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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Launching a Technology Revolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the technological challenges and opportunities that spring from the goal of stabilizing the concentration of greenhouse gases particularly as they affect energy systems.

Edmonds, James A.; Stokes, Gerald M.

2003-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

IT Revolution in Learning Technology Riichiro Mizoguchi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT Revolution in Learning Technology Riichiro Mizoguchi The Institute of Scientific and Industrial@ei.sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp Introduction The change has already begun. It is not a simple change but a Revolution in the sense of speed and its impact. It is called IT(Information Technology) revolution and has been giving great impacts

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

3

Industrial Revolutions: a graduate seminar Seminar in History of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Revolutions: a graduate seminar HSci 8930 Seminar in History of Technology Jennifer K the question: Was there an Industrial Revolution? Historians have been discussing the Industrial Revolution of industrial revolution itself. This reassessment includes renewed attention to the scientific and technical

Janssen, Michel

4

Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market (e.g. electricity, cars and lighting), they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: Onshore wind power Polysilicon photovoltaic modules LED lighting Electric vehicles Editor's note: The original report has been updated to fix inaccuracies in some graph labels. Revolution Now -- The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies.pdf

5

Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market (e.g. electricity, cars and lighting), they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: Onshore wind power Polysilicon photovoltaic modules LED lighting Electric vehicles Editor's note: The original report has been updated to fix inaccuracies in some graph labels. Revolution Now -- The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies.pdf

6

Emerging Shale Gas Revolution in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

? Agri-Environment Branch, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast BT9 5PX, U.K. ... The US therefore has a world lead in ‘fracking’ techniques and also research on the potential adverse environmental consequences of this technology. ... China is now embarking upon substantial development of shale gas extraction but the question of major public concern is whether or not the Chinese government will try to learn from the US experience not only to benefit from the new engineering techniques but also to minimize the negative impacts of this technology on environmental and human health. ...

Yunhua Chang; Xuejun Liu; Peter Christie

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technology matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would ?always be five years away.? This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market, they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic modules, LED lighting, and electric vehicles.

Tillemann, Levi; Beck, Fredric; Brodrick, James; Brown, Austin; Feldman, David; Nguyen, Tien; Ward, Jacob

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Solar Photovoltaics Technology: The Revolution Begins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prospects of solar-photovoltaic (PV) technologies are envisioned, arguing this electricity source is at a tipping point in the complex, worldwide energy outlook. The emphasis of...

Kazmerski, Lawrence L

9

Revolution Now  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revolution Now Revolution Now The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies September 17, 2013 Lead author Dr. Levi Tillemann, Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs Contributors Fredric Beck, DOE Wind Technology Program Dr. James Brodrick, DOE Solid-State Lighting Program Dr. Austin Brown, DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory David Feldman, DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory Tien Nguyen, DOE Fuel Cells Technology Office Jacob Ward, DOE Vehicles Technology Program Gaining Force ................................................................................................................................................ 1 U.S. Land-Based Wind Power ........................................................................................................................ 2

10

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Small gas turbine technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small Gas Turbine Technology: Small gas turbine, in the power range up to 500 kW, requires a recuperated thermodynamic cycle to achieve an electrical efficiency of about 30%. This efficiency is the optimum, which is possible for a cycle pressure ratio of about 4–1. The cycle airflow is function of the power requirement. To increase the efficiency, in view to reduce the CO2 emission, it is mandatory to develop a more efficient thermodynamic cycle. Different thermodynamic cycles were examined and the final choice was made for an Intercooled, Recuperated cycle. The advantage of this cycle, for the same final electrical efficiency of about 35%, is the smaller cycle airflow, which is the most dimensional parameter for the important components as the heat exchanger recuperator and the combustion chamber. In parallel with the thermodynamic cycle it is necessary to develop the High Speed Alternator technology, integrated on the same shaft that the gas turbine rotating components, to achieve the constant efficiency at part loads, from 50% up to 100%, by the capacity to adjust the engine speed at the required load. To satisfy the stringent requirement in pollutant emissions of \\{NOx\\} and CO, the catalytic combustion system is the most efficient and this advance technology has to be proven. The major constraints for the small gas turbine technology development are the production cost and the maintenance cost of the unit. In the power range of 0–500 kW the gas turbine technology is in competition with small reciprocating engines, which are produced in large quantity for automotive industry, at a very low production cost.

Andre Romier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector.

13

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Natural gas from shale formation – The evolution, evidences and challenges of shale gas revolution in United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extraction of natural gas from shale rock in the United States (US) is one of the landmark events in the 21st century. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing can extract huge quantities of natural gas from impermeable shale formations, which were previously thought to be either impossible or uneconomic to produce. This review offers a comprehensive insight into US shale gas opportunities, appraising the evolution, evidence and the challenges of shale gas production in the US. The history of US shale gas in this article is divided into three periods and based on the change of oil price (i.e., the period before the 1970s oil crisis, the period from 1970s to 2000, and the period since 2000), the US has moved from being one of the world's biggest importers of gas to being self-sufficient in less than a decade, with the shale gas production increasing 12-fold (from 2000 to 2010). The US domestic natural gas price hit a 10-year low in 2012. The US domestic natural gas price in the first half of 2012 was about $2 per million British Thermal Unit (BTU), compared with Brent crude, the world benchmark price for oil, now about $ 80–100/barrel, or $14–17 per million BTU. Partly due to an increase in gas-fired power generation in response to low gas prices, US carbon emissions from fossil-fuel combustion fell by 430 million ton CO2 – more than any other country – between 2006 and 2011. Shale gas also stimulated economic growth, creating 600,000 new jobs in the US by 2010. However, the US shale gas revolution would be curbed, if the environmental risks posed by hydraulic fracturing are not managed effectively. The hydraulic fracturing is water intensive, and can cause pollution in the marine environment, with implications for long-term environmental sustainability in several ways. Also, large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, can be emitted during the shale gas exploration and production. Hydraulic fracturing also may induce earthquakes. These environmental risks need to be managed by good practices which is not being applied by all the producers in all the locations. Enforcing stronger regulations are necessary to minimize risk to the environment and on human health. Robust regulatory oversight can however increase the cost of extraction, but stringent regulations can foster an historic opportunity to provide cheaper and cleaner gas to meet the consumer demand, as well as to usher in the future growth of the industry.

Qiang Wang; Xi Chen; Awadhesh N. Jha; Howard Rogers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Oil & Gas Technology Center | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center GE Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center Mark Little, SVP and chief technology officer for GE, and Eric Gebhardt, vice president...

20

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Natural Gas Research Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gas to Liquid Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The liquefaction energy required in a LNG plant typically has been reported as 9–12% of the heat energy in the natural gas, and 9–10% energy shrinkage is ... energy. LNG projects have a very high capital cost, in...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Esso Energy Award Lecture, 1998. Boosting production from low-pressure oil and gas fields: a revolution in hydrocarbon production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Boosting production from low-pressure oil and gas fields: a revolution in hydrocarbon...major part of the future source of oil and gas supply. Full development...Caledonia Ltd (Wood Group Engineering), Marathon Oil UK Ltd, Mobil North Sea Ltd, Oil...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nanorobotics is an emerging interdisciplinary technology area raising new scientific challenges and promising revolution-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and promising revolution- ary advancements in applications such as medicine, biology and industrial function, as well as for identifying ways of designing protein-based nano- mechanical systems. Industrial Nanorobotics The papers in the second group of this special issue are rel- evant to industrial nanorobotics (or

Mavroidis, Constantinos

24

Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Gas Technology Institute  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Gas Technology Institute will conduct research and development on hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion processes to make gasoline and diesel.

25

Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Natural gas engine technology has evolved to meet the...

26

Sandia National Laboratories: oil and gas technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industriell og teknisk forskning) will now tackle energy challenges such as renewable-energy integration, grid modernization, gas technologies, and algae-based biofuels. SINTEF is...

27

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forum Forum Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Form (NGVTF) logo The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) supports development and deployment of commercially competitive natural gas engines, vehicles, and infrastructure. Learn about NGVTF's purpose, activities, meetings, stakeholders, steering committee, and webinars. Purpose Led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission, NGVTF unites a diverse group of stakeholders to: Share information and resources Identify natural gas engine, vehicle, and infrastructure technology targets Facilitate government-industry research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) to achieve targets Communicate high-priority needs of natural gas vehicle end users to natural gas equipment and vehicle manufacturers

28

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Research Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and heavy-duty fleets, which have significant potential to use natural gas, currently consume more than a third of the petroleum in transportation in the U.S. Natural gas is an excellent fit for a wide range of heavy-duty applications, especially transit buses, refuse haulers, and Class 8 long-haul or delivery trucks. In addition, natural gas can be a very good choice for light-duty vehicle fleets with central refueling. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center for a description of the uses and benefits of natural gas vehicles or its Laws and Incentives database for information on tax incentives. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports the development of natural gas engines and research into renewable natural gas production.

30

Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

31

Revolution in Detection Affairs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

Stern W.

2013-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

32

Revolution Now | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revolution Now Revolution Now Revolution Now Policies and investments to support emerging clean energy technology are a cornerstone of the Energy Department's work to advance the energy economy of tomorrow. Thanks to decades of these policies and investments, the clean energy future has already arrived for four key technologies: wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles and LED light bulbs, each of which has seen drops in cost and growth in consumer demand over the past four years. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies tells the story of how these four technologies successfully crossed "the valley of death" -- what entrepreneurs commonly call the gap between research and wide-scale deployment -- and joined a burgeoning consumer market for

33

Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned November 20, 2014...

34

DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for...

35

Externally fired gas turbine technology: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Externally fired heat engines were used widely since helium the industrial revolution using dirty solid fuels for example coal, due to the lack of refined fuels. However, with the availability of clean fuels, external firing mode was abandoned, except for steam power plants. Lately, with the global trend moving towards green power production, the idea of the external fired system has captured the attention again especially externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) due to its wider range of power generation and the potential of using environment friendly renewable energy sources like biomass. In this paper, a wide range of thermal power sources utilizing EFGT such as concentrated solar power (CSP), fossil, nuclear and biomass fuels are reviewed. Gas turbine as the main component of EFGT is investigated from micro scale below 1 MWe to the large scale central power generation. Moreover, the different high temperature heat exchanger (HTHE) materials and designs are reviewed. Finally, the methods of improving cycle efficiency such as the externally fired combined cycle (EFCC), humidified air turbine (HAT), EFGT with fuel cells and other cycles are reviewed thoroughly.

K.A. Al-attab; Z.A. Zainal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on AddThis.com...

37

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technology Forum Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership

38

Natural Gas Technologies Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Center Technologies Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Gas Technologies Center Name Natural Gas Technologies Center Address 1350, Nobel, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada Place Montreal, Quebec Zip J4B 5H3 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1992 Phone number 1.450.449.4774 Coordinates 45.5678623°, -73.4186892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5678623,"lon":-73.4186892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May -October, 2009 May -October, 2009 Submitted by: Rice University, University of Texas, and Oklahoma State University George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Texas Priyank Jaiswal, Oklahoma State University November, 2009 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 John Terneus, Program Officer Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy 2 Table of Contents Disclaimer .......................................................................................................... 3

40

PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant Program PON-13-503 http ............................................................................................................................5 PIER NATURAL GAS RESEARCH PROGRAM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lithium bromide chiller technology in gas processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption Chillers have been in use for more than half a century, mainly in the commercial air conditioning industry. The Gas Research Institute and EnMark Natural Gas Company co-funded a field test to determine the viability of this commercial air conditioning technology in the gas industry. In 1991, a 10 MMCFC natural gas conditioning plant was constructed in Sherman, Texas. The plant was designed to use a standard, off-the-shelf chiller from Trane with a modified control scheme to maintain tight operating temperature parameters. The main objective was to obtain a 40 F dewpoint natural gas stream to meet pipeline sales specifications. Various testing performed over the past three years has proven that the chiller can be operated economically and on a continuous basis in an oilfield environment with minimal operation and maintenance costs. This paper will discuss how a LiBr absorption chiller operates, how the conditioning plant performed during testing, and what potential applications are available for LiBr chiller technology.

Huey, M.A.; Leppin, D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Revolution Now  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Energy Technologies September 17, 2013 Lead author Dr. Levi Tillemann, Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs Contributors Fredric Beck, DOE Wind Technology...

43

Research-Technology Management November--December 2013 | 1 Before the Industrial Revolution, goods were produced by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the manufacturing sector as the Industrial Revolution was--the age of 3D printing and the digital tools that support-build-deliver model with the emerging 3D printing model: Ask a factory today to make you a single hammer to your own-scale production with an economies-of-one production model enabled by 3D printing and additive manufactur- ing

44

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Deepwater Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Research Project Summaries Reference Shelf O&G Document Archive Deepwater (and Ultra-Deepwater, 5000 feet of water depth and beyond) is recognized as one of the last remaining areas of the world were oil and natural gas resources remain to be discovered and produced. The architecture of the systems employed to cost-effectively develop these resources in an environmentally safe manner, reflect some of industryÂ’s most advanced engineering accomplishments. NETL is funding research to catalyze further advances that can help Gulf of Mexico discoveries progress to production quickly and safely, and that can help maximize oil and gas recovery from fields that are currently at the edge of industry capabilities. Many of these efforts are focused on subsea production

45

Gas Reactor Technology R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy to Invest U.S. Department of Energy to Invest up to $7.3 Million for "Deep-Burn" Gas-Reactor Technology R&D Artist's rendering of Nuclear Plant An artist's rendering of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant concept. The U.S. Department of Energy today announced a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) valued at $7.3 million for universities, commercial entities, National Laboratories with expertise in the concept of nuclear fuel "Deep-Burn" in which plutonium and higher transuranics recycled from spent nuclear fuel are destroyed. The funding opportunity seeks to establish the technological foundations that will support the role of the very-high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) in the nuclear fuel cycle -- which is one of the prototype reactors being researched/developed under

46

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

47

Promising technology for recovery and use of liquefied natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of liquefied natural gas is proposed as an alternative to motor fuel. Technology for recovering liquid natural gas based on the principle of internal gas cooling in a turbo-expander, and the equipment require...

E. B. Fedorova; V. V. Fedorov; A. D. Shakhov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

49

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Meeting to someone by E-mail 1 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

50

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

51

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Meeting to someone by E-mail 2 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

52

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program

53

Revolution in nuclear detection affairs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

Stern, Warren M. [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

Digital Revolutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cutting-edge work in this field such as augmented reality, artificial intelligence, wearable technologies, robotics and 3D printing. Drawing these at times disparate subjects and projects together to make a cohesive whole is no easy feat. The curator......

Catherine Mason

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2005 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail 2005 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative

56

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail 10 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative

57

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

58

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas INTRODUCTION Alternative energy technologies such asmotivations of alternative energy technologies: mitigatingaddresses the goal of alternative energy technology

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta-Analysis of Estimates in the Literature and overlapping choices of assumptions. The purpose of the study is to use regression and related analyses

Watson, Andrew

60

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:27am Addthis Photo of a bulldozer on top of a large trash mound in a landfill with a cloudy sky in the backdrop. Methane and other gases produced from landfill decomposition can be leveraged for energy. This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector. Overview Landfill gases are a viable energy resource created during waste decomposition. Landfills are present in most communities. These resources can be tapped to generate heat and electricity. As organic waste decomposes, bio-gas is produced made up of roughly half methane, half carbon dioxide, and small amounts of non-methane organic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology Energy Systems Research/index.html January 2012 The Issue California is the secondlargest natural gas consuming state in the United States, just behind Texas. About 85% of the natural gas consumed in California is delivered on interstate

62

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 June 23, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An industry-driven consortium initiated in 2000, SWC's goal is to keep "stripper wells" productive in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. The consortium is managed and administered by The Pennsylvania State University on behalf of DOE; the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

63

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf E&P Focus Newsletter Banner The oil and gas exploration and production R&D newsletter, E&P Focus, highlights the latest developments in R&D being carried out by NETL. E&P Focus promotes the widespread dissemination of research results among all types of oil and gas industry stakeholders: producers, researchers, educators, regulators, and policymakers. Each issue provides up-to-date information regarding extramural projects managed under the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and OilÂ’s traditional oil and gas program, the EPAct Section 999 Program administered by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA), and in-house oil and gas research carried out by NETLÂ’s Office of Research and Development.

64

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf Solicitations Project Summaries Publications News Releases Software/Databases CDs/DVDs EOR Illustrations Welcome to the NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf. Recently released and in-demand reference materials are available directly from this page using the links below. Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Now Available The Knowledge Management Database (KMD) provides easy access to the results of nearly four decades of research supported by the Office of Fossil EnergyÂ’s Oil and Natural Gas Program. The database portal provides access to content from dozens of CDs and DVDs related to oil and natural gas research that FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory has published over the years. It

65

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs May 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). OsComp Systems designed and tested the novel compressor design with funding from the DOE-supported Stripper Well Consortium, an industry-driven organization whose members include natural gas and petroleum producers,

66

DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A $92 million research investment in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Energy is today being credited with technological contributions that have stimulated development of domestic natural gas from shales.

67

Oil and Natural Gas Program Commericialized Technologies and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) works to ensure that domestic natural gas and oil can remain part of the U.S. energy portfolio for decades to come. Research focused on...

68

Offshore oil and gas: global resource knowledge and technological change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is argued that the contribution of technological change to the offshore oil and gas industry's progress is under-researched. As a prelude this theme, the changing geography of known offshore oil and gas resources is reviewed. Significant, and largely technologically dependent, developments are identified in terms of the industry's global spread, its extension into deep and ultradeep waters and its ability to enhance output from well-established oil and gas provinces. Three sections (on the evolution of exploration and production rigs, drilling techniques and the application of IT to improve resource knowledge and access) then examine the relationships between technological change and the offshore industry's progress. It is concluded that new technologies improve knowledge of, and access to, resources via four distinctive routes, but that the full impact of R & D is frequently related to the inter-dependence of technologies. Opportunities for further research are identified.

David Pinder

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

An overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work an overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies is presented. In particular, the various gas turbine technologies are described and compared. Emphasis has been given to the various advance cycles involving heat recovery from the gas turbine exhaust, such as, the gas to gas recuperation cycle, the combined cycle, the chemical recuperation cycle, the Cheng cycle, the humid air turbine cycle, etc. The thermodynamic characteristics of the various cycles are considered in order to establish their relative importance to future power generation markets. The combined cycle technology is now well established and offers superior to any of the competing gas turbine based systems, which are likely to be available in the medium term for large-scale power generation applications. In small-scale generation, less than 50 MWe, it is more cost effective to install a less complex power plant, due to the adverse effect of the economics of scale. Combined cycle plants in this power output range normally have higher specific investment costs and lower electrical efficiencies but also offer robust and reliable performance. Mixed air steam turbines (MAST) technologies are among the possible ways to improve the performance of gas turbine based power plants at feasible costs (e.g. peak load gas turbine plants).

Andreas Poullikkas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

IFP --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --(Script : 1er specimen) --1 --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --rev. IFP, Vol. xx (2009), No X, pp. 00-00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 1 -- Oil & Gas Science2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology - Rev. IFP, 65, 3 (2010) 435-444" DOI : 10.2516/ogst/2010007 #12;IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 2

Boyer, Edmond

71

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NETL: News Release - DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today Washington, DC - A $92 million research investment in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is today being credited with technological contributions that have stimulated development of domestic natural gas from shales. The result: more U.S. jobs, increased energy security, and higher revenues for states and the Federal Government. Spurred by the technological advancements resulting from this investment, U.S. shale gas production continues to grow, amounting to more than 8 billion cubic feet per day, or about 14 percent of the total volume of dry natural gas produced in the United States. DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that the shale gas share of U.S. natural gas production will reach 45 percent by 2035. The EIA also projects that 827 trillion cubic feet of natural gas is now recoverable from U.S. shales using currently available technology-an increase of nearly 500 trillion cubic feet over earlier estimates.

73

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Membrane Technology and Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR), based in Menlo Park, CA, is a privately- owned developer, manufacturer, and supplier of customized membrane process solutions. Currently, the company's principal membrane products are * VaporSep® systems to remove organic vapors from air and nitrogen * NitroSep TM and fuel gas conditioning systems for natural gas treatment * Hydrogen recovery systems for refinery and other applications MTR's current R&D is extending use of membranes to carbon sequestration and biofuels separations. www.mtrinc.com New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes Challenge Membrane technology was first commercialized in the 1960s and 1970s for well-known applications such as water filtration

74

Efficiency of Gas-to-Liquids Technology with Different Synthesis Gas Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design and optimization of a gas-to-liquids technology (GTL) is considered, mostly from the view of an optimal choice of a synthesis gas (syngas) production method. ... If the tail gas is not enough, an additional portion of the natural gas is burned. ... The temperature of the flue gases passing from the radiation chamber of the tubular furnace to the convection chamber is taken as equal to 1150 °C, which allows proper calculation of required amount of gas supplied to the burner. ...

Ilya S. Ermolaev; Vadim S. Ermolaev; Vladimir Z. Mordkovich

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

75

Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Revolution in Microbial Contamination Control ReliOxTM Corporation has licensed a patented chemical production technology from the University of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revolution in Microbial Contamination Control ReliOxTM Corporation has licensed a patented chemical-fashioned way requires many hazardous chemicals such as concentrated acids and volatile, dangerous gases for generating Chlorine Dioxide with an innovative, compact, and simple- to-operate process platform. Reli

Jawitz, James W.

77

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential July 18, 2012 - 3:52pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy Corp. in Houston, Texas. Proinlosa is a company in the wind turbine manufacturing supply chain that develops tower parts and has benefitted from the Production Tax Credit (PTC). | Photo courtesy of Keri Fulton. Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy Corp. in Houston, Texas. Proinlosa is a company in the wind turbine manufacturing supply chain that develops tower parts and has benefitted from the Production Tax Credit (PTC). | Photo courtesy of Keri Fulton. Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy What does this project do? Builds on President Obama's call for a new era for American energy

78

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forum 2014 Meeting Forum 2014 Meeting Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Form (NGVTF) logo The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) will hold a meeting for stakeholders on Jan. 14-15, 2014, at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Meeting Details Date: Jan. 14-15, 2014 | Icon of a calendar. Add to my calendar Location: Brookhaven National Laboratory 33 Lewis Rd. Upton, NY 11961 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is hosting this meeting in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission to support the development and deployment of commercially competitive natural gas engines, vehicles, and infrastructure. NGVTF is free and open to stakeholders, so join the conversation about natural gas engines, vehicles, infrastructure, and codes and standards.

79

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry Title Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kong, Lingbo, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Lynn K. Price Date Published 12/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords emerging technologies, energy efficiency, ghg, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, pulp and paper Abstract The pulp and paper industry ranks fourth in terms of energy consumption among industries worldwide. Globally, the pulp and paper industry accounted for approximately 5 percent of total world industrial final energy consumption in 2007, and contributed 2 percent of direct carbon dioxide (CO2)emissions from industry. Worldwide pulp and paper demand and production are projected to increase significantly by 2050, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and GHG mitigation technologies and their deployment in the market will be crucial for the pulp and paper industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report describes the industry's processes and compiles available information on the energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for 36 emerging technologies to reduce the industry's energy use and GHG emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies that have already been commercialized for the pulp and paper industry, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. The purpose of this report is to provide engineers, researchers, investors, paper companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured resource of information on these technologies.

80

Final report on grand challenge LDRD project : a revolution in lighting : building the science and technology base for ultra-efficient solid-state lighting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SAND report is the final report on Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD Project 27328, 'A Revolution in Lighting -- Building the Science and Technology Base for Ultra-Efficient Solid-state Lighting.' This project, which for brevity we refer to as the SSL GCLDRD, is considered one of Sandia's most successful GCLDRDs. As a result, this report reviews not only technical highlights, but also the genesis of the idea for Solid-state Lighting (SSL), the initiation of the SSL GCLDRD, and the goals, scope, success metrics, and evolution of the SSL GCLDRD over the course of its life. One way in which the SSL GCLDRD was different from other GCLDRDs was that it coincided with a larger effort by the SSL community - primarily industrial companies investing in SSL, but also universities, trade organizations, and other Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories - to support a national initiative in SSL R&D. Sandia was a major player in publicizing the tremendous energy savings potential of SSL, and in helping to develop, unify and support community consensus for such an initiative. Hence, our activities in this area, discussed in Chapter 6, were substantial: white papers; SSL technology workshops and roadmaps; support for the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), DOE and Senator Bingaman's office; extensive public relations and media activities; and a worldwide SSL community website. Many science and technology advances and breakthroughs were also enabled under this GCLDRD, resulting in: 55 publications; 124 presentations; 10 book chapters and reports; 5 U.S. patent applications including 1 already issued; and 14 patent disclosures not yet applied for. Twenty-six invited talks were given, at prestigious venues such as the American Physical Society Meeting, the Materials Research Society Meeting, the AVS International Symposium, and the Electrochemical Society Meeting. This report contains a summary of these science and technology advances and breakthroughs, with Chapters 1-5 devoted to the five technical task areas: 1 Fundamental Materials Physics; 2 111-Nitride Growth Chemistry and Substrate Physics; 3 111-Nitride MOCVD Reactor Design and In-Situ Monitoring; 4 Advanced Light-Emitting Devices; and 5 Phosphors and Encapsulants. Chapter 7 (Appendix A) contains a listing of publications, presentations, and patents. Finally, the SSL GCLDRD resulted in numerous actual and pending follow-on programs for Sandia, including multiple grants from DOE and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with SSL companies. Many of these follow-on programs arose out of contacts developed through our External Advisory Committee (EAC). In h s and other ways, the EAC played a very important role. Chapter 8 (Appendix B) contains the full (unedited) text of the EAC reviews that were held periodically during the course of the project.

Copeland, Robert Guild; Mitchell, Christine Charlotte; Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Chow, Weng Wah Dr.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Thoma, Steven George; Gee, James Martin; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Burdick, Brent A.; Salamone, Angelo, L., Jr.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Elliott, Russell D.; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Abrams, Billie Lynn; Wendt, Joel Robert; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Simpson, Regina Lynn; Kurtz, Steven Ross; Cole, Phillip James; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm; Kerley, Thomas M.; Norman, Adam K.; Tallant, David Robert; Woessner, Stephen Matthew; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Moffat, Harry K.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Emerson, John Allen; Kaplar, Robert James; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea; Cross, Karen Charlene; Wright, Alan Francis; Gonzales, Rene Marie; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Garcia, Marie L.; Allen, Mark S.; Southwell, Edwin T. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Bauer, Tom M.; Monson, Mary Ann; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Creighton, James Randall; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Simmons, Jerry A.; Boyack, Kevin W.; Jones, Eric Daniel; Moran, Michael P.; Pinzon, Marcia J. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Pinson, Ariane O. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Miksovic, Ann E. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Wang, George T.; Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Missert, Nancy A.; Koleske, Daniel David; Rahal, Nabeel M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now September 19, 2013 - 3:52pm Addthis A Clean Energy Revolution -- Now Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy #CleanTechNow: Learn more Watch a video featuring Secretary Moniz that highlights four key energy technologies that have already made America's clean energy future a reality. Read the full "Revolution Now" report. Use the tag #CleanTechNow to share photos on Twitter, Instagram or via email newmedia@hq.doe.gov how clean energy technology already plays a role in your daily life. We'll feature our favorite submissions on Energy.gov next week. Editor's note: This article originally appeared on WhiteHouse.gov. For decades, America has chased after the promise of clean, domestic

82

Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004 axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna Germany. Since its installation this turbine has gathered more than 16 000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

Klaus Ohlig; Stefan Bischoff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal

84

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Authors: Maša Prodanovic (speaker), Javad Behseresht, Yao Peng, Steven L. Bryant, Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: A spectrum of behavior is encountered in methane hydrate provinces, especially ocean sediments, ranging from essentially static accumulations where the pore space is filled with hydrate and brine, to active seeps where hydrate and methane gas phase co-exist in the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). The grain-scale models of drainage and fracturing presented demonstrate key processes involved in pressure-driven gas phase invasion of a sediment. A novel extension of invasion percolation to infinite-acting, physically representative networks is used to evaluate the connectivity of water in a gas-drained sediment. A novel implementation of the level set method (LSM) is used to determine the capillarity-controlled displacement of brine by gas from sediment and from fractures within the sediment. The discrete element method (DEM) is extended to model the coupling between the pore fluids and the solid, and thereby predict the onset of sediment fracturing by gas phase pressure under in situ loading conditions. The DEM grain mechanics model accounts for the different pressure of brine and methane gas in a “membrane” two-fluid model. The fluid-fluid configuration from LSM can be mapped directly to the pore space in DEM, thereby coupling the drainage and mechanics models. The type of behavior that can emerge from the coupled processes is illustrated with an extended LSM model. The extension computes grain displacement by the gas phase with a simple kinematic rule.

85

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economics of black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogenerationblack liquor and biomass gasifier/gas turbine technology".entrained flow booster gasifier in New Bern, North Carolina;

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Authors: Charles B. McComas, PE; J. Daniel Arthur, PE; Gerry Baker; G. Lee Moody; and David B. Cornue, PG, CHMM Venue: American Chemical Society (53rd Pentasectional Meeting) – Halliburton Energy Services Technology Center, Duncan, OK, March 8, 2008 (http://www.acs.org [external site]) Abstract: Research funded by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and conducted under the direction of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission has examined concerns related to air emissions resulting from domestic onshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Current air issues such as ambient air quality standards and non-attainment areas, regulatory compliance and regional inconsistencies, as well as global climate change and carbon sequestration are a few of the subjects perceived to represent potential barriers to energy development. The topic of air quality and how it relates to onshore oil and gas exploration and production activities is examined from the position of environmental sustainability. These concerns can be addressed through reasonable and prudent practices that industry may implement in order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate air emissions. Additionally, air emissions parameters that are not currently regulated (e.g.: CH4 and CO2) may become the subject of increased concern in the future and, therefore, add to the list of issues facing oil and gas exploration and production. Suggestions for further research opportunities with the potential to benefit responsible energy resource development are also presented.

87

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Authors: Mark White and Pete McGrail Venue: The 9th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Technologies will be held November 16-20, 2008 at The Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. The Conference will be organized by MIT in collaboration with the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG), with major sponsorship from the US Department of Energy. http://mit.edu/ghgt9/ . Abstract: Under high pressure and low temperature conditions small nonpolar molecules (typically gases) can combine with water to form crystalline structures known as clathrate hydrates. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) form nearly identical clathrate structures (sI), with the CO2 hydrate being thermodynamically favored. Vast accumulations of methane hydrates have been found in suboceanic deposits and beneath the arctic permafrost. Because of the large volumetric storage densities, clathrate hydrates on the deep ocean floor have been suggested as a sequestration option for CO2. Alternatively, CO2 hydrates can be formed in the geologic settings of naturally occurring accumulations of methane hydrates. Global assessments of natural gas resources have shown that gas hydrate resources exceed those of conventional resources, which is indicative of the potential for clathrate hydrate sequestration of CO2. Recovery of natural gas from hydrate-bearing geologic deposits has the potential for being economically viable, but there remain significant technical challenges in converting these natural accumulations into a useable resource. Currently, conventional methods for producing methane hydrates from geologic settings include depressurization, thermal stimulation, and inhibitor injection. Although CO2 clathrates generally are not naturally as abundant as those of CH4, their occurrence forms the foundation of an unconventional approach for producing natural gas hydrates that involves the exchange of CO2 with CH4 in the hydrate structure. This unconventional concept has several distinct benefits over the conventional methods: 1) the heat of formation of CO2 hydrate is greater than the heat of dissociation of CH4 hydrate, providing a low-grade heat source to support additional methane hydrate dissociation, 2) exchanging CO2 with CH4 will maintain the mechanical stability of the geologic formation, and 3) the process is environmentally friendly, providing a sequestration mechanism for the injected CO2. The exchange production technology would not be feasible without the favorable thermodynamics of CO2 hydrates over CH4 hydrates. This situation yields challenges for the technology to avoid secondary hydrate formation and clogging of the geologic repository. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of producing natural gas and sequestering CO2 using the direct exchange technology in geologic media. These experiments have duplicated numerically using the STOMP-HYD simulator, which solves the nonisothermal multifluid flow and transport equations for mixed hydrate systems in geologic media. This paper describes the design (via numerical simulation) of a pilot-scale demonstration test of the CO2 exchange production and sequestration technology for a geologic setting beneath the arctic permafrost, involving a gas-hydrate interval overlying a free-gas interval (i.e., Class 1 Hydrate Accumulation).

88

Catalyst optimization in gas-to-liquid technology : an operations view / Israel Olalekan Jolaolu.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gas to Liquids (GTL) technology is a general term used for a group of technologies that has the capability to create liquid hydrocarbon fuels from… (more)

Jolaolu, Israel Olalekan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sizzling Qatar boom sparked by foreign money, technology, and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International oil companies have collected advanced upstream and downstream technology and focused it on the small Persian Gulf emirate of Qatar, a roughly 110 mile long by 50 mile wide, thumb-like peninsula that juts out from Saudi Arabia. The emirate, in a burst of enlightened self interest, has opened its doors to international companies and is now riding a wave of foreign investment and new technology to major increases in oil, natural gas, and petrochemical production. The largest natural gas reserve in the world is under Qatari waters and is the driver for the activity that includes two LNG plants. Qatar has proven that you don`t need crude oil in the Persian Gulf to be important. Activities are discussed.

Aalund, L.R.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gas Foil Bearing Technology Advancements for Closed Brayton Cycle Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbine systems are under consideration for future space electric power generation. CBC turbines convert thermal energy from a nuclear reactor or other heat source to electrical power using a closed?loop cycle. The operating fluid in the closed?loop is commonly a high pressure inert gas mixture that cannot tolerate contamination. One source of potential contamination in a system such as this is the lubricant used in the turbomachine bearings. Gas Foil Bearings (GFB) represent a bearing technology that eliminates the possibility of contamination by using the working fluid as the lubricant. Thus foil bearings are well suited to application in space power CBC turbine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center is actively researching GFB technology for use in these CBC power turbines. A power loss model has been developed and the effects of very high ambient pressure start?up torque and misalignment have been observed and are reported here.

Samuel A. Howard; Robert J. Bruckner; Christopher DellaCorte; Kevin C. Radil

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies January 22, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis...

92

Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies; Natural Gas Trasit Users Group (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

and and infrastructure research, development, and deployment through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to help the United States reduce its dependence on imported petro- leum and to pave the way to a future transportation network based on hydrogen. Natural gas vehicles can also reduce emissions of regulated pollutants compared with vehicles powered by conventional fuels such as gasoline

93

Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Address 2025 George St. Place Sandusky, Ohio Zip 44870 Sector Biomass, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Agriculture;Business and legal services;Consulting; Energy provider: power production;Energy provider: wholesale;Engineering/architectural/design;Installation;Investment/finances;Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing Phone number 419-663-8000 Website http://www.biogastech.com Coordinates 41.4369°, -82.747133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4369,"lon":-82.747133,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

94

Options for Gas-to-Liquids Technology in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10 percent. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinquish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, Eric Partridge

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Options for gas-to-liquids technology in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10%. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinguish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, E.P.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Davies, J. (General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)); Zammit, M. (AC Rochester, NY (United States)); Patterson, P. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Davies, J. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Zammit, M. [AC Rochester, NY (United States); Patterson, P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Technology Institute Place Des Plaines, IL Website http://www.gastechnology.org/ Coordinates 42.0333623°, -87.8833991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0333623,"lon":-87.8833991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Mohamed Toema (speaker), Sarah Nuss-Warren, and Kirby S. Chapman, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory; James McCarthy and Thomas McGrath, Innovative Environmental Solutions Inc. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: The researchers are conducting a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of field gas-fired four-stroke cycle rich burn engines equipped with non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology. Engine emissions and operating parameters are being monitored on three engines over an extended period. In addition, a mapping study was conducted on one engine. The NSCR was operated at various controlled air-to-fuel (AF) ratios while emission measurements were conducted and engine operating parameters monitored. NOx, CO, and oxygen were measured using both EPA reference method technology and the portable analyzer used in the long-term study. In the mapping study, ammonia, formaldehyde, CO, NOx, and speciated hydrocarbon emissions were recorded in real-time using an extractive FTIR system. This paper focuses on the engine mapping phase. The mapping tests demonstrated a trade-off between NOx emissions and CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbon emissions. Richer engine operation (lower AF) decreases NOx emissions at the expense of higher CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbons. Leaner operation has the opposite effect. The results to date of the semi-continuous monitoring are presented in a separate paper.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Natural Gas Technologies II Conference - Ingenuity & Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Technologies II Conference - Ingenuity & Innovation Natural Gas Technologies II Conference - Ingenuity & Innovation Session 10 - Gas Industry Forum February 8-11, 2004 Phoenix, Arizona Table of Contents Disclaimer Program [PDF-102KB] Biographies [PDF-107KB] Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

102

Government works with technology to boost gas output/usage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specially treated ethane gas from fields of the Moomba area in the Cooper basin of South Australia now flows freely through 870 mi of interstate gas pipeline to an end-user in Sydney, New South Wales. This unprecedented usage of ethane is the result of a long-term cooperative agreement. The producer sought to provide the end-user with ethane gas for usage as a petrochemical feedstock to manufacture ethylene and plastic goods. The end-user had strict specifications for a low-CO{sub 2}, very dry ethane product with a small percentage of methane. In order to meet these, the producer committed millions of dollars to construct a high-technology, state-of-the-art ethane treatment facility in the Moomba area, and lay an extensive pipeline. Santos also contracted with the amines supplier to provide a high-performance, deep CO{sub 2} removal solvent with good corrosion prevention characteristics. The paper discusses the Moomba field overflow, gas treatment, government cooperation, and project completion.

Nicoll, H. [Dow Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States). GAS/SPEC Technology Group

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

104

THE NUCLEAR ENERGY REVOLUTION—1966  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plant. Most of the development in evaporator design...currently accessible technology. But the next factor...and research and development must precede any...supposes that the turbine power generated...recasting this advanced technology into the design...reforming of natural gas. Table 5 gives...

Alvin M. Weinberg; Gale Young

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low-Rank Coals Project Number: DE-FE0007759 Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX. Air Products, in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), is testing its Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (Sour PSA) process that separates syngas into an hydrogen-rich stream and second stream comprising of sulfur compounds(primarily hydrogen sulfide)carbon dioxide (CO2), and other impurities. The adsorbent technology testing that has been performed to date utilized syngas streams derived from higher rank coals and petcoke. Using data from experiments based on petcoke-derived syngas, replacing the

106

Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate End of Phase 2 Topical Report Reporting Period: June, 2007-June, 2008 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston June, 2008 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory

107

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.

108

Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia May 14, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis Joshua DeLung During his recent commencement address at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Energy Secretary Steven Chu hailed the ingenuity of the engineers responsible for the Industrial Revolution. He noted, however, that the carbon emissions from that pivotal era have caused the world's climate to change drastically. "More frequent heat waves and increased water stress in many areas of the world are predicted," he said. "Rising sea levels and the severity of hurricanes and cyclones will threaten low-lying coastal areas. The climate will change so rapidly that many species, including many people, will have

109

Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia Sensible Solar Fueling Energy Revolution in Georgia May 14, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis Joshua DeLung During his recent commencement address at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Energy Secretary Steven Chu hailed the ingenuity of the engineers responsible for the Industrial Revolution. He noted, however, that the carbon emissions from that pivotal era have caused the world's climate to change drastically. "More frequent heat waves and increased water stress in many areas of the world are predicted," he said. "Rising sea levels and the severity of hurricanes and cyclones will threaten low-lying coastal areas. The climate will change so rapidly that many species, including many people, will have

110

Revolutionen i Egypten; The Revolution in Egypt.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This study examines whether social media had an influence on the revolution in Egypt. Social media was an important tool for the revolution since… (more)

Stamm'ler Jaliff, Pernilla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Kirby S. Chapman (speaker), Mohamed Toema, and Sarah Nuss-Warren, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: This paper describes work on a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology, including a catalyst and air-to-fuel ratio controller (AFRC), applied to four-stroke cycle rich-burn engines. Emissions and engine data were collected semi-continuously with a portable emissions analyzer on three engines in the Four Corners area. In addition, periodic emissions measurements that included ammonia were conducted several times. Data collected from October 2007 through August 2008 show significant variation in emissions levels over hours, days, and longer periods of time, as well as seasonal variation. As a result of these variations, simultaneous control of NOx to below a few hundred parts per million (ppm) and CO to below 1,000 ppm volumetric concentration was not consistently achieved. Instead, the NSCR/AFRC systems were able to simultaneously control both species to these levels for only a fraction of the time the engines were monitored. Both semi-continuous emissions data and periodically collected emissions data support a NOx-CO trade-off and a NOx-ammonia tradeoff in NSCR-equipped engines.

112

The Esso Energy Award Lecture, 1998. Boosting production from low-pressure oil and gas fields: a revolution in hydrocarbon production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have developed a simple cost-effective system which...moving parts; low capital cost, with the payback achieved...14% coal oil gas hydro nuclear Figure 2. World primary...such as ASME, API, BS, Dnv stoomwezen (Dutch...The WELLCOM system is a cost-effective way to boost...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6: July 14, 2003 6: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276:

114

Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

Steinberg, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity The mission of the Environmental Program is to promote a reliable, affordable, and secure supply of domestic oil and clean-burning natural gas, by providing cost-effective environmental regulatory compliance technologies, enhancing environmental protections during oil and gas E&P operations, and facilitating the development and use of scientific, risk-based environmental regulatory frameworks.

116

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (OTC 19672) Authors: Jonny Rutqvist (speaker), George J. Moridis, and Tarun Grover Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: This study investigated coupled multiphase flow, themal, thermodynamic and geomechanical behavior of oceanic Hydrate Bearing Sediments (HBS), during depressurization-induced gas production in general, and potential wellbore in-stability and casing deformation in particular. The project investigated the geomechanical changes and wellbore stability for two alternative cases of production using a horizontal well in a Class 3 deposit and a vertical well in a Class 2 deposit. The research compared the geomechanical responses and the potential adverse geomechanical effects for the two different cases. Analysis shows that geomechanical responses during depressurization-induced gas production from oceanic hydrate deposits is driven by the reservoir-wide pressure decline (Delta P), which in turn is controlled by the induced pressure decline near the wellbore. Because any change quickly propagates within the entire reservoir, the reservoir wide geomechanical response can occur within a few days of production induced pressure decline.

117

Review of technologies for oil and gas produced water treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Produced water is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. It is a mixture of different organic and inorganic compounds. Due to the increasing volume of waste all over the world in the current decade, the outcome and effect of discharging produced water on the environment has lately become a significant issue of environmental concern. Produced water is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, current technologies cannot remove small-suspended oil particles and dissolved elements. Besides, many chemical treatments, whose initial and/or running cost are high and produce hazardous sludge. In onshore facilities, biological pretreatment of oily wastewater can be a cost-effective and environmental friendly method. As high salt concentration and variations of influent characteristics have direct influence on the turbidity of the effluent, it is appropriate to incorporate a physical treatment, e.g., membrane to refine the final effluent. For these reasons, major research efforts in the future could focus on the optimization of current technologies and use of combined physico-chemical and/or biological treatment of produced water in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits.

Ahmadun Fakhru’l-Razi; Alireza Pendashteh; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Dayang Radiah Awang Biak; Sayed Siavash Madaeni; Zurina Zainal Abidin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells already producing oil and gas and drilling operations for new wells. One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells

120

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development April 14, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces the release of "Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer." The Primer provides regulators, policy makers, and the public with an objective source of information on the technology advances and challenges that accompany deep shale gas development. Natural gas production from hydrocarbon rich deep shale formations, known as "shale gas," is one of the most quickly expanding trends in onshore domestic oil and gas exploration. The lower 48 states have a wide

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121

Gas Detonation and its Application in Engineering and Technologies (Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most relevant aspects of advanced experimental investigations of gas detonation and its mathematical simulation are presented. Examples of the engineering use of gas detonation are given.

Yu. A. Nikolaev; A. A. Vasil'ev…

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- for a total of 30 million - that will pursue innovations in natural gas storage tanks and fueling stations, helping to harness our abundant supplies of domestic natural gas...

123

THE NUCLEAR ENERGY REVOLUTION—1966  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nuclear energy revolution-1966. | Oak Ridge National Laboratory. | Journal...ALVIN MI. WEINBERG AND GALE YOUNG OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORYt Delivered before...have passed since Fermi and his co-workers at Chicago achieved the first...

Alvin M. Weinberg; Gale Young

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Authors: Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM; Enid J. Sullivan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM; and Lynn E. Katz and Kerry A. Kinney, University of Texas, Austin, TX. Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: About 2.3 billion cubic meters (600 billion gallons) of wastewater (produced water) is generated each year as a byproduct of oil and gas operations in the continental United States. Disposal of this water represents about 10% of the cost of hydrocarbon production. Inexpensive treatment technologies can lower the cost of disposal and generate higher-quality water for other uses. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively sorb a variety of nonpolar organic compounds from water. SMZ was tested as a medium to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from produced water generated during extraction of coalbed natural gas. BTEX removal is necessary prior to surface discharge of produced waters or as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis. We demonstrated in laboratory column experiments that BTEX-saturated SMZ is readily regenerated by air sparging. There was no loss in BTEX sorption capacity, and a minor decrease in hydraulic conductivity, after 50 sorption/regeneration cycles. Based upon the laboratory results, a pilot-scale produced-water treatment system was designed and tested at a reinjection facility in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The SMZ-based system was designed to treat up to 110 liters (30 gallons) of produced water per hour on a continuous basis by running two SMZ columns in series. The system performed as predicted, based on laboratory results, over repeated feed and regeneration cycles during the month-long operation. The BTEX-laden sparge gases were treated with a vapor-phase bioreactor system, resulting in an emissions-free process

125

Oil & Gas Science and Technology --Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles Copyright 2010 IFPEN Energies nouvelles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles Copyright © 2010 IFPEN Energies to an effective thermal management system and to maintain safety, perfor- #12;2 Oil & Gas Science and Technology of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109 - USA 2 U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development

Stefanopoulou, Anna

126

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Authors: George J. Moridis, Jonny Rutqvist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Venue: 2007 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 30–May 1, 2007 (http://www.otcnet.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The thermal and mechanical loading of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) can result in hydrate dissociation and a significant pressure increase, with potentially adverse consequences on the integrity and stability of the wellbore assembly, the HBS, and the bounding formations. The perception of HBS instability, coupled with insufficient knowledge of their geomechanical behavior and the absence of predictive capabilities, has resulted in a strategy of avoidance of HBS when locating offshore production platforms. These factors can also impede the development of hydrate deposits as gas resources. For the analysis of the geomechanical stability of HBS, project researchers developed and used a numerical model that integrates a commercial geomechanical code into a simulator describing the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transport, and thermodynamic behavior in geologic media. The geomechanical code includes elastoplastic models for quasi-static yield and failure analysis and viscoplastic models for time-dependent (creep) analysis. The hydrate simulator can model the non-isothermal hydration reactions (equilibrium or kinetic), phase behavior, and flow of fluids and heat in HBS, and can handle any combination of hydrate dissociation mechanisms. The simulations can account for the interdependence of changes in the hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical properties of the HBS, in addition to swelling/shrinkage, displacement (subsidence), and possible geomechanical failure. Researchers investigated in three cases the coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS systems. The first involves hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper, conventional reservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipes intersecting the HBS. The second case involves mechanical loading caused by the weight of structures placed on HBS at the ocean floor, and the third describes system response during gas production from a hydrate deposit. The results indicate that the stability of HBS in the vicinity of warm pipes may be significantly affected, especially near the ocean floor where the sediments are unconsolidated and more compressible. Conversely, the increased pressure caused by the weight of structures on the ocean floor increases the stability of hydrates, while gas production from oceanic deposits minimally affects the geomechanical stability of HBS under the conditions that are deemed desirable for production.

127

Rarefied gas dynamics and its applications to vacuum technology F. Sharipov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rarefied gas dynamics and its applications to vacuum technology F. Sharipov Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, 81531-990, Brazil Abstract Basic concepts of rarefied gas dynamics are given in a concise form. Some problems of rarefied gas flows are considered, namely, calculations of velocity slip

Sharipov, Felix

128

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Current Oil Sands Technologies: Surface Mining and In Situ Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Current Oil Sands Technologies: Surface Mining and In Situ Applications ... efficiency - gas turbine ?GT ... The studied uncertainties include, (1) uncertainty in emissions factors for petroleum substitutes, (2) uncertainties resulting from poor knowledge of the amt. of remaining conventional petroleum, and (3) uncertainties about the amt. of prodn. of petroleum substitutes from natural gas and coal feedstocks. ...

Joule A. Bergerson; Oyeshola Kofoworola; Alex D. Charpentier; Sylvia Sleep; Heather L. MacLean

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio.

130

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy

131

NETL: News Release - DOE, Penn State To Establish Gas Storage Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 11, 2003 September 11, 2003 DOE, Penn State To Establish Gas Storage Technology Consortium Goal is to Improve Performance of the Nation's Underground Gas Storage Infrastructure Map of U.S. natural gas storage sites - click for larger image FOSSIL FACT: The nation's gas industry stores natural gas in more than 400 underground storage reservoirs and salt caverns throughout the country. Click here for larger image UNIVERSITY PARK , PA - The Pennsylvania State University has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to establish and operate an underground gas storage technology consortium. The agreement between Penn State and DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas will last four-and-a-half years at a total cost of $3 million. The first phase of the agreement will last

132

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FE0013363 Project Description In this project, Air Products will operate a two-bed mobile system at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) facility. A slipstream of authentic, high-hydrogen syngas based on low-rank coal will be evaluated as the feedstock. Testing will be conducted for approximately eight weeks, thereby providing far longer adsorbent exposure data than demonstrated to date. By utilizing real-world, high- hydrogen syngas, information necessary to understand the utility of the system for methanol production will be made available. In addition, Air Products will also operate a multi-bed PSA process development unit (PDU), located at its Trexlertown, PA headquarters, to evaluate the impact of incorporating pressure equalization steps in the process cycle. This testing will be conducted utilizing a sulfur-free, synthetic syngas, and will improve the reliability of the prediction of the system's operating performance at commercial scale.

133

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand (OTC 19536) Authors: Timothy J. Kneafsey (speaker), Yongkoo Seol, Arvind Gupta, and Liviu Tomutsa Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] Abstract: Methane hydrate was formed in moist sand under confining stress in a long, x-ray transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane hydrate saturations. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes, caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas permeability was measured in each test for dry sand, moist sand, frozen sand, and hydrate-bearing sand. Results of these measurements are presented. Water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing sand, and the changes in water saturation were observed using CT scanning. Inverse modeling will be performed using these data to extend the relative permeability measurements

134

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Authors: Joshua A. Simpson and Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) from water generated during oil and natural gas production (produced water). The BTEX sorption isotherms are linear and noncompetitive, suggesting that the removal mechanism is partitioning into the surfactant’s hydrophobic bilayer formed on SMZ. Even though BTEX sorption in batch systems is rapid, chemical equilibrium models do not accurately describe BTEX transport through packed beds of SMZ. Comparison with transport of a nonreactive tracer (tritium) suggests that two-site, diffusive nonequilibrium sorption-desorption controls BTEX transport. We conducted batch experiments with SMZ to determine the nonequilibrium sorption kinetics of each BTEX constituent. The kinetic measurements were used to parameterize a nonequilibrium transport model to predict BTEX removal under varying flow conditions. The accuracy of predictions is being tested using laboratory column experiments with produced water from the San Juan Basin of New Mexico

135

Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Transit Users Group, which provides assistance to transit agencies implementing natural gas vehicles into their fleets.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES COAL AND THE EUROPEAN INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

underpinning comparative European economic development during the Industrial Revolution. Our analysis exploits of coal-powered technologies, to quantify the effect of coal availability on historic city population.orourke@all-souls.ox.ac.uk #12;1 Introduction There is a long tradition in economic history that places coal at the centre

Huber, Bernhard A.

137

Current Status of High Resolution Column Technology for Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......work in high-resolution gas-solid chromatography...developments in high- resolution gas chromatographic column...illary or high-resolution gas chromatography. Of these...column material is its high cost compared to glass columns...re sulting from column production, and requires deactivation......

Mary A. Kaiser; Matthew S. Klee

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The efficiency of using gas turbine technologies in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper considers the technical and economic features of using stream-gas and gas-turbine power generators in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits in Irkutsk oblast under conditions of carrying o...

A. M. Karasevich; A. V. Fedyaev; G. G. Lachkov; O. N. Fedyaeva

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Revolution Environmental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Revolution Environmental Revolution Environmental Jump to: navigation, search Name Revolution Environmental Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60654 Sector Efficiency, Services Product Chicago-based firm that provides a range of environmental related services such as energy efficiency and electrical vehicle infrastructure. Coordinates 41.88415°, -87.632409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.88415,"lon":-87.632409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Semantic technology in the oil and gas drilling domain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Data integration and knowledge representation in the oil and gas drilling domain are two challenges much work is focused upon. They are important real-world challenges… (more)

Overĺ, Lars

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Clean Cities program webinar elaborates first on successful past technology choices and then suggests future technological pathways that can be taken for the United States to expand its use of...

142

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) during hydrate formation and loading tests (OTC 19559) Authors: Seiji Nakagawa (speaker), Timothy J. Kneafsey, and George J. Moridis Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] Abstract: An on-going effort on conducting laboratory triaxial compression tests on synthetic methane hydrate-bearing sediment cores is presented. Methane hydrate is formed within a sand pack inside a test cell under controlled temperature and confining stress, and triaxial compression tests are performed while monitoring seismic properties. A unique aspect of the experiment is that the formation and dissociation of hydrate in a sediment core, and the failure of the sample during loading tests, can be monitored in real time using both seismic waves and x-ray CT imaging. For this purpose, a specially designed triaxial (geomechanical) test cell was built. This cell allows for conducting seismic wave measurements on a sediment core using compressional and shear (torsion) waves. Concurrently, CT images can be obtained through an x-ray-transparent cell wall. These are used to determine the porosity distribution within a sample owing to both original sand packing and formation of hydrate in the pore space. For interpreting the results from both seismic measurements and geomechanical tests, characterization of sample heterogeneity can be critically important. In this paper, the basic functions of the test cell are presented, with the results of preliminary experiments using non-hydrate bearing sandpack and sandstone core. These measurements confirmed that (1) clear x-ray images of gas-fluid boundaries within a sediment/rock core can be obtained through a thick aluminum test cell wall, (2) the test cell functions correctly during loading tests, and (3) both compressional and shear waves can be measured during a loading test. Further experiments using methane-hydrate-bearing samples will be presented at the conference

143

Post-industrial-revolution HCI Colin Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post-industrial-revolution HCI Colin Johnson University of Kent Computing Laboratory Canterbury is akin to the state of manufacturing prior to the industrial revolution. It is suggested that eventually an industrial revolution will occur in programming through the use of automated program generation tools, which

Kent, University of

144

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines For years, gas turbine manufacturers faced a barrier that, for all practical purposes, capped power generating efficiencies for turbine-based power generating systems. The barrier was temperature. Above 2300 degrees F, available cooling technologies were insufficient to protect the turbine blades and other internal components from heat degradation. Since higher temperatures are the key to higher efficiencies, this effectively limited the generating efficiency at which a turbine power plant could convert the energy in the fuel into electricity. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy took on the challenge of turbine temperatures in 1992, and nine years later, its private sector

145

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of hydrogen production using low-cost natural gas.

146

The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fracture treatments. This study evaluates fracture stimulation technology in tight gas sands by using case histories found in the petroleum engineering literature and by using a comparison of the performance of wells stimulated with different treatment...

Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Description Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology offers a means to utilize coal -the most abundant fuel in the United States-to produce a host of products, ranging from electricity to value-added chemicals like transportation fuels and hydrogen, in an efficient, environmentally friendly manner. However, the overall cost (capital, operating,

148

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Fact sheet from Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. about its pilot-scale industrial membrane system that was funded by the SBIR program.

149

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the...

150

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pore-Scale Mechanistic Study of the Preferential Mode of Hydrate Formation in Sediments: Fluid Flow Aspects Pore-Scale Mechanistic Study of the Preferential Mode of Hydrate Formation in Sediments: Fluid Flow Aspects Pore-Scale Mechanistic Study of the Preferential Mode of Hydrate Formation in Sediments: Fluid Flow Aspects Authors: Javad Behseresht, Masa Prodanovic, and Steven Bryant, University of Texas at Austin. Venue: American Geophysical Union fall meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 10-14, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/ [external site]). Abstract: A spectrum of behavior is encountered in ocean sediments bearing methane hydrates, ranging from essentially static accumulations where hydrate and brine co-exist, to active cold seeps where hydrate and a methane gas phase co-exist in the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). In this and a companion paper (Jain and Juanes), the researchers describe methods to test the following hypothesis: The coupling between drainage and fracturing, both induced by pore pressure, determines whether methane gas entering the HSZ is converted completely to hydrate. The researchers will describe a novel implementation of the level set method to determine the capillarity-controlled displacement of brine by gas from sediment and from fractures within the sediment. Predictions of fluid configurations in infinite-acting-model sediments indicate that the brine in drained sediment (after invasion by methane gas) is better connected than previously believed. This increases the availability of water and the rate of counter-diffusion of salinity ions, thus relaxing the limit on hydrate build-up within the gas-invaded grain matrix. Simulated drainage of a fracture in sediment shows that points of contact between fracture faces are crucial. They allow residual water saturation to remain within an otherwise gas-filled fracture. Simulations of imbibition—which can occur, for example, after drainage into surrounding sediment reduces gas phase pressure in the fracture—indicate that the gas/water interfaces at contact points significantly shift the threshold pressures for withdrawal of gas. During both drainage and imbibition, the contact points greatly increase water availability for hydrate formation within the fracture. The researchers will discuss coupling this capillarity-controlled displacement model with a discrete element model for grain-scale mechanics. The coupled model provides a basis for evaluating the macroscopic conditions (thickness of gas accumulation below the hydrate stability zone, average sediment grain size, principal earth stresses) favoring co-existence of methane gas and hydrate in the HSZ. Explaining the range of behavior is useful in assessing resource volumes and evaluating pore-to-core scale flow paths in production strategies

151

Gas-lift technology applied to dewatering of coalbed methane wells in the black warrior basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) wells are usually dewatered with sucker rod or progressive cavity pumps to reduce wellbore water levels, although not without problems. This paper describes high-volume artificial-lift technology that incorporates specifically designed gas-lift methods to dewater Black Warrior CBM wells. Gas lift provides improved well maintenance and production optimization by the use of conventional wireline service methods.

Johnson, K.J.; Coats, A. (Otis Engineering Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)); Marinello, S.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The refrigerator revolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses how a simple, new technology threw the best-laid plans of the chemical and refrigerator industries into disarray-and provided a new perspective on how future environmental agreements can be reached. In recent years, a series of massive business mergers has mesmerized the industrial world. However in the early 1990s a German environmentalist, triggered global reprocussions in the wake of the mandate to phase out the use of ozone depleting substances. The economic and political background of this is explained in detail.

Ayres, E.; French, H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

154

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Authors: Matthew T. Reagan and George J. Moridis Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, July 9-12, 2008 (http://www.icgh.org [external site]) Abstract: Paleoceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating past global climate. The implication is that global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate is the main culprit for a sequence of rapid global warming affects that occurred during the late Quaternary period. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed coupled thermo-hydrological-chemical simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor, and assessed the potential for methane release into the ecosystem. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and the effects of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that while many deep hydrate deposits are indeed stable during periods of rapid ocean temperature changes, shallow deposits (such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico) can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant carbon fluxes over a period of decades. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane and the formation of carbonates) to sequester the released carbon. This model will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

155

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Authors: J. Phirani. & K. K. Mohanty Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008. http://www.ichg.org/showcontent.aspx?MenuID=287 [external site]. Abstract: Large quantities of natural gas hydrate are present in marine sediments. This research is aimed at assessing production of natural gas from these deposits. We had developed a multiphase, multicomponent, thermal, 3D simulator in the past, which can simulate production of hydrates both in equilibrium and kinetic modes. Four components (hydrate, methane, water and salt) and five phases (hydrate, gas, aqueous-phase, ice and salt precipitate) are considered in the simulator. The intrinsic kinetics of hydrate formation or dissociation is considered using the Kim–Bishnoi model. Water freezing and ice melting are tracked with primary variable switch method (PVSM) by assuming equilibrium phase transition. In this work, we simulate depressurization and warm water flooding for hydrate production in a hydrate reservoir underlain by a water layer. Water flooding has been studied as a function of well spacing, well orientation, and injection temperature. Results show that depressurization is limited by the supply of heat of hydrate formation. Warm water flooding can supply this heat of formation. Gas production rate is higher for the water flooding than depressurization. Optimum configuration for wells and water temperature are identified.

156

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas-hydrate concentration and uncertainty estimation from electrical resistivity logs: examples from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico Gas-hydrate concentration and uncertainty estimation from electrical resistivity logs: examples from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico Carbon isotope evidence (13C and 14C) for fossil methane-derived dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps Authors: Pohlman, J.W. (speaker), Coffin, R.B., and Osburn, C.L., U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Bauer, J.E., College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Venue: Goldschmidt 2007 Atoms to Planets conference in Cologne, Germany, August 19-24, 2007 http://www.the-conference.com/conferences/2007/gold2007/ [external site]. Abstract: No abstract available yet. Related NETL Project: The proposed research of the related NETL project DE-AI26-05NT42496, “Conducting Scientific Studies of Natural Gas Hydrates to Support the DOE Efforts to Evaluate and Understand Methane Hydrates,” is to conduct scientific studies of natural gas hydrates to support DOE efforts to evaluate and understand methane hydrates, their potential as an energy resource, and the hazard they may pose to ongoing drilling efforts. This project

157

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Fuel experts from China, India, and the United States shared lessons learned about deploying CNG- and hydrogen-fueled vehicles in public transit fleets and the consumer sector at the Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles workshop. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) hosted the workshop on December 10-11, 2009. Here you'll find information about the workshop's focus, agenda and notes, and presentations. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Focus of the Workshop The workshop aimed to: Compare fuel properties-including blends-industries, and applications (e.g., product specifications, tanks, reliability, safety procedures, risk mitigation, and dispensing)

158

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Authors: John and Deidre Boysen Venue: International Petroleum and Biofuels Environmental Conference, November 11-13, 2008, Albuquerque, NM cese@utulsa.edu Abstract: Economic and efficient produced water management is complex. Produced waters contain mixtures of organic and inorganic compounds, including heavy metals. Many of these constituents interfere with treatment processes that are selective for other constituents. Further, the concentrations of organic and inorganic constituents vary widely with location and producing formation. In addition, regulations related to discharge and beneficial uses vary from state to state, basin-to-basin and well location to well location.

159

Quantum technology: the second quantum revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...be an electron or nuclear spin in a molecule...the Coulomb energy cost of adding one extra...1667 A B A' B' C D BS M M S - 0 2.0 1...resolution at low cost. In addition to writing...A silicon-based nuclear spin quantum computer...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005227 Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005227 Final Report Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County Submitted by: Lea County Government 100 N. Main Lovington, NM 88260 And New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM 87801 Report Authors: Cecilia E. Nelson, Principal Investigator Lea County Government and Ashok Kumar Ghosh, Ph.D., P.E. Principal Researcher, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Report Date: September 20, 2011 Reporting Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Authors: Robert Hunter (ASRC Energy), Scott Digert (BPXA), Tim Collett (USGS), Ray Boswell (USDOE) Venue: AAPG National Meeting Gas Hydrate session, Oral Presentation, San Antonio, TX, April 22, 2008 (http://www.AAPG.org [external site]) Abstract: This BP-DOE collaborative research project is helping determine whether or not gas hydrate can become a technically and economically recoverable gas resource. Reservoir characterization, development modeling, and associated studies indicate that 0-0.34 trillion cubic meters (TCM) gas may be technically recoverable from the estimated 0.92 TCM gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). Reservoir modeling indicates sufficient potential for technical recovery to justify proceeding into field operations to acquire basic reservoir and fluid data from the Mount Elbert gas hydrate prospect in the Milne Point Unit (MPU). Successful drilling and data acquisition in the Mount Elbert-01 stratigraphic test well was completed during February 3-19, 2007. Data was acquired from 131 meters of core (30.5 meters gas hydrate-bearing), extensive wireline logging, and wireline production testing operations using Modular Dynamics Testing (MDT). The stratigraphic test validated the 3D seismic interpretation of the MPU gas hydrate-bearing Mount Elbert prospect. Onsite core sub- sampling preserved samples for later analyses of interstitial water geochemistry, physical properties, thermal properties, organic geochemistry, petrophysics, and mechanical properties. MDT testing was accomplished within two gas hydrate-bearing intervals, and acquired during four long shut-in period tests. Four gas samples and one pre-gas hydrate dissociation formation water sample were collected. MDT analyses are helping to improve understanding of gas hydrate dissociation, gas production, formation cooling, and long-term production potential as well as help calibrate reservoir simulation models.

162

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Authors: Winters, W.J., (U.S. Geological Survey, speaker), Gomes, M., Giosan, L., Johnson, J., Kastner, M., Torres, M.E., Long, P.E., Schaef, H.T., Rose, K., and the NGHP-01 Shipboard Scientific Party. Venue: India’s Directorate General of Hydrocarbons’ International Conference on Gas Hydrates in Nodia (New Delhi), India, February 6–8, 2008 (http://www.dghindia.org/site/pdfattachments/upcomingevents/Updated_Programme_gAS[1].pdf [PDF-external site]). Abstract: The scientific goals of the NGHP Expedition 01 physical properties program are to a) constrain baseline index properties of host sediment; b) ground-truth well-log, seismic, and other shipboard data sets; c) relate textural characteristics to gas hydrate occurrence and small-scale porous media effects; and d) relate index properties and textural analyses to gas hydrate occurrence and regional sedimentologic interpretations. During the shipboard phase of NGHP-01, baseline bulk physical properties, such as water content, grain density, bulk density, and porosity, were determined on more than 1,800 sediment samples from 14 sites located in four study areas. Overall, physical properties change more significantly near the seafloor, then at a much more gradual rate with depth. The transition depth varies between sites but can range from about 12 to as deep as 200 meters beneath the seafloor. In addition, shear strength, electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal conductivity, and acoustic velocity measurements were conducted to further characterize the sediment. These measurements, when combined with sedimentologic and geochemical studies, delineate the role of the host sediment in hydrate formation and occurrence and are used in modeling the response of hydrate-bearing sediment to natural change or drilling operations. Strong correlation typically exists between physical properties determined from shipboard analyses and well-log studies. More than 500 shore-based grain-size analyses have been conducted that indicate that most sediment is characterized as clayey silt to silty clay with a median grain size that is near or slightly greater than the silt-clay boundary. Grain-size analyses are being conducted on samples identified by infrared imaging as having high concentrations of gas hydrate in recovered core samples. These analyses will be used to study porous-media effects and geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in situ.

163

Shale gas for the petrochemical industry: Incorporation of novel technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, a new shale gas-based polygeneration system with essentially zero CO2 emissions is proposed that co-produces methanol, dimethyl ether (DME), olefins and power. The thermal and economic analysis of the proposed process is performed to determine the optimum product portfolio regarding current market prices. The optimization results show that production of methanol/DME and power can improve the performance of the olefin production section significantly. Therefore, the proposed plant can link the shale gas industry to the petrochemical sector efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way.

Yaser Khojasteh Salkuyeh; Thomas A. Adams II

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Recent developments in gas turbine materials and technology and their implications for syngas firing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbine combined-cycle systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology that is widely used. A critical factor in their development was the rapid adaptation of aero-engine technology (single crystal airfoils, sophisticated cooling techniques, and thermal barrier coatings) in order to operate at the high rotor-inlet temperatures required for high efficiency generation. Early reliability problems have been largely overcome, so that this type of power generation system is now considered to be a mature technology capable of achieving high levels of availability. Current interest in replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas or hydrogen) in these gas turbine systems focuses attention on implications for the critical turbine components. In this paper, the development requirements for materials for critical hot gas-path parts in large gas turbines burning coal-derived syngas fuels are briefly considered in the context of the state-of-the-art in materials for engines burning natural gas. It is shown that, despite some difficult design issues, many of the materials used in current engines will be applicable to units burning syngas. However, there is the potential that the durability of some components may be prejudiced because of differences in the combustion environment (especially in terms of water vapor content, and possibly sulfur compounds and particulates). Consequently, effort to develop improved coatings to resist erosion and also attack by S-containing compounds may be necessary.

I.G. Wright; T.B. Gibbons

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The oil and gas industry is a very diverse and complex sector of the energy economy. It ranges from exploration to production, processing, transportation, and distribution. All of these segments are elements of the natural gas industry and the oil industry but are different for oil than for natural gas. An example of a technology pathway for the oil refining industry is the Petroleum Refining Vision and Roadmap, which was developed through a joint effort of government and industry. Other technology roadmaps of relevance to Climate VISION participants either are being developed or will be developed in the future. The oil refining example is provided initially. Others will be added as they become available. Petroleum refining is one of nine energy-intensive industries that is

166

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments HyFlux - Part II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments Authors: Naehr, T.H., Asper, V., Garcia, O., Kastner, M., Leifer, I., MacDonald, I.R., Solomon, E., Yvon-Lewis, S., and Zimmer, B. Venue: AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19 2008 -- Session OS25: Methane Flux from Naturally Occurring Marine Gas Hydrates http://www.agu.org Abstract: The recently funded DOE/NETL study "HyFlux: Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere" (see MacDonald et al.: HyFlux - Part I) will combine sea surface, water column and shallow subsurface observations to improve our estimates of methane flux from submarine seeps and associated gas hydrate deposits to the water column and atmosphere along the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and other selected areas world-wide. As methane-rich fluids rise towards the sediment-water interface, they will interact with sulfate-rich pore fluids derived from overlying bottom water, which results in the formation of an important biogeochemical redox boundary, the so-called sulfate-methane interface, or SMI. Both methane and sulfate are consumed within the SMI and dissolved inorganic carbon, mostly bicarbonate (HCO3-) and hydrogen sulfide are produced, stimulating authigenic carbonate precipitation at and immediately below the SMI. Accordingly, the formation of authigenic carbonates in methane- and gas-hydrate-rich sediments will sequester a portion of the methane-derived carbon. To date, however, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these reactions. Rates of DIC production are not well constrained, but recent biogeochemical models indicate that CaCO3 precipitation rates may be as high as 120 µmol cm-2a-1. Therefore, AOM-driven carbonate precipitation must be considered when assessing the impact of gas-hydrate-derived methane on the global carbon cycle.

167

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulation of the system behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic media involves solving fully coupled mass and heat balance equations. The models need to simulate equilibrium or kinetic processes of hydrate formation and dissociation. TOUGH+HYDRATE is a widely used code for gas hydrate simulations. The code can model non-isothermal gas release, phase changes and flow of fluids and heat. It accounts for up to four mass components and four possible phases. Because hydrate simulations require intensive computational effort, many studies that involve serial processors are limited by problems of complexity and scale. With the growing availability of multi-core CPUs, Linux clusters, and super-computers, the use of parallel processing methods is a distinct advantage. This study develops a domain decomposition approach for large-scale gas hydrate simulations using parallel computation. The approach partitions the simulation domain into small sub-domains. The full simulation domain is simulated integrally by using multiple processes. Each process will be in charge of one portion of the simulation domain for updating thermophysical properties, assembling mass and energy balance equations, solving linear equation systems, and performing other local computations. The linear equation systems are solved in parallel by multiple processes with a parallel linear solver. The multiple processes are run in parallel on shared- or distributed memory multiple-CPU computers. A hybrid approach, running multiple processes in each CPU and using multiple CPUs, may achieve additional speedup. During calculations, communication between processes is needed to update sub-domain boundary parameters. An efficient inter-process communication scheme has been developed. The new approach was implemented into the TOUGH+HYDRATE code and demonstrates excellent speedup and very good scalability. For many large-scale problems, this method can obtain linear or super-linear speedup. This paper will show applications of the new approach to simulate three dimensional field-scale models for gas production from gas-hydrate

168

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright © 2014 Inderscience fields in Saudi Arabia', Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp.115­131. Biographical economic recovery of oil and gas from a reservoir. The purpose of reservoir management is to control

Mohaghegh, Shahab

169

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The geomechanical response of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (HBS) is a serious concern that needs to be addressed before the installation of facilities for hydrate deposits can proceed, and if gas production from hydrate deposits is to become reality. HBS are often unconsolidated, and are characterized by low shear strength. Heat from external sources, that cross the formation or depressurization-based production, can induce dissociation of hydrates (a strong cementing agent), and degradation of the structural stability of the HBS. Changes in pressure and temperature, phase changes, and the evolution of an expanding (and structurally weak) gas zone can significantly alter the distribution of loads in the sediments. The corresponding changes in the local stress and strain fields can result in substantial changes in the hydrologic, thermal and geomechanical properties of the system, displacement, and potentially failure.

170

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

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Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Author: M. Sharma Venue: Industry Workshop, Austin, Texas, May 7, 2008 (http://www.cpge.utexas.edu) Abstract: The Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control project consists of a set of 9 projects (5 related to fracturing and 4 related to sand control) that are currently underway. The project began in 2006 and is planned to continue for at least 2 years (2008). Each member company contributes $50,000 per year as a grant to the University and in return receives all the research results from the projects underway. F1. Energized fractures in tight gas sands/ gas shales (Kyle Freihof, Mukul Sharma) F2. Refracturing and stress reorientation in sands / shales (Vasudev Singh, Nicolas Rousell, Mukul Sharma)

171

Technology Makes Solid State Multi-Gas Emission Monitoring Possible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

single crystal thallium arsenic se1enide (TAS) on a production basis has made it possible to buLld an electronically controlled acousto ,-,ptie tunable filter (AOTF) capable of operating in the infrared. Such a filter with integral .11 t rasonic... trifnsduce r can be used in place of Inechanica1 filter wheels, spinning gas cells, moving mirrors, diffraction gratings and mechanical light choppers. The TAS AOTF produces an electronically controllable narrow banel infrared filter capable of being...

Nelson, R. L.

172

#CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

#CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution September 17, 2013 - 10:21am Addthis Levi Tillemann Levi Tillemann Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs How can I participate? Read a blog post from Secretary Ernest Moniz about the report and the Clean Energy revolution. All week on energy.gov, we'll be highlighting four key clean energy technologies that are already making America's clean energy future a reality. Share your photos of how clean energy technology already plays a role in your everyday life, using the tag #CleanTechNow. Submit your #CleanTechNow photos via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or email at newmedia@hq.doe.gov. We'll share our favorites next week. Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into

173

#CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

#CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution #CleanTechNow: America's Clean Energy Revolution September 17, 2013 - 10:21am Addthis Levi Tillemann Levi Tillemann Special Advisor for Policy and International Affairs How can I participate? Read a blog post from Secretary Ernest Moniz about the report and the Clean Energy revolution. All week on energy.gov, we'll be highlighting four key clean energy technologies that are already making America's clean energy future a reality. Share your photos of how clean energy technology already plays a role in your everyday life, using the tag #CleanTechNow. Submit your #CleanTechNow photos via Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or email at newmedia@hq.doe.gov. We'll share our favorites next week. Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into

174

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Framework of the 2005 Keathley Canyon Geologic Framework of the 2005 Keathley Canyon Gas Hydrate Research Well, Northern Gulf of Mexico Authors: D.R. Hutchinson, P.E. Hart, T.S. Collett, K.M. Edwards, and D.C. Twichell, U.S. Geological Survey, and F. Snyder, WesternGeco-Schlumberger. Venue: American Geophysical UnionÂ’s 2007 Joint Assembly, Acapulco, Mexico, May 22-25, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/ja07/ [external site]). Abstract: The project was located in the Casey Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico at 1,335 m water depth. A grid of 2-D high-resolution multichannel seismic lines around the drill sites, targeted for imaging depths down to at least 1,000 m subbottom, reveals multiple disconformities that bound seven mappable seismic stratigraphic units. A major disconformity in the middle of the units stands out for its angular baselapping geometry. From the seismic and drilling data, three episodes of sedimentary deposition and deformation are inferred. The oldest episode consists of fine-grained muds deposited during a period of relative stability in the basin (Units E, F, and G). A second episode (Units C and D) consists of large vertical displacements associated with infilling and ponding of sediment. This second interval corresponds with intercalated fine and coarse-grained material in the drill hole, which sampled the thin edges of much thicker units. The final episode (Units A and B) occurred during much-subdued vertical displacement. Hemipelagic drape (Unit A) characterizes the modern seafloor deposits. The basin is mostly filled. Its sill is part of a subsiding graben that is only 10-20 m shallower than the deepest point in the basin, indicating that gravity-driven transport would mostly bypass the basin. Contemporary faulting along the basin margins has selectively reactivated an older group of faults. The intercalated sand and mud deposits of Units C and D are tentatively correlated with late Pleistocene deposition derived from the western shelf-edge delta/depocenter of the Mississippi River, which was probably most active from 320 ka to 70 ka (Winker and Booth, 2000). Gas hydrate occurs within near-vertical fractures in Units E and F of the oldest episode. The presence of sand within the gas hydrate stability zone is not sufficient to concentrate gas hydrate, even though dispersed gas hydrate occurs deeper in the fractured mud/clay-rich sections of Units E and F.

175

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics – Application to Methane Hydrates in Natural Systems Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19, 2008 – Special Session H06: Particle Tracking Simulation of Fluid Flow and Mass Transport. http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm08/ Abstract: A discrete element model is presented for the simulation, at the grain scale, of gas migration in brine-saturated deformable media. The model rigorously accounts for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating grain forces due to pore fluid pressures, and surface tension between fluids. The coupled model permits investigating an essential process that takes place at the base of the hydrate stability zone: the upward migration of methane in its own free gas phase. The ways in which gas migration may take place were elucidated: (1) by capillary invasion in a rigid-like medium; and (2) by initiation and propagation of a fracture. Results indicate that the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport in the sediment is the grain size, and that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain media. The results have important implications for understanding hydrates in natural systems. The results predict that, in fine sediments, hydrate will likely form in veins that follow a fracture-network pattern, and the hydrate concentration in this type of accumulations will likely be quite low. In coarse sediments, the buoyant methane gas is likely to invade the pore space more uniformly, in a process akin to invasion percolation, and the overall pore occupancy is likely to be much higher than for a fracture-dominated regime. These implications are consistent with field observations of methane hydrates in natural

176

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Gas Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Authors: T.Collett (USGS), R. Boswell (DOE), K. Rose (DOE), W. Agena (USGS), and R. Baker (DOE) Venue: American Chemical Society Meeting, March 22-26, 2009, Salt Lake City, Utah http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_MEETINGS&node_id=86&use_sec=false&__uuid=614acbfd-ce1c-4a0b-98de-348a14738f4e [external site] Abstract: In 1982, scientists onboard the Research Vessel Glomar Challenger retrieved a meter-long sample of massive gas hydrate off the coast of Guatemala. This sample became the impetus for the first United States national research and development program dedicated to gas hydrates. By the mid 1990s, it was widely accepted that gas hydrates represented a vast storehouse of gas. Recognizing the importance of gas hydrate research and the need for coordinated efforts, Congress and the President of the United States enacted Public Law 106-193, the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. Authorization for this program was extended to 2010 as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Many of the current gas hydrate projects in the United States are conducted within this program, which is administered by the U. S. Department of Energy in collaboration with six other U.S. federal agencies, and conducted in partnership with private industry, academic institutions, and DOEÂ’s National Laboratories. In addition, other U.S. federal agencies conduct significant self-directed gas hydrate research; most notably the gas hydrate resource assessment activities conducted by U.S. Department of Interior agencies (the U.S. Geological Survey and the Minerals Management Service).

177

A Path to Reduce Methane Emissions from Gas Systems | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy The United States is now the world's largest producer of natural gas. This natural gas revolution is driving economic growth across the country,...

178

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity Title The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, James H., Andrew DeBenedictis, Rebecca Ghanadan, Amber Mahone, Jack Moore, William R. Morrow, Snuller Price, and Margaret S. Torn Journal Science Volume 335 Start Page 53 Issue 6064 Pagination 53-59 Date Published 01/2012 Abstract Several states and countries have adopted targets for deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, but there has been little physically realistic modeling of the energy and economic transformations required. We analyzed the infrastructure and technology path required to meet California's goal of an 80% reduction below 1990 levels, using detailed modeling of infrastructure stocks, resource constraints, and electricity system operability. We found that technically feasible levels of energy efficiency and decarbonized energy supply alone are not sufficient; widespread electrification of transportation and other sectors is required. Decarbonized electricity would become the dominant form of energy supply, posing challenges and opportunities for economic growth and climate policy. This transformation demands technologies that are not yet commercialized, as well as coordination of investment, technology development, and infrastructure deployment.

179

Chapter 10.2 - Heat-Resistant Coating Technology for Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operating temperature of gas turbines in the 1990s and later has been notably high in order to achieve high-efficiency power-generating plants by combining these gas turbines and steam turbines. Such high operating temperatures has been made possible with the development of heat-resistant superalloys forming turbine hot parts, as well as advances made in heat-resistant coating technology and cooling technology. For 1500 °C-class gas turbines, the adoption of single-crystal Ni-based superalloy blades and ceramic thermal barrier coatings is indispensable, and additionally, steam-cooled technology should be employed. In particular, thermal barrier coating (TBC) technology is recognized as important. Therefore, this paper reviews the trend of development of heat-resistant coating technology for gas turbines by paying attention to coating processes and evaluation. The paper also reviews the trend of development and standardization of heat-resistance evaluation test methods for coatings, because such evaluation test methods are indispensable for the development of heat-resistant coating technology.

Yoshiyasu Ito

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone: Modeling Multiphase Flow and Sediment Mechanics at the Pore-Scale Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19, 2008 – Special Session H06: Particle Tracking Simulation of Fluid Flow and Mass Transport. http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm08/ Abstract: Two competing processes were simulated, capillary invasion and fracture opening, by which free methane gas penetrates the Hydrate Stability Zone (HSZ). In situ conditions were predicted in which the methane propagates fractures and flows all the way through the HSZ and into the ocean, bypassing hydrate formation. In the fully coupled model, the discrete element method was used to simulate the sediment mechanics, and pore fluid pressures and surface tension between the gas and brine were accounted for by incorporating additional sets of pressure forces and adhesion forces. Results indicate that given enough capillary pressure, the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport is the grain size, and show that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion and widespread hydrate formation, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain sediments. The fracturing threshold was calculated as a function of grain size, capillary pressure, and seafloor depth, and place these results in the context of naturally-occurring hydrate

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181

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capillarity-controlled displacements in sediments with moveable grains Capillarity-controlled displacements in sediments with moveable grains Capillarity-controlled displacements in sediments with moveable grains: Implications for growth of methane hydrates Authors: Maša Prodanovic (speaker), Steven L. Bryant Venue: SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, Denver, Colorado, 21-24 September, 2008. http://www.spe.org [external site]. Abstract: We consider immiscible displacements when fluid/fluid interfaces are controlled by capillary forces. The progressive quasistatic (PQS) algorithm based on the level set method readily determines the geometry of these interfaces at the pore level. Capillary pressure generally exerts a net force on grains supporting an interface. We extend PQS to implement a kinematic model of grain displacement in response to that force. We examine the changes in the drainage curve caused by this coupling. We compute the interfacial area associated with the bulk water phase, anticipating preferential growth of methane hydrate there. Gas invasion of sediments is one mechanism by which methane hydrates are believed to form. In unconsolidated ocean sediments the capillary pressure exerted by an accumulated gas phase below the hydrate stability zone can be large enough to move grains apart. This motion alters the pore throat sizes which control subsequent drainage of the sediment. A model for the dynamics of this process is useful for assessing the competition between drainage (controlled by capillary forces) and fracturing (controlled by pore pressure and earth stresses). This in turn provides insight into the possible growth habits within the hydrate stability zone. When grains can move in response to net force exerted by the gas phase, small variations in an otherwise uniform distribution of pore throat sizes quickly lead to self-reinforcing, focused channels of gas phase. In contrast to behavior in stationary grains, the drainage curve exhibits no clear percolation threshold. Displacements in materials with broad throat size distributions also exhibit self-reinforcing channels. Behind the leading edge of the displacement front, the net force exerted on the grains tends to push them together. This effectively seals off these regions from subsequent invasion. Thus hydrate growth tends to be localized along the channel of displaced grains. This is the first quantitative grain-scale study of the drainage behavior when grains can move in response to invasion events. The coupling leads to qualitatively different displacement patterns. The method presented for studying this behavior is applicable to any granular material and to other applications, such as sand production.

182

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs Author: Mohan Kelkar, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. Venue: Tulsa Association of Petroleum Landmen meeting in Tulsa, OK, April 19, 2007 (http://www.landman.org [external site]). Abstract: The Hunton reservoir in Oklahoma represents one of the largest discoveries in Oklahoma in recent history. Since 1995, several Hunton reservoir fields have been exploited by various operators. The principle behind this exploitation remains the same: The wells produce large quantities of water, and along with it, significant quantities of natural gas and sometimes oil. Examination of various fields producing from the Hunton reservoir indicates that the economic success from these fields is not uniform. Some fields produce significant quantities of oil, whereas some fields only produce gas. In some fields, horizontal wells work best, whereas in some other fields, vertical wells do a good job. The water production from the fields ranges from as low as few hundred barrels per day to several thousand barrels per day. In this paper, we present the results from various fields to indicate the parameters needed in a Hunton field to make it economically successful. We restrict our evaluation to parameters that can be easily measured or are readily available. These include log data (gamma ray, resistivity, neutron, and density), initial potential data, production data (oil, gas, and water—if available) and well configuration (vertical or horizontal). By analyzing the recovery of oil and gas according to various reservoir parameters, we developed a methodology for predicting the future success of the field. For example, a clear relationship exists between porosity of the rock and initial hydrocarbon saturation: The higher the oil saturation, the better the recovery factor. Initial potential is critical in determining possible recovery. Horizontal wells cost 1.5 to 2 times more than vertical wells and may not provide the additional recovery to justify the costs. The Hunton formation is extensive in Oklahoma. If we want to extend the success of some of the fields to other areas, we need clear guidelines in terms of what is needed to exploit those fields. This paper provides some of those guidelines based on the examination of the currently producing fields.

183

Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives are to develop actuators for enhancing the mixing between gas streams, increase combustion stability, and develop hgih-temperature materials for actuators and sensors in combustors. Turbulent kinetic energy maps of an excited jet with co-flow in a cavity with a partially closed exhaust end are given with and without a longitudinal or a transverse acoustic field. Dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients were determined for Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics.

Vandsburger, U. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Roe, L.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

185

NETL: News Release - DOE Seeks "Small-Footprint" Oil and Gas Technologies  

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June 16, 2004 June 16, 2004 DOE Seeks "Small-Footprint" Oil and Gas Technologies Two-Inch "Microholes" Could Lessen Environmental Impacts, Costs The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a major new research and development initiative to develop "microhole" technologies - those that use portable drilling rigs with a smaller footprint and lower environmental impact. The program is designed to bring about faster, cheaper and safer oil and gas projects. "This is a major new research and development initiative that is aimed at reducing the environmental footprint of oil and gas operations at the same time it reduces costs and increases America's oil and gas production," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "It's clear this initiative will help meet President Bush's goals for energy and the environment."

186

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand: Observations Using X-Ray CT Scanning Authors: Yongkoo Seol and Timothy J. Kneafsey Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008. http://www.icgh.org/ [external site] Abstract: The effects of porous medium heterogeneity on methane hydrate formation, water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand, and hydrate dissociation were observed in an experiment using a heterogeneous sand column with prescribed heterogeneities. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to monitor saturation changes in water, gas, and hydrate during hydrate formation, water flow, and hydrate dissociation. The sand column was packed in several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with two distinct grain-size sands. The CT images showed that as hydrate formed, the water and hydrate saturations were dynamically redistributed by variations in capillary strength of the medium (the tendency for a material to imbibe water), which changed with the presence and saturation of hydrate. Water preferentially flowed through fine sand near higher hydrate-saturation regions where the capillary strength was elevated relative to the lower hydrate saturation regions. Hydrate dissociation initiated by depressurization varied with different grain sizes and hydrate saturations.

187

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Authors: Michael D. Vanden Berg, Stephanie Carney, Michael D. Laine, Craig D. Morgan, Utah Geological Survey; and Paul B. Anderson, consulting geologist. Venue: Poster Session: Responsible Development, Sustainability, and Climate Science—Groundwater and Site Remediation, June 9, 2009, American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting, Denver, CO, June 7 to 10, 2009. http://www.aapg.org/denver/ [external site] Abstract: Saline water disposal is the single most pressing issue with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Conventional oil and gas fields in the basin provide 67% of Utah’s total crude oil production and 71% of Utah’s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 175% in the last 10 years. As petroleum production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of fresh water sources. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that petroleum and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. Researchers have begun efforts to re-map the base of the moderately saline aquifer within the Uinta Basin using more robust data and more sophisticated GIS techniques than previous efforts. Below this base, they believe that saline water can be injected without damage to the overlying freshwater reservoirs. Water chemistry data are being collected from wells of operators and governmental agencies. These ground-truth data are supplemented with water chemistry information calculated from geophysical logs. In addition to the new GIS-based map, the researchers are constructing cross sections showing the stratigraphic position of the moderately saline to very saline transition and its relationship to potential seals and disposal zones in the Uinta Basin. A potentially suitable disposal zone for large volume saline water disposal is the fresh to slightly saline Bird’s-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formation’s Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft above the kerogen-rich Mahogany zone. A significant concern is that saline water disposal into the Bird’s-Nest by conventional gas producers may hinder oil shale development by creating unforeseen economic and technical hurdles. With increased saline water disposal, the water quality in the Bird’s-Nest could degrade and create additional water disposal problems for oil shale development companies. Researchers have examined this aquifer in outcrop, core, and geophysical logs and have gained a better understanding of its areal extent, thickness, and zones of differing water chemistry

188

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regenerating spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub 2} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The process will generate only marketable by-products. Our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high-efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water-soluble phthalocyanine compounds invented by SRI as well as polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media. The final novelty of our approach is the arrangement of the absorbers in cassette (stackable) form so that the NO{sub x} absorber can be on top of the SO{sub x} absorber. This arrangement is possible only because of the high efficiency of the hollow fiber scrubbing devices, as indicated by our preliminary laboratory data. This arrangement makes it possible for the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing chambers to be separate without incurring the large ducting and gas pressure drop costs necessary if a second conventional absorber vessel were used. Because we have separate scrubbers, we will have separate liquor loops and simplify the chemical complexity of simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} scrubbing.

Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Ventura, S. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm[sup 2]; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Technology and Innovation in the Service Economyin the Service Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural & Biological Systems Engineered Systems #12;The Industrial Revolution A technology and science based revolution #12;Innovations in the Industrial Economy Over past two centuries we have achieved Technologies Digital technologies are to the 21st century as steam power was to the Industrial Revolution 8

Gabrieli, John

191

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

Unknown

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Environmental trends in Asia are accelerating the introduction of clean coal technologies and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the changing energy mix for Asia to 2020, and impacts of increased coal consumption on Asia`s share of world SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} emissions. Stricter SO{sub 2} emissions laws are summarized for eight Asian economies along with implications for fuel and technology choices. The paper compares the economics of different technologies for coal and natural gas in 1997 and in 2007. Trends toward introducing clean coal technologies and the use of natural gas will accelerate in response to tighter environmental standards by 2000. The most important coal conversion technology for Asia, particularly China, in the long term is likely to be integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), but only under the assumption of multiple products.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Integrated Underground Gas Storage of CO2 and CH4 to Decarbonise the “Power-to-gas-to-gas-to-power” Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Excess energy produced from renewables can be stored and reused via the “power-to-gas-to-power” (PGP) technology. We present an innovative idea which represents a decarbonised extension of PGP based on a closed carbon cycle. Our show case for the cities Potsdam and Brandenburg/Havel (Germany) outlines an overall efficiency for the entire process chain of 28% with total costs of electricity of 20 eurocents/kWh. If existing locations in Europe, where natural gas storage in porous formations is performed, were to be extended by CO2 storage sites, a significant quantity of wind and solar energy could be stored economically as methane.

Michael Kühn; Martin Streibel; Natalie Nakaten; Thomas Kempka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Delivery Reliability for Natural Gas--Inspection Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique is ideal for inspecting unpiggable pipelines because all of its components can be made smaller than the diameter of the pipe to be inspected. For these reasons, RFEC was selected as a technology to be integrated with the Explorer II robotic platform for unpiggable pipeline inspections. The research work is a continuation of a prior DOE-NETL project but is now directed towards a seamless integration with the robot. The laboratory set-up has been improved and data collection is nearly autonomous. With the improved collections speeds, GTI has been able to test more variables. Tests have been run on 6-inch and 12-inch seamless and seam-welded pipes. Testing on the 6-inch pipes have included using five exciter coils, each of a different geometry. Two types of sensor coils have been tested. With a focus on preparing the technology for use on the Explorer II, improvements in power consumption have proved successful. Tests with metal components have been performed to check for interference with the electromagnetic field. The results of these tests indicate RFEC will produce quality inspections while on the robot. GTI has also been testing manufactured detection boards currently used for boiler tube inspections. These boards are appropriately compact for use on the Explorer II robot and are able to detect defects at the speed of robot travel. In addition to advanced sensor development, GTI has participated in sensor/platform definition and module design activities. Mechanical constraints, power requirements, limited control and communication protocols, and potential busses and connectors have been addressed. GTI has conducted a proper design process to produce a sound design for the RFEC components to fit into two modules. The remaining work to be performed in the design of the sensor module is packaging and strengthening.

Albert Teitsma; Julie Maupin

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Coalbed Methane  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Author: John Wheaton, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, Butte, MT. Venue: The tour will be conducted starting in Gillette, WY, and extend along the northern Powder River Basin, on June 3, 2007, under the auspices of the American Society for Mining and Reclamation (http://ces.ca.uky.edu/asmr/ [external site]). Abstract: This field tour will emphasize successful reclamation in an alternative type of coal industry in the Powder River Basin: coalbed methane. The tour will leave Gillette, WY, at 7:30 a.m., Sunday, June 3, 2007, and travel to Sheridan, WY, and back, touring coalbed methane production areas. Stops will include active drilling and producing areas to learn about the footprint and approach to development of coalbed methane. Reclamation includes drilling pads and linear trenching for water and gas pipelines. Produced-water management is a major expense and concern. Among the water management options we plan to see are stock-watering facilities, infiltration ponds, irrigation sites, and water treatment facilities. A landowner will join us and be able to answer questions from the ranching perspective for part of the tour. Lunches are included in the price of the tour.

196

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Authors: Fred Sabins, Kevin Edgely, and Larry Watters, CSI Technologies, LLC, Houston, TX. Venue: 2007 Drilling Engineering Association Workshop, Moody Gardens Hotel, Galveston, TX, June 19-20, 2007 (http://www.dea-global.org) [external site]). Abstract: Successful laboratory and field testing of Ultra-Seal® R and Pre-Stressed Cement will be presented. The application of these materials can dramatically reduce the costs of re-establishing annular seal integrity in deep, hot wells, thereby significantly lowering life-cycle well costs. CSI Technologies chose two cement types for further field testing in the third phase of the project to develop a “supercement” for work in high-temperature/high-pressure (HT/HP) wells. HT/HP wells often encounter problems with isolation of production zones due to cement failures. This can result in expensive repair jobs and costly shut-ins of high-volume wells. CSI determined that resin and magnesium oxide cements showed very good mechanical properties and bonding characteristics and are controllable at HT/HP conditions. The resin cement has been used successfully in more than 50 field plugging jobs and in one HT/HP squeeze job. CSI developed a second supercement formulation that is Portland cement- based and functions by generating substantial expansion during the curing process. This material functions in the confined wellbore environment by developing significant cement matrix compressive stress during cure, resulting in a compressive pre-load. In practice, the compressive pre-load functions to elevate the effective tensile strength of the material because the compressive stress must be relieved before the material can experience tensile stress. Additionally, the pre-load functions to keep the material tightly bound to the wellbore tubulars, thereby reducing the tendency of repeated stress cycles to form a microannulus.

198

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Author: Bruce W. Ohme, Honeywell Inc., Plymouth, MN. Venue: HITEN 2007 (High-Temperature Electronics Network conference), St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, U.K., September 17–19, 2007, (http://science24.com/event/hiten2007 [external site]). Abstract: Electronics are used in modern oil and gas exploration to collect, log, and/or process data such as heading and inclination, weight on the bit, vibration, seismic/acoustic response, temperature, pressure, radiation, and resistivity of the strata. High-temperature electronics are needed that can operate reliably in deep-well conditions (up to 250oC). Under its Deep Trek program, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded two projects led by Honeywell. The first project, launched in 2003 and being completed this year, established a production-level integrated circuit manufacturing process, components, and design tools specifically targeting high-temperature environments (up to 250oC). The second project, launched in 2006 and expected to be completed in 2008, will develop rugged packaging suitable for downhole shock and vibration levels that will be used to house and demonstrate components developed in the earlier project. This paper will describe updated results from both of these projects, including previously unreported results obtained from prototype testing of a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC); a high-temperature, single-poly, floating-gate EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory); and a 12-bit, successive-approximation ADC. Also, a multi-chip module being developed as a complete downhole processing unit will be discussed

199

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating Fracture Reorientation Due to Fluid Injection/Production Estimating Fracture Reorientation Due to Fluid Injection/Production Estimating Fracture Reorientation Due to Fluid Injection/Production Authors: Zongyu Zhai and Mukul M. Sharma, University of Texas at Austin. Venue: Society of Petroleum Engineers’ Production and Operations Symposium, Oklahoma City, OK, April 1–3, 2007 (http://www.spe.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The injection or production of large volumes of fluid into or from a reservoir can result in significant changes to the effective in-situ stress distributions. Field evidence of this has been provided in the past by mapping refracturing treatments in tight gas sands and microseismic monitoring of injection wells in waterflooded reservoirs. A poro-elastic model is presented to show how the extent of fracture reorientation can be estimated under different conditions of fluid injection and production. The extent of fracture reorientation is a function of the in-situ stresses, the mechanical properties of the rock, and the pore pressure gradients. In reservoirs where the pore pressure gradients are complicated due to multiple injection and production wells, fracture reorientation is sensitive to the net pore-pressure gradients. Fractures tend to reorient themselves towards the injection wells and away from production wells, if the pressure gradients are comparable to the in-situ stress contrast. While far-field principal stress orientations are impacted only by in-situ stresses and pore-pressure gradients, near-wellbore in-situ stress orientation is also impacted by the hoop stress and the wellbore pressure. These can have a significant effect on near-wellbore fracture reorientation. The results of our model are compared with field observations obtained from microseismic monitoring of water injection wells. The implications of the results to refracturing operations and candidate well selection are discussed.

200

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Authors: Mark Wassell, Martin Cobern, Carl Perry, Jason Barbely, and Daniel Burgess, APS Technology, Inc. Venue: Drilling Engineering Association’s 2007 DEA Workshop in Galveston, TX, June 19-20, 2007 Abstract: Testing of an active drilling vibration damper (AVD) system at TerraTek Laboratory, under conditions designed to induce vibration, demonstrated that the use of the AVD reduced vibration, maintained more consistent weight-on-bit, and increased rate of penetration (ROP). These tests demonstrated that the AVD is likely to provide significant time and cost savings, particularly in deep wells. The results of these tests will be outlined. Related NETL Project: The goal of the related NETL project DE-FC26-02NT41664, “Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System,” is to improve ROP and reduce the incidence of premature equipment failures in deep hard rock drilling environments by reducing harmful drillstring vibration.

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201

NETL: News Release - 3-D Seismic Technology Locates Natural Gas in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 10, 2005 January 10, 2005 3-D Seismic Technology Locates Natural Gas in Fractured Reservoirs DOE-Sponsored Project Taps New Supplies of "Tight" Gas RIO ARRIBA COUNTY, N.M. - Large volumes of natural gas are being tapped from the tight rocks of the San Juan Basin in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County using a new technology developed in a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In this cost-shared project, GeoSpectrum, Inc., of Midland, Texas, uses 3-D seismic to locate fractures in the earth that provide access to millions of cubic feet of untapped natural gas in four new wells-including one well that is now producing up to 2 million cubic feet per day. "The key innovation in this project is the integration of technologies that map previously unseen fracture lineaments and perturbations in seismic data, and then target fracture "sweet spots" where multiple fractures intersect," said geophysicist Francis Toro, who manages the project for DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory.

202

Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01/2004 Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing to monitor total NOx (0-1000 ppm), CO (0-1000 ppm) and O2 (1-15%) within the convective pass of the boiler of such sensor systems will dramatically alter how boilers are operated, since much of the emissions creation

Dutta, Prabir K.

203

IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser. biogas fra anaerob udrådning (AD) som en integreret gylle og affalds behandlings teknologi. Arbejdet

204

ESTIMATING THE IMPACT OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ON GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng Department of Civil Engineering University of Transportation Engineers to be held May 12-15, 2002 in Ottawa Ontario #12;1 Estimating the Impact of Demographics and Automotive Technologies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ryan McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng

Hellinga, Bruce

205

Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments that Contain Hydrates and High Concentrations of Methane Authors: Colwell, F. (speaker, Oregon State University), Hangsterfer, A., Brodie, E., Daly, R., Holland, M., Briggs, B., Carini, P., Torres, M., Kastner, M., Long, P., Schaef, H., Delwiche, M., Winters, W., and Riedel, M. Venue: American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting in San Francisco, CA, December 10–14, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/ [external site]). Abstract: Deep subseafloor sediments with high concentrations of organic carbon and microbially generated methane contain microbial communities that play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. However, there remains a limited understanding of the fine (centimeter)-scale sediment properties (e.g., grain size, presence/absence of hydrates) that determine key microbial attributes in deep marine sediments. This project’s objective is to determine the quantity, diversity, and distribution of microbial communities in the context of abiotic properties in gas-rich marine sediments. DNA was extracted from deep marine sediments cored from various continental shelf locations, including offshore India and the Cascadia Margin. Abiotic characterization of the same sediments included grain size analysis, chloride concentrations in sediment pore waters, and presence of hydrates in the sediments as determined by thermal anomalies. As in past studies of such systems, most of the samples yielded low levels of DNA (0.3-1.5 ng/g of sediment). Bacterial DNA appeared to be more easily amplified than archaeal DNA. Initial attempts to amplify DNA using primers specific for the methanogen functional gene, methyl-CoM-reductase, were unsuccessful. Infrequently, cores from relatively shallow sediments (e.g., 0.5 mbsf Leg 204, 1251B-1H) from central (Hydrate Ridge) and northern (offshore Vancouver Island) Cascadia and from India’s eastern margin contained macroscopically visible, pigmented biofilms. One of these biofilms was composed of high concentrations of cell clusters when viewed microscopically. The predominant cells in the Hydrate Ridge biofilm were large (ca. 10 um) cocci, and preliminary characterization of the 16S rDNA amplified and sequenced from this biofilm suggests the prevalence of a microbe with 97% similarity to mycobacteria. These discrete biofilm communities appear to be distinctive relative to the normally sparse distribution of cells in the sediments. By determining how the abiotic properties of deep marine sediments control the numbers and distribution of microbial communities that process organic matter, project researchers hope to provide better parameters for computational models that describe carbon cycling in these systems.

207

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Authors: Rick Colwell, Oregon State University, and Dimitris Ntarlagiannis, Rutgers University. Venue: American Geophysical UnionÂ’s 2007 Joint Assembly, Acapulco Mexico, May 21-25, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The new subdiscipline of biogeophysics has focused mostly on the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in contaminated subsurface environments usually undergoing remediation. However, the use of biogeophysics to examine the biogeochemistry of marine sediments has not yet been well integrated into conceptual models that describe subseafloor processes. Current examples of geophysical measurements that have been used to detect geomicrobiological processes or infer their location in the seafloor include sound surveillance system (SOSUS)-derived data that detect seafloor eruptive events, deep and shallow cross-sectional seismic surveys that determine the presence of hydraulically conductive zones or gas-bearing sediments (e.g., bottom-simulating reflectors or bubble-rich strata), and thermal profiles. One possible area for innovative biogeophysical characterization of the seafloor involves determining the depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) in locations where sulfate diffuses from the seawater and methane emanates from subsurface strata. The SMI demarcates a stratum where microbially driven anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is dependent upon methane as an electron donor and sulfate as an electron acceptor. AMO is carried out by a recently defined, unique consortium of microbes that metabolically temper the flux of methane into the overlying seawater. The depth of the SMI is, respectively, shallow or deep according to whether a high or low rate of methane flux occurs from the deep sediments. Presently, the SMI can only be determined by direct measurements of methane and sulfate concentrations in the interstitial waters or by molecular biological techniques that target the microbes responsible for creating the SMI. Both methods require collection and considerable analysis of sediment samples. Therefore, detection of the SMI by non-destructive methods would be advantageous. As a key biogeochemical threshold in marine sediments, the depth of the SMI defines methane charge in marine sediments, whether it is from dissolved methane or from methane hydrates. As such, a biogeophysical strategy for determining SMI depth would represent an important contribution to assessing methane charge with respect to climate change, sediment stability, or potential energy resources.

208

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Authors: Paul La Pointe, FracMan Technology Group, Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA; Robert D. Benson, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; and Claudia Rebne, Legacy Energy, Denver, CO. Venue: American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting in Snowbird, UT, October 7-9, 2007. Abstract: A 3D9C survey was carried out over a 6 square mile portion of the Roadrunner and Towaoc fields on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation in southwestern Colorado. This survey was jointly funded by DOE and the Southern Ute tribeÂ’s Red Willow Corporation to promote development of Ismay algal mound plays in the Paradox Basin within Ute Mountain Tribal lands and elsewhere in the Paradox Basin. Multicomponent data were utilized to better delineate the external mound geometry as well as to estimate internal mound reservoir parameters such as matrix permeability, saturation, and porosity. Simple cross-plotting of various multicomponent attributes against reservoir properties did not provide the desired predictive accuracy, in part due to sub-optimal frequency content in components derived from the shear wave data. However, a multivariate statistical analysis greatly improved the predictive accuracy. These multivariate regressions were then used to prescribe reservoir properties for a static reservoir model, which in turn formed the basis for a dynamic reservoir simulation model of the project area to assess the usefulness of the multivariate relations developed. This poster presentation will illustrate the workflow used to carry out the multivariate modeling, key maps of the reservoir properties that were derived, the static model, and results from the dynamic simulation used to assess the usefulness of the approach. Results from wells drilled based on the seismic data also will be presented.

209

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Authors: Sean P. Trisch, Wayne D. Pennington, and Roger Turpening, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI. Venue: Seismological Society of America’s annual meeting in Waikaloa, Kona, HI., April 11–13, 2007 Abstract: Imaging of the Earth’s crust is increasingly being accomplished through the use of borehole-based sensors. Experience gained in recent crosswell seismic surveys may assist endeavors to image the near-borehole environment near plate boundaries or other places of scientific interest. A high-resolution crosswell seismic data set was collected over a Silurian (Niagaran) reef in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The survey was optimized for both reflection imaging purposes and the gathering of a wide range of incidence angles. The reflection image was intended to aid in interpretation of the reef structure at a level of detail never before possible with seismic methods. The survey was also conducted to maximize data available for study of the dependence of amplitudes with angle-of-incidence. Prestack angle data were processed to half-degree intervals and utilized for enhanced interpretation of the seismic image through partial stacks and through amplitude variation with angle (AVA) analyses. Frequencies as high as 3,000 Hz (the limit of the source sweep) were recorded, with a predominant signal at about 2,000 Hz; the well separation was 600 m, and the target reef is at 1,400–1,525 m depth. Many of the interfaces present within the area have small reflection amplitudes at narrow angles that increase substantially near the critical angle. Analyses were performed on various interfaces in the seismic section to compare with Zoeppritz-equation solutions, using rock data acquired through an extensive library of seismic and well logging data available for the area. These models were then compared with the actual AVA character acquired at the interface and matched as closely as possible. Through this analysis and match process, various rock property estimates were inferred or refined.

210

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0000408 Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0000408 Final Report October 2009 - September 2012 Post Retort, Pre Hydro-treat Upgrading of Shale Oil Submitted by: Ceramatec Inc 2425 S. 900 W. Salt Lake City, UT 84119 Prepared by: John H. Gordon, PI Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 25, 2013 Office of Fossil Energy Final Report: October 2009 - September 2012 Ceramatec Inc, 1 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em- ployees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

211

IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed the anode field of fuel cell stack is considered partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas. We present a model-based control analysis and design

Peng, Huei

212

Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Recent Development in Oxy-Combustion Technology and Its Applications to Gas Turbine Combustors and ITM Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent Development in Oxy-Combustion Technology and Its Applications to Gas Turbine Combustors and ITM Reactors ... Also, the application of oxy-combustion technology into gas turbines is possible; however, the combustion temperature will be increased tremendously, which needs more control to make safe the turbine blades. ... technologies, a simplified model of a power plant with two forms of CO2 capture was developed. ...

Mohamed A. Habib; Medhat Nemitallah; Rached Ben-Mansour

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

STATE OF THE ART AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NATURAL GAS ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current, state of the art natural gas engines provide the lowest emission commercial technology for use in medium heavy duty vehicles. NOx emission levels are 25 to 50% lower than state of the art diesel engines and PM levels are 90% lower than non-filter equipped diesels. Yet, in common with diesel engines, natural gas engines are challenged to become even cleaner and more efficient to meet environmental and end-user demands. Cummins Westport is developing two streams of technologies to achieve these goals for medium-heavy and heavy-heavy duty applications. For medium-heavy duty applications, lowest possible emissions are sought on SI engines without significant increase in complexity and with improvements in efficiency and BMEP. The selected path builds on the capabilities of the CWI Plus technology and recent diesel engine advances in NOx controls, providing potential to reduce emissions to 2010 values in an accelerated manner and without the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction or NOx Storage and Reduction technology. For heavy-heavy duty applications where high torque and fuel economy are of prime concern, the Westport-Cycle{trademark} technology is in field trial. This technology incorporates High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI{trademark}) of natural gas with a diesel pilot ignition source. Both fuels are delivered through a single, dual common rail injector. The operating cycle is entirely unthrottled and maintains the high compression ratio of a diesel engine. As a result of burning 95% natural gas rather than diesel fuel, NOx emissions are halved and PM is reduced by around 70%. High levels of EGR can be applied while maintaining high combustion efficiency, resulting in extremely low NOx potential. Some recent studies have indicated that DPF-equipped diesels emit less nanoparticles than some natural gas vehicles [1]. It must be understood that the ultrafine particles emitted from SI natural gas engines are generally accepted to consist predominantly of VOCs [2], and that lubricating oil is a major contributor. Fitting an oxidation catalyst to the natural gas engine leads to a reduction in nanoparticles emissions in comparison to engines without aftertreatment [2,3,4]. In 2001, the Cummins Westport Plus technology was introduced with the C Gas Plus engine, a popular choice for transit bus applications. This incorporates drive by wire, fully integrated, closed loop electronic controls and a standard oxidation catalyst for all applications. The B Gas Plus and the B Propane Plus engines, with application in shuttle and school buses were launched in 2002 and 2003. The gas-specific oxidation catalyst operates in concert with an optimized ring-pack and liner combination to reduce total particulate mass below 0.01g/bhphr, combat ultrafine particles and control VOC emissions.

Dunn, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

216

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Donald Duttlinger

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Unknown

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

Unknown

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41330  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 (October 2009 - March 2010) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities Principal Author: John T. Balczewski Chevron Energy Technology Company 1400 Smith Street Houston, TX 77002 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2010 Office of Fossil Energy i DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

220

Applying Learning Curves to Modeling Future Coal and Gas Power Generation Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Other potential improvements to the model include an expansion to cover competing energy technologies not included in the current model such as nuclear, wind, and solar. ... Given the dominance of power plant emissions of greenhouse gases, and the growing worldwide interest in CO2 capture and storage (CCS) as a potential climate change mitigation option, the expected future cost of power plants with CO2 capture is of significant interest. ... Bergek, A.; Tell, F.; Berggren, C.; Watson, J.Technological Capabilities and Late Shakeouts: Industrial Dynamics in the Advanced Gas Turbine Industry, 1987–2002 Industrial and Corporate Change 2008, 17 ( 2) 335– 392 ...

Chris Ordowich; John Chase; Daniel Steele; Ripudaman Malhotra; Michiaki Harada; Keiji Makino

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Quiet Revolution Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product: Quiet Revolution, a spin off company of XCO2 Ltd, have developed a vertical axis wind turbine. The patent pending design is being installed into many buildings in the...

222

Shadow Geometry for Solids of Revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we explore the analysis of shadows of Right Circular SHGCs (solids of revolution). We have already seen that, when the viewing angle ? is known, the tangency contours themselves can be analyze...

Steven A. Shafer

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Wind Revolutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Revolutions LLC Revolutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Revolutions LLC Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80202 Sector Wind energy Product Wind Revolutions is a wind energy project developer with three projects currently under development in Wyoming and three other projects in early stages in California, New Mexico, and Arizona. Coordinates 39.74001°, -104.992259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.74001,"lon":-104.992259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Study on technology of electromagnetic radiation of sensitive index to forecast the coal and gas hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hazard forecast of coal and gas outburst was an important step of comprehensive outburst-prevention measures. Aiming at the manifestation of disaster threatens such as the gas outburst to mine safety, this paper explained the forecasting principles of electromagnetic radiation to coal and gas outburst, by the electromagnetic radiation theory of coal rock damage; it studied the characteristics and rules of electromagnetic radiation during the deformation and fracture process of loaded coal rocks, and confirmed forecast sensitive indexes of electromagnetic radiation as well as its critical values by signals of electromagnetic radiation. By applying EMR monitoring technology in the field, outburst prediction and forecast tests to the characteristics of electromagnetic radiation during the driving process was taken, and figured out the hazard prediction values by using forecast methods of static and dynamic trend.

Yuliang Wu; Wen Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Comparative Economical Analysis of Technologies for CO2 Removal from Offshore Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the scenario of the Brazilian Pre-Salt fields, where associated Natural Gas (NG) shows high concentration of CO2, gas conditioning comes out as one of the main challenges. Among the possible capture technologies available, three alternatives stand out for CO2 sequestration: (A) gas permeation through membranes, (B) absorption columns using aqueous blends of ethanolamines and (C) application of hybrid - membrane modules in series with amine absorption and regeneration columns. The main objective of this work is to investigate the technical and economical feasibility of applying these three separation processes on offshore platforms, given the stringent constraints on footprint and equipment weight, and for minimizing NG production and transportation costs. The methodology involves: (i) development of cases based on the Brazilian Pre-Salt gas composition. NG streams with CO2 molar concentrations ranging from 8 to 18% are applied; (ii) Simulations of three process flowsheets, corresponding to each one of chosen technologies - A, B and C; (iii) Equipment sizing; and (iv) Analysis of economic performance through calculation of capital (CAPEX) and operational (OPEX) costs.

Tatiana S. Gadelha; Aline R.S. Guimarăes; Andressa Nakao; Ofélia de Q.F. Araújo; José Luiz de Medeiros

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Advancing our world. It's the Washington Way. The world is in the middle of a materials revolution. Advances in materials have preceded almost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing our world. It's the Washington Way. The world is in the middle of a materials revolution. Advances in materials have preceded almost every technological leap since the beginning of civilization of Washington's Materials Science & Engineering department is at the heart of this revolution preparing our

Anderson, Richard

227

Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Technology-Based Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken? Through the use of technology, U.S. oil and natural gas operators are converting previously uneconomic oil and natural gas resources into proved reserves and production. The Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin is a success story of horizontal drilling, fracturing, and completion technologies. The recent, highly productive oil field discoveries within the Bakken Formation did not come from venturing out into deep uncharted waters heretofore untapped by man, nor from blazing a trail into pristine environs never open to drilling before. Instead, success came from analysis of geologic data on a decades-old producing area, identification of uptapped resources, and application of the new drilling and completion technology necessary to exploit them. In short, it came from using technology

228

Greenhouse gas emissions reduction in China by cleaner coal technology towards 2020  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Chinese energy system, a major CO2 emitter, relies heavily on fossil fuels, especially coal. Coal will continue to play a major role in the new installed power generation capacity in the future, which will cause unavoidable environmental problems. Clean coal technologies (CCTs) are essential for emissions reduction in the power sector. In general, \\{CCTs\\} cover coal upgrading, efficiency improvements, advanced technologies and zero emissions technologies. Besides these, \\{CCTs\\} also include other emissions reduction technologies and comprehensive utilization technologies in China. This paper review the complete life cycle modeling of CCTs. The advanced technologies include super-critical (super-C), ultra super-critical (USC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). The results show that the higher efficiency technologies have lower potential impacts. Compared with the average level of power generation technology, CO2 emissions reduction is 6.4% for super-C, 37.4% for USC and 61.5% for IGCC. Four coal power scenarios are developed based on the assumption of potential investment power for \\{CCTs\\} in 2020, which are super-C, USC, USC and old low efficiency generation substitution by USC, IGCC and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The CO2 emissions intensity is 1.93 kg/kWh for super-C, 1.69 kg/kWh for USC, 1.59 kg/kWh for USC + replacement and 1.29 kg/kWh for IGCC + CCS. The CO2 emissions intensity was 1.95 kg/kWh in 2010, which had decreased 5.5% compared with the level in 2005. The energy structure is continuously being improved and optimized. The potential carbon reduction will be limited in the power system in 2020 by current commercial \\{CCTs\\} with the generation efficiency increase. The most impressive technology is IGCC with CCS which enables greenhouse gas reduction of 37.6% compared with the level in 2005.

Guangling Zhao; Sha Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Revolution Now | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

investments, the clean energy future has already arrived for four key technologies: wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles and LED light bulbs, each of which has seen drops...

230

Nanotechnology: a successive industrial revolution of Schumpeter's long wave theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the strategies on research management and technology policies of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is now a science and technology (S&T) priority area for many Asian countries with governments making efforts to put the results of nanotechnology development to commercialisation. The national policy for nanotechnology is to change the existing technology system and bring about an industrial revolution (the nanorevolution). Under the pressure of competition, the key to success lies in how each country can find the right application on which to focus in order to survive through international competition. This paper reviews nanotechnology research activities in some Asian countries exhibiting an enthusiastic approach in undertaking nanotechnology initiatives â?? Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, China, South Korea, Taiwan, and Japan. The paper finally recommends policy implications to encourage national innovativeness and effective commercialisation.

Jarunee Wonglimpiyarat

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mental Strain as Field of Action in the 4th Industrial Revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Industrial revolutions have changed the society by a development of key-technologies. The vision of the 4th industrial revolution is triggered by technological concepts and solutions to realize a combination of the economy of scale with the economy of scope. This aim is also known as mass customization and is characterized by handling a high level of complexity with a total network integration of products and production processes. These technology-driven changes also lead to new fields of activity in the industrial science and the occupational psychology. The 4th industrial revolution intends to implement the collaboration between humans and machines. At the same time, processes are locally controlled and planned. For humans, this results to new work items. Resulting psychological effects should be investigated. This paper classifies the 4th industrial revolution systematically and describes future changes for employees. It derives the necessity of labor- psychological analysis of new key technologies like cyber physical systems. A theoretical foundation of a psychological work requirement analysis by using the VERA method is given. Finally, results of a preliminary study are carried out that will give the base for further studies.

Uwe Dombrowski; Tobias Wagner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Chapter 10 - Coal and Coalbed Gas: Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The future of coal and coalbed gas future is intertwined as source and reservoir rocks. Coal generates coalbed gas during coalification (e.g. thermogenic gas) and methanogenesis (biogenic gas). These gas types occur as singular and mixed accumulations. Accumulation of biogenic coalbed gas has received worldwide research and development interests on sustaining production. The new coal-to-biogenic coalbed gas technology centers on stimulating indigenous microbes in coal and associated groundwater with bioengineered nutrients and amendments to “farm” gas from abandoned wells and non-gas-producing coals. Coal mainly as a basic fuel for electric power generation since the Industrial Revolution continues to be utilized despite environmental concerns. The outlook of coal is dimmed in the United States where natural gas has replaced power generation. However, in Asia and Europe continued economic growth is going to be fueled by coal and coalbed gas as liquefied natural gas will rely on combustion from more efficient, high-temperature power plants in the future.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Gas lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book describes the fundamentals of gas lasers. It provides information and data on neutral gas lasers, ionized gas lasers, and molecular gas lasers. Concluding this volume is an extensive table of all gas laser wavelengths.

Weber, M.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Safety management in the Dutch oil and gas industry: the effect on the technological regime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the recent trend in Europe, from the formulation of detailed instructions and specifications with respect to the safety of industrial installations by governments, towards regulation on the level of safety management systems and risk analyses. The development sketched is studied with respect to the offshore oil and gas industry in the Netherlands. The government inspectorate responsible for this industry, the Staatstoezicht op de Mijnen (SodM), has, since the early 1990s, changed its approach from hardware-based inspections to inspection at the level of management systems. To assess the effects of this change in approach on industry practice the concept of ''technological regime'' is employed.

I.R. van de Poel; A.R. Hale; L.H.J. Goossens

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Production of Middle Caloric Fuel Gas from Coal by Dual-Bed Gasification Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work demonstrated the dual-bed gasification technology on a pilot plant (1000 tons of coal/a) mainly consisting of a fluidized-bed gasifier and a pneumatic combustor using the coal with a particle size of less than 20 mm. ... It can be seen in Table 1 that the mass fraction of the coal with sizes less than 2.0 mm was about 45 wt %. ... Coal was continuously fed in the gasifier, and meanwhile, air or gas mixture (air and steam) as the fluidizing medium and gasifying reagent was introduced from the bottom of the gasifier. ...

Yin Wang; Wen Dong; Li Dong; Junrong Yue; Shiqiu Gao; Toshiyuki Suda; Guangwen Xu

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing including fossil fuel use global warming and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end?users particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN?IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs HTR VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions January 3, 2012 - 9:42am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Happy New Year to all you Energy Savers out there! Now that 2012 calendars are up and we (hopefully) remember to use '12 instead of '11 where necessary (does anyone write checks anymore?), it's time to think about the New Year's resolutions we made and are (hopefully again) still keeping. For instance... if you've been putting off getting an energy assessment of your home, why wait? Now is a good time to find out if you have cracks, leaks or other places where heat is escaping; you can start making your home more energy efficient today. Have you put off replacing your traditional light bulbs with energy efficient ones? Well, check out our page on lighting and get started! There

238

New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Years Revolutions Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions January 3, 2012 - 9:42am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Happy New Year to all you Energy Savers out there! Now that 2012 calendars are up and we (hopefully) remember to use '12 instead of '11 where necessary (does anyone write checks anymore?), it's time to think about the New Year's resolutions we made and are (hopefully again) still keeping. For instance... if you've been putting off getting an energy assessment of your home, why wait? Now is a good time to find out if you have cracks, leaks or other places where heat is escaping; you can start making your home more energy efficient today. Have you put off replacing your traditional light bulbs with energy efficient ones? Well, check out our page on lighting and get started! There

239

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41330  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R19 R19 (April 2010 - September 2010) Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities Principal Author: John T. Balczewski Chevron Energy Technology Company 6001 Bollinger Canyon Road, CHVPKD San Ramon, CA 94583 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 2010 Office of Fossil Energy i DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

240

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's Board made a strategic decision to relocate the Headquarters (HQ) office from Washington, DC to Houston, Texas. Driving force behind relocation was to better connect with independent producers, but cost savings could also be realized. Relocation was accomplished in late December 2000, with the HQ office being fully operational by January 2001. Early indications are that the HQ relocation is, in fact, enabling better networking with senior executives of independents in the Houston oil community. New Board leadership, elected in March 2001, will continue to effectively guide PTTC.

Unknown

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy technology expert elicitations: An application to natural gas turbine efficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Expert elicitations are critical tools for characterizing technological uncertainty, since historical data on technical progress may not provide a sufficient basis for forecasting future advances. The objectives of this paper are to describe the protocol and results for an expert elicitation on the future performance of gas-turbine-based technologies in the electric power sector and to discuss how these insights relate to the current elicitation literature in energy modeling. Elicitation results suggest that prospective efficiency gains are likely to be slower than historical trends; however, the assessed values are still appreciably higher than the efficiencies used in many energy models. The results also indicate that conducting face-to-face elicitations may be important for minimizing overconfidence and for critically examining reported values, especially when assessing non-central probabilities in the tails of a distribution.

John E. Bistline

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

THE NUCLEAR ENERGY REVOLUTION—1966  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the coming generation. It is this...cheap nuclear power, about which...water nuclear power plant. At its...for a coal-fired power plant of the...Utilities Rochester Gas & Electric Consolidated...available for generation 76 per cent of...

Alvin M. Weinberg; Gale Young

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas the Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas The Performance of Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits during Co-Production with Conventional Gas (OTC 19435) Authors: George J. Moridis (speaker), Matthew T. Reagan, and Keni Zhang Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: Recent numerical studies have provided strong indications that it is possible to produce large volumes of gas from natural hydrate deposits at high rates (in excess of 10 MMSCFD) for long times by depressurization-induced dissociation of hydrates. Of the various factors that can adversely affect the production potential of hydrates, low temperatures have one of the strongest negative impacts. These can be caused by low initial temperatures, increasing stability of the hydrate (as defined by the deviation between the temperature of the deposit and the equilibrium temperature at the reservoir pressure), and by an advanced stage of dissociation (a strongly endothermic reaction) when substantial amounts of hydrates remain. The reasons for the production decline include a reduction in the rate of the hydrate dissociation at lower temperatures and the evolution of flow restrictions in the vicinity of the well caused by the formation of hydrate and/or ice in the vicinity of the wellbore. The latter is caused by continuous cooling, and is the reason why large amounts of gas that may have been released in the reservoir in the course of earlier dissociation cannot be easily recovered.

244

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

Kloosterman, Jeff

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Emerging technologies for the management and utilization of landfill gas. Final report, August 1994-August 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3), for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the utilization of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from LFG. The emerging technologies that are considered to be Tier 1 are: (1) phosphoric acid fuel cells, (2) processes for converting CH4 from LFG to compressed LFG for vehicle fuel or other fuel uses, and (3) use of LFG as a fuel source for leachate evaporation systems. The Tier 2 technologies covered in the report are: (1) operation of landfills as anaerobic bioreactors, (2) operation of landfills are aerobic bioreactors, (3) production of ethanol from LFG, (4) production of commercial CO2 from LFG, and (5) use of LFG to provide fuel for heat and CO2 enhancement in greenhouses. Tier 3 technologies, considered as potentially applicable for LFG. include Stirling and Organic Rankine Cycle engines.

Roe, S.; Reisman, J.; Strait, R.; Doorn, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE-Supported Technology Passes Scale-Up Test Converting CO DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

into Valuable Materials into Valuable Materials Publications News Release Release Date: June 17, 2013 DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Photo courtesy of Mikro Systems, Inc. Washington, D.C. - An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The technology - which is expected to contribute to cleaner, more reliable and affordable domestic energy production as well as creating new

247

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scheibel (1997) “Current Gas Turbine Developments and Futurefor Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines,” October 2000. Available onlineNext Evolution of the F Gas Turbine,” April 2001. Available

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fiber Optic Sensing Technology for Detecting Gas Hydrate Formation and Decomposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fiber optic-based distributed sensing system (DSS) has been integrated with a large volume (72 L) pressure vessel providing high spatial resolution, time resolved, 3-D measurement of hybrid temperature-strain (TS) values within experimental sediment gas hydrate systems. Areas of gas hydrate formation (exothermic) and decomposition (endothermic) can be characterized through this proxy by time series analysis of discrete data points collected along the length of optical fibers placed within a sediment system. Data is visualized as a 'movie' of TS values along the length of each fiber over time. Experiments conducted in the Seafloor Processing Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory show clear indications of hydrate formation and dissociation events at expected P-T conditions given the thermodynamics of the CH4-H2O system. The high spatial resolution achieved with fiber optic technology makes the DSS a useful tool for visualizing time resolved formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in large-scale sediment experiments.

Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Leeman, John R [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Alford, Jonathan E [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Madden, Megan Elwood [University of Oklahoma, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Oil and Gas Science and Technology, 2009, 64(5), 629-636, doi: 10.2516/ogst/2009042 DDDiiissscccuuussssssiiiooonnn ooofff aaagggggglllooommmeeerrraaatttiiiooonnn mmmeeeccchhhaaannniiisssmmmsss bbbeeetttwwweeeeeennn hhhyyydddrrraaattteee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas Science and Technology, 2009, 64(5), 629-636, doi: 10.2516/ogst/2009042 1. KKeeyywwoorrddss:: gas hydrate formation ; water/oil emulsions ; hydrate slurry ; agglomeration ; Population@emse.fr hal-00480033,version1-3May2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology 64, 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

250

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Products Industry Technology Roadmap. Agenda 2020 Technology2011. "The IEA CCS Technology Roadmap: One Year On". Energy1287- Reitzer, R. 2007. Technology Roadmap - Applications of

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

(M)other Russia: Evolution or Revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(M)other Russia: Evolution or Revolution Twenty Years since the Collapse of Communism An inter.music.sas.ac.uk ÂŁ25 (ÂŁ15 student) Keynote speakers: Sir Rodric Braithwaite (former UK Ambassador to Russia) Vladimir Ambassador to Russia: Russia Today Coffee 11:00 Irina Souch (University of Amsterdam): Double Thinking

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

252

GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN The green revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN The green revolution Green fluorescent protein allows gene expression a fluorescent product when expressed. Just such a molecule, green fluorescent protein (GFP), has recently green light when disturbed (often seen when riding in a boat at night). In Aequorea, the green

Stearns, Tim

253

StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

u' m .,. . Society of Petroleum Engineers u I SPE 49259 StarWars Laser Technology Applied to Drilling and Completing Gas Wells R.M. Graves, SPE, Colorado School of Mines; and D.G. O'Brien, PE, SPE, Solutions Engineering Copyr@ht 1998, Scdety of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prapared for presentation at the 1998 SPE Annual Technicar Conference and Exhibition bald in New Orteans, Lcuisiana, 27-30 September 1998, This paper waa selected for presentation by en SPE Program Commiftee folrowing review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(a). Contents of the paper, as prasented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The materiar, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the .%ciety of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers prasented at SPE meetings

254

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Gasification Technologies for Fuels, Chemicals andEnergy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. CO ? Solution01GO10621. Industrial Technologies Progarm (ITP). 2006e.

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distinguish between a solar technology installed to replaceone installed to the grid; solar technology installed at thetheir concentrator solar energy technology. In this section,

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Quantum dots in bio-imaging: Revolution by the small  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visual analysis of biomolecules is an integral avenue of basic and applied biological research. It has been widely carried out by tagging of nucleotides and proteins with traditional fluorophores that are limited in their application by features such as photobleaching, spectral overlaps, and operational difficulties. Quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a superior alternative and are poised to change the world of bio-imaging and further its applications in basic and applied biology. The interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology is experiencing a revolution and QDs as an enabling technology have become a harbinger of this hybrid field. Within a decade, research on QDs has evolved from being a pure science subject to the one with high-end commercial applications.

Arya, Harinder [Gene Function Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kaul, Zeenia [Gene Function Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wadhwa, Renu [Gene Function Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Taira, Kazunari [Gene Function Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Hirano, Takashi [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, 7 Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kaul, Sunil C. [Gene Function Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)]. E-mail: s-kaul@aist.go.jp

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions- Presentation by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), June 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO, and VOC Emissions, given by David Cygan of the Gas Technology Institute, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

258

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 1, Nos. 1/2, 2008 65 Copyright © 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. Building the foundation for Prudhoe Bay oil production optimisation using neural networks E-mail: siskd@Bp.com Abstract: Field data from the Prudhoe Bay oil field in Alaska was used

Mohaghegh, Shahab

259

2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2009 Copyright © 2009 Inderscience@yahoo.com Hafez Hafez ADCO-PDD, Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operation (ADCO), P.O. Box 270, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Email

Mohaghegh, Shahab

260

High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

Horner, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis, are being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and ring-design concepts have been explored, and engine experiments have been done on a full-scale Waukesha VGF F18 in-line 6 cylinder power generation engine rated at 370 kW at 1800 rpm. Current accomplishments include designing and testing ring-packs using a subtle top-compression-ring profile (skewed barrel design), lowering the tension of the oil-control ring, employing a negative twist to the scraper ring to control oil consumption. Initial test data indicate that piston ring-pack friction was reduced by 35% by lowering the oil-control ring tension alone, which corresponds to a 1.5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Although small in magnitude, this improvement represents a first step towards anticipated aggregate improvements from other strategies. Other ring-pack design strategies to lower friction have been identified, including reduced axial distance between the top two rings, tilted top-ring groove. Some of these configurations have been tested and some await further evaluation. Colorado State University performed the tests and Waukesha Engine Dresser, Inc. provided technical support. Key elements of the continuing work include optimizing the engine piston design, application of surface and material developments in conjunction with improved lubricant properties, system modeling and analysis, and continued technology demonstration in an actual full-sized reciprocating natural-gas engine.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley; Jeffrey Jocsak

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Existing and anticipated technology strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Korea’s petrochemical and steel industries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the existing and anticipated technology strategies for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Korea’s petrochemical and steel industries. The results of the cluster analysis identify three types of technology strategies employed by firms for reducing GHG emissions: “wait-and-see” “in-process-focused”, and “all-round” strategies. The “in-process-focused” strategy was the most widely used strategy, followed by the “all-round” strategy. However, firms in these industries are expected to change their technology strategies to “treatment-reliance”, “inbound-substitution”, and “all-round” strategies in 5–10 years by employing a wider range of technology options to respond more effectively to the issue of GHG emissions. The demand for new energy sources and raw material substitutes is expected to strengthen in the near future as related technologies advance rapidly and become more widely available.

Su-Yol Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Advances of flue gas desulfurization technology for coal-fired boilers and strategies for sulfur dioxide pollution prevention in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is one of the most important kinds of energy resources at the present time and in the immediate future in China. Sulfur dioxide resulting from combustion of coal is one of the principle pollutants in the air. Control of SO{sub 2} discharge is still a major challenge for environmental protection in developing China. In this paper, research, development and application of technology of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired boilers in China will be reviewed with emphasis on cost-effective technology, and the development trends of FGD technology, as well as the strategy for SO{sub 2} discharge control in China, will be analyzed. A practical technology for middle-small-sized boilers developed by the primary author and the field investigation results will also be presented. At present, there are four major kinds of FGD technologies that are practical to be applied in China for their cost-effectiveness and efficiency to middle-small-sized boilers. An important development trend of the FGD technology for middle-small-sized boilers for the next decade is improvement of the existing cost-effective wet-type FGD technology, and in the future it will be the development of dry-type FGD technology. For middle-sized generating boilers, the development direction of the FGD technology is the spraying and drying process. For large-sized generating boilers, the wet-type limestone-plaster process will still be applied in the immediate future, and dry-type FGD technologies, such as ammonia with electron beam irradiation, will be developed in the future. State strategies for the control of SO{sub 2} discharge will involve the development and popularization of efficient coal-fired devices, extension of gas coal and liquefied coal, spreading coal washing, and centralized heating systems.

Yang, C.; Zeng, G.; Li, G.; Qiu, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Flirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesus Revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of God. Studying gender ethics within the JM will helpFlirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesus Revolution byof free love, gender ethics and evangelical Christianity

Johnson, Julianne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Independent Validation and Verification of Process Design and Optimization Technology Diagnostic and Control of Natural Gas Fired Furnaces via Flame Image Analysis Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program has invested in emerging Process Design and Optimizations Technologies (PDOT) to encourage the development of new initiatives that might result in energy savings in industrial processes. Gas fired furnaces present a harsh environment, often making accurate determination of correct air/fuel ratios a challenge. Operation with the correct air/fuel ratio and especially with balanced burners in multi-burner combustion equipment can result in improved system efficiency, yielding lower operating costs and reduced emissions. Flame Image Analysis offers a way to improve individual burner performance by identifying and correcting fuel-rich burners. The anticipated benefit of this technology is improved furnace thermal efficiency, and lower NOx emissions. Independent validation and verification (V&V) testing of the FIA technology was performed at Missouri Forge, Inc., in Doniphan, Missouri by Environ International Corporation (V&V contractor) and Enterprise Energy and Research (EE&R), the developer of the technology. The test site was selected by the technology developer and accepted by Environ after a meeting held at Missouri Forge. As stated in the solicitation for the V&V contractor, 'The objective of this activity is to provide independent verification and validation of the performance of this new technology when demonstrated in industrial applications. A primary goal for the V&V process will be to independently evaluate if this technology, when demonstrated in an industrial application, can be utilized to save a significant amount of the operating energy cost. The Seller will also independently evaluate the other benefits of the demonstrated technology that were previously identified by the developer, including those related to product quality, productivity, environmental impact, etc'. A test plan was provided by the technology developer and is included as an appendix to the summary report submitted by Environ (Appendix A). That plan required the V&V contractor to: (1) Establish the as-found furnace operating conditions; (2) Tune the furnace using currently available technology to establish baseline conditions; (3) Tune the furnace using the FIA technology; and (4) Document the improved performance that resulted from application of the FIA technology. It is important to note that the testing was not designed to be a competition or comparison between two different methodologies that could be used for furnace tuning. Rather, the intent was to quantify improvements in furnace performance that could not be achieved with existing technology. Therefore, the measure of success is improvement beyond the furnace efficiency obtainable using existing furnace optimization methods rather than improvement from the as found condition.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The programs focus on hot-gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match or nearly match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents which can reduce the sulfur in coal gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. This report summarizes the highlights and accomplishments of the October slipstream test run of the Zinc Titanate Fluid Bed Desulfurization/Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (ZTFBD/DSRP) Mobile Laboratory at the Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Although the run had to be shortened due to mechanical problems with METC`s gasifier, there was sufficient on-stream time to demonstrate highly successful operation of both the zinc titanate fluid bed desulfurization and the DSRP with actual coal gas.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Recovery of gas from hydrate deposits using conventional production technology. [Salt-frac technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane hydrate gas could be a sizeable energy resource if methods can be devised to produce this gas economically. This paper examines two methods of producing gas from hydrate deposits by the injection of hot water or steam, and also examines the feasibility of hydraulic fracturing and pressure reduction as a hydrate gas production technique. A hydraulic fracturing technique suitable for hydrate reservoirs is also described.

McGuire, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of greenhouse gas (N 2 O and CO...Greenhouse gas emissions from...prospect of coal-fired power generation energy-saving...m-3 natural gas, and 0.08...electricity generation using coal, hydro, and nuclear power in China and...

Wei-feng Zhang; Zheng-xia Dou; Pan He; Xiao-Tang Ju; David Powlson; Dave Chadwick; David Norse; Yue-Lai Lu; Ying Zhang; Liang Wu; Xin-Ping Chen; Kenneth G. Cassman; Fu-Suo Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The shale revolution: Global gas and oil markets under transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental concerns have also been raised about the unsustainable use of freshwater and contamination of aquifers during the fracking process. However, advances have been made...2012). Also, advances in well d...

Roberto F. Aguilera; Marian Radetzki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

INAL Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0010175  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INAL INAL Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0010175 Quarterly Research Performance Progress Report (Period ending 06/30/2013) PLANNING OF A MARINE METHANE HYDRATE PRESSURE CORING PROGRAM FOR THE WALKER RIDGE AND GREEN CANYON AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Project Period (10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 (suggested 30 March 2014)) Submitted by: Gary D. Humphrey, Project PI Signature Fugro GeoConsulting, Inc DUNS #: 118972301 6100 Hillcroft Houston, TX 77081-1009 e-mail: GHumphrey@Fugro.com Phone number: (713) 369-5600 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Submission Date: July 31, 2013 Executive Summary This research effort will focus on developing a site characterization program for naturally occurring gas

272

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of Brazing Technology for Use in High- Temperature Gas Separation Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen separators, fuel gas reformers, solid oxide fuel cells, and chemical sensors is part of a rapidly expanding segment of the solid state technology market. These devices employ an ionic conducting ceramic as the active membrane that establishes the electrochemical potential of the device, either under voltage (i.e. to carry out gas separation) or under chemical gradient (to develop an electrical potential and thereby generate electrical power). Because the device operates under an ionic gradient that develops across the electrolyte, hermiticity across this layer is paramount. That is, not only must this thin ceramic membrane be dense with no interconnected porosity, but it must be connected to the rest of the device, typically constructed from a heat resistant alloy, with a high-temperature, gas-tight seal. A significant engineering challenge in fabricating these devices is how to effectively join the thin electrochemically active membrane to the metallic body of the device such that the resulting seal is hermetic, rugged, and stable during continuous high temperature operation. Active metal brazing is the typical method of joining ceramic and metal engineering components. It employs a braze alloy that contains one or more reactive elements, often titanium, which will chemically reduce the ceramic faying surface and greatly improve its wetting behavior and adherence with the braze. However, recent studies of these brazes for potential use in fabricating high-temperature electrochemical devices revealed problems with interfacial oxidation and subsequent joint failure [1,2]. Specifically, it was found that the introduction of the ceramic electrolyte and/or heat resistant metal substrate dramatically affects the inherent oxidation behavior of the braze, often in a deleterious manner. These conclusions pointed to the need for an oxidation resistant, high-temperature ceramic-to-metal braze and consequently lead to the development of the novel reactive air brazing (RAB) concept. The goal in RAB is to reactively modify one or both oxide faying surfaces with an oxide compound dissolved in a molten noble metal alloy such that the newly formed surface is readily wetted by the remaining liquid filler material. In many respects, this concept is similar to active metal brazing, except that joining can be conducted in air and the final joint will be resistant to oxidation at high temperature. Potentially, there are a number of metal oxide-noble metal systems that can be considered for RAB, including Ag-CuO, Ag-V2O5, and Pt-Nb2O5. Our current interest is in determining whether the Ag-CuO system is suitable for air brazing functional ceramic-to-metal joints such as those needed in practical electrochemical devices. In a series of studies, the wetting behavior of the Ag-CuO braze was investigated with respect to a number of potential hydrogen separation, oxygen separation, and fuel cell electrolyte membrane materials and heat resistant metal systems, including: alumina, (La0.6Sr0.4)(Co0.2Fe0.8)O3, (La0.8Sr0.2)FeO3, YSZ, fecralloy, and Crofer-22APU. Selected findings from these studies as well as from our work on joint strength and durability during high-temperature exposure testing will be discussed.

Weil, K.S.; Hardy, J.S.; Kim, J.Y.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Published: 23 June 2011 Another Revolution Afoot in Egypt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Published: 23 June 2011 Another Revolution Afoot in Egypt: Top-Notch Science Egypt has launched way to cure fanaticism. Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail Cairo -- Nearly 100 days after the revolution, Egypt say hawa gadid -- a new air. The big question is how to channel this energy to forge a new Egypt

Zewail, Ahmed

275

IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development Andrei Kirilyuk be used as a basis for the latter, in the form of "complexity revolution" in information systems-driven IT to various aspects of post-industrial civilisation dynamics, including intelligent communication, context

Boyer, Edmond

276

Reactor User Interface Technology Development Roadmaps for a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Outlet Temperature of 750 degrees C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the technology readiness of the interface components that are required to transfer high-temperature heat from a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) to selected industrial applications. This report assumes that the HTGR operates at a reactor outlet temperature of 750°C and provides electricity and/or process heat at 700°C to conventional process applications, including the production of hydrogen.

Ian Mckirdy

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - american revolution Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: american revolution Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 J. Franklin Jameson Written when political Summary: . Franklin Jameson's The American Revolution Con- sidered as a Social Move-...

278

niscent of the early stages of the industrial revolution, when inefficient factories pollut-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

niscent of the early stages of the industrial revolution, when inefficient factories pollut- ed environment.However,agreenerrevolution is also needed -- a revolution that incorpo- rates accumulated

Wolfe, Cecily J.

279

Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, 1 December 1979-29 February 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The component technology base required for improved industrial gas turbine conversion efficiency is discussed. Specific goals are to demonstrate the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling technologies required to achieve industrial gas turbine efficiencies of 34 to 36% simple cycle and 45 to 48% in combined cycle operation while reducing the number of compressor and turbine parts 80% over state-of-the-art units. The approach involves combining some of the most advanced aircraft turbine cooling and high-pressure compressor technology with the simplicity and ruggedness required of industrial engines to achieve not only improved performance, but also increased durability and low initial cost. The program currently consists of two phases. Phase I, which has been completed, included the conceptual definition of an industrial gas turbine capable of meeting the above goals and the aerothermodynamic designs of compressor and turbine component test rigs. Phase II, which is in progress, consists of component validation testing of the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling designs which evolved in Phase I. During this quarter, work continued on Phase II, Task III - Compressor Rig Assembly and Test. Assembly of the compressor rig has been completed and final preparation of the rig for transporting to the test facility is in progress.

none,

1980-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

280

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency with regard to carbon capture". Energy 31 (15):67 3.6. Emerging Carbon Capture Technologies for the Pulp2011. Technology Roadmaps: Carbon Capture and Storage in

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification with combined cycles biological oxygen demandsintegrated gasification combined cycle Intergovernmentalbe integrated with combined-cycle (CC) technology (BLGCC),

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

LEADERSHIP AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION: "THE GREAT POTENTIALS AND NEEDS ARE NOT FOR TOMORROW, BUT FOR YESTERDAY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

revolution in the 21st century in many areas, the way steam power or electricity made industrial revolution are in the beginning of the information revolution, it is hard to comprehend that new technology will make another global changes and challenges, which are occurring in every-day life, industry and services mainly due

Kostic, Milivoje M.

283

Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

that are here today: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic (PV) modules, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and electric vehicles (EVs). That study showed how dramatic...

284

Honeywell UOP technology is used to clean natural gas on FPSO vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modec Inc, which supplies offshore production systems to the oil and gas industry, has commissioned a Separex membrane system from UOP Llc, a Honeywell company that is based in Des Plaines, Illinois, USA, for processing natural gas on board a new floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Pennsylvania Partnership for Promoting Natural Gas Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

286

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SolFocus panels. By concentrating solar energy 500 times,solar energy technology. In this section, GROI U SA SolFocus panels

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Experimental Research on Low-Temperature Methane Steam Reforming Technology in a Chemically Recuperated Gas Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under the operating parameters of a chemically recuperated gas turbine (CRGT), the low-temperature methane steam reforming test bench is designed and built; systematic experimental studies about fuel steam reforming are conducted. Four different reforming ...

Qian Liu; Hongtao Zheng

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Demonstration of Natural Gas Engine Driven Air Compressor Technology at Department of Defense Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are offset by differences in prevailing utility rates, efficiencies of partial load operation, reductions in peak demand, heat recovery, and avoiding the cost of back-up generators. Natural gas, a clean-burning fuel, is abundant and readily available...

Lin, M.; Aylor, S. W.; Van Ormer, H.

289

To appear in Proceedings of the 7 International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-efficient vehicles. Introduction Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology offers the least costly,2]. But because cost-competitive H2 end-use technologies such as fuel cell vehicles will not be widely available engine vehicles, which are more energy efficient than spark-ignition engine vehicles. Compression

290

Technology Cooperation Agreement Pilot Project development-friendly greenhouse gas reduction, May 1999 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technology Cooperation Agreement Pilot Project (TCAPP) was launched by several U.S. Government agencies (USAID, EPA and DOE) in August 1997 to establish a model for climate change technology cooperation with developing and transition countries. TCAPP is currently facilitating voluntary partnerships between the governments of Brazil, China, Kazakhstan, Korea, Mexico, and the Philippines, the private sector, and the donor community on a common set of actions that will advance implementation of clean energy technologies. The six participating countries have been actively engaged in shaping this initiative along with international donors and the private sector. This program helps fulfill the US obligation to support technology transfer to developing countries under Article 4.5 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. TCAPP also provides a mechanism to focus resources across international donor programs on the technology cooperation needs of developing and transition countries.

Benioff, R.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Implications of the U.S. Shale Revolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Implications of the U.S. Shale Revolution For US-Canada Energy Summit October 17, 2014 | Chicago, IL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration 0 5 10...

292

Nanosciences : evolution or revolution ? Jean-Louis Pautrat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nanosciences : evolution or revolution ? Jean-Louis Pautrat Physicist, former Director of Foundation "Nanosciences aux limites de la nanoélectronique" 23 rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

293

21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution, Fall 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, ...

Ravel, Jeffrey S.

294

A new technology for producing hydrogen and adjustable ratio syngas from coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 15 billion Nm{sup 3} coke oven gas (COG) is emitted into the air in Shanxi Province in China as air pollutants. It is also a waste of precious chemical resources. In this study, COG was purified respectively by four methods including refrigeration, fiberglass, silica gel, and molecular sieve. Purified COG was separated by a prism membrane into two gas products. One consists mainly of H{sub 2} ({gt}90 vol %) and the other is rich in CH{sub 4} ({gt}60 vol %) with their exact compositions to vary with the membrane separation pressure and outlet gas flow ratio. The gas rich in CH{sub 4} was partially oxidized with oxygen in a high-temperature fixed-bed quartz reactor charged with coke particles of 10 mm size. At 1200-1300{sup o}C, a CH{sub 4} conversion of {gt}99% could be obtained. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the synthesis product gas can be adjusted in the range 0.3-1.4, very favorable for further C1 synthesis. 10 refs., 17 figs., 1t ab.

Jun Shen; Zhi-zhong Wang; Huai-wang Yang; Run-sheng Yao [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Interdependency of electricity and natural gas markets in the United States : a dynamic computational model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to high storage costs and limited storage availability, natural gas is generally used as a just-in- time resource that needs to be delivered as it is consumed. With the shale gas revolution, coal retirements and ...

Jenkins, Sandra Elizabeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required.

297

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and decarbonized energy supply alone are...dominant form of energy supply, posing...This transformation demands technologies that are...components of an energy transition. California...emitter of GHGs. Its per capita GDP and GHG emissions are...

James H. Williams; Andrew DeBenedictis; Rebecca Ghanadan; Amber Mahone; Jack Moore; William R. Morrow III; Snuller Price; Margaret S. Torn

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Developments of cast superalloys and technology for gas turbine blades in BIAM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1960's many important subjects relating to cast turbine blades including alloy developments, directional solidification (DS) and single crystal (SC) technique and casting technology for blades have been ...

R. Z. Chen

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Inorganic membranes: The new industrial revolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation systems are a vital part of most industrial processes. These systems account for a large fraction of the capital equipment used and the operating costs of industrial processes. Inorganic membranes have the potential for providing separation systems that can significantly reduce both the capital equipment and operating costs. These separation processes include waste management and recycle as well as the primary production of raw materials and products. The authors are rapidly learning to understand the effect of physical and chemical properties on the different transport mechanisms that occur in inorganic membranes. Such understanding can be expected to provide the information needed to design, engineer and manufacture inorganic membranes to produce very high separation factors for almost any separation function. To implement such a revolution, the authors need to organize a unique partnership between the national laboratories, and industry. The university can provide research to understand the materials and transport mechanisms that produce various separations, the national laboratories the development of an economical fabrication and manufacturing capability, and industry the practical understanding of the operational problems required to achieve inplementation.

Fain, D.E. [Martin Merietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Low  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf of Mexico Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf of Mexico Low Temperature X-ray Diffraction Study of Natural Gas Hydrate Samples from the Gulf of Mexico Authors: C.J. Rawn, R. Sassen, S.M. Ulrich, E.A. Payzant, B.C. Chakoumakos, and T.J. Phelps Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates, Fairmont Hotel, Vancouver, Canada July 6-10, 2008. http://www.icgh.org/ [external site]. Abstract: Clathrate hydrates of methane and other small alkanes occur widespread as terrestrial components in marine sediments of the continental margins and in permafrost sediments of the arctic. Quantitative study of natural clathrate hydrates is hampered by the difficulty in obtaining pristine samples, particularly from submarine environments. Bringing samples of clathrate hydrate from the seafloor at depths without compromising their integrity is not trivial. Most physical property measurements are based on studies of laboratory-synthesized samples. Here we report x-ray powder diffraction measurements of a natural gas hydrate sample from the Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The first data were collected in 2002 and revealed ice and structure II gas hydrate. In the subsequent time the sample has been stored in liquid nitrogen. Recently new x-ray powder diffraction data have been collected as a function of temperature. Rietveld refinements on this new data show that there is approximately 50 wt % gas hydrate with structure type II and 50% ice at -140, -130, -115, -100, and -85oC. The Rietveld refinements on the data sets collected at -70 and -55oC show the amount of structure type II hydrate decreasing to approximately 40% and 37%, respectively. The Rietveld refinement of the data set collected at -40oC shows a sharp decrease in the amount of structure type II hydrate to approximately 9%. Rietveld refinements on the data sets collected at -25 and -10oC indicated that the structure type II hydrate is still present at 7 and 3%, respectively

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Improvement of LNG production technology in gas-distribution stations with an increased content of carbon dioxide in supply-line gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility is considered of reducing the weight of absorbent in a carbon dioxide gas cleaning system during liquefied natural gas production in gas-distribution stations (due to use of a pressure drop ... is...

S. P. Gorbachev; S. V. Lyugai

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A review of "Radicalism in British Literary Culture: From Revolution to Revolution." by T. Morton and N. Smith, eds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be strangled in the bowels of the last priest,? Justin Champion sees the aftermath of the English Revolution, and espe- cially of the Toleration Act of 1689, as triggering a long-term heterodoxy in public discourse about religion and politics... be strangled in the bowels of the last priest,? Justin Champion sees the aftermath of the English Revolution, and espe- cially of the Toleration Act of 1689, as triggering a long-term heterodoxy in public discourse about religion and politics...

R. C. Taylor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

Liebowitz, B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Quarterly technical report No. 8, [January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first quarter of 1994, we continued work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. We also began work on Task 7. In Task 2, we incorporated 4.5% O{sub 2} into our simulated flue gas stream during this quarter`s NO{sub x}-absorption experiments. We also ran experiments using Cobalt (II)-phthalocyanine as an absorbing agent We observed higher absorption capacities when using this solution with the simulated flue gas containing O{sub 2}. In Task 3, we synthesized a few EDTA polymer analogs. We also began scaled up synthesis of Co(II)-phthalocyanine for use in Task 5. In Task 4, we performed experiments for measuring distribution coefficients (m{sub i}) Of SO{sub 2} between aqueous and organic phases. This was done using the liquor regenerating apparatus described in Task 6. In Task 5, we began working with Co(II)-phthalocyanine in the 301 fiber hollow fiber contactor. We also calculated mass transfer coefficients (K{sub olm}) for these runs, and we observed that the gas side resistance dominates mass transfer. In Task 6, in the liquor regeneration apparatus, we observed 90% recovery of SO{sub 2} by DMA from water used as the scrubbing solution. We also calculated the distribution of coefficients (m{sub i}). In Task 7, we established and began implementing a methodology for completing this task.

Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Ventura, S. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumick, D. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States)] [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Pore  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pore scale mechanistic study of the preferential mode of hydrate formation in sediments Pore scale mechanistic study of the preferential mode of hydrate formation in sediments Pore scale mechanistic study of the preferential mode of hydrate formation in sediments: Coupling of fluid flow and sediment mechanics Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: International Conference on Gas Hydrates, Vancouver, Canada, July 7-10, 2008. ( http://www.icgh.org [external site] ) Abstract: Methane hydrates in ocean sediments range from essentially static accumulations of hydrate and brine, to active cold seeps where hydrate and a methane gas phase co-exist in the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). In this and a companion paper (Behseresht, Prodanovic and Bryant) methods are described to test the following hypothesis: the coupling between drainage and fracturing (both induced by pore pressure) determines whether methane gas entering the HSZ is converted completely to hydrate. H A discrete element method (DEM) is presented to model the strong coupling that takes place between the pore fluids and the mechanical behavior of the sediment.

306

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economic comparison of IGCC power plants with cold gas cleanup and hot gas cleanup units using Indian coals.

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

TECHNOLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluidized Carbonization of Lignite Produces Cheap Fuel ... Developed by the Bureau of Mines, this process can utilize the reserves of lignite and subbituminous coal in that area to produce industrial fuel that will compete with natural gas at prevailing prices. ...

1953-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Technolog  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

310

Dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engines: Technology, performance, and emissions. Topical report, February 1993-November 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of current dual-fuel natural gas/diesel engine design, performance, and emissions was conducted. The most pressing technological problems associated with dual-fuel engine use were identified along with potential solutions. It was concluded that dual-fuel engines can achieve low NOx and particulate emissions while retaining fuel-efficiency and BMEP levels comparable to those of diesel engines. The investigation also examined the potential economic impact of dual-fuel engines in diesel-electric locomotives, marine vessels, farm equipment, construction, mining, and industrial equipment, and stand-alone electricity generation systems. Recommendations for further additional funding to support research, development, and demonstration in these applications were then presented.

Turner, S.H.; Weaver, C.S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy & the Industrial Revolution: Past, Present & Future | Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy & the Industrial Revolution: Past, Present & Future Energy & the Industrial Revolution: Past, Present & Future Event Sponsor: Director's Special Colloquium Start Date: Nov 22 2013 - 10:00am Building/Room: Building 402/Auditorium Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Arun Majumdar Speaker(s) Title: Google As we work to develop clean, sustainable and innovative approaches to our nation's greatest energy challenges, Argonne researchers are constantly seeking new insights into the future of the global energy economy. The laboratory is pleased to welcome Director's Special Colloquium speaker Arun Majumdar, who will give a presentation on "Energy & the Industrial Revolution: Past, Present & Future." Dr. Majumdar, a recognized leader in energy innovation, drives energy initiatives at Google.org (the company's charitable arm) and advises the

312

Research on Application of Steering Drilling Technologies in Shale Gas Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract HF-1 well of Pengye is a sidetracking horizontal well for shale gas development, the directional segment of the well is long, high requirements for well trajectory control of the directional segment in construction process. In allusion to the features and challenges of this well drilling, this paper introduces the application of slide steering drilling system and rotary steerable drilling system in this well, including analyzing all these tool basic principle, the characteristics and field application. The analysis shows that using different angel screw drill tool can meet the needs of increasing hole angle, steadying hole angle and adjusting the orientation; Adoption of EZ-Pilot steerable rotary system solves the problem of remarkable resistance and low degree of hole cleanness in long horizontal section, and satisfies the requirement of drilling and completion of the well. The system also shows the desirable performance in improving ROP and hole quality.

Guang Xinjun; Li Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

US democracy assistance programs in Ukraine after the Orange Revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The 2004 Orange Revolution failed to skyrocket Ukraine into the ranks of consolidated democracies. Some previous research claimed that, in the similar case of post-Rose Revolution Georgia, its vague democratic perspectives can be explained by, among others, a negative impact of politically biased US democracy assistance programs. This article examines five groups of US programs (electoral aid, political party development, legislative strengthening, NGO development and media strengthening) implemented in Ukraine in 2005–2010, and concludes that US diplomatic support for the pro-Western “Orange” leadership did not translate into political bias of US-funded democracy assistance programs.

Povilas Žielys; R?ta Rudinskait?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Revolutions in energy through modeling and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and application of energy technologies for all aspects from generation to storage have improved dramatically with the advent of advanced computational tools, particularly modeling and simulation. Modeling and simulation are not new to energy technology development, and have been used extensively ever since the first commercial computers were available. However, recent advances in computing power and access have broadened the extent and use, and, through increased fidelity (i.e., accuracy) of the models due to greatly enhanced computing power, the increased reliance on modeling and simulation has shifted the balance point between modeling and experimentation. The complex nature of energy technologies has motivated researchers to use these tools to understand better performance, reliability and cost issues related to energy. The tools originated in sciences such as the strength of materials (nuclear reactor containment vessels); physics, heat transfer and fluid flow (oil production); chemistry, physics, and electronics (photovoltaics); and geosciences and fluid flow (oil exploration and reservoir storage). Other tools include mathematics, such as statistics, for assessing project risks. This paper describes a few advancements made possible by these tools and explores the benefits and costs of their use, particularly as they relate to the acceleration of energy technology development. The computational complexity ranges from basic spreadsheets to complex numerical simulations using hardware ranging from personal computers (PCs) to Cray computers. In all cases, the benefits of using modeling and simulation relate to lower risks, accelerated technology development, or lower cost projects.

Tatro, M.; Woodard, J.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FE0001243 FE0001243 Topical Report DEVELOPMENT OF CFD-BASED SIMULATION TOOLS FOR IN SITU THERMAL PROCESSING OF OIL SHALE/SANDS Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February 2012 Office of Fossil Energy TOPICAL REPORT: DEVELOPMENT OF CFD_BASED SIMULATION TOOLS FOR IN SITU THERMAL PROCESSING OF OIL SHALE/SANDS Authors: Michal Hradisky and Philip J. Smith DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Reporting Period: October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2011 Report Issued: February 2012 Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380

316

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT15458  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NT15458 NT15458 Final Report Improvement of Carbon Dioxide Sweep Efficiency by Utilization of Microbial Permeability Profile Modification to Reduce the Amount of Oil Bypassed During Carbon Dioxide Flood Submitted by: Darrel Schmitz, Lewis R. Brown, F. Leo Lynch (posthumous), Brenda L. Kirkland, Krystal M. Collins, and William K. Funderburk Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Geosciences Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS 39762 Denbury Resources, Inc. 5320 Legacy Drive Plano, TX 75024 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of

317

The Communications Revolution and Health Inequalities in the 21st Century: Implications for Cancer Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Revolution and Health Inequalities in the 21st Century: Implications for Cancer Control...inequalities and public health implications of adult social...revolution and health inequalities in the 21st century: implications for cancer control...

K. Viswanath; Rebekah H. Nagler; Cabral A. Bigman-Galimore; Michael P. McCauley; Minsoo Jung; and Shoba Ramanadhan

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documented Example of Gas Hydrate Saturated Sand in the Gulfthe behavior of gas hydrate bearing sand reservoirs can beof highly-saturated gas-hydrate bearing sand in the Gulf of

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the conventional gas reserve of 1.5x10 14 m 3 ofconventional oil and gas reserves, the assessment of theconventional fossil fuel reserves, gas hydrates are emerging

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. A detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and concepts have been explored, and engine experiments will validate these concepts. An iterative process of experimentation, simulation and analysis, will be followed with the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. As planned, MIT has developed guidelines for an initial set of low-friction piston-ring-pack designs. Current recommendations focus on subtle top-piston-ring and oil-control-ring characteristics. A full-scale Waukesha F18 engine has been installed at Colorado State University and testing of the baseline configuration is in progress. Components for the first design iteration are being procured. Subsequent work includes examining the friction and engine performance data and extending the analyses to other areas to evaluate opportunities for further friction improvement and the impact on oil consumption/emission and wear, towards demonstrating an optimized reduced-friction engine system.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

322

IT Revolutions in the Industry: From the Command Economy to the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT ­ Revolutions in the Industry: From the Command Economy to the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem of the traditional hierarchy ­ as backbone of last Century's Industrial Revolution - towards the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem ­ as backbone for this Century's on-going IT-Revolution. Socio-cultural and economic

Ulieru, Mihaela

323

Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization and establish a plausible link between consumption structure evolutions and industrial revolutions. In particular, we show that an industrial revolution starts with a "smithian growth process", which is demand

Boyer, Edmond

324

Published: 14 October 2013 The Revolution Egypt Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Published: 14 October 2013 The Revolution Egypt Needs Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail Pasadena, California -- When I was a boy in Desuq, Egypt, a city on the Rosetta branch of the Nile, about 50 miles east was in the fabric of our culture and religion. I left Egypt in 1969 for graduate school at the University

Zewail, Ahmed

325

Henry Cavendish: the catalyst for the chemical revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Society 1. The article was originally dedicated to Glenn T. Seaborg (1912-1999) and concentrates particularly on Cavendish's...that was carried out during and after World War II by Glenn Seaborg and others. The revolution in chemical science brought...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The development of coke smelting and the industrial revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abraham Darby and the origins of the industrial revolution in Britain. Alan Macfarlane talks to John about the reasons for the area near Birmingham becoming the epi-centre of the industrial development, and the development of coke furnaces and iron...

Macfarlane, Alan

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

327

Adult Football Helmet Detailed Ratings Riddell Revolution Speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adult Football Helmet Detailed Ratings May 2011 Riddell Revolution Speed Helmet ID SPEED1 SPEED2: A total of 10 adult football helmet models were evaluated using the STAR evaluation system for May 2011.397 0.350 0.322 Overall STAR 0.356 Very Good: Adult Football Helmet Detailed Ratings May 2011 #12

Lu, Chang

328

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

329

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology program: Evaluation of gas reburning and low-NO sub x burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly describes the Gas Reburning and Low-NO{sub x} Burners technology which is a low-cost technology that can be applied in both retrofit and new applications. This demonstration will be conducted on a utility boiler in Colorado at Cherokee Station {number sign}3; however, the technology is applicable to industrial boilers and other combustion systems. Although this technology is primarily a NO{sub x} reduction technology, some reductions in other emissions will take place. Since 15--20% of the coal is replaced with natural gas, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions are reduced commensurately. Also the lower carbon-to-hydrogen ratio of natural gas compared to coal reduces CO{sub 2} emissions. The formation of NO{sub x} is controlled by several factors: (1) the amount of nitrogen that is chemically bound in the fuel; (2) the flame temperature; (3) the residence time that combustion products remain at very high temperatures; and (4) the amount of excess oxygen available, especially at the hottest parts of the flame. Decreasing any of these parameters, tends to reduce NO{sub x} formation. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

CHP -- A revolution in the making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liberalization, globalization, and particularly climate change are changing energy thinking. In the future, climate change will be tackled by improved energy efficiency and carbon neutral sources of energy, but much more could be done today by the more widespread use of CHP. CHP has made reasonably good progress in the UK and Europe, due to energy industry liberalization and the widespread availability of gas. But the pursuit of sustainability objectives requires government intervention into liberalized markets. While the current UK Government is a strong supporter of CHP, major opportunities to develop CHP were missed in favor of less efficient CCGT power stations over the last decade. The two critical policy issues in the UK now are the proposed tax on the business use of energy and the current reform of electricity trading arrangements. Both could impact favorably on the development of CHP. The UK CHP Association, COGEN Europe and the International Cogeneration Alliance continue to press the case for CHP.

Green, D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Current status of MHI CO2 capture plant technology, large scale demonstration project and road map to commercialization for coal fired flue gas application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) It is becoming increasingly evident that the prolonged utilization of fossil fuels for primary energy production, especially coal which is relatively cheap and abundant, is inevitable and that Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology can significantly reduce CO2 emissions from this sector thus allowing the continued environmentally sustainable use of this important energy commodity on a global basis. (2) MHI has co-developed the Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process (KM-CDR Process™) and KS-1™ absorbent, which has been deployed in seven CO2 capture plants, now under commercial operation operating at a CO2 capture capacity of 450 metric tons per day (tpd). In addition, a further two commercial plants are now under construction all of which capture CO2 from natural gas fired flue gas boilers and steam reformers. Accordingly this technology is now available for commercial scale CO2 capture for gas boiler and gas turbine application. (3) However before offering commercial CO2 capture plants for coal fired flue gas application, it is necessary to verify the influence of, and develop countermeasures for, related impurities contained in coal fired flue gas. This includes the influence on both the absorbent and the entire system of the CO2 capture plant to achieve high operational reliability and minimize maintenance requirements. (4) Preventing the accumulation of impurities, especially the build up of dust, is very important when treating coal fired flue gas and MHI has undertaken significant work to understand the impact of impurities in order to achieve reliable and stable operating conditions and to efficiently optimize integration between the CO2 capture plant, the coal fired power plant and the flue gas clean up equipment. (5) To achieve this purpose, MHI constructed a 10 tpd CO2 capture demonstration plant at the Matsushima 1000 MW Power Station and confirmed successful, long term demonstration following ?5000 hours of operation in 2006–07 with 50% financial support by RITE, as a joint program to promote technological development with the private sector, and cooperation from J-POWER. (6) Following successful demonstration testing at Matsushima, additional testing was undertaken in 2008 to examine the impact of entrainment of higher levels of flue gas impurities (primarily \\{SOx\\} and dust by bypassing the existing FGD) and to determine which components of the CO2 recovery process are responsible for the removal of these impurities. Following an additional 1000 demonstration hours, results indicated stable operational performance in relation to the following impurities; (1) SO2: Even at higher SO2 concentrations were almost completely removed from the flue gas before entering the CO2 absorber. (2) Dust: The accumulation of dust in the absorbent was higher, leading to an advanced understanding of the behavior of dust in the CO2 capture plant and the dust removal efficiency of each component within the CO2 recovery system. The data obtained is useful for the design of large-scale units and confirms the operating robustness of the CO2 capture plant accounting for wide fluctuations in impurity concentrations. (7) This important coal fired flue gas testing showed categorically that minimizing the accumulation of large concentrations of impurities, and to suppress dust concentrations below a prescribed level, is important to achieve long-term stable operation and to minimize maintenance work for the CO2 capture plant. To comply with the above requirement, various countermeasures have been developed which include the optimization of the impurity removal technology, flue gas pre treatment and improved optimization with the flue gas desulfurization facility. (8) In case of a commercial scale CO2 capture plant applied for coal fired flue gas, its respective size will be several thousand tpd which represents a considerable scale-up from the 10 tpd demonstration plant. In order to ensure the operational reliability and to accurately confirm the influence and the behavior of the impurities in coal fired fl

Takahiko Endo; Yoshinori Kajiya; Hiromitsu Nagayasu; Masaki Iijima; Tsuyoshi Ohishi; Hiroshi Tanaka; Ronald Mitchell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Manycore Revolution and Parallel Software Projects at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Manycore The Manycore Revolution and Parallel Software The Manycore Revolution and Parallel Software | Tags: Math & Computer Science PGAS.jpg Key Challenges: A new software ecosystem is expected to emerge over the next decade to support changes brought about by manycore and multicore systems. The question is whether languages like Unified Parallel C (UPC), which runs on all of the major DOE Office of Science platforms, can provide the best path forward, lowering the barrier to entry for parallel computing and making parallel machines more attractive as commercial products. Why it Matters: Although MPI is currently the de facto standard for programming supercomputers, partitioned global address space (PGAS) languages offer advantages in both programmability and performance. They

336

VIDEO: Celebrating Women's Leadership in the Clean Energy Revolution |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

VIDEO: Celebrating Women's Leadership in the Clean Energy VIDEO: Celebrating Women's Leadership in the Clean Energy Revolution VIDEO: Celebrating Women's Leadership in the Clean Energy Revolution September 30, 2013 - 4:29pm Addthis Watch highlights from the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium -- an annual event that is working to build a community of professionals dedicated to advancing the careers and goals of women in clean energy. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Last week we shared a recap of the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium. The event, a key component of the Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most

337

Intelligent Microsystems: Keys to the Next Silicon Revolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paul McWhorter, Deputy Director for of the Microsystems Center at Sandia National Laboratories, discusses the potential of surface micromachining. A vision of the possibilities of intelligent Microsystems for the future is presented along with descriptions of several possible applications. Applications that are just around the corner and some that maybe quite a ways down the road but have a clear development path to their realization. Microsystems will drive the next silicon revolution.

MCWHORTER,PAUL J.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Revolution vs. Devolution in Kansas: Teaching in a Conservative Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

academic fredom, I shal argue, as I examine and recommend a strategy for achieving this revolution in the devolving situation that is Kansas. I. Religious fundamentalism and academic fredom in Kansas The political problems of teaching in Kansas can... feminists and biologists: evolution, sexuality education, abortion, stem cel research, and academic fredom itself. Each of these isues and the related controversies in Kansas ilustrate how fundamentalists would restrict the world view of students...

Cudd, Ann E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy revolution: policies for a sustainable future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book examines the policy options for mitigating or removing the entrenched advantages held by fossil fuels and speeding the transition to a more sustainable energy future, one based on improved efficiency and a shift to renewable sources such as solar, wind, and bioenergy. The book: examines today's energy patterns and trends and their consequences; describes the barriers to a more sustainable energy future and how those barriers can be overcome; provides ten case studies of integrated strategies that have been effective in different parts of the world examines international policies and institutions and recommends ways they could be improved; reviews global trends that suggest that the transition to renewables and increased efficiency is underway and is achievable. The core of the book are presentations of Clean Energy scenarios for the US and Brazil. His US scenario has 10 policies. These include: Adopt voluntary agreements to reduce industrial energy use; Provide tax incentives for innovative renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies; Expand federal R & D and deployment programs; Remove barriers to combined heat and power systems; and Strengthen emissions standards on coal-fired plants. Geller calculates that the impact of his ten policies would be a $600 billion cost and a $1200 billion savings, for a net savings of $600 billion compared to a baseline scenario of continued promotion of fossil fuels.

Howard Geller [Southwest Energy Efficiency Project, Boulder, CO (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Improving the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Field Performance the Field Performance of Natural Gas Furnaces Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Improving Gas Furnace Performance-A Field and Lab Study at End of Life Location: Chicago, IL Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Natural Gas Furnaces Application: New and/or retrofit; Single and/or multifamily Year Tested: 2012/2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All or specify which ones PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $250 for adjustments Projected Energy Savings: 6.4% heating savings Projected Energy Cost Savings: $100/year climate-dependent Gas furnaces can successfully operate in the field for 20 years or longer with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector- Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The "Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles" workshop report by Sandia National Laboratory summarizes a workshop that discussed common opportunities and challenges in expanding the use of hydrogen (H2) and natural gas (CNG or LNG) as transportation fuels.

342

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost-effective) techniques to remotely detect hydrate deposits, and to monitor their changes in the course of gas production.production of gas from hydrates occurring in the Gulf of Mexico because, despite of the substantially increased complexity and cost

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge June 6 and 7, 2012 University College Dublin, Electricity Research Centre Location: UCD, Engineering...

344

Framing Iran: The Islamic Revolution and the Green Movement as Told Through Time Magazine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? FRAMING IRAN: THE ISLAMIC REVOLUTION AND THE GREEN MOVEMENT AS TOLD THROUGH TIME MAGAZINE by Nadia Maiwandi This framing analysis was conducted to study… (more)

Maiwandi, Nadia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge Workshop Proceedings Benjamin Kroposki and Connie Komomua National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mark...

346

World experience with development of combined-cycle and gas turbine technologies and prospects for employing them in the thermal power engineering of Russia using the capacities of the country’s industry producing power machinery and equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

World experience gained from using combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies in power engineering is analyzed. The technical and production capacities of the Russian industry constructing power machinery and...

O. N. Favorskii; V. L. Polishchuk; I. M. Livshits…

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Michigan v. Bryant: The Counter-Revolution Begins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that “the guy in the gas station shot me. ” 223 Standingthat in 2011 there were two gas stations nearby on CadillacEven though the guy in the gas station is still there with a

Graham, Kenneth W. Jr.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Development of Warm Gas Cleanup Technologies for the Removal of Sulfur Containing Species from Steam Hydrogasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22. 5. X. Sha, Coal gasification. Coal, oil shale, natural7. C. Higman, M. Burgt, Gasification. 2003. Elsevier/Gulfbiomass ( part 3): gasification technologies. Bioresource

Luo, Qian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of PV panels, solar thermal equipment, and storage systems.chiller, energy storage, or solar-based technologies areexpensive solar-based equipment and energy storage Intercept

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Experience you can trust. The U.S. Smart Grid Revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experience you can trust. The U.S. Smart Grid Revolution KEMA's Perspectives for Job Creation of Contents The U.S. Smart Grid Revolution December 23, 2008 KEMA's Perspectives for Job Creation i 1.S...............................................................................................2-1 2.2 Smart Grid Activity in the U

351

Consumption, Social Capital, and the 'Industrious Revolution' in Early Modern Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consumption, Social Capital, and the “Industrious Revolution” in Early Modern Germany SHEILAGH OGILVIE Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge Acknowledgements: I am grateful to Marco Belfanti, André... ; labour; discrimination; gender; Germany 1 Expanding market consumption is widely ascribed a key role in European economic growth before industrialization. A “Consumer Revolution” between 1650 and 1800 is thought to have seen the middle classes...

Ogilvie, Sheilagh

352

Joint Stiffness Identification of Six-revolute Industrial Serial Robots Claire Dumas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Stiffness Identification of Six-revolute Industrial Serial Robots Claire Dumas , St the stiffness of industrial robots from robot manufacturers. As a consequence, this paper introduces a robust and fast procedure that can be used to identify the joint stiffness values of any six-revolute serial robot

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/of Mexico, http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil- gas/

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Chapter 212: Role of Standardization in Technology Development, Transfer, Diffusion and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 212: Role of Standardization in Technology Development, Transfer, Diffusion and Management by John W. Bagby Abstract Since the industrial revolution, standardization has become a hybrid. Standards are increasingly developed outside government regulatory venues in consortia and other forms

Bagby, John

355

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expensive solar-based equipment and energy storage Interceptchiller, energy storage, or solar-based technologies aresolar thermal system is mostly used to supply the heat storage and absorption chiller with energy.

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

358

Joining Technology Thomas W. Eagar, FA$M (1989)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A revolution in arc-welding power-supply technology will occur due to the use of new inverter of empirical-models building before the capabilities of these new power supplies are used to their full extent will increase steadily, driven as much by a shortage of skilled labor as by new technologies. The most

Eagar, Thomas W.

359

Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

EGYPT: The Revolution and the Future February 17, 2011, 7:30 p.m.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EGYPT: The Revolution and the Future February 17, 2011, 7:30 p.m. Kane Hall, Room 210 University ELLIS GOLDBERG, Professor of Political Science, University of Washington, Specialist on Egypt

Hochberg, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wind tunnel simulation of wind loading on a solid structure of revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wind tunnel simulations of wind loading on a solid structure of revolution ... smooth and five rough surfaces were conducted using wind tunnel tests. Time-mean and fluctuating pressure ... distributions. The ...

Le-Tian Yang; Zhi-Fu Gu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

From the Building to the Grid: an Energy Revolution and Modeling...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From the Building to the Grid: an energy revolution and modeling challenge Workshop Agenda May 1, 2012 7:45 am Security Check-in at NREL Visitors Center 8:00-8:30 Continental...

363

High-frequency approximations for edge scatter from surfaces of revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the radar backscatter from a truncated surface of revolution viewed at axial incidence and derive a closed-form high-frequency (HF) approximation for the physical-optics...

Gordon, William B; Bilow, Henry J

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Food security: contributions from science to a new and greener revolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2007 World energy outlook 2007. Paris, France: International Energy Agency. IEA 2008 World energy outlook 2008. Paris, France: International Energy Agency. IFPRI 2002 Green revolution curse or blessing? Washington, DC: International Food...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France, Spring 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examines the origins, course, and consequences of the revolution which arose in France at the end of the eighteenth century and its Napoleonic sequel. Particular attention given to the interplay of politics, culture, and ...

Ravel, Jeffrey S.

366

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program]. Quarterly technical progress narrative No. 21, December 1, 1987--February 29, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm{sup 2}; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A review of "Political Speaking Justified: Women Prophets and the English Revolution" By Teresa Feroli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

214 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS the 1640s and 1650s. And that complexity is, after all, a major source of our fascination with the period. Teresa Feroli. Political Speaking Justified: Women Prophets and the English Revolution. Newark, DE: University... the political sphere during the English Revolution and Restoration by claiming authority to speak based on their identity as women. Her aim, in part, is to locate female political consciousness much earlier than has historiographically been supposed. More...

Parker, B. F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOE Solar Decathlon: Team Germany: Starting a Solar Revolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surPLUShome at the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009 with Silo House and the Washington Monument in the background. surPLUShome at the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009 with Silo House and the Washington Monument in the background. Enlarge image Team Germany's surPLUShome took first place in Solar Decathlon 2009. It is now permanently placed on the Technische Universität Darmstadt campus. (Credit: Jim Tetro/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: Team Germany What: surPLUShome Where: Technische Universität Darmstadt El-Lissitzky-Str. 3 64287 Darmstadt, Deutschland Map This House Public tours: Not available Solar Decathlon 2009 Team Germany: Starting a Solar Revolution In June 2010, Team Germany's surPLUShome returned to the Technische Universität Darmstadt campus for permanent placement next to Solarhouse, from the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2007. As part of the

369

Voigt's transformations and the beginning of the relativistic revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1887 W. Voigt published a paper on the Doppler effect, which marked the birth of the relativistic revolution. In his paper Voigt derived a set of spacetime transformations by demanding covariance to the homogeneous wave equation in inertial frames, and this was an application of the first postulate of special relativity. Voigt assumed in his derivation the invariance of the speed of light in inertial frames, and this is the second postulate of special relativity. He then applied the postulates of special relativity to the wave equation 18 years before Einstein explicitly enunciated these postulates. Voigt's transformations questioned the Newtonian notion of absolute time for the first time in physics by suggesting that the absolute time should be replaced by the non-absolute time $t'=t-vx/c^2$. Unfortunately, Voigt's 1887 paper was not appreciated by most physicists of that time. Voigt's transformations do not form a group and are an example of the conformal symmetry of spacetime. In the present paper we e...

Heras, Ricardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Vacuum Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

Biltoft, P J

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Natural Gas Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

373

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during drilling. The method developed in this study involves analysis of the surface morphology of the broken end of the core as a top indicator. Together with information on the working of the tool (rotation direction), fracture-surface features, such as arrest lines and plume structures, not only give a top direction for the cores but also indicate the direction of fracture propagation in the tough, fine-grained Cataract/Medina sandstones. The study determined that microresistivity logs or other image logs can be used to obtain accurate sidewall core azimuths and to determine the precise depths of the sidewall cores. Two seismic S-wave technologies were developed in this study. The first was a special explosive package that, when detonated in a conventional seismic shot hole, produces more robust S-waves than do standard seismic explosives. The importance of this source development is that it allows S-wave seismic data to be generated across all of the Appalachian Basin. Previously, Appalachian operators have not been able to use S-wave seismic technology to detect fractured reservoirs because the industry-standard S-wave energy source, the horizontal vibrator, is not a practical source option in the heavy timber cover that extends across most of the basin. The second S-wave seismic technology that was investigated was used to verify that standard P-wave seismic sources can create robust downgoing S-waves by P-to-S mode conversion in the shallow stratigraphic layering in the Appalachian Basin. This verification was done by recording and analyzing a 3-component vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Atlas Montgomery No. 4 well at Henderson Dome, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The VSP data confirmed that robust S-waves are generated by P-to-S mode conversion at the basinwide Onondaga stratigraphic level. Appalachian operators can thus use converted-mode seismic technology to create S-wave images of fractured and unfractured rock systems throughout the basin.

BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Technology Integration Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portfolio of Technologies Eliminate Alternative Fuels Electric Vehicles Biodiesel Ethanol Hydrogen Propane Natural Gas Fuel Economy More Fuel efficient vehicles, adopting smarter...

375

Oil and Gas Research| GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas We're balancing the increasing demand for finite resources with technology that ensures access to energy for generations to come. Home > Innovation > Oil & Gas Innovation...

376

6/10/12 UK team advances measurement of gas bubbles in pipelines. | Technology news | Process Engineer... 1/2processengineering.theengineer.co.uk/.../1012631.article  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process in the manufacturing, power, oil & gas and petrochemical industries. For instance, the sharp

Sóbester, András

377

Technology Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Multi-Path Transportation Futures * Idling Studies * EDrive Vehicle Monthly Sales Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Technology Analysis truck Heavy vehicle techologies are one subject of study. Research Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation Heavy Vehicle Technologies Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study Idling Studies Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Reports Propane Vehicles: Status, Challenges, and Opportunities (pdf; 525 kB) Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities (pdf; 696 kB) Regulatory Influences That Will Likely Affect Success of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles (pdf; 1.02 MB)

378

Democracy in Ukraine after the Orange Revolution : youth activists' insights on past events, present efficacy, and future prospects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigates the democratic developments in Ukraine beginning with the 2004 Orange Revolution. After its break-off from the Soviet empire, Ukraine began democratizing its… (more)

Shyyan, Vitaliy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

380

GHG Mitigation Technology Performance Evaluations Underway at the GHG Technology Verification Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Technology Verification Center is one of 12 ... technology performance data. The Center focuses on GHG mitigation and monitoring technologies and has completed ... natural gas industry, e...

Stephen D. Piccot; David A. Kirchgessner

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies-- 2014 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report provides an update and finds that cost reductions and deployment have continued to advance in the past year for onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic (PV) modules, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and electric vehicles (EVs).

382

Nanotechnology Patents : The next technological revolution and the future of the patent system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Experiences from ICT and biotechnology have shown that the current patent system has increasing difficulties with the numbers and complexity of patent applications. As a… (more)

Helwegen, Wim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

CET2001 Customer Led Network Revolution (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CET2001 Customer Led Network Revolution (Smart Grid Project) CET2001 Customer Led Network Revolution (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name CET2001 Customer Led Network Revolution Country United Kingdom Coordinates 55.378052°, -3.435973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.378052,"lon":-3.435973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

384

Power to the People: A Consumer-Led Revolution in Energy Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power to the People: A Consumer-Led Revolution in Energy Management Power to the People: A Consumer-Led Revolution in Energy Management Speaker(s): Scott McGaraghan Date: July 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page Do you love your thermostat? Nest Labs, founded by the people who brought you the iPod and the iPhone has just released a learning thermostat targeted at the iPhone generation. Initial enthusiasm and demand since the company's launch in October has been quite strong, hinting at the potential to change the conversation around smart grid implementation and residential energy management. Come to learn about what it really means to apply an Apple-style approach to residential energy management, and come ready to discuss and brainstorm on how to realize a consumer-led revolution

385

Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution May 24, 2011 - 2:48pm Addthis Vice-President Joe Biden spoke about clean-energy partnerships between government scientists and private entrepreneurs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Photo by Dennis Schroeder | Public Domain | Vice-President Joe Biden spoke about clean-energy partnerships between government scientists and private entrepreneurs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Photo by Dennis Schroeder | Public Domain | Bill Scanlon Office of Public Affairs, National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

386

Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution Biden Says U.S. Will Lead Energy Revolution May 24, 2011 - 2:48pm Addthis Vice-President Joe Biden spoke about clean-energy partnerships between government scientists and private entrepreneurs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Photo by Dennis Schroeder | Public Domain | Vice-President Joe Biden spoke about clean-energy partnerships between government scientists and private entrepreneurs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Photo by Dennis Schroeder | Public Domain | Bill Scanlon Office of Public Affairs, National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

387

In the mIdst of an energy revolutIon, Purdue's world-class researchers lead the charge. we collaborate across a broad range of dIscIPlInes --to develoP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rechargIng IndIana's renewable energy revolutIon #12;enerGY solutions solar The U.S. Department of Energy expects that 10-15 percent of the nation's energy should be generated from solar sources by 2030. The target of the Purdue projects: · Researchersaredevelopingthinfilm solar cells that would have greater

Holland, Jeffrey

388

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

389

DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

greenhouse gas emissions - the technology component of a comprehensive U.S. approach to climate change. The technologies developed under the Climate Change Technology program...

390

NATURAL GAS: Diversity for Profit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS: Diversity for Profit ... "The current and future natural gas shortage may be a blessing in disguise. ... Getting involved will mean increased profitability by becoming an integrated total energy company and not just a marketer of natural gas, was the repeated message of the Institute of Gas Technology. ...

1969-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Power-to-Gas Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter gives an overview of the technological fundamentals of the Power-to-Gas concept. After a general introduction to the ... itself, efficiencies and synergy potentials of the Power-to-Gas technology are...

Markus Lehner; Robert Tichler…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Determination of Low Levels of Methanol in Crude Oils by Multi-dimensional Gas Chromatography (MDGC) Using Novel Micro Channel Flow Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......prevent the formation of gas hydrates in crude oil...wells are shut in or when production rates are slowed. Since...ionization (GC/FID) or gas chromatography/mass...Nitrogen is used-as the low cost carrier gas. Sample preparation and......

Andrew Tipler; Lee Marotta; Frank DiSanzo; Heidi Grecsek

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The military aircraft gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the gas turbine for use in military aircraft is discussed. The advancing fields of component technology and engine testing are also outlined

R.M. Denning; R.J. Lane

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

How to manage a revolution: Isaac Newton in the early twentieth century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1007 187 99 How to manage a revolution: Isaac Newton in the...dramatic developments in physics came to be viewed as revolutionary, apparently...theories. British physicists were keen to promote quantum physics and relativity theory...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, And Think  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;BIG DATA A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, And Think Keynotes of Chapter 56;Value With big data, the value of data is changing. Data's value shifts from its primary use to its, and where to build electric-vehicle service stations. 8/8/2013 14 #12;The reuse of data The value in data

Qiu, Robert Caiming

396

Metric 3D Reconstruction and Texture Acquisition of Surfaces of Revolution from a Single Uncalibrated View  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Image analysis and computer vision can be effectively employed to recover the three-dimensional structure of imaged objects, together with their surface properties. In this paper, we address the problem of metric reconstruction and texture acquisition ... Keywords: Index Terms- Surface of revolution, camera self-calibration, single-view 3D metric reconstruction, texture acquisition, projective geometry, image-based modeling.

Carlo Colombo; Alberto Del Bimbo; Federico Pernici

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack...

Frederick, J. D.

398

Natural Gas from Shale  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, protective environmental practices and data development, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of gas technically recoverable where they once were not.

399

Reseña de gas natural, Programa de TecnologĂ­as de VehĂ­culos, Marzo 2010 (Natural Gas Basics, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), March 2010) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Marzo 2010 Marzo 2010 El gas natural comprimido se almacena dentro del vehículo en tanques seguros y resistentes a la punción. ¿Qué es el gas natural? El gas natural es una mezcla gaseosa inodo- ra y no tóxica de hidrocarburos, compuesta predominantemente por metano (CH 4 ). Como es un gas, hay que almacenarlo en el vehículo ya sea como gas comprimido o en estado líquido. El gas natural comprimido (GNC) se almacena en general en un tanque a una presión de 3,000 a 3,600 libras por pulgada cuadrada. El gas natural líquido (GNL) está superenfriado y se almacena en fase líquida a -260° F en tanques con aisla- miento especial. El gas natural se vende en galones equivalentes de gasolina o diesel de acuerdo al contenido energético de un galón

400

A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from the corn harvest into renewable biofuels will help the U.S. produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels over the coming decade. It will also stimulate local economies and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.

Mathisen, Todd; Bruch, Don;

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nepal: Applications of Renewable Energy Technologies - Datasets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Renewable Energy Technologies (Abstract): Wind, biomass, bio-gas, photovoltaic and small hydro renewable energy technologies in Nepal (Purpose): SWERA Documentation Data and...

402

FE-Funded Study Released on Key Factors Affecting China Shale Gas Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As many people know, over the past decade the United States has experienced a shale gas revolution that has beneficially transformed its energy landscape. In witnessing this transformation, other nations with significant shale resources are understandably interested in pursuing the responsible development of their domestic reserves, and achieving for their people accompanying economic, energy security and environmental benefits.

403

Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unconventional Resources Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. Mission The Secretary of Energy, in response to provisions of Subtitle J, Sec. 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, must carry out a program of research, development, demonstration, and commercial application of technologies for ultra-deepwater and onshore unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production, as well as addressing the technology

404

Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and environmental mitigation (including reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and sequestration of carbon). The Department's Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...

405

The relationship between technology integration reading instruction and reading achievement in high performing campuses as reported by PEIMS and third grade classroom teachers in selected South Texas school districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and evolving technologies (International Society for Technology in Education[ISTE], 2000). The technological revolution centers on computer information, communication, and multimedia technologies and is often i n t e r p r e t e d a s t h e b e g i n n i...

Bauer, Hilaria

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

406

State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies 2003 DEER Conference...

407

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Implementation of the Ensemble Kalman Filter in the Characterization of Hydraulic Fractures in Shale Gas Reservoirs by Integrating Downhole Temperature Sensing Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing in horizontal wells has demonstrated successful results for developing unconventional low-permeability oil and gas reservoirs. Despite being vastly implemented by different operators across North America, hydraulic...

Moreno, Jose A

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at St. Bliss, Texas. Interim report, October 1992--May 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from a demonstration program conducted on the comparative evaluations of the combustion of compressed natural gas as an alternative fuel for gasoline. General Motors pick-up trucks were utilized in the study.

Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Sandia National Laboratories: biomarine technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industriell og teknisk forskning) will now tackle energy challenges such as renewable-energy integration, grid modernization, gas technologies, and algae-based biofuels. SINTEF is...

411

Sandia National Laboratories: materials technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industriell og teknisk forskning) will now tackle energy challenges such as renewable-energy integration, grid modernization, gas technologies, and algae-based biofuels. SINTEF is...

412

Sandia National Laboratories: maritime technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industriell og teknisk forskning) will now tackle energy challenges such as renewable-energy integration, grid modernization, gas technologies, and algae-based biofuels. SINTEF is...

413

The Rise And Fall Of The Muslim Brotherhood In The Egyptian Revolution: The Interplay of Narrative And Other Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the aftermath of revolution is that leaders adapt their narrative (including policies) to the changed context (revolutionaries as rulers) and reform existing institutions. Historically, the failure to successfully adapt narrative results in instability. After...

Tombaugh, William

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Electric power generation using a phosphoric acid cell on a municipal solid waste landfill gas stream. Technology verification report, November 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phosphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Performance data were collected at two sites determined to be representative of the U.S. landfill market. The Penrose facility, in Los Angeles, CA, was the first test site. The landfill gas at this site represented waste gas recovery from four nearby landfills, consisting primarily of industrial waste material. It produced approximately 3000 scf of gas/minute, and had a higher heating value of 446 Btu/scf at about 44% methane concentration. The second test site, in Groton, CT, was a relatively small landfill, but with greater heat content gas (methane levels were about 57% and the average heating value was 585 Btu/scf). The verification test addressed contaminant removal efficiency, flare destruction efficiency, and the operational capability of the cleanup system, and the power production capability of the fuel cell system.

Masemore, S.; Piccot, S.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Parameter identification for joint elements in a revolute-joint detector manipulator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolute-joint robot is being developed for the spatial positioning of an x-ray detector at the Advanced Photon Source. Commercially available revolute-joint manipulators do not meet our size, positioning, or payload specifications. One idea being considered is the modification of a commercially available robot, with the goal of improving the repeatability and trajectory accuracy. Theoretical, computational, and experimental procedures are being used to (1) identify, (2) simulate the dynamics of an existing robot system using a multibody approach, and eventually (3) design an improved version, with low dynamic positioning uncertainty. A key aspect of the modeling and performance prediction is accurate stiffness and damping values for the robot joints. This paper discusses the experimental identification of the stiffness and damping parameters for one robot harmonic drive joint.

Preissner, C.; Shu, D.; Royston, T.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Hierarchy of Linear Threshold Models for the Spread of Political Revolutions on Social Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a linear threshold agent-based model (ABM) for the spread of political revolutions on social networks using empirical network data. We propose new techniques for building a hierarchy of simplified ordinary differential equation (ODE) based models that aim to capture essential features of the ABM, including effects of the actual networks, and give insight in the parameter regime transitions of the ABM. We relate the ABM and the hierarchy of models to a population-level compartmental ODE model that we proposed previously for the spread of political revolutions [1], which is shown to be mathematically consistent with the proposed ABM and provides a way to analyze the global behaviour of the ABM. This consistency with the linear threshold ABM also provides further justification a posteriori for the compartmental model of [1]. Extending concepts from epidemiological modelling, we define a basic reproduction number $R_0$ for the linear threshold ABM and apply it to predict ABM behaviour on empirical networ...

Lang, John C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

New Scientist|Space|Technology|Environment|New Scientist Jobs|Subscribe to New Scientist New Scientist, 2578, 18 November 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

revolution will be recognised as a transformation as significant as the industrial revolution. The evolution

Horvitz, Eric

418

Dynamic analysis of shells of revolution submerged in an acoustic medium by the finite element method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the spherical shell transformation matrix relating (q} and (u) for an element generalized added mass matrix due to radiated pressure matrix relating (q) and (I) for an element unknown source strength velocity of sound in fluid coupled equivalent nodal load... A method 1s presented for the evaluation of the displacements and the surface pressure which are induced by the harmonic exc1tation of a shell of revolution submerged in an acoustic medium. The method utilizes a source distribution approach...

Ng, Chi Kin

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Literacy, orality annd the digital revolution: history and prospects for university undergraduate research fellows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERACY, ORALITY AND THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION: HISTORY AND PROSPECTS FOR UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS A Senior Honors Thesis by J. GARRETT CORNEL I SON Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A8 M... FELLOWS A Senior Honors Thesis by J. GARRETT CORNELISON Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS Approved...

Cornelison, J. Garrett

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

420

Science and technology news Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science and technology news Home Nanotechnology Physics Space & Earth Electronics Technology Chemistry Biology Medicine & Health Other Sciences General Physics Condensed Matter Optics & Photonics, nanotechnology and medical diagnostics. Magnetism observed in gas for the first time http

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chevron, GE form Technology Alliance February 3, 2014 HOUSTON, TX, Feb. 3, 2014-Chevron Energy Technology Company and GE Oil & Gas announced today the creation of the Chevron GE...

422

SANBAG Natural Gas Truck Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SANBAG Natural Gas Truck Project SANBAG Natural Gas Truck Project 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11,...

423

Exploring the Optimum Role of Natural Gas in Biofuels Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-D: Natural Gas & Biomass to Liquids Vann Bush, Managing Director, Energy Conversion, Gas Technology Institute

424

SANBAG - Ryder Natural Gas Vehicle Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SANBAG - Ryder Natural Gas Vehicle Project SANBAG - Ryder Natural Gas Vehicle Project 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review...

425

SANBAG - Ryder Natural Gas Vehicle Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SANBAG - Ryder Natural Gas Vehicle Project SANBAG - Ryder Natural Gas Vehicle Project 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review...

426

Southeast Propane AutoGas Development Program | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Southeast Propane AutoGas Development Program Southeast Propane AutoGas Development Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit...

427

Southeast Propane AutoGas Development Program | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

D.C. tiarravt065christopher2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Southeast Propane AutoGas Development Program Southeast Propane AutoGas Development Program Technology...

428

ALSO: ISRC Technologies Meet The Challenge RIM Industry Booms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUMMER* 2000 SUMMER* 2000 ALSO: ISRC Technologies Meet The Challenge RIM Industry Booms SMART MACHINES The Robotics Revolution ALSO: Smart Scalpel Detects Cancer Cells Shrinking Prostate Glands Without Surgery SMART MACHINES The Robotics Revolution ALSO: Smart Scalpel Detects Cancer Cells Shrinking Prostate Glands Without Surgery A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 2, NO. 2 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y ON THE COVER: MARV (Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle) is one of the world's smallest autonomous vehicles, containing all necessary power, sensors, computers, and controls on board. MARV is a three-year-old technology measuring one cubic inch in size. (Photo by Randy Montoya) Sandia Technology is a quarterly journal published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram

429

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Developing Technology for a Cleaner Planet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequestering CO2 from Coal by Fluidized Bed Technology . . . . .18 Reducing Mercury Emissions from CoalDeveloping Technology for a Cleaner Planet Developing Technology for a Cleaner Planet Fall 2008 #12 Combustion . . . . . . . . . .19 Removing Pollutants from Coal Gas

Saniie, Jafar

432

Reduction of the Passage Between the Flame Tubes of the Combustor for a Millimeter Size Gas Turbine Engine in the Art of Micromachine Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The confluence of the market demands for the production of compact power source is not only in the electronics but also in the aeromechanical field. The micromachining technology has made feasible design and developments

Syed Alay Hashim; Nancy Manish…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline of 145 MW Combined Cycle Power Plant for KawasakiGas Firing Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Plant,” Journal ofgasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Novel Surface Architecture Synthesis for Gas Separation and Fuel-Cell Catalyst Applications James Guthrie, Georgia Institute of Technology, SURF 2010 Fellow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Surface Architecture Synthesis for Gas Separation and Fuel-Cell Catalyst Applications James-shell nanoparticle, Pt was deposited onto a flat surface substrate. Three separate substrates were used, Au(111 not significantly change over different voltages [3]. STM work was done using electrochemically etched tungsten tips

Li, Mo

435

Compressed natural gas measurement issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition`s Measurement and Metering Task Group (MMTG) was established on July 1st, 1992 to develop suggested revisions to National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) Handbook 44-1992 (Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Technical Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices) and NIST Handbook 130-1991 (Uniform Laws & Regulations). Specifically, the suggested revisions will address the sale and measurement of compressed natural gas when sold as a motor vehicle fuel. This paper briefly discusses the activities of the MMTG and its interaction with NIST. The paper also discusses the Institute of Gas Technology`s (IGT) support of the MMTG in the area of natural gas composition, their impact on metering technology applicable to high pressure fueling stations as well as conversion factors for the establishment of ``gallon gasoline equivalent`` of natural gas. The final portion of this paper discusses IGT`s meter research activities and its meter test facility.

Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Freeman, P.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Prime Movers of Globalization: The History and Impact of Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gas turbines has been continuously improved by technology, and new devices and procedures under development

Anderson, Byron P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

gas hydrate accumulations * Suboceanic gas hydrate accumulations * Piceance Basin oil shale * Enhanced oil recovery technologies Experimental Links * CCl 4 Migration and...

438

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

Gary Stiegel

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Shale Gas and Hydrofracturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in horizontal drilling technology and hydrofracturing allow natural gas to escape from shale formations following high pressure treatment, i.e. “fracking” with sand, water and chemicals. ... With fracking, natural gas prices have remained low at less than $2.50 per million BTU. ... Fracking chemicals, petrochemicals, and metals and radionuclides from source rock cause major environmental burdens if not properly treated or deep-injected. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas revolution technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High Temperature Optical Gas Sensing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Gas Sensing Optical Gas Sensing Opportunity Research is active on optical sensors integrated with advanced sensing materials for high temperature embedded gas sensing applications. Patent applications have been filed for two inventions in this area and several other methods are currently under development. These technologies are available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Organizations or individuals with capabilities in optical sensor packaging for harsh environment and high temperature applications are encouraged to contact NETL to explore potential collaborative opportunities. Overview Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov

442

Flame aerosol nano-technology has been developed to preparation of thin and defect-free porous membrane from the gas phase as a one step method in preparation of membrane for gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Flame aerosol nano-technology has been developed to preparation of thin and defect on deposition of nano particles (-Al2O3, MgO or spinel MgAl2O4), formed in the premixed flame reactor through/or aluminium precursors in the flame to form nano-particles of -Al2O3, MgO or MgAl2O4 spinel. The generated

443

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts Rockies Gas & Oil Conference, Denver, CO, April  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61. Nelson, D. C. Oil Shale: New Technologies Defining New Opportunities. Presented at the Platts I, II Modeling of the In-Situ Production of Oil from .',1 l ',".1" Oil Shale ilil 'I' 'I~ :' l of conventional oil reserves amidst increasing liquid fuel demand in the world have renewed interest in oil shale

Kulp, Mark

444

Sun Yat-sen University in Moscow and the Chinese Revolution: A Personal Account  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sun Yat-sen University in Moscow and the Chinese Revolution A Personal Account Yueh Sheng INTERNATIONAL STUDIES, EAST ASIAN SERIES RESEARCH PUBLICATION, NUMBER SEVEN CENTER EOR EAST ASIAN STUDIES THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS UNIVERSITY.... $2.50 5. AKASHI, YOJI The Nanyang Chinese National Salvation Movement, 1937-1941. $6.00 6. LEE, CHAE-JIN Communist China's Policy Toward Laos: A Case Study, 1954-67. $5.00 7. SHENG, YUEH Sun Yat-sen University in Moscow and the Chinese...

Sheng, Yueh

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A review of "Commonwealth Principles: Republican Writing of the English Revolution." by Jonathan Scott,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS Jonathan Scott. Commonwealth Principles: Republican Writing of the English Revolution. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. xii + 402 pp. $75.00. Review by CHARLES W. A. PRIOR, UNIVERSITY OF HULL... in no way disposed to require the definition of En- gland as a polis or the Englishman as a citizen? (334). To a very large extent, Jonathan Scott?s mission is to show how this process of domestication took place, and the result is a thought...

Prior, Charles W. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Numerical methods of integration applied in the nonlinear dynamic analysis of shells of revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structural bel&avior a&d therefore cannot be used for nonlinear analyses. lhe second nðod of dynamic analysis uses numerical integra- tion of the equations of notion wit'bout necessitating a transforma- tion of coordinates. Tne numerical integration...!riinear beam analysis {first vibratory mode only) with the most prc!! ising methods b ing programmed for shell analy! es. Rea- listic test problems are used to evaluate three of the numerical integration procedures as applied in shell of revolution analyses...

Tillerson, Joe Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

447

The energy services revolution: New opportunities for commercial and industrial end-users  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The changing energy services industry presents significant cost-control opportunities for end-users. However, the transition period from a monopoly to a deregulated market will be chaotic and confusing. For end-users, knowing who to turn to is the first step in taking advantage of the energy services revolution. For energy and energy services providers, bridging the gap between what suppliers perceive as key customer needs and what large energy users actually want will be the key in producing mutually successful ventures.

Hoggard, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Russia’s Natural Gas Export Potential up to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent increases in natural gas reserve estimates and advances in shale gas technology make natural gas a fuel with good prospects to serve a bridge to a low-carbon world. Russia is an important energy supplier as it holds ...

Paltsev, Sergey

449

Greater focus needed on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...benefits of natural gas fuel-technology pathways. Significant progress appears possible given...leakage in the natural gas system (EPA reports a range of-19% to...factor for stationary gas turbines of 110 lbMMBtu [AP-42...

Ramón A. Alvarez; Stephen W. Pacala; James J. Winebrake; William L. Chameides; Steven P. Hamburg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

World Gas Conference Tokyo, June 1-5, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22nd World Gas Conference Tokyo, June 1-5, 2003 HYDRATE NON-PIPELINE TECHNOLOGY FOR TRANSPORT OF NATURAL GAS JĂłn S. Gudmundsson, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Oscar F. Graff, Aker Kvaerner Technology AS SUMMARY The economics of natural gas transport depends greatly on the annual volumes

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

452

Natural gas strategic plan and program crosscut plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas strategic plan recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing increased U.S. natural gas use. Focus areas of research include natural gas supply, delivery, and storage, power generation, industrial, residential and commercial, natural gas vehicles, and the environment. Historical aspects, mission, situation analysis, technology trends, strategic issues, performance indicators, technology program overviews, and forecasting in the above areas are described.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined review of the HMS software algorithms and supporting field measurements lead to the conclusion that the majority of process gas pipe measurements are adequately corrected for source self-attenuation using HMS4. While there will be instances where the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup mass presents an infinitely thick deposit to the NaI-HMS4 system these situations are expected to be infrequent. This work confirms that the HMS4 system can quantify UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup, in its current configuration (deposition, enrichment, and geometry), below the DQO levels for the K-25 building decommissioning and demolition project. For an area measurement of process gas pipe in the K-25 building, if an infinitely thick UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposit is identified in the range of enrichment of {approx}4-40%, the holdup quantity exceeds the corresponding DQO established for the K-25 building demolition project.

Rasmussen B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Revolution Now  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to produce at a lower capacity factor than nuclear generators (average for onshore wind turbines in the US from 2006-2013 was 32%). For more information on capacity factors, see...

455

History of Gas Lasers, Part 2: Pulsed Gas Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this second article of a two-part series, Colin Webb explores the origins of pulsed gas lasers, which made possible many critical applications of laser technology, including...

Webb, Colin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Advanced stimulation technology deployment program, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company, Eagle Gas Sands, Cedar Creek Anticline, Southeastern Montana. Topical report, August-December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company (WBI) implemented an AST pilot program to improve production from wells completed in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline in southeastern Montana. Extensive pre- and post-fracture Absolute Open Flow Testing was used to evaluate the benefits of stimulation. Additional, gas production doubled when compared to direct offsets completed in previous years. This report summarizes the documentation of AST methodologies applied by WBI to an infill drilling program in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline.

Green, T.W.; Zander, D.M.; Bessler, M.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Chu: U.S. Can "Lead this New Industrial Revolution" in Clean Energy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chu: U.S. Can "Lead this New Industrial Revolution" in Clean Energy Chu: U.S. Can "Lead this New Industrial Revolution" in Clean Energy Chu: U.S. Can "Lead this New Industrial Revolution" in Clean Energy July 22, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC- The Wednesday, July 22, 2009 edition of the Richmond Times-Dispatch includes the following opinion piece from Energy Secretary Steven Chu: Cleaning Up: Energy and Climate Bill Will Boost the Economy US ENERGY SECRETARY STEVEN CHU Published: July 22, 2009 Over the next few months, Congress will decide on historic energy legislation that would create a generation of clean-energy jobs here in America, reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and prevent the worst effects of climate change. I believe passing a strong energy and climate bill is the single most important step we could take to secure our economic

459

Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technologies Technologies Technologies November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Distributed energy (DE) technologies consist primarily of energy generation and storage systems placed at or near the point of use. DE provides consumers with greater reliability, adequate power quality, and the possibility to participate in competitive electric power markets. DE also has the potential to mitigate congestion in transmission lines, control price fluctuations, strengthen energy security, and provide greater stability to the electricity grid. The use of DE technologies can lead to lower emissions and, particularly in combined heat and power (CHP) applications, to improved efficiency. Example of a thermally activated energy conversion technology (TAT) -- a type of distributed energy technology. Distributed energy technologies consist primarily of energy generation and storage systems placed at or near the point of use. This gas engine-driven heat pump is operating on a rooftop.