's Tulsa Research Center is developing a High Speed Drilling System (HSDS) to improve drilling economics for both exploration and development wells. The system is targeted for areas where historically the drilling rate is less than 25 ft/hr over a large section of hole. Designed as a five-year development program, work began on the system in late 1984. A major service company is participating in the project. The objective of the HSDS project is to improve drilling efficiency by developing improvements in the basic mechanical drilling system. The HSDS approach to improved drilling economics is via the traditional routes of increasing penetration rate (ROP) and bit life, increasing hole stability and reducing trouble time.

Warren, T.M.; Canson, B.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

363

An innovative drilling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal project objectives were the following: To demonstrate the capability of the Ultrashort Radius Radial System to drill and complete multiple horizontal radials in a heavy oil formation which had a production history of thermal operations. To study the effects that horizontal radials have on steam placement at specific elevations and on reducing gravity override. To demonstrate that horizontal radials could be utilized for cyclic production, i.e. for purposes of oil production as well as for steam injection. Each of these objectives was successfully achieved in the project. Early production results indicate that radials positively influenced cyclic performance. This report documents those results. 15 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Nees, J.; Dickinson, E.; Dickinson, W.; Dykstra, H.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies April 6, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Victor Der, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, Subcommittee on Energy and Environment. Chairman Harris, Ranking Member Miller, and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) perspective on research and development (R&D) to improve oil and gas drilling in ever-deeper waters with greater margins of safety, reduced risk of spills, and better mitigation approaches should there be a spill. As you know, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) leads DOE's efforts to

365

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies April 6, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Victor Der, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, Subcommittee on Energy and Environment. Chairman Harris, Ranking Member Miller, and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) perspective on research and development (R&D) to improve oil and gas drilling in ever-deeper waters with greater margins of safety, reduced risk of spills, and better mitigation approaches should there be a spill. As you know, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) leads DOE's efforts to

366

Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Drilling Systems Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Drilling Systems Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

367

Managing pressure during underbalanced drilling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? AbstractUnderbalanced drilling has received more and more attention in recent years. The reason for that may be because many oil fields, especially on the… (more)

Rĺen, Jostein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Method for drilling directional wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of locating a substantially horizontal bed of interest in a formation and maintaining a drill string therein during the drilling operation, said drill string including a measurement-while-drilling (MWD) electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor, comprising the steps of: drilling a substantially vertical offset well in a formation having at least one selected substantially horizontal bed therein; measuring resistivity in the formation at the offset well to provide a first resistivity log as a function of depth; modeling the substantially horizontal bed to provide a modeled resistivity log indicative of the resistivity taken along the substantially horizontal bed, said modeling being based on said first resistivity log; drilling a directional well in said formation near said offset well, a portion of said directional well being disposed in said substantially horizontal bed; measuring resistivity in said directional well using the MWD electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensor to provide a second log of resistivity taken substantially horizontally; comparing said second log to said modeled log to determine the location of said directional well; and adjusting the directional drilling operation so as to maintain said drill string within said substantially horizontal bed during the drilling of said directional well in response to said comparing step.

Wu, Jianwu; Wisler, M.M.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling Authors: E. Jones, T....

370

The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds, tight sands, and shales. Whereas these resources are abundant, they have largely been overlooked and understudied, especially outside of North America. New technologies, including those needed to unlock unconventional gas (UCG) resources, have been acknowledged to be the most significant factor in increasing natural gas supply in the United States. This study evaluates advances in critical technology that will most likely increase supply the most. Advanced technology is one of the main drivers in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water treatments are current important technologies critical in developing unconventional gas resources. More advanced technologies with significant impacts are expected to be available in the next decades. Fit-to-purpose technology reduces the cost to recover gas from unconventional resources. The better the unconventional gas resources are characterized, the better we can tailor specific technology to recover the gas, and less cost are needed. Analogy assumption is a good start in deciding which critical technology to be transferred to undeveloped unconventional reservoirs. If the key properties of two unconventional gas basins or formations are more or less similar, it is expected that the impact of certain technology applied in one basin or formation will resemble the impact to the other basin or formation.

Yanty, Evi

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Parent/Student Resource Page Why do we have fire drills? Fire drills are conducted in order to familiarize occupants with the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings in accordance with the New York State Education Law, Section 807. Of the four drills or smolders when used All flammable materials (gas, lighter fluid, charcoal, propane, solvents, etc.) All

Portman, Douglas

372

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MN 55441 Background Electronic data acquisition systems are necessary to make deep oil and gas drilling and production cost effective, yet the basic electronic components...

373

Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing  

SciTech Connect

Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber test, the BHA delivered up to 50 kW (67 hhp) hydraulic power. The tool drilled uncertified class-G cement samples cast into casing at a rate of 0.04 to 0.17 m/min (8 to 33 ft/hr), within the range projected for this tool but slower than a conventional PDM. While the tool met most of the performance goals, reliability requires further improvement. It will be difficult for this tool, as currently configured, to compete with conventional positive displacement downhole motors for most coil tubing drill applications. Mechanical cutters on the rotating nozzle head would improve cutting. This tool can be easily adapted for well descaling operations. A variant of the Microhole jet drilling gas separator was further developed for use with positive displacement downhole motors (PDM) operating on commingled nitrogen and water. A fit-for-purpose motor gas separator was designed and yard tested within the Microhole program. Four commercial units of that design are currently involved in a 10-well field demonstration with Baker Oil Tools in Wyoming. Initial results indicate that the motor gas separators provide significant benefit.

Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRILLING FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24-month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a ''removable filtercake'' has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed.

David B. Burnett

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Electric drill-string telemetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We design a numerical algorithm for simulation of low-frequency electric-signal transmission through a drill string. This is represented by a transmission line with varying geometrical and electromagnetic properties versus depth, depending on the characteristics ... Keywords: drill string, low frequency, simulation, transmission line, voltage

José M. Carcione; Flavio Poletto

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Drilling Methods | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drilling Methods Drilling Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Drilling Methods: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Document # Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal Area Lead Agency District Office Field Office Mineral Manager Surface Manager Development Phase(s) Techniques CA-170-02-15 EA Mammoth Pacific Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area BLM BLM Central California District Office BLM Bishop Field Office BLM Geothermal/Exploration Drilling Methods

377

Borehole measurements while drilling: systems and activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attention is focused on all potential methods of drilling safer and cheaper. Real time data from the bit offers the greatest potential for meeting these needs. As a result, numerous companies are actively competing to develop this oil field service capability and to capture a world wide market. Two basic categories of service are sought. The first, and highest priority, is drilling safety and efficiency; the second is real-time logging, or formation evaluation. This study addresses the types of systems being studied, describes company activity and projects underway, estimates the practical potential for success and considers the commercial market for successful systems. The need for research data on bit hydraulics and drill string dynamics, special deep, hot or sour gas situations and other relatively unusual requirements may become exceptions to the general conclusions that are drawn. Historical and present activity are documented through presenting the results of extensive literature and patent researches. A breakdown is presented of activity by company along with names and addresses for further contact.

McDonald, W.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hydraulic Pulse Drilling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE REV DATE DESCRIPTION ORIGINATOR REVIEWED DATE 0 4/13/2004 Final Report Author: J. Kolle Hunter/Theimer 4/13/2004 Document No.: TR- 053 HydroPulse(tm) Drilling Final Report Prepared by J.J. Kolle April 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Development Agreement No. DE-FC26-FT34367 Tempress Technologies, Inc. 18858 - 72 ND Ave S. Kent, WA 98032 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

379

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using a section of drill-in casing connected to a free-fall reentry cone. This hole was drilled to 95

380

Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Rigs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Rigs Department of Energy Supercomputer Helps Design More Efficient Big Rigs February 8, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - BMI Corporation, a company in South Carolina, in partnership with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has successfully developed a technology that will make semi trucks more fuel efficient with the potential to save millions of gallons of fuel. Utilizing the nation's most powerful computer, BMI Corp designed a SmartTruck UnderTray System, a set of integrated aerodynamic fairings that improve the aerodynamics of 18-wheeler (Class 8) long-haul trucks. If all 1.3 million Class 8 trucks in the U.S. were configured with these components, companies could achieve annual savings of 1.5 billion gallons

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381

Report on ignitability testing of flammable gasses in a core sampling drill string  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the results from testing performed at the Pittsburgh Research Center to determine the effects of an ignition of flammable gasses contained in a core sampling drill string. Testing showed that 1) An ignition of stoichiometric hydrogen and air in a vented 30 or 55 ft length of drill string will not force 28`` or more of water out the bottom of the drill string, and 2) An ignition of this same gas mixture will not rupture a vented or completely sealed drill string.

Witwer, K.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Development and evaluation of a meter for measuring return line fluid flow rates during drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most costly problem routinely encountered in geothermal drilling is lost circulation, which occurs when drilling fluid is lost to the formation rather than circulating back to the surface. The successful and economical treatment of lost circulation requires the accurate measurement of drilling fluid flow rate both into and out of the well. This report documents the development of a meter for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates in the return line of a drilling rig. The meter employs a rolling counterbalanced float that rides on the surface of the fluid in the return line. The angle of the float pivot arm is sensed with a pendulum potentiometer, and the height of the float is calculated from this measurement. The float height is closely related to the fluid height and, therefore, the flow rate in the line. The prototype rolling float meter was extensively tested under laboratory conditions in the Wellbore Hydraulics Flow Facility; results from these tests were used in the design of the field prototype rolling float meter. The field prototype meter was tested under actual drilling conditions in August and September 1991 at the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, Ca. In addition, the performance of several other commercially available inflow and outflow meters was evaluated in the field. The tested inflow meters included conventional pump stroke counters, rotary pump speed counters, magnetic flowmeters, and an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter. On the return flow line, a standard paddlemeter, an acoustic level meter, and the prototype rolling float meter were evaluated for measuring drilling fluid outflow rates.

Loeppke, G.E.; Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wright, E.K. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Oil ang gas: general rules and regulations  

SciTech Connect

Sixty-two rules and regulations on gas and oil cover items such as: drilling permits, location and access to wells, surface mining, stratigraphic and core tests, disposal and service of wells, underground gas storage, surface equipment of wells, oil measurements, production tests, oil and gas transportation, gas-oil ratio, pipeline connection, and drilling and production violations.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Establishing nuclear facility drill programs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Drainhole drilling projects under way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that many operators are taking advantage of continued developments in drainhole drilling technology to increase productivity in certain fields. Previously untapped prospects are under renewed scrutiny to determine if drainhole and horizontal drilling can make them more attractive. Producing properties are being reevaluated as well. Drainhole drilling typically involves reentering an existing well and cutting through the casing to drill a relatively short length of horizontal wellbore. Although separating drainhole and horizonal or extended-reach drilling is somewhat of a gray area, one difference is that a drainhole well turns to the horizontal much quicker. The radius of turn to 90/sup 0/ can be as little as 30 to 50 ft. Additionally, the length of horizontal kick in a drainhole well is typically in the 300- to 500-ft range compared to 1000 ft or more in extended-reach drilling. A final separating characteristic is that drainhole drilling can be associated with several horizontal lengths of wellbore coming off a single vertical hole.

Burton, B.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

EIA Completes Corrections to Drilling Activity Estimates Series  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as aleading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

Information Center

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

400 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Natural gas production million cubic feet/day 0 250 500 750 1,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well oil production per rig barrels/day 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feet/day (450) (400) (350) (300) (250) (200) (150) (100) (50) 0 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Legacy gas production change million cubic feet/day

388

Acoustical properties of drill strings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recovery of petrochemical and geothermal resources requires extensive drilling of wells to increasingly greater depths. Real-time collection and telemetry of data about the drilling process while it occurs thousands of feet below the surface is an effective way of improving the efficiency of drilling operations. Unfortunately, due to hostile down-hole environments, telemetry of this data is an extremely difficult problem. Currently, commercial systems transmit data to the surface by producing pressure pulses within the portion of the drilling mud enclosed in the hollow steel drill string. Transmission rates are between two and four data bits per second. Any system capable of raising data rates without increasing the complexity of the drilling process will have significant economic impact. One alternative system is based upon acoustical carrier waves generated within the drill string itself. If developed, this method would accommodate data rates up to 100 bits per second. Unfortunately, the drill string is a periodic structure of pipe and threaded tool joints, the transmission characteristics are very complex and exhibit a banded and dispersive structure. Over the past forty years, attempts to field systems based upon this transmission method have resulted in little success. This paper examines this acoustical transmission problem in great detail. The basic principles of acoustic wave propagation in the periodic structure of the drill string are examined through theory, laboratory experiment, and field test. The results indicate the existence of frequency bands which are virtually free of attenuation and suitable for data transmission at high bit rates. 9 refs., 38 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Simulation of air and mist drilling for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect

An air drilling model has been developed that accounts for cuttings and mist. Comparison of the model results with previous work shows this model to be more conservative. The equations developed are simple enough to be used in hand calculations, but the full capability of the model is more easily obtained with a computer program. Studies with the model show that volume requirements and standpipe pressures are significantly different for mist drilling compared with air drilling. An improved method for calculating downhole temperatures, pressures, fluid densities, and velocities during air drilling has been developed. Improvements on previous methods include the following. A fully transient thermal analysis of the wellbore and formation is used to determine the flowing temperatures. The effects of flow acceleration are included explicitly in the calculation. The slip velocity between the gas and the cuttings is determined by the use of a separate momentum equation for the cuttings. The possibility of critical flow in the wellbore is tested and appropriate changes in the volume flow rate and standpipe pressure are made automatically. The standpipe and flowing pressures are predicted. The analysis is conservative. The effect of the cuttings on the wellbore flow will tend to overpredict the required volume flow rates. In this paper, the basic equations of fluid flow for a gas with cuttings and mist are presented along with a numerical method for their solution. Several applications of this calculational method are given, showing the effect of flow rate and standpipe pressure in typical air and mist drilling situations.

Mitchell, R.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slurry Injection Slurry Injection Fact Sheet - Slurry Injection of Drilling Wastes Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes Several different approaches are used for injecting drilling wastes into underground formations for permanent disposal. Salt caverns are described in a separate fact sheet. This fact sheet focuses on slurry injection technology, which involves grinding or processing solids into small particles, mixing them with water or some other liquid to make a slurry, and injecting the slurry into an underground formation at pressures high enough to fracture the rock. The process referred to here as slurry injection has been given other designations by different authors, including slurry fracture injection (this descriptive term is copyrighted by a company that provides slurry injection services), fracture slurry injection, drilled cuttings injection, cuttings reinjection, and grind and inject.

392

DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology DOE-Sponsored Project Pushes the Limits of Seismic-While-Drilling Technology August 12, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - In a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Technology International Inc. has developed a breakthrough borehole imaging system that stands on the cusp of commercialization. By pushing the limits of seismic-while-drilling technology, the patent-pending SeismicPULSER system provides more accurate geo-steering for the discovery of new oil and natural gas reserves, facilitating new field development and improving well economics. Drill-bit seismic-while-drilling techniques use a downhole acoustic source and receivers at the surface to create real-time images that allow

393

Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Drilling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(20) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify lithology and mineralization, provide core samples and rock cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify stratigraphy and structural features such as fracture networks or faults Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates

394

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

395

Crude Injustice in the Gulf: Why Categorical Exclusions for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico are Inconsistent with U.S. International Ocean Law and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION In an instant, oil and gas fumes raced from theChallenges for Very Deep Oil and Gas Drilling-Will ThereOUTER CON- TINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS LEASING PROGRAM: FINAL

Hull, Eric V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

NETL: News Release - New Seismic Technology Improves Pre-Drill Diagnostics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 12, 2007 June 12, 2007 New Seismic Technology Improves Pre-Drill Diagnostics for Deep Oil and Gas Reservoirs WASHINGTON, DC - New technology developed through a cost-shared project managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is improving industry's ability to identify commercially viable deep oil and gas targets prior to drilling. Applications of this groundbreaking technology will help to accelerate future development of deep oil and gas resources in the United States. As the oil and gas industry turns its attention toward deeper targets, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, the tremendous costs involved require advanced technologies for pre-drill evaluation of a deep prospect's location, size, and hydrocarbon charge. Rock Solid Images, of Houston, Texas, answered the call with their much-needed pre-drill seismic imaging technology. The patented new technology improves pre-drill oil and gas detection in the reservoir and reduces the risks associated with drilling deep wells. With a significant portion of the Nation's oil and natural gas resource trapped in deep reservoirs, the new seismic technology represents a much-needed improvement that should bring more deep oil and gas to market.

397

Distribution network modeling and optimization for rapid and cost-effective deployment of oilfield drilling equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AAA, a large oil and gas field services company, is in the business of providing drilling services to companies that extract and market hydrocarbons. One of the key success factors in this industry is the ability to provide ...

Martchouk, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

U.S. Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov ... Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and ...

399

Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation prototype tool. In the past, several combinations of laser and rock variables were investigated at standard conditions and reported in the literature. More recent experiments determined the technical feasibility of laser perforation on multiple samples of rock, cement and steel. The fiber laser was capable of penetrating these materials under a variety of conditions, to an appropriate depth, and with reasonable energy requirements. It was determined that fiber lasers are capable of cutting rock without causing damage to flow properties. Furthermore, the laser perforation resulted in permeability improvements on the exposed rock surface. This report discusses the design and development of a customized laser pressure cell; experimental design and procedures, and the resulting data on pressure-charged samples exposed to the laser beam. An analysis provides the resulting effect of downhole pressure conditions on the laser/rock interaction process.

Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

GRR/Section 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-CA-a - Drilling and Well Development 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf 05CAADrillingApplicationProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil and Gas (DOGGR) administers geothermal well drilling activities (permitting, drilling,

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Infill drilling enhances waterflood recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of west Texas carbonate reservoir and waterflood data were studied to evaluate the impact of infill drilling on waterflood recovery. Results show that infill drilling enhanced the current and projected waterflood recovery from most of the reservoirs. The estimated ultimate and incremental infill-drilling waterflood recovery was correlated with well spacing and other reservoir and process parameters. Results of the correlation indicate that reducing well spacing from 40 to 20 acres (16 to 8 ha) per well would increase the oil recovery by 8 to 9% of the original oil in place (OOIP). Because of the limited data base and regressional nature of the correlation models, the infill-drilling recovery estimate must be used with caution.

Wu, C.H.; Jardon, M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Laughlin, B.A. (Union Pacific Research Co. (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ŤCharacterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas...

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

pressreleasesSalazar-Announces-Regulations-to-Strengthen-Drilling-Safety-Reduce-Risk-of-Human-Error-on-Offshore-Oil-and-Gas-Operations.cfm Natural Gas Transportation Update In...

404

Ethane prices trail other natural gas liquids - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... shift their drilling programs to the more liquids-rich portions of natural gas fields to take advantage of considerable price premiums over dry natural gas. ...

405

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from natural gas hydrates, plugging pipelines, stability and safety of drilling of platforms, as well as how dissociation of gas hydrates and sequestration of CO2 within the...

406

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français

407

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

408

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

409

Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

PAO lubricant inhibits bit balling, speeds drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For drilling operations, a new polyalphaolefin (PAO) lubricant improves penetration rates by reducing bit balling tendencies in water-based mud. The additive also reduces drillstring drag. This enables the effective transmission of weight to the bit and thereby increases drilling efficiency in such applications as directional and horizontal drilling. The paper describes drilling advances, bit balling, laboratory testing, and test analysis.

Mensa-Wilmot, G. [GeoDiamond, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, R.L. [Garrett Fluid Technology, The Woodlands, TX (United States); Stokes, R.S. [Coastal Superior Solutions Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

On-site generated nitrogen cuts cost of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of on-site generated nitrogen, instead of liquid nitrogen, has reduced the cost of drilling underbalanced horizontal wells in Canada and the western US. Because nitrogen is inert and inflammable, it is the preferred gas for underbalanced drilling. Nitrogen can be supplied for oil field use by three different methods: cryogenic liquid separation, pressure swing adsorption, and hollow fiber membranes. The selection of nitrogen supply from one of these methods depends on the cost of delivered nitrogen, the required flow rates and pressure, the required nitrogen purity, and the availability and reliability of the equipment for nitrogen generation. These three methods are described, as well as the required equipment.

Downey, R.A. [Energy Ingenuity Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

NETL: EPAct2005 - Title 9, Subtitle J of the Energy Policy Act...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Program image showing a drilling rig at sunset The Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program is a 10-year, 50...

413

Global Internet Summit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from laboring as a roughneck on drilling rigs to working as an engineer and manager, and running a multi-billion dollar oil and gas company at 33 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of drilling offshore wells is important as we drill more wells in deeper water. Drilling-related problems, including stuck pipe, lost circulation, and excessive mud cost, show the need for better drilling technology. If we can solve these problems, the economics of drilling the wells will improve, thus enabling the industry to drill wells that were previously uneconomical. Managed pressure drilling (MPD) is a new technology that enables a driller to more precisely control annular pressures in the wellbore to prevent these drillingrelated problems. This paper traces the history of MPD, showing how different techniques can reduce drilling problems. MPD improves the economics of drilling wells by reducing drilling problems. Further economic studies are necessary to determine exactly how much cost savings MPD can provide in certain situation. Furter research is also necessary on the various MPD techniques to increase their effectiveness.

Martin, Matthew Daniel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging, 2/25/2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to examine hoisting and rigging operations to ensure that safe equipment and work practices are being used.  The surveillance includes verification that...

417

Design, Construction, and Preliminary Validation of the Turbine Reacting Flow Rig.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the design, construction and partial operation of the Turbine Reacting Flow Rig (TuRFR), which is a high temperature turbine vane test facility… (more)

Cramer, Klaron Nathanael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Rotary steerable motor system for underground drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preferred embodiment of a system for rotating and guiding a drill bit in an underground bore includes a drilling motor and a drive shaft coupled to drilling motor so that drill bit can be rotated by the drilling motor. The system further includes a guidance module having an actuating arm movable between an extended position wherein the actuating arm can contact a surface of the bore and thereby exert a force on the housing of the guidance module, and a retracted position.

Turner, William E. (Durham, CT); Perry, Carl A. (Middletown, CT); Wassell, Mark E. (Kingwood, TX); Barbely, Jason R. (Middletown, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Cobern, Martin E. (Cheshire, CT)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: News Release - Regional Partner Launches Drilling Test in DOE's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 30, 2007 August 30, 2007 Regional Partner Launches Drilling Test in DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program Project Focuses on Greenhouse Gas Storage in Lignite Seam, Methane Gas Recovery MORGANTOWN, WV - As an integral part of the U.S. Department of Energy's effort to develop carbon sequestration technologies to capture and permanently store greenhouse gases, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership has begun drilling operations to determine the suitability of a North Dakota lignite coal seam to simultaneously sequester the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and produce valuable coalbed methane. The PCOR Partnership-one of seven partnerships in the Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, which is managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory-plans to inject at least 400 tons of CO2 to a depth of approximately 1,200 feet into an unminable lignite seam in Burke County, ND.

422

Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology  

SciTech Connect

This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

Pioneer Natural Resources

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0...

424

U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

425

Newberry Exploratory Slimhole: Drilling And Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During July-November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5360' exploratory slimhole (3.895" diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia's program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling we performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well's data set includes: over 4000' of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for ...

John Finger Ronald; Ronald D. Jacobson; Charles E. Hickox

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

DOE/Fossil Energy`s drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D: A technologies/products overview  

SciTech Connect

An overview of natural gas drilling, completion, and stimulation RD&D sponsored by the US Department of Energy is reported in this paper. Development of high rate-of-penetration drilling systems and underbalanced drilling technologies are detailed among other RD&D activities. The overview serves as a technology transfer medium and is intended to accelerate the deployment of the products and technologies described.

Duda, J.R.; Yost, A.B. II

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Natural Gas from Shale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, protective environmental practices and data development, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of gas technically recoverable where they once were not.

429

RECIPIENT:Potter Drilling Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potter Drilling Inc Potter Drilling Inc u.s. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERG¥ EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DEIERl\IINATION PROJECr TITLE: Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Page 1 0[2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announ<:ement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number OE·PS36-09G099016 OE· EE0002746 ~FO . 10 - [r,,~ G02746 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA ComplianC:f Offkrr (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited 10, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

430

Affine crystal structure on rigged configurations of type $D_{n}^{(1)}$  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extending the work in Schilling (Int. Math. Res. Not. 2006:97376, 2006), we introduce the affine crystal action on rigged configurations which is isomorphic to the Kirillov---Reshetikhin crystal B r,s of type Keywords: Crystal bases, Quantum algebras, Rigged configurations

Masato Okado; Reiho Sakamoto; Anne Schilling

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Probabilistic structure matching for visual SLAM with a multi-camera rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to use a multi-camera rig for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), providing flexibility in sensor placement on mobile robot platforms while exploiting the stronger localization constraints provided by omni-directional sensors. In ... Keywords: Localization, Mapping, Mobile robot, Multi-camera rig, Omni-directional, SFM

Michael Kaess; Frank Dellaert

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.

Dunn, James C.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Assembly for directional drilling of boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a drilling assembly for directional drilling of boreholes in subsurface formations. The assembly comprising a downhole drilling motor. The motor having an output shaft which is suitable to drive a rotary drill bit and a motor housing which is suitable to be arranged at the lower end of a drill string; stabilizing means for stabilizing the assembly; means in the assembly for permanently tilting the central axis of the output shaft with respect to the longitudinal axis of the drill string in the borehole. It is characterized in that the stabilizing means include a lower-most stabilizer which is secured to and rotates with the output shaft.

Steiginga, A.; Worrall, R.N.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

435

Offshore underbalanced drilling system could revive field developments. Part 2: Making this valuable reservoir drilling/completion technique work on a conventional offshore drilling platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1, presented in the July issue, discussed the emerging trend to move underbalanced drilling (UBD) operations into the offshore arena, following its successful application in many onshore areas. This concluding article delves into the details of applying UBD offshore. Starting with advantages the technique offers in many maturing or complex/marginal prospects, the UBD system for offshore platforms use is described. This involves conversion of the conventional rotary system, use of rotating diverters, design of the surface fluid separation system and the necessary gas (nitrogen or natural gas) injection system to lighten the fluid column. Commonly faced operational challenges for offshore UBD are listed along with recommended solutions.

Nessa, D.O.; Tangedahl, M.J.; Saponja, J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

High Temperature Battery for Drilling Applications  

SciTech Connect

In this project rechargeable cells based on the high temperature electrochemical system Na/beta''-alumina/S(IV) in AlCl3/NaCl were developed for application as an autonomous power source in oil/gas deep drilling wells. The cells operate in the temperature range from 150 C to 250 C. A prototype DD size cell was designed and built based on the results of finite element analysis and vibration testing. The cell consisted of stainless steel case serving as anode compartment with cathode compartment installed in it and a seal closing the cell. Critical element in cell design and fabrication was hermetically sealing the cell. The seal had to be leak tight, thermally and vibration stable and compatible with electrode materials. Cathode compartment was built of beta''-alumina tube which served as an electrolyte, separator and cathode compartment.

Josip Caja

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Acoustic data transmission through a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Direct gas in mud measurement at the well site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A patented process developed by Datalog provides a direct quantitative gas measurement from the drilling fluid, eliminates the gas trap (degasser) and the conversion to gas-in-air measurements associated with traditional gas detection methods. Quantitative hydrocarbon gas measurement can be performed at the wellsite through the use of this gas detection system called GasWizard. This is achieved with a passive device containing a gas permeable membrane that is immersed in the drilling fluid. The device extracts a gas sample that is directly proportional to the actual gas concentration in the drilling fluid. Through this simple process, the gas measurement is equally effective in conventional water or oil-base drilling muds or in underbalanced drilling fluids such as foam, air or nitrogen.

Hawker, D. [Datalog, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Well descriptions for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

NETL: News Release - New Carbon Drill Pipe Signals Technical Achievement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 17, 2004 May 17, 2004 New Carbon Drill Pipe Signals Technical Achievement Technology May Benefit American Energy Production WASHINGTON, DC -- The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today the development of a new "composite" drill pipe that is lighter, stronger and more flexible than steel, which could significantly alter the ability to drain substantially more oil and gas from rock than traditional vertical wells. MORE INFO Read about January, 2003 field test Read about October, 2003 field test - "This is another example of the technology breakthroughs in the arena of domestic energy production being carried out by our Office of Fossil Energy," said Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham. "To reach and recover untapped domestic oil and gas reserves, we must have the ability to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas rigs drilling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

442

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the following agencies: Australia/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche

443

Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

Hall; David R. (Provo, UT), Fox; Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

Graphene Compositions And Drilling Fluids Derived Therefrom ...  

Drilling fluids comprising graphenes and nanoplatelet additives and methods for production thereof are disclosed. Graphene includes graphite oxide, graphene oxide ...

445

DOE Project Leads to New Alliance to Promote Low-Impact Drilling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Leads to New Alliance to Promote Low-Impact Drilling Project Leads to New Alliance to Promote Low-Impact Drilling DOE Project Leads to New Alliance to Promote Low-Impact Drilling February 25, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- A project supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has given rise to a major new research consortium to promote advanced technology for low-impact oil and gas drilling. Announced earlier this month by the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) and Texas A&M University, the University/National Laboratory Alliance will fund and transfer advanced technologies to accelerate development of domestic oil and natural gas resources with minimal environmental impact. The alliance has its roots in a project funded through the Office of Fossil

446

DOE Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Ultra-Deepwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Ultra-Deepwater DOE Selects Projects Aimed at Reducing Drilling Risks in Ultra-Deepwater November 22, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected six new natural gas and oil research projects aimed at reducing risks and enhancing the environmental performance of drilling in ultra-deepwater settings. The projects have been selected for negotiation leading to awards totaling $9.6 million, and will add to the research portfolio for FE's Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program. Research needs addressed by the projects include the prevention of uncontrolled oil flow through new and better ways to cement well casing,

447

Microhole Drilling Tractor Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to increase the U.S. energy reserves and lower costs for finding and retrieving oil, the USDOE created a solicitation to encourage industry to focus on means to operate in small diameter well-Microhole. Partially in response to this solicitation and because Western Well Tool's (WWT) corporate objective to develop small diameter coiled tubing drilling tractor, WWT responded to and was awarded a contract to design, prototype, shop test, and field demonstrate a Microhole Drilling Tractor (MDT). The benefit to the oil industry and the US consumer from the project is that with the MDT's ability to facilitate Coiled Tubing drilled wells to be 1000-3000 feet longer horizontally, US brown fields can be more efficiently exploited resulting in fewer wells, less environmental impact, greater and faster oil recovery, and lower drilling costs. Shortly after award of the contract, WWT was approached by a major oil company that strongly indicated that the specified size of a tractor of 3.0 inches diameter was inappropriate and that immediate applications for a 3.38-inch diameter tractor would substantially increase the usefulness of the tool to the oil industry. Based on this along with an understanding with the oil company to use the tractor in multiple field applications, WWT applied for and was granted a no-cost change-of-scope contract amendment to design, manufacture, assemble, shop test and field demonstrate a prototype a 3.38 inch diameter MDT. Utilizing existing WWT tractor technology and conforming to an industry developed specification for the tool, the Microhole Drilling Tractor was designed. Specific features of the MDT that increase it usefulness are: (1) Operation on differential pressure of the drilling fluid, (2) On-Off Capability, (3) Patented unique gripping elements (4) High strength and flexibility, (5) Compatibility to existing Coiled Tubing drilling equipment and operations. The ability to power the MDT with drilling fluid results in a highly efficient tool that both delivers high level of force for the pressure available and inherently increases downhole reliability because parts are less subject to contamination. The On-Off feature is essential to drilling to allow the Driller to turn off the tractor and pull back while circulating in cleanout runs that keep the hole clean of drilling debris. The gripping elements have wide contact surfaces to the formation to allow high loads without damage to the formation. As part of the development materials evaluations were conducted to verify compatibility with anticipated drilling and well bore fluids. Experiments demonstrated that the materials of the tractor are essentially undamaged by exposure to typical drilling fluids used for horizontal coiled tubing drilling. The design for the MDT was completed, qualified vendors identified, parts procured, received, inspected, and a prototype was assembled. As part of the assembly process, WWT prepared Manufacturing instructions (MI) that detail the assembly process and identify quality assurance inspection points. Subsequent to assembly, functional tests were performed. Functional tests consisted of placing the MDT on jack stands, connecting a high pressure source to the tractor, and verifying On-Off functions, walking motion, and operation over a range of pressures. Next, the Shop Demonstration Test was performed. An existing WWT test fixture was modified to accommodate operation of the 3.38 inch diameter MDT. The fixture simulated the tension applied to a tractor while walking (pulling) inside 4.0 inch diameter pipe. The MDT demonstrated: (1) On-off function, (2) Pulling forces proportional to available differential pressure up to 4000 lbs, (3) Walking speeds to 1100 ft/hour. A field Demonstration of the MDT was arranged with a major oil company operating in Alaska. A demonstration well with a Measured Depth of approximately 15,000 ft was selected; however because of problems with the well drilling was stopped before the planned MDT usage. Alternatively, functional and operational tests were run with the MDT insi

Western Well Tool

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

448

Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Directional drilling and equipment for hot granite wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following drilling equipment and experience gained in drilling to date are discussed: positive displacement motors, turbodrills, motor performance experience, rotary-build and rotary-hold results, steering devices and surveying tools, shock absorbers, drilling and fishing jars, drilling bits, control of drill string drag, and control of drill string degradation. (MHR)

Williams, R.E.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

High-temperature directional drilling turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a high-temperature turbodrill for directional drilling of geothermal wells in hard formations is summarized. The turbodrill may be used for straight-hole drilling but was especially designed for directional drilling. The turbodrill was tested on a dynamometer stand, evaluated in laboratory drilling into ambient temperature granite blocks, and used in the field to directionally drill a 12-1/4-in.-diam geothermal well in hot 200/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) granite at depths to 10,5000 ft.

Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Downhole mud properties complicate drilling hydraulics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains that wellsite parameters such as penetration rate, hole cleaning, hole erosion and overall wellbore stability are directly related to the hydraulic conditions occurring while drilling. Drilling hydraulics, in turn, are largely a function of the drilling mud's properties, primarily viscosity and density. Accurate pressure loss calculations are necessary to maximize bit horse-power and penetration rates. Also, annular pressure loss measurements are important to record equivalent circulating densities, particularly when drilling near balanced formation pressures or when approaching formation fracture pressures. Determination of the laminar, transitional or turbulent flow regimes will help ensure the mud will remove drill cuttings from the wellbore and minimize hole erosion.

Leyendecker, E.A.; Bruton, J.R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Conformable apparatus in a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube. The metal tube may be adapted to stretch as the drill pipes stretch.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41330  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project...