Sample records for gas resources beneath

  1. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera. Authors Stephan Husen, Robert B. Smith and Gregory P. Waite Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research,...

  2. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: Energy Resources(RECP)Coolers Jump

  3. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

  4. Primer on gas integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

  5. NETL: Natural Gas Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgenda Workshop AgendaGraphic of aEnergy

  6. Resources on Greenhouse Gas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist...

  7. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources: Annual report, October 1986--September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, G.D.; Kamath, V.A.; Godbole, S.P.; Patil, S.L.; Paranjpe, S.G.; Mutalik, P.N.; Nadem, N.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid ice-like mixtures of natural gas and water in the form of natural gas hydrated have been found immobilized in the rocks beneath the permafrost in Arctic basins and in muds under the deep water along the American continental margins, in the North Sea and several other locations around the world. It is estimated that the arctic areas of the United States may contain as much as 500 trillion SCF of natural gas in the form of gas hydrates (Lewin and Associates, 1983). While the US Arctic gas hydrate resources may have enormous potential and represent long term future source of natural gas, the recovery of this resource from reservoir frozen with gas hydrates has not been commercialized yet. Continuing study and research is essential to develop technologies which will enable a detailed characterization and assessment of this alternative natural gas resource, so that development of cost effective extraction technology.

  8. Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the public policy of the state to conserve and control the natural resources of oil and gas, and their products; to prevent waste of oil and gas; to provide for the protection and adjustment...

  9. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  10. A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Zhenzhen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . Very little is known publicly about technically recoverable unconventional gas resource potential on a global scale. Driven by a new understanding of the size of gas shale resources in the United States, we estimated original gas in place (OGIP...

  11. A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Zhenzhen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . Very little is known publicly about technically recoverable unconventional gas resource potential on a global scale. Driven by a new understanding of the size of gas shale resources in the United States, we estimated original gas in place (OGIP...

  12. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , the BASIN software is combined with PRISE in the UGRA system to estimate unconventional resource potential in frontier basins. The PRISE software contains information about the resources (conventional gas, conventional oil, shale gas, coalbed methane...

  13. Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komar, C.A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

  14. Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Energy Resources provides rebates to their residential customers for the purchase of energy efficient natural gas equipment and set-back thermostats. Rebates are available for furnaces,...

  15. Assessment of Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xinglai

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , and to assess Eagle Ford shale oil and gas reserves, contingent resources, and prospective resources. I first developed a Bayesian methodology to generate probabilistic decline curves using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) that can quantify the reserves...

  16. Development of the Natural Gas Resources in the Marcellus Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    be the most productive areas of the shale. The large amount of industrial activity necessary for shale gasDevelopment of the Natural Gas Resources in the Marcellus Shale New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia for informational purposes only and does not support or oppose development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas

  17. Oil and Gas CDT Structural and depositional controls on shale gas resources in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Structural and depositional controls on shale gas resources in the UK), http://www.bgs.ac.uk/staff/profiles/0688.html · Laura Banfield (BP) Key Words Shale gas, Bowland of structural and depositional controls on shale gas potential in the UK with a synthesis of a series

  18. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  19. Methane hydrate gas production: evaluating and exploiting the solid gas resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, P.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane hydrate gas could be a tremendous energy resource if methods can be devised to produce this gas economically. This paper examines two methods of producing gas from hydrate deposits by the injection of hot water or steam, and also examines the feasibility of hydraulic fracturing and pressure reduction as a hydrate gas production technique. A hydraulic fracturing technique suitable for hydrate reservoirs and a system for coring hydrate reservoirs are also described.

  20. Accounting for Depletion of Oil and Gas Resources in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Othman, Jamal, E-mail: jortman@ukm.my; Jafari, Yaghoob, E-mail: yaghoob.jafari@gmail.com [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Economics and Management (Malaysia)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since oil and gas are non-renewable resources, it is important to identify the extent to which they have been depleted. Such information will contribute to the formulation and evaluation of appropriate sustainable development policies. This paper provides an assessment of the changes in the availability of oil and gas resources in Malaysia by first compiling the physical balance sheet for the period 2000-2007, and then assessing the monetary balance sheets for the said resource by using the Net Present Value method. Our findings show serious reduction in the value of oil reserves from 2001 to 2005, due to changes in crude oil prices, and thereafter the depletion rates decreased. In the context of sustainable development planning, albeit in the weak sustainability sense, it will be important to ascertain if sufficient reinvestments of the estimated resource rents in related or alternative capitals are being attempted by Malaysia. For the study period, the cumulative resource rents were to the tune of RM61 billion. Through a depletion or resource rents policy, the estimated quantum may guide the identification of a reinvestment threshold (after considering needed capital investment for future development of the industry) in light of ensuring the future productive capacity of the economy at the time when the resource is exhausted.

  1. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

  2. Evaluation and Prediction of Unconventional Gas Resources in Underexplored Basins Worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Kun

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    triangle concept, which implies that all natural resources, including oil and gas, are distributed log-normally. In this work, I describe a methodology to estimate values of technically recoverable resources (TRR) for unconventional gas reservoirs...

  3. Development of an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar Vanegas, Jesus

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ) According to Haskett, resources recoverable from reservoirs of difficult nature have come to be called “unconventional resources.” These include fractured reservoirs, tight gas, gas/oil shale, oil sands and CBM. There are many definitions but most...

  4. Enhanced Prognosis for Abiotic Natural Gas and Petroleum Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prognosis for potential resources of abiotic natural gas and petroleum depends critically upon the nature and circumstances of Earth formation. Until recently, that prognosis has been considered solely within the framework of the so-called "standard model of solar system formation", which is incorrect and leads to the contradiction of terrestrial planets having insufficiently massive cores. By contrast, that prognosis is considerably enhanced (i) by the new vision I have disclosed of Earth formation as a Jupiter-like gas giant; (ii) by core formation contemporaneous with raining out from within a giant gaseous protoplanet rather than through subsequent whole-Earth re-melting after loss of gases; (iii) by the consequences of whole-Earth decompression dynamics, which obviates the unfounded assumption of mantle convection, and; (iv) by the process of mantle decompression thermal-tsunami. The latter, in addition to accounting for much of the heat leaving the Earth's surface, for the geothermal gradient observ...

  5. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of U.S. Oil and Gas Resources (on CD-ROM) (limited conventional oil and gas resources (Boswell, 2007).for conventional oil and gas resources (Collett, 2004)

  6. Enhanced Prognosis for Abiotic Natural Gas and Petroleum Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2006-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The prognosis for potential resources of abiotic natural gas and petroleum depends critically upon the nature and circumstances of Earth formation. Until recently, that prognosis has been considered solely within the framework of the so-called "standard model of solar system formation", which is incorrect and leads to the contradiction of terrestrial planets having insufficiently massive cores. By contrast, that prognosis is considerably enhanced (i) by the new vision I have disclosed of Earth formation as a Jupiter-like gas giant; (ii) by core formation contemporaneous with raining out from within a giant gaseous protoplanet rather than through subsequent whole-Earth re-melting after loss of gases; (iii) by the consequences of whole-Earth decompression dynamics, which obviates the unfounded assumption of mantle convection, and; (iv) by the process of mantle decompression thermal-tsunami. The latter, in addition to accounting for much of the heat leaving the Earth's surface, for the geothermal gradient observed in the crust, for substantial volcanism, and possibly for earthquake generation as well, also might enhance the prognosis for future abiotic energy supplies by pressurizing and heating the base of the crust, a potential collection point for abiotic mantle methane or other mantle-derived carbon-containing matter.

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO): Key Natural Gas and Petroleum Publications Balancing Natural Gas Policy - Fueling the Demands...

  8. Potential for deep natural gas resources in eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, D.D.; Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Fox, J.E.; Clayton, J.L.; Dyman, T.S.; Higley, D.K.; Keighin, C.W.; Law, B.E.; Pollastro, R.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of the research is to evaluate the geological possibility that significant economically recoverable resources of natural gas exist in sedimentary basins of the United States at depths greater than 150,000 ft. While relatively unexplored, these gas resources may be large. The main objectives of the research are to determine the geologic factors that control deep gas accumulations in addition to the distribution and resource potential of these accumulations.

  9. Potential for deep natural gas resources in eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, D.D.; Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Fox, J.E.; Clayton, J.L.; Dyman, T.S.; Higley, D.K.; Keighin, C.W.; Law, B.E.; Pollastro, R.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of the research is to evaluate the geological possibility that significant economically recoverable resources of natural gas exist in sedimentary basins of the United States at depths greater than 150,000 ft. While relatively unexplored, these gas resources may be large. The main objectives of the research are to determine the geologic factors that control deep gas accumulations in addition to the distribution and resource potential of these accumulations.

  10. Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

  11. Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garousi, Vahid

    Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Chapter 56 Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource that requires a pipeline to transport pro- duction from all producers at non-discriminatory rates. Compulsory resource, congestion exter- nality, minimum oil/gas ratio, monopsony power, pipeline transportation, no

  12. Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Energy Resources provides a variety of rebates to commercial, industrial, institutional and governmental entities.

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fossil Energy and other organizations: Office of Fossil Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy International Energy Agency (IEA) IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme...

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    energy sources like hydrogen fuels and fusion technologies. Fossil fuels - coal, oil, and natural gas - currently provide more than 85% of all the energy consumed in the United...

  15. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Petroleum Institute The oil and natural gas industry provides the fuel for American life, warming our homes, powering our businesses and giving us...

  16. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  17. DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays.

  18. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of U.S. Oil and Gas Resources (on CD-ROM) (Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields, Structuraland logging conventional oil and gas wells. The ability to

  19. World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    resources is also reflected in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) energy projections www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 #12;The information presented by Advanced Resources International (ARI) for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA

  20. Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas)- Low-Income New Construction Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Energy Resources is now offering rebates for non-profits servicing low-income communities. New construction organizations can take advantage of rebates for efficient technologies if the...

  1. Review of Emerging Resources: U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain a better understanding of the potential U.S. domestic shale gas and shale oil resources, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) commissioned INTEK, Inc. to develop an assessment of onshore lower 48 states technically recoverable shale gas and shale oil resources. This paper briefly describes the scope, methodology, and key results of the report and discusses the key assumptions that underlie the results.

  2. A Methodology to Determine both the Technically Recoverable Resource and the Economically Recoverable Resource in an Unconventional Gas Play

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almadani, Husameddin Saleh A.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for all the wells in a given gas play, to determine the values of the P10 (10th percentile), P50 (50th percentile), and P90 iv (90th percentile) from the CDF. We then use these probability values to calculate the technically... recoverable resource EUR estimated ultimate recovery F&DC finding and development cost LOE lease operating expenses Mcf million cubic feet Mcfe million cubic feet equivalent OGIP original gas in place P(EUR) cumulative distribution...

  3. Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    was not quantified. In November 2011, Petr?leos Mexicanos (PEMEX) estimated prospective gas resources in the different plays. For the Upper Cretaceous (which includes the Eagle Ford shale) the estimates were 54-106-171 TCF (P90-P50-P10). For the Eagle Ford... and Agua Nueva shales combined resources were estimated to be 27-87 TCF (P90-P10) (PEMEX 2011). An assessment of the Eagle Ford shale oil and gas resources in the US is being done by the Crisman Institute for Petroleum Research at Texas A&M University...

  4. Research Portfolio Report Unconventional Oil & Gas Resources:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s oPrecipitationWeatherTacklingAboutNRAP: Air, Wellbore

  5. Research Portfolio Report Unconventional Oil & Gas Resources:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s oPrecipitationWeatherTacklingAboutNRAP: Air,

  6. Research Portfolio Report Unconventional Oil & Gas Resources:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s oPrecipitationWeatherTacklingAboutNRAP: Air, Subsurface

  7. California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facilityin Charts Jump28Transportation

  8. Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of Energy

  9. Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton: ENERGY8DecommissioningFuelDeepwater Oil

  10. Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ ReportEnergy National SolarPublications »with theDepartment of

  11. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Resources | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department ofDepartment of<< back to

  12. Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1 DEPARTMENTSeptember 27,SeptemberEnergy 4, 2007:JulyofThe

  13. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag:8,, 20153 To.T. J.

  14. Incremental natural gas resources through infield reserve growth/secondary natural gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, R.J.; Levey, R.A.; Hardage, B.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gasfrom conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas gulf coast basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields. To transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

  15. Models, Simulators, and Data-driven Resources for Oil and Natural Gas Research

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NETL provides a number of analytical tools to assist in conducting oil and natural gas research. Software, developed under various DOE/NETL projects, includes numerical simulators, analytical models, databases, and documentation.[copied from http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/Software_main.html] Links lead users to methane hydrates models, preedictive models, simulators, databases, and other software tools or resources.

  16. Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat-ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat- ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly to be acquired. To apply seismic technology to gas-hydrate studies in the gulf in an optimal manner, it is essential to understand the seismic target that has to be analyzed. What is gas hydrate? Gas hydrate

  17. Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The commercialization of an innovative telemetry communications system developed through a U.S. Department of Energy research program will help U.S. producers tap previously hard-to-reach natural gas resources deep underground, resulting in access to additional supplies that will help enhance national energy security.

  18. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  19. Natural gas cost for evaluating energy resource opportunities at Fort Stewart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ft. Stewart, a United States Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) installation located near Hinesville, Georgia, is currently undergoing an evaluation of its energy usage, which is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. In order to examine the energy resource opportunities (EROs) at Ft. Stewart, marginal fuel costs must be calculated. The marginal, or avoided, cost of gas service is used in conjunction with the estimated energy savings of an ERO to calculate the dollar value of those savings. In the case of natural gas, the costing becomes more complicated due to the installation of a propane-air mixing station. The propane-air station is being built under a shared energy savings (SES) contract. The building of a propane-air station allows Ft. Stewart to purchase natural gas from their local utility at an interruptible rate, which is lower than the rate for contracting natural gas on a firm basis. The propane-air station will also provide Ft. Stewart with fuel in the event that the natural gas supply is curtailed. While the propane-air station does not affect the actual cost of natural gas, it does affect the cost of services provided by gas. Because the propane-air station and the SES contract affect the cost of gas service, they must be included in the analysis. Our analysis indicates a marginal cost of gas service of 30.0 cents per therm, assuming a total propane usage by the mixing station of 42,278 gallons (38,600 therms) annually. Because the amount of propane that may be required in the event of a curtailment is small relative to the total service requirement, variations in the actual amount should not significantly affect the cost per therm.

  20. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

  1. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M W of geothermal, and 3 M W of landfill gas. The wind powerwind, geothermal, and landfill gas generators, provide theRISK: SUMMARY advance. Landfill gas and geothermal resources

  2. RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

  3. Oil and gas resources of the Fergana basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Advance summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA), in cooperation with the US Geological Survey (USGS), has assessed 13 major petroleum producing regions outside of the United States. This series of assessments has been performed under EIA`s Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). The basic approach used in these assessments was to combine historical drilling, discovery, and production data with EIA reserve estimates and USGS undiscovered resource estimates. Field-level data for discovered oil were used for these previous assessments. In FESAP, supply projections through depletion were typically formulated for the country or major producing region. Until now, EIA has not prepared an assessment of oil and gas provinces in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Before breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Fergana basin was selected for a trial assessment of its discovered and undiscovered oil and gas. The object was to see if enough data could be collected and estimated to perform reasonable field-level estimates of oil and gas in this basin. If so, then assessments of other basins in the FSU could be considered. The objective was met and assessments of other basins can be considered. Collected data for this assessment cover discoveries through 1987. Compared to most other oil and gas provinces in the FSU, the Fergana basin is relatively small in geographic size, and in number and size of most of its oil and gas fields. However, with recent emphasis given to the central graben as a result of the relatively large Mingbulak field, the basin`s oil and gas potential has significantly increased. At least 7 additional fields to the 53 fields analyzed are known and are assumed to have been discovered after 1987.

  4. Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodrick, J.R. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort's electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils [number sign]2 and [number sign]6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

  5. Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodrick, J.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort`s electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils {number_sign}2 and {number_sign}6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

  6. Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell E. Fray

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Progress continues to be made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. Significant progress was made in development of the draft program solicitations. In addition, RPSEA personnel continued an aggressive program of outreach to engage the industry and ensure wide industry participation in the research award solicitation process.

  7. Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell E. Fray

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Significant progress has been made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. RPSEA has concluded an industry-wide collaborative effort to identify focus areas for research awards under this program. This effort is summarized in the RPSEA Draft Annual Plan, which is currently under review by committees established by the Secretary of Energy.

  8. Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    and for their commitment to our education. I would also like to thank Dr. Yuefeng Sun for being part of my committee and Dr. Juan Carlos Laya for serving as a substitute in my thesis defense. My special thanks to Petr?leos Mexicanos for providing me information... was not quantified. In November 2011, Petr?leos Mexicanos (PEMEX) estimated prospective gas resources in the different plays. For the Upper Cretaceous (which includes the Eagle Ford shale) the estimates were 54-106-171 TCF (P90-P50-P10). For the Eagle Ford...

  9. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen and Fuel CellFew-LayerGas Streamsof the

  10. Preliminary evaluation of coal and coalbed gas resource potential of western Clay County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, K.S.; Gazzier, C.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing all previously published data it appeared that if the Mississippi portion of the Black Warrior Basin contained potentially economic seams of coal the thicker downdip section was a more likely place to look. The generosity of several exploration companies in providing an extensive suite of logs that could be correlated with samples contained in the Bureau of Geology Sample Library allowed the authors to correlate and identify these upper Pottsville coal groups previously unknown in Mississippi. The purpose of this study was to identify the potential for coal resources in western Clay County, Mississippi, and to correlate laterally any coal seams identified in order to develop a gross volumetric estimate of in-place resources. It became apparent that many of the shallow coal seams (1,800 feet-3,700 feet) had appreciable quantities of gas, for they exhibited excellent gas shows when drilled. Efforts to determine rank for these coals were made by vitrinite reflectance and thus a preliminary estimate was also made for the potential coalbed methane reserves. 73 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of natural gas prices, renewable resources in general have aSince the use of renewable resources decreases fuel priceof its electricity from renewable resources under long-term

  12. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

  13. A comparison of undiscovered oil and gas resource estimates, Los Padres National Forest in the Ventura Basin Province, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, K.J.; Valin, Z.C. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bain, D.M. [Consultant, Daily City, CA (United States); Hopps, T.E. [Consultant, Santa Paula, CA (United States); Friehauf, J.S.F. [Forest Service, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two recent assessments of the undiscovered oil and gas resources of Los Padres National Forest lands in the Ventura Basin Province using different methodologies and personnel show remarkable coincidence of estimated resources. The 1989 U.S. Geological Survey assessment was part of a National appraisal. In the Ventura Basin Province, two separate plays were assessed and a percentage of resources from these plays was allocated to Federal lands. By this allocation, the undiscovered oil and gas resources of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from <10-140 MMBO (means probability 60 MMBO, million barrels of oil) and 10-250 BCFG (mean probability 110 BCFG, billion cubic feet of gas). In 1993, the U.S. Forest Service completed an oil and gas assessment of the entire 1.8 million-acre Los Padres National Forest as part of a Reasonably Foreseeable Oil and Gas Development Scenario. In those areas of the forest considered to have high potential for the occurrence of oil and gas deposits, a deposit simulation model was used. This method is based on a fundamental reservoir engineering formula in the USGS computer program, FASPU (Fast Appraisal System for Petroleum-Universal). By this method, the undiscovered oil and gas resource of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from 0-182 MMBO (mean probability 56 MMBO) and 9-233 BCFG (mean probability 103 BCFG). An additional 6 MMBO (mean probability) is allocated to forest lands with medium potential within this province but not to any specific prospects. The remarkable coincidence of estimate resources resulting from such different assessment methods and personnel is noteworthy and appears to provide an increased measure of confidence in the estimates.

  14. Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed crust northeast China USArray a b s t r a c t We observe a clear seismic arrival at $35­45 s after

  15. Distinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed by the USArray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Natural Gas Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China b Department of Earth Science, RiceDistinct compositional thin layers at mid-mantle depths beneath northeast China revealed February 2013 Keywords: S to P converted wave mid-mantle reflectors subducted oceanic crust northeast China

  16. Analysis of the effects of section 29 tax credits on reserve additions and production of gas from unconventional resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal tax credits for production of natural gas from unconventional resources can stimulate drilling and reserves additions at a relatively low cost to the Treasury. This report presents the results of an analysis of the effects of a proposed extension of the Section 29 alternative fuels production credit specifically for unconventional gas. ICF Resources estimated the net effect of the extension of the credit (the difference between development activity expected with the extension of the credit and that expected if the credit expires in December 1990 as scheduled). The analysis addressed the effect of tax credits on project economics and capital formation, drilling and reserve additions, production, impact on the US and regional economies, and the net public sector costs and incremental revenues. The analysis was based on explicit modeling of the three dominant unconventional gas resources: Tight sands, coalbed methane, and Devonian shales. It incorporated the most current data on resource size, typical well recoveries and economics, and anticipated activity of the major producers. Each resource was further disaggregated for analysis based on distinct resource characteristics, development practices, regional economics, and historical development patterns.

  17. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

  18. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Lewan (2002) concluded that much of the thermogenic gas produced in this basin is the result of cracking of oil to gas in deeply buried reservoirs. The efficiency of expulsion, migration and trapping has been estimated to range from 0.5 to 10 percent for certain basins (Schmoker, 1994: Zimmerman, 1999). The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin is 910 billion barrels using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated is 1,540 billion barrels using the Platte River software application. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 3,130 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 4,050 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Claypool and Mancini (1989) report that the conversion of oil to gas in reservoirs is a significant source of thermogenic gas in this basin. The Manila and Conecuh Subbasins are oil-prone. Although these subbasins are thermally mature for oil generation and expulsion, they are not thermally mature for secondary, non-associated gas generation and expulsion. The gas produced from the highly productive gas condensate fields (Big Escambia Creek and Flomaton fields) in these subbasins has been interpreted to be, in part, a product of the cracking of oil to gas and thermochemical reduction of evaporite sulfate in the reservoirs (Claypool and Mancini, 1989). The areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior Salt Basins with high potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs (>15,000 ft) have been identified. In the North Louisiana Salt Basin, these potential reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies, especially the Smackover, Cotton Valley, Hosston, and Sligo units. The estimate of the secondary, non-associated gas generated from cracking of oil in the source rock from depths below 12,000 feet in this basin is 4,800 TCF. Assuming an expul

  19. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

  20. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

  1. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the InorganicResources Resources Policies,

  2. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource ProgramResources

  3. Emerging energy security issues: Natural gas in the Gulf Nations, An overview of Middle East resources, export potentials, and markets. Report Series No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proceeds with a presentation of the natural gas resource base of the Gulf nations of the Middle East. The resource base is put in the context of the world natural gas resource and trade flows. This is followed by a discussion of the existing and planned project to move Gulf natural gas to consuming regions. Then a discussion of the source of demand in the likely target markets for the Gulf resource follows. Next, the nature of LNG pricing is discussed. A brief summary concludes the paper.

  4. Constraints to leasing and development of federal resources: OCS oil and gas and geothermal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter I identifies possible technological, economic, and environmental constraints to geothermal resource development. Chapter II discusses constraints relative to outer continental shelf and geothermal resources. General leasing information for each resource is detailed. Chapter III summarizes the major studies relating to development constraints. 37 refs. (PSB)

  5. Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

  6. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

  7. U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Review of Emerging Resources...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    most shale gas and shale oil wells are only a few years old, their long-term productivity is untested. Consequently, the long-term production profiles of shale wells and...

  8. Statistical issues in the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Gordon M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to his untimely death, my friend Dave Wood gave me wise counsel about how best to organize a paper describing uses of statistics in oil and gas exploration. A preliminary reconnaissance of the literature alerted me ...

  9. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic

  10. A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

    2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

  11. Oil and gas resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis is part of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). This one for the Fergana Basin is an EIA first for republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). This was a trial study of data availability and methodology, resulting in a reservoir-level assessment of ultimate recovery for both oil and gas. Ultimate recovery, as used here, is the sum of cumulative production and remaining Proved plus Probable reserves as of the end of 1987. Reasonable results were obtained when aggregating reservoir-level values to the basin level, and in determining general but important distributions of across-basin reservoir and fluid parameters. Currently, this report represents the most comprehensive assessment publicly available for oil and gas in the Fergana Basin. This full report provides additional descriptions, discussions and analysis illustrations that are beneficial to those considering oil and gas investments in the Fergana Basin. 57 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. NPDES permit compliance and enforcement: A resource guide for oil and gas operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the fall of 1996, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission sponsored sessions for government and industry representatives to discuss concerns about the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program under the Clean Water Act. In January 1997, the NPDES Education/Communication/Training Workgroup (ECT Workgroup) was established with co-leaders from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and industry. The ECT Workgroup`s purpose was to develop ideas that would improve communication between NPDES regulators and the oil and gas industry regarding NPDES compliance issues. The Workgroup focused on several areas, including permit compliance monitoring and reporting, enforcement activity and options, and treatment technology. The ECT Workgroup also discussed the need for materials and information to help NPDES regulatory agency personnel understand more about oil and gas industry exploration and extraction operations and treatment processes. This report represents a compendium of the ECT Workgroup`s efforts.

  13. Atlas of Northern Gulf of Mexico Gas and Oil Reservoirs: Procedures and examples of resource distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the program is to produce a reservoir atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico that (1) classifies and groups offshore oil and gas reservoirs into a series of geologically defined reservoir plays, (2) compiles comprehensive reservoir play information that includes descriptive and quantitative summaries of play characteristics, cumulative production, reserves, original oil and gas in place, and various other engineering and geologic data, (3) provides detailed summaries of representative type reservoirs for each play, and (4) organizes computerized tables of reservoir engineering data into a geographic information system (GIS). The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas series of the offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location.

  14. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

  15. Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

  16. Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

  17. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  18. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  19. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, USA, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  20. Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South Inyo Crater,...

  1. DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat Tim R subsoil (Turunen and Moore, 2003). TheyWe showed that sandy subsoils beneath peat near Ramsey Lake conditions beneath the peat. soils beneath the forest, those beneath the peat contained similar In this paper

  2. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

  3. DOE Expedition Discovers the First Gulf of Mexico Resource-Quality Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at BettisEMERGENCYTravel 28 ForHydrate

  4. Results from DOE Expedition Confirm Existence of Resource-Quality Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring our Transportation

  5. New Project To Improve Characterization of U.S. Gas Hydrate Resources |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDynNet-Zero Campus

  6. Research Portfolio Accomplishment Report Unconventional Oil & Gas Resources: Produced Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronic Public Reading Room Electronic Public

  7. U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

  8. Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1 * Mark Skidmore,1 John C. Priscu,2, particularly those that lie beneath polar ice sheets, are beginning to be recog- nized as an important part Vostok, Antarctica, no sub-ice sheet environments have been shown to support microbial ecosystems. Here

  9. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the second involves gas and hydrate (Class 1G, water-poorpriorities for marine gas hydrates, Fire In The Ice, NETLCollett, T. , 1993, Natural gas hydrates of the Prudhoe Bay

  10. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy (EG& G Services) [EG& G Services; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy (Advanced Resources International) [Advanced Resources International

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  11. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  12. Launching a Cornell Examination of the Marcellus System The issues related to the development of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are emblematic of a whole family of extremely complicated Energy. The development plans for the Marcellus Shale are unfolding immediately in our backyards and require of different ways of developing the Marcellus Shale and the economics of not developing the Marcellus Shale. We

  13. Melt generation, crystallization, and extraction beneath segmented oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia M.

    We examine mantle melting, fractional crystallization, and melt extraction beneath fast slipping, segmented oceanic transform fault systems. Three-dimensional mantle flow and thermal structures are calculated using a ...

  14. Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsello, Joseph William

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

  15. Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiswetter, Dean; Black, Ross A.; Steeples, Don W.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick glacial till are clearly...

  16. Seismic evidence for a moderately thick lithosphere beneath the Siberian Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic evidence for a moderately thick lithosphere beneath the Siberian Platform Keith Priestley-wavespeed tomographic model for the upper mantle beneath the Siberian platform and surrounding region derived from lithosphere is $200 km thick beneath most of the Siberian platform but may extend to $250 km depth beneath

  17. Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

  18. Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 states Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

  19. A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States Avner Vengosh,*, Robert B. Jackson,, Nathaniel Warner,§ Thomas H: The rapid rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has hydraulic fracturing. This paper provides a critical review of the potential risks that shale gas operations

  20. Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

  1. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occurrence while drilling a well (Takahashi et al, 2001;logging while drilling (16 wells), wireline logging (2that has led the drilling of 36 wells in gas hydrate-bearing

  2. Infrastructure investments and resource adequacy in the restructured US natural gas market : is supply security at risk?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschhausen, Christian von

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the development of US natural gas infrastructure over the last two decades and to discuss its perspectives. In particular, we focus on the relationship between the regulatory ...

  3. Buoyant melting instabilities beneath extending lithosphere: 1. Numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    Buoyant melting instabilities beneath extending lithosphere: 1. Numerical models John W. Hernlund,1,2 Paul J. Tackley,1,3 and David J. Stevenson4 Received 18 November 2006; revised 18 October 2007 diffusely extending lithosphere is studied using numerical convection models covering a wide range

  4. Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia Acknowledgements This work, A., Amarjargal, S. and Déverchère, J., 2003. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in the Baikal-Mongolia., 2002. Mantle structure and rifting processes in the Baikal-Mongolia region: geophysical data

  5. Beneath the shadow of the Tower Soldiers' Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beneath the shadow of the Tower Soldiers' Tower Schedule of Events October-November 2013 As of Oct. 21, 2013 Telephone: 416-978-3485 (office) E-mail: soldiers.tower@utoronto.ca Soldiers' Tower Web Site: www.alumni.utoronto.ca/tower Facebook: www.facebook.com/soldierstower U of T Events web site: www

  6. Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenterLogging in Logging inLogistics UserAbout

  7. Electrical structure beneath the northern MELT line on the East Pacific Rise at 15450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    Electrical structure beneath the northern MELT line on the East Pacific Rise at 15°450 S Kiyoshi] The electrical structure of the upper mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 15°450 S is imaged structure beneath the northern MELT line on the East Pacific Rise at 15°450 S, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L

  8. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  9. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CEC). 2000. California Natural Gas Analysis and Issues.2002. Average Price of Natural Gas Sold to Electric Utilityfor investments in natural gas and renewables to complement

  10. Geological play analysis of the Pacific Federal Offshore Region - A status report on the National Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunkel, C.A. (Minerals Management Service, Camarillo, CA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological and geophysical data from the federal offshore areas seaward of California, Oregon, and Washington (Pacific Outer Continental Shelf or OCS) are being used to identify petroleum plays for the Department of the Interior's National Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources project. Analysis of these data by a team of Minerals Management Service geo-scientists have led to the definition, delineation, and qualitative characterization of plays in six Pacific OCS assessment provinces: Pacific Northwest, Central California, Santa-Barbara-Ventura Basin, Los Angeles Basin, inner borderland, and other borderland. Plays are defined on the bases of reservoir rock stratigraphy, trap style, and hydrocarbon type. Each play is classified as established, frontier, or conceptual according to its discovery status and data availability. Preliminary analysis of the plays are complete and have been compiled in map and text formats by province. Plays are being further analyzed to characterize their quantitative attributatives such as numbers and sizes of undiscovered fields and geologic risk. Statistical evaluation to develop volumetric estimates of undiscovered oil and gas resources will be completed in late 1994. A discovery process modeling technique will be used to evaluate established plays in the Santa Maria and Santa Barbara-Ventura basins. Subjective modeling, based on estimated field-size distributions, will be applied to frontier and conceptual plays. Formal reports of the assessment results will be presented in 1995.

  11. A comprehensive analysis of contaminant transport in the vadose zone beneath tank SX-109

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, A.L.; Gee, G.W.; White, M.D.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vadose Zone Characterization Project is currently investigating the subsurface distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in S and SX Waste Management Area (WMA-S-SX) located in the 200 West Area of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Spectral-gamma logging of boreholes has detected elevated {sup 137}Cs concentrations as deep as 38 m, a depth considered excessive based on the assumed geochemistry of {sup 137}Cs in Hanford sediments. Routine groundwater sampling under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) have also detected elevated levels of site-specific contaminants downgradient of WMA-S-SX. The objective of this report is to explore the processes controlling the migration of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 99}Tc, and NO{sub 3} through the vadose zone of WMA-S-SX, particularly beneath tank SX-109.

  12. Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

  13. Moho topography beneath the Corinth Rift area (Greece) from inversion of gravity data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Moho topography beneath the Corinth Rift area (Greece) from inversion of gravity data C. Tiberi,1 to Miocene lithospheric instabilities. Key words: boudinage, continental rifts, gravity inversion, Greece

  14. A Temperature Model Of The Crust Beneath The Barents Sea- Investigatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Temperature Model Of The Crust Beneath The Barents Sea- Investigations Along Geotraverses...

  15. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of United States oil and gas resources on CD-ROM: U.S.of United States Oil and Gas Resources conducted by the U.S.assess conventional oil and gas resources. In order to use

  16. Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

  17. Thermo-mechanical structure beneath the young orogenic belt of Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kuo-Fong

    Thermo-mechanical structure beneath the young orogenic belt of Taiwan Kuo-Fong Ma*, Teh-Ru Alex Abstract We investigate the thermo-mechanical properties beneath the young orogenic belt of Taiwan.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Thermo-mechanical; Rheology; Seismicity; Strength profile; Composition

  18. Mantle transition zone beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary and its tectonic implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Mantle transition zone beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary and its tectonic seismic network of Venezuela to study the mantle transition zone structure beneath the Caribbean Caribbean, the 410-km is featured by a narrow (200 km EW) 25-km uplift extending in the NS direction around

  19. Spatial distribution of melt conduits in the mantle beneath oceanic spreading ridges: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accretion beneath the ridges. Dunite veins, composed of the minerals olivine and spinel, mark conduits that mantle melt extraction occurs in a fractal, branching network, and with recent results on formation] There are two essential observational con- straints on melt extraction from the mantle beneath oceanic spreading

  20. Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath a perennial river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath a perennial river Grace W. Su,1,2 James a streambed during groundwater pumping near streams can reduce the pumping capacity, change flow paths) the formation of an unsaturated region beneath the stream, (2) the pumping capacity, (3) stream water fluxes

  1. Horizontal subduction and truncation of the Cocos Plate beneath central Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Robert W.

    Horizontal subduction and truncation of the Cocos Plate beneath central Mexico Xyoli Pe from a trans-Mexico temporary broadband seismic network centered on Mexico City, we report that the subducting Cocos Plate beneath central Mexico is horizontal, and tectonically underplates the base

  2. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold to infer the canyon-infilling, fold uplift, and gas hydrate occurrences beneath the frontal fold at the toe simu- lating reflector (BSR) on seismic sections indicates the base of gas hydrate stability zone

  3. Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceived Justice behind Disruptive Tactics of Migrant Wage Claimants in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, X; Wang, L; Su, Y

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bs_bs_banner Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceivedmigrant workers perch on roof tops or towering construction

  4. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991activities, such as oil and gas production, natural gasmade in quantifying oil and gas resource volumes in

  5. The University of Aberdeen is a charity registered in Scotland, No SC013683 Oil and gas industry resources in Special Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    guide The University of Aberdeen is a charity registered in Scotland, No SC013683 Oil and gas.abdn.ac.uk/library/about/special/ Introduction Special Collections have established an Oil and Gas Archive to hold collections relating to the oil and gas industry, spanning 40 years. All areas are represented in holdings, including major

  6. Low wave speed zones in the crust beneath SE Tibet revealed by ambient noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    , China, 4 State Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resource and Prospecting, and Unconventional Natural Gas's Interior, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China Abstract We present a refined 3D crustal model

  7. Oil and Gas (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

  8. Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

  9. Computer resources Computer resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

  10. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Preston D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas and Geothermal Resources (2006) Oil ?eld data ?le datedDivision of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources (2007),Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources, Sacramento

  11. Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for...

  12. Ice-induced enhancement of solar radiation beneath overcast skies near Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Nicholas Charles

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF SOLAR RADIATION BENEATH OVERCAST SKIES NEAR ANTARCTICA A Thesis by NICHOLAS CHARLES HORVATH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIFNCE May 1981 Major Subject: Meteorology ICE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF SOLAR RADIATION BENEATH OVERCAST SKIES NEAR ANTARCTICA A Thesis by NICHOLAS CHARLES HORVATH Approsed as to style and content by: (Ch irman of Committee) (Member...

  13. Recent Advances in Mapping Deep Permafrost and Gas Hydrate Occurrences Using Industry Seismic Data, Richards Island Area, Northwest Territories, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    101 Recent Advances in Mapping Deep Permafrost and Gas Hydrate Occurrences Using Industry Seismic the extent of gas hydrate occurrences beneath it. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with lakes, primarily related to thermal variations within the permafrost. Keywords: gas hydrates; Mallik; Richards

  14. Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and environmental mitigation (including reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and sequestration of carbon). The Department's Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...

  15. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas-fired power plants, which will increase California'spower plants, which will presumably increase California'sin California is PG&E's Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant,

  16. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Chemical Producers' Association, Canadian Foundry Association, Canadian Gas Association, Canadian Petroleum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on energy in the industrial sector or publications by NRCan that reflect energy consumption in various des ressources naturelles, Québec. Ministry of Energy Mines and Petroleum Resource, BC. CIEEDAC An Inventory of Industrial Energy and Emissions Databases in Canada, 2007 Prepared for Natural Resources Canada

  17. The Potential of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles as Grid Resources: the Case of a Gas and Petroleum Oriented Elecricity Generation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Mark R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferdowsi, M. (2007). Plug-hybrid vehicles – A vision for thepower: battery, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles as resources2010). Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as regulating power

  18. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 615-644, December 2006 Distribution and Characters of Gas Hydrate Offshore of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    of Gas Hydrate Offshore of Southwestern Taiwan Char-Shine Liu 1, *, Philippe Schnürle 1 , Yunshuen Wang 2 reflector (BSR) is a key indicator for the presence of gas hydrate beneath the sea floor. Widely distributed% of the seismic profiles that we collected. A newly compiled BSR distri- bution map suggests that gas hydrates

  19. Unconventional Energy Resources: 2013 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration: American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Energy Minerals Division

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains nine unconventional energy resource commodity summaries and an analysis of energy economics prepared by committees of the Energy Minerals Division of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Unconventional energy resources, as used in this report, are those energy resources that do not occur in discrete oil or gas reservoirs held in structural or stratigraphic traps in sedimentary basins. These resources include coal, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, tight-gas sands, gas shale and shale oil, geothermal resources, oil sands, oil shale, and U and Th resources and associated rare earth elements of industrial interest. Current U.S. and global research and development activities are summarized for each unconventional energy commodity in the topical sections of this report.

  20. Unconventional Energy Resources: 2007-2008 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes five 2007-2008 resource commodity committee reports prepared by the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Current United States and global research and development activities related to gas hydrates, gas shales, geothermal resources, oil sands, and uranium resources are included in this review. These commodity reports were written to advise EMD leadership and membership of the current status of research and development of unconventional energy resources. Unconventional energy resources are defined as those resources other than conventional oil and natural gas that typically occur in sandstone and carbonate rocks. Gas hydrate resources are potentially enormous; however, production technologies are still under development. Gas shale, geothermal, oil sand, and uranium resources are now increasing targets of exploration and development, and are rapidly becoming important energy resources that will continue to be developed in the future.

  1. Constraints on a plume in the mid-mantle beneath the Iceland region from seismic array data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    of kilometres long, with P-wave speeds VPy0.5 per cent high, extend into the lower mantle beneath some, though of such a continuous low-wave-speed zone beneath a hotspot does not necessarily indicate a zone of upwelling traversing was investigated by Ji & Nataf (1998), who applied 2-D waveform tomography to scattered long-period P waves

  2. Recalculated probability of M !!!!!! 7 earthquakes beneath the Sea of Marmara, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recalculated probability of M !!!!!! 7 earthquakes beneath the Sea of Marmara, Turkey Tom Parsons U); KEYWORDS: earthquake probability, Sea of Marmara, seismic hazard, Turkey, stress interaction, North of Marmara, Turkey, J. Geophys. Res., 109, B05304, doi:10.1029/2003JB002667. 1. Introduction [2] The North

  3. Sampling and Hydrogeology of the Vadose Zone Beneath the 300 Area Process Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Four open pits were dug with a backhoe into the vadose zone beneath the former 300 Area Process Ponds in April 2003. Samples were collected about every 2 feet for physical, chemical, and/or microbiological characterization. This reports presents a stratigraphic and geohydrologic summary of the four excavations.

  4. Re^Os evidence for replacement of ancient mantle lithosphere beneath the North China craton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    Re^Os evidence for replacement of ancient mantle lithosphere beneath the North China craton Shan and was replaced by more fertile lithospheric mantle sometime after the Paleozoic. Moreover, lithospheric mantle crust (2700 Ma), suggesting that the original Archean lithosphere was replaced in the Proterozoic

  5. RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy and geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxter, Ethan F.

    RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy with Boston University undergraduates to analyze the mineralogy and unravel the unique story that each rock into modern scientific methods of geochemistry and mineralogy and to unlock for them the exciting

  6. The structure of a Mesozoic basin beneath the Lake Tana area, Ethiopia, revealed by magnetotelluric imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The structure of a Mesozoic basin beneath the Lake Tana area, Ethiopia, revealed by magnetotelluric of Mines, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia c Geological Survey of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Received 18 April 2006 Abstract The northwestern Plateau of Ethiopia is almost entirely covered with extensive Tertiary

  7. Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Caribbean-South American boundary region American continental lithosphere, the Venezuelan archipelago, and the Caribbean oceanic lithosphere

  8. Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a, , Anne Academy of Sciences (RCAG), P.O. Box 51, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o-wave splitting upper mantle Mongolia Hangay dome Siberian craton Bogd fault Mongolia represents the northernmost

  9. Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South Inyo

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction | OpenCrater, Long

  10. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbe nice if logos couldCalifornia:using

  11. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California: An Initial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, searchLook at the 4 May

  12. Teacher Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teacher Resources For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Teacher Resources Scavenger...

  13. Measurement of Oil and Gas Emissions from a Marine Seep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Boles, J R; Luyendyk, B P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the gas flux from shallow gas hydrate deposits: InteractionK.A. , Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare,Emerging US gas resources; 4, Hydrates contain vast store of

  14. The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanty, Evi

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    As energy supplies from known resources are declining, the development of new energy sources is mandatory. One reasonable source is natural gas from unconventional resources. This study focus on three types of unconventional gas resources: coalbeds...

  15. Unconventional Energy Resources: 2011 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration: American Association of Petroleum Geologists

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains nine unconventional energy resource commodity summaries prepared by committees of the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Unconventional energy resources, as used in this report, are those energy resources that do not occur in discrete oil or gas reservoirs held in structural or stratigraphic traps in sedimentary basins. These resources include coal, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, tight gas sands, gas shale and shale oil, geothermal resources, oil sands, oil shale, and uranium resources. Current U.S. and global research and development activities are summarized for each unconventional energy commodity in the topical sections of this report. Coal and uranium are expected to supply a significant portion of the world's energy mix in coming years. Coalbed methane continues to supply about 9% of the U.S. gas production and exploration is expanding in other countries. Recently, natural gas produced from shale and low-permeability (tight) sandstone has made a significant contribution to the energy supply of the United States and is an increasing target for exploration around the world. In addition, oil from shale and heavy oil from sandstone are a new exploration focus in many areas (including the Green River area of Wyoming and northern Alberta). In recent years, research in the areas of geothermal energy sources and gas hydrates has continued to advance. Reviews of the current research and the stages of development of these unconventional energy resources are described in the various sections of this report.

  16. Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbedema, Tometi Koku

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rich in such resources, like oil and gas, have encounteredDivision of Oil and Gas, Geothermal Resources, Sacramento,and natural resource commission on oil and gas activity

  17. Using dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater resources in a small, high elevation catchment to predicted climate changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water in a small high elevation catchment to provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge; and to determine subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. They identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water from bedrock aquifers that have elevated radiogenic {sup 4}He, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have 'mantle' helium and hydrothermal carbon isotope signatures. Although a bimodal distribution in apparent groundwater age indicates that groundwater storage times range from less than a year to several decades, water that recharges seasonally is the largest likely contributor to stream baseflow. Under climate change scnearios with earlier snowmelt, the groundwater that moves through the alluvial aquifer seasonally will be depleted earlier, providing less baseflow and possible extreme low flows in the creek during summer and fall. Dissolved noble gas measurements indciate recharge temperatures are 5 to 11 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that excess air concentrations are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, as indicated by {delta}{sup 13}C-DIC values that are consistent with incorporation of CO{sub 2} from soil respiration. Recharge temperatures are close to or slightly higher than mean annual air temperature, and are consistent with recharge during May and June, when snowpack melting occurs.

  18. Deregulation in Japanese gas industries : significance and problems of gas rate deregulation for large industrial customers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inoue, Masayuki

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the circumstances surrounding Japanese City gas industries have been changing drastically. On one hand, as energy suppliers, natural gas which has become major fuel resource for city gas, as public utilities, ...

  19. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  20. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  1. Resource Adequacy Advisory Committeey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Total Resources Reported Net Gas-Fired Plants (2017) Import Assumption* "Surplus" Average Min B=D*1 in winter loads (summer didn't matter because we assumed no marketmatter because we assumed no market Report (April 2011) S. to N. Transfer (AC + DC) A B C D E F G 2010 Demand 1:2 Adequacy Requirement (AR

  2. Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generating Resources Advisory Committee February 27, 2014 Steven Simmons and Gillian Charles Upcoming Symposium 9:15 am Natural Gas Peaking Technologies Technology Trends Proposed reference plant Costing, Economies of Scale, Normalizations Reference Plants 12:30 pm Discussion of Next GRAC Meetings

  3. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  4. A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/egrid. [24] Wang,Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations.CO: National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory Report TP-

  5. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003), “Distributed Energy Resources Customer AdoptionGas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations,”National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory, Golden, CO,

  6. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations”,National Renewable Energy Resource Laboratory, Golden, CO,Edwards, “Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption

  7. Low seismic velocity layers in the Earth's crust beneath Eastern Siberia (Russia) and Central Mongolia: receiver function data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Stephen Shangxing

    Mongolia: receiver function data and their possible geological implication Yu.A. Zorina,*, V.V. Mordvinovaa­Baikal, Paleozoic Mongolian, Early Mesozoic Mongolia­Okhotsk fold areas, and beneath the Siberian platform

  8. Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health,...

  9. 382-1 underground gasoline storage tank soil-gas survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, I.D.

    1993-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil-gas survey was conducted near the 382 Pump House in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of the soil-gas survey was to characterize the extent of petroleum product contamination in the soil beneath the 382-1 underground gasoline storage tank excavation. The tank was discovered to have leaked when it was removed in September 1992. The results of this soil-gas survey indicate petroleum products released from the 382-1 tank are probably contained in a localized region of soil directly beneath the tank excavation site. The soil-gas data combined with earlier tests of groundwater from a nearby downgradient monitoring well suggest the spilled petroleum hydrocarbons have not penetrated the soil profile to the water table.

  10. Virginia Gas and Oil Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas and Oil Act addresses the exploration, development, and production of oil and gas resources in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It contains provisions pertaining to wells and well spacing,...

  11. Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

  12. Soil stiffness beneath a rigid mass using non-destructive impact testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, James Christopher

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jean-Louis Briaud Research on the prediction of the soil stiffness beneath spread footings using non-destructive impact testing was conducted. Three sites having three different soils were investigated.... The soils tested were sand, clay and a landfill covered with a layer of gravel. Impact tests were performed on several footings resting on sand. These footings ranged in size from 0. 093 to 0. 836 m'. One small footing (0. 093 m') was used at several...

  13. Distribution of stress in the oceanic lithosphere beneath the Lau-Havre Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altman, Larry Wayne

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . If the material injected into the basin floor came from the upper edge of the down-going slab, then it should be andesitic in composition just like the rocks of the volcanic frontal arc which are thought to have the same source. The CI CI CI Cl I I I I... arcs. In this theory, the Benioff zones do not delineate great thrust faults in the classical sense, but rather, they reflect underthrusting or subduction of lithospheric plates into the mantle beneath the arcs. The Origin of Marginal Basins...

  14. Resource Management Services: Mineral Resources, Parts 550-559 (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes a Bureau of Mineral Resources within the Department of Environmental Conservation, which has the authority to regulate the exploration and mining for oil and gas resources...

  15. Unconventional gas: truly a game changer?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If prices of natural gas justify and/or if concerns about climate change push conventional coal off the table, vast quantities of unconventional gas can be brought to market at reasonable prices. According to a report issued by PFC Energy, global unconventional natural gas resources that may be ultimately exploited with new technologies could be as much as 3,250,000 billion cubic feet. Current conventional natural gas resources are estimated around 620,000 billion cubic feet.

  16. Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

  17. Oil and Gas General Provisions (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter describes general provisions for the exploration and development of oil and gas resources in Montana. The chapter addresses royalty interests, regulations for the lease of local...

  18. Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Act is to promote safety, the protection of the environment, the conservation of oil and gas resources, joint production arrangements, and economically efficient infrastructures.

  19. Oil & Gas Research | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data and modeling tools needed to predict and quantify potential risks associated with oil and gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing or other...

  20. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/UnionGlossary Shale GasShale gas

  1. Geothermal resources of Sao Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffield, W.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal studies were carried out on the island of Sao Miguel, Azores to characterize the nature of the resource, to estimate its magnitude, and to identify target areas toward which exploration and developmental drilling might be directed. The main geothermal resource areas are Furnas, Agua de Pau, and Sete Cidades, three Quaternary silicic volcanic centers characterized by summit calderas beneath which magmatic heat sources provide thermal energy to overlying hydrothermal convection systems. For each of the systems, the studies have defined the size of the system, the subsurface temperature, the thermodynamic state of fluid in the system, the chemical composition of the fluid, and permeable parts of the system. 8 figs. (ACR)

  2. Oil and Gas Conservation (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes the state's interest in encouraging the development, production, and utilization of natural gas and oil resources in a manner which will prevent waste and lead to the...

  3. Additional Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

  4. State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Suite Arizona http www azogcc az gov Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Arkansas Oil and Gas Commission Natural Resources Dr Ste Arkansas http www aogc state ar us JDesignerPro...

  5. Aragonite crusts and pisolites beneath dolomitic tepees, Lake MacLeod evaporate basin, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R.; Kendall, A.C.; Dunham, J.B.; Logan, B.W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research currently being conducted by the Sedimentology and Marine Geology Group, under Brian W. Logan at the University of Western Australia, has recently concentrated on Lake MacLeod, a 2000 km/sup 2/ (770 mi/sup 2/) coastal salina on the western coast of Australia. This work has shown that this evaporite basin, which is 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft) below sea level, is separated from the Indian Ocean by a topographic barrier, but seawater under hydrostatic head, seeps freely through the barrier and discharges from several vents and springs in a carbonate mud flat at the north end of the basin. From there, seawater flows slowly across the basin, evaporating and depositing carbonate, gypsum, and ephemeral halite. About 10 to 12 m (33 to 39 ft) of evaporites have been deposited in the past 5300 years. In July 1982, the authors visited the carbonate mud flats and discovered abundant aragonite pisolites and botryoidal-mammillary crusts of fibrous aragonite cement beneath lily-pad tepee slabs of cemented protodolomite. Thick aragonite crusts cover both the undersides of lily-pad slabs and the lithified floors of tepees. Crusts covering the floors are more botryoidal and consist of both aragonite nubs and mounds (0.2 to 2.5 cm, 0.08 to 1 in., in diameter), and a few scattered, loose pisolites, several millimeters in diameter. The manner in which crusts, pisolites, and tepees occur at Lake MacLeod raises the possibility that they and their ancient counterparts from the Permian basin share a common origin. Perhaps Permian pisolites and aragonite crusts formed beneath cemented slabs of peritidal sediments in tepees bathed by marine water which seeped across exposed portions of the shelf crest.

  6. Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

  7. Seismic structure and ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the Earth's mantle beneath Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Lianxing

    Seismic structure and ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the Earth's mantle beneath Southeast t We constrain seismic structure and ultra-low velocity zones near the Earth's core-mantle boundary that the strong scatterers represent ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs). We suggest that the seismic structure

  8. Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late-than early-successional stage biological soil crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late- than early-successional stage biological soil crusts Brian J. Darby a,*, Deborah A. Neher a , Jayne Belnap b a Department of Plant and Soil; accepted 12 April 2006 Abstract Biological soil crusts are key mediators of carbon and nitrogen inputs

  9. Density distribution of the India plate beneath the Tibetan plateau: Geophysical and petrological constraints on the kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Density distribution of the India plate beneath the Tibetan plateau: Geophysical and petrological combine seismological and Bouguer anomaly data with thermo-kinematic and petrological modelling of its descent is reached. In an integrated geophysical and petrological approach, the temperature field

  10. Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface mixed layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    mixed-layer energy [D'Asaro et al., 1995]. In this study we show that, even under weak wind and waveRapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface Received 7 March 2008; revised 9 May 2008; accepted 2 June 2008; published 8 July 2008. [1] High

  11. Strategic Significance of Americas Oil Shale Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heavy oil and tar sand, coal liquids, gas-to-liquids (GTL), hydrogen, gas hydrates, and renewable energy resources, as well as oil shale, which is the focus of this re- port....

  12. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  13. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  14. Employee, Retiree Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:researchEmerging Threats and

  15. Fermilab | Resources for ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photophotoReleases Subscribe

  16. Fermilab | Resources | Industrial Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A This photophotoReleases

  17. Comprises over of Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into fuels including gasoline. Like coal, it can be burned in power plants, but its high sulfur and heavy to 1% of the region's energy resources. Hydro- power 46% Coal 18% Energy Efficiency 16% Natural Gas 11) Energy Efficiency (4,633 MW) Coal (5,396 MW) Hydropower (13,401.8 MW) Dispatched Average Megawatts

  18. Renewable Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Explore the following renewable energy technology areas for resources and information focusing on Federal application opportunities. Solar Wind Geothermal Biomass Landfill Gas...

  19. 343. Document entitled "Develop "Frontier" Resources to Ensure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3. Document entitled "Develop "Frontier" Resources to Ensure Future Oil and Natural Gas Supply," dated March 8, 2001. B-5 Exemption - Information withheld (under Exemption 5)...

  20. ABOUT THE JOURNAL Marine Resource Economics publishes creative and scholarly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    biodiversity, marine and coastal recreation, marine pollution, offshore oil and gas, seabed mining, renewable pollution, coastal and marine recreation, ocean energy resources, coastal climate adaptation, ecosystem

  1. Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elby, Andy

    Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES Epistemological resources University Maryland, College Park Trisha Kagey Montgomery County Public Schools #12;Epistemological resources are better understood as made up of finer-grained cognitive resources whose activation depends sensitively

  2. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  3. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers` short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners` (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  4. Resource Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource Program

  5. NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.F. Fenster

    2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this report, but are planned to be included in the hydrology section of future revisions of the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c).

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  7. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    hydrocarbons such as natural gas. Whereas an over- all goal for the century is to achieve a sustainable system to increased use of unconventional gas resources as a result of declining supplies of conventional resources case study of energy transitions we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from

  8. Developing a coupled ice flow, meltwater plume model to study Developing a coupled ice flow, meltwater plume model to study interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica.interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , meltwater plume model to study interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica.interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica. Victoria Lee1 (v.lee@bristol.ac.uk), Tony Payne1 on the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Observational studies have shown that ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica

  9. Cultural Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of

  10. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  11. Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbedema, Tometi Koku

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local residents while natural gas energy resource developmentEnergy resource development creates new opportunities for locallocal communities are undermined with existing energy development

  12. Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine #12;11/17/2014 4 Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Background Primary Components Gas-fired combustion

  13. Managing talent flow. 2006 Energy and Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and market growth in mining, utilities, oil and gas have been relatively stagnant, prompting many youngManaging talent flow. 2006 Energy and Resources Talent Pulse Survey Report Consulting #12;Executive ................................................................ 13 Contents #12;1 Managing talent flow 2006 Energy and Resources Talent Pulse Survey Report 2006

  14. Specialized Resources: http://library.queensu.ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Specialized Resources: http://library.queensu.ca Under `Locations & Hours', choose: MADGIC - Maps by keyword to find these (and many more) resources: Annual Estimates of Employment Earning and Hours-STAT ­ time series for academic, non-profit use - FREE Energy Statistics Handbook ­ statistics on oil, gas

  15. PROCEDURES FOR ALLOCATION AND AGGREGATION OF RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Chapter AA PROCEDURES FOR ALLOCATION AND AGGREGATION OF RESOURCES By Ronald R. Charpentier, T.......................................................................................................AA-7 Appendix 1 Aggregation of Undiscovered Oil, Gas, and NGL Volumes Of Regions to World Total Monte RH. The separate reporting of onshore versus offshore undiscovered resources is important to economic

  16. New study shows prospects for unconventional natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharer, J.C.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With reserves of conventional sources of natural gas in the lower 48 expected to decline in coming decades, the potential of various supplemental gas sources is of critical interest to energy planners and decision makers. Substantial quantities of supplemental supplies can be produced domestically from Alaskan and unconventional sources or synthesized through conversion of organic materials. In addition, imports of LNG and pipeline gas from Canada and Mexico can further supplement the supply of gas available. Small quantities of gas already are being produced commercially from unconventional sources: approximately 0.8 tcf annually from western tight gas sands and 0.1 tcf from E. Devonian gas shales. A consensus is beginning to form in the gas industry on a reasonable range for forecasts of unconventional gas resources and potential production. The assessed resources include western tight gas sand, E. Devonian gas shales, coal seam methane, and methane from geopressured zones.

  17. Offshore Natural Gas Royalty Regime (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The province’s offshore contains large natural gas deposits. The Provincial Government has developed an Offshore Natural Gas Royalty Regime that will ensure these resources are developed in the...

  18. Utility Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict SolarJohnpotential-calc Sign InPages

  19. Archaeological Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management » History »Dept

  20. Online Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeeding accessOfficeAdsorptionOnline

  1. Computing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit theInnovationComputationalEnergyEvents

  2. Volunteers - Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolker

  3. Business Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced MaterialsEnergy,EnvelopeJeffersonBusinessPractices Sign In About

  4. Marketing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'llMappingMariaHereld Manager,Markdefault

  5. Subcontractor Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... StrengtheningLab (NewportStudying theSubcontactor

  6. Teacher Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails TakingRTapeUpdatedTeachers »

  7. Privacy Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPoints of Contact

  8. Mobile Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7,AMission MissionMistakesMoMobile

  9. Chemical kinetic modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of sour gas for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongartz, Dominik

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxy-fuel combustion of sour gas, a mixture of natural gas (primarily methane (CH 4 )), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), could enable the utilization of large natural gas resources, especially when ...

  10. Alternative Fuel Vehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles in California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbanat, Brian A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Canadian Natural Gas Vehicles Survey,” SAE 892067,2000. Gushee, David E, “Natural Gas Vehicles Stall on Way toWelfare Costs of Natural Gas Vehicles,” Resources for the

  11. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANCE HAYS

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

  12. GEOLOGIC ASSESSMENT OF DRILLING, COMPLETION, AND STIMULATION METHODS IN SELECTED GAS SHALE PLAYS WORLDWIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Harsh Jay

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States regularly imports majority of the transportation oil, and several TCF of natural gas annually. Nevertheless, there is very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of natural gas in just...

  13. Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbedema, Tometi Koku

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and meditation on “oil and gas industries’ promotion thatrich in such resources, like oil and gas, have encounteredMost conflicts involving oil and gas drilling are rooted in

  14. Trinity Gas to explore for gas in Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trinity Gas Corp. officials signed an agreement on May 20, 1997, with the Cauca Valley Corp. (CVC) allowing Trinity to use CVC data to explore for natural gas in the Cauca Valley of Colombia. CVC, Colombia`s Valle del Cauca water resources and environmental division, is evaluating Colombia`s underground water reserves to protect, control and preserve fresh water aquifers, some of which contain natural gas pockets that cause blowouts in farmers` water wells. Preparations now are underway for drilling Trinity`s first well at the Palmira 1 site on the San Jose Hacienda, the largest privately owned sugar cane plantation in the valley. Trinity also entered into an agreement with the Cauca Valley Natural Gas and Electricity Project to furnish natural gas, generated electricity and energy fuel for the industrial district in the region. According to this contract, many valley residents will have electric service for the first time.

  15. Bioremediation of RDX in the vadose zone beneath the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shull, T.L.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.; McKinney, D.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of dissolved high explosives (HE), in particular RDX and HMX, is well documented in the perched aquifer beneath the Pantex Plant, but the distribution of HE in the vadose zone has not yet been well defined. Although current remediation activities focus on the contamination in the perched aquifer, eventually regulatory concern is likely to turn to the residual contamination in the vadose zone. Sources of HE include the infiltration of past wastewater discharges from several HE-processing facilities through the ditch drainage system and leachate from former Landfill 3. With limited existing data on the HE distribution in the vadose zone and without preventive action, it must be assumed that residual HE could be leached into infiltrating water, providing a continuing supply of contamination to the perched aquifer. The purpose of this project was to more closely examine the fate and transport of HE in the vadose zone through mathematical modeling and laboratory experimentation. In particular, this report focuses on biodegradation as one possible fate of HE. Biodegradation of RDX in the vadose zone was studied because it is both present in highest concentration and is likely to be of the greatest regulatory concern. This study had several objectives: determine if indigenous soil organisms are capable of RDX biodegradation; determine the impact of electron acceptor availability and nutrient addition on RDX biodegradation; determine the extent of RDX mineralization (i.e., conversion to inorganic carbon) during biodegradation; and estimate the kinetics of RDX biodegradation to provide information for mathematical modeling of fate and transport.

  16. Review and model-based analysis of factors influencing soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. A simple, multi-compartment model was developed to predict soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) plantations in the southeastern United States. Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of sustainable switchgrass production for bioenergy because soil organic matter promotes water retention, nutrient supply, and soil properties that minimize erosion. A literature review was included for the purpose of model parameterization and five model-based experiments were conducted to predict how changes in environment (temperature) or crop management (cultivar, fertilization, and harvest efficiency) might affect soil carbon storage and nitrogen losses. Predictions of soil carbon sequestration were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the ratio of belowground to aboveground biomass production, and temperature. Predictions of ecosystem nitrogen loss were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the soil C/N ratio, and nitrogen remobilization efficiency (i.e., nitrogen cycling within the plant). Model-based experiments indicated that 1) soil carbon sequestration can be highly site specific depending on initial soil carbon stocks, temperature, and the amount of annual nitrogen fertilization, 2) response curves describing switchgrass yield as a function of annual nitrogen fertilization were important to model predictions, 3) plant improvements leading to greater belowground partitioning of biomass could increase soil carbon sequestration, 4) improvements in harvest efficiency have no indicated effects on soil carbon and nitrogen, but improve cumulative biomass yield, and 5) plant improvements that reduce organic matter decomposition rates could also increase soil carbon sequestration, even though the latter may not be consistent with desired improvements in plant tissue chemistry to maximize yields of cellulosic ethanol.

  17. Andrew Ford BWeb for Modeling the Environment 1 Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    for clean vehicles. Natural gas was also the most popular fuel for new power generation during of Natural Gas in the USA These exercises provide an opportunity to use system dynamics to study the life cycle of a non- renewable resource. Natural gas may be the most important source of energy in the United

  18. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS, AND NGL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    AM-i Chapter AM U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASSESSMENT MODEL FOR UNDISCOVERED CONVENTIONAL OIL, GAS Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of the oil, gas, and natural-gas liquids (NGL) resources by the USGS in1998 for undiscovered oil, gas, and NGL resources that reside in conventional accumulations

  19. advanced automotive gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the environment and legislation introduced to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve resource efficiency, eco product design and manufacturing strategies have to be developed...

  20. California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Place: Sacramento, California Coordinates: 38.5815719,...

  1. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy,...

  2. Impact of Recent Discoveries on Petroleum and Natural Gas Exploration: Emphasis on India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two discoveries have greatly impacted understanding relevant to the origination and emplacement of petroleum and natural gas deposits. One discovery, pertaining to hydrocarbon formation from methane broadens significantly potential regions where abiotic petroleum and natural gas deposits might be found. The other, discovery of the physical impossibility of Earth-mantle convection, restricts the range and domain of geodynamic behavior, and leads to new insights on the formation of petroleum and natural gas deposits. This article highlights the impact and implications of those discoveries, especially as they relate to petroleum and natural gas exploration in India and throughout the world. From the reasoning developed here, the generality of the considerations involved, the understanding developed with respect to the East African Rift System, and the experience garnered from the larger and older Siberian Traps, the prognosis and potential for the region beneath the Deccan Traps of India to eventually become a major source of petroleum and natural gas seems quite favorable.

  3. Pipeline Politics: Natural Gas in Eurasia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landrum, William W.; Llewellyn, Benjamin B.; Limesand, Craig M.; Miller, Dante J.; Morris, James P.; Nowell, Kathleen S.; Sherman, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    important to US efforts to reduce its reliance on Middle Eastern energy resources. Presently, pipelines in Eurasia stretch across thousands of miles throughout unstable political regions. Disruptions in gas and oil supplies negatively affect the economies...

  4. Oil, Gas, and Metallic Minerals (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operators of oil, gas, and metallic mineral exploration and production operations are required to obtain a drilling permit from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and file specific forms with...

  5. Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a major geologic feature that cuts across Cameroon from the south west to the north east. It is a unique volcanic lineament which has both an oceanic and a continental sector and consists of a chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline volcanoes stretching from the Atlantic island of Pagalu to the interior of the African continent. The oceanic sector includes the islands of Bioko (formerly Fernando Po) and Sao Tome and Principe while the continental sector includes the Etinde, Cameroon, Manengouba, Bamboutos, Oku and Mandara mountains, as well as the Adamawa and Biu Plateaus. In addition to the CVL, three other major tectonic features characterize the region: the Benue Trough located northwest of the CVL, the Central African Shear Zone (CASZ), trending N70 degrees E, roughly parallel to the CVL, and the Congo Craton in southern Cameroon. The origin of the CVL is still the subject of considerable debate, with both plume and non-plume models invoked by many authors (e.g., Deruelle et al., 2007; Ngako et al, 2006; Ritsema and Allen, 2003; Burke, 2001; Ebinger and Sleep, 1998; Lee et al, 1994; Dorbath et al., 1986; Fairhead and Binks, 1991; King and Ritsema, 2000; Reusch et al., 2010). Crustal structure beneath Cameroon has been investigated previously using active (Stuart et al, 1985) and passive (Dorbath et al., 1986; Tabod, 1991; Tabod et al, 1992; Plomerova et al, 1993) source seismic data, revealing a crust about 33 km thick at the south-western end of the continental portion of the CVL (Tabod, 1991) and the Adamawa Plateau, and thinner crust (23 km thick) beneath the Garoua Rift in the north (Stuart et al, 1985) (Figure 1). Estimates of crustal thickness obtained using gravity data show similar variations between the Garoua rift, Adamawa Plateau, and southern part of the CVL (Poudjom et al., 1995; Nnange et al., 2000). In this study, we investigate further crustal structure beneath the CVL and the adjacent regions in Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  7. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  8. Top Resources | Commercial Buildings Resource Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Programs & Offices Consumer Information Commercial Buildings Resource Database Resources to support the adoption of energy-saving building technologies Search form Search...

  9. Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Economic Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private Automobile Transportation, Technology and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Implications of Natural Gas Vehicle Technology in U.S. Private natural gas resources, and the growing international liquefied natural gas (LNG) market, gas prices

  10. Annual resources report. [Glossary on technical terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is separated into the following sections: acknowledgments; a table of contents; a list of tables and figures; a glossary; an introduction; an overview of the role of energy resources in New Mexico; separate sections on oil and gas, coal, electrical generation, uranium, and geothermal energy; a section on the geologic setting of oil and gas, coal, and uranium; an appendix of additional tables pertaining to oil and gas development; and a listing of selected references. The glossary is a brief listing of technical terms used in the report with simplified definitions for the reader's use. The overview contains highlights of data found in the report as well as comparisons of New Mexico's resources with those of other states and the nation. In general, each section covering a resource area describes reserves, production, prices, consumption, transportation, employment, and revenue statistics over the past ten or more years and projections to the year 2000.

  11. Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Training & Development Mentoring Safety Program Brochure Postdoctoral Blog Resources The resources in this section have been curated to better support you in your...

  12. LANSCE | User Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposal process to the completion of the experiment, LANSCE provides its users with resources critical to their experiements and their experience. Lujan Resources WNR Resources...

  13. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469DecadeOrigin State Glossary HomeCapacityNatural Gas

  14. Oil and Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil ResearchEnergy OfficeProjectsResearch in

  15. ARM - Methane Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARMMeasurementsMethane Gas Outreach Home Room

  16. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports byTransportation

  17. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOil & Gas Efficient recovery

  18. Florida Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May2009 2010 2011 2012

  19. Florida Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May2009 2010 2011

  20. Georgia Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPriceIndustrial Consumers48 4.95

  1. Hawaii Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAINCommercialPipeline22.38

  2. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in6 The

  3. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in6 The7

  4. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in6 The78

  5. Idaho Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-MonthExportsLeaseThousand4.37

  6. Shale Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a eviequestionnairesMillionNovember 200061:WaterGas

  7. Washington Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet) Gas, WetCubicYearYear

  8. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemical industry, port activitiesLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  9. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cultural and economic life involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemicalLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  10. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemical industry, port activitiesLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  11. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved with water resource issues. The oil and gas industry, the chemical industry, port activitiesLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  12. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources JumpAnaconda, Montana:

  13. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  14. Gas power, its promises and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seay, J.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the recent decline in natural gas supply, it is still the dominant domestic source of energy supply and the most widely used fuel in the industrial, commercial, and household sectors. The basic problem of the gas industry is that of finding new supplies cost-competitive with other fuels in order to maintain the delivery of adequate gaseous energy to its customers, utilizing the existing and literally irreplaceable underground transmission and distribution system. The decline in gas supplies is traced to regulation of the field price of natural gas at a level too low to insure continuing additions to reserves at a rate sufficient to balance production. As a result, the US is drawing down its inventory of gas supply. The higher prices for gas in the field established by the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 provides additional economic incentives for exploration and development of new natural gas, and it is hoped that the higher prices will elicit new supplies. The US has available a large resource base of gas yet to be discovered, natural gas in unconventional sources, and the potential of additional incremental supplies from gasification of coal, the largest remaining fossil fuel resource.

  15. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Crustal and upper mantle structure beneath1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of Southampton, Southampton, U.K. 8 Yemen Geological Survey and mineral Resources Board, Sana'a, Yemen. 9 Sana] and how it is connected with global mantle flow [e.g.30 Montelli et al., 2006; Boschi et al., 2007, 2008

  16. Department of Mathematics: Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resources Internal Resources Computing Information Business Office Information for TAs and Limited-Term Lecturers Information for Faculty Information for ...

  17. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  18. 2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued August 2011 DIVISION OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2010 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  19. 2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued April 2013 OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2012 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  20. REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

  1. This news release accompanies the press conference, "Greenland Glaciers: What Lies Beneath," to be given Wednesday, December 16, 2009, at 9:00 a.m. PT (12:00 NOON ET) at the American Geophysical Union Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    on acceleration and ice loss -- through fast-moving outlet glaciers that connect the inland ice sheet to the ocean-cost technologies to track the flow of glaciers and get a glimpse of what lies beneath the ice. As ice melts, water-more- This news release accompanies the press conference, "Greenland Glaciers: What Lies Beneath

  2. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  3. Markets slow to develop for Niger delta gas reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. [Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nigeria produces a very high quality, light, sweet crude oil but with a large percentage of associated gas derived from a high gas-to-oil ratio. Official proved gas reserves, both associated and nonassociated, are 120 tcf. Proved and probable reserves are estimated as high as 300 tcf. The internal market for gas has only begun to develop since the 1980s, and as a result approximately 77% of associated gas production is flared. Domestic gas consumption is currently approximately 700 MMcfd and is projected to have a medium term potential of 1.450 bcfd. The article discusses resource development, gas markets, gas flaring, gas use programs, the Bonny LNG scheme, the gas reserve base, LNG project status, competition, and energy opportunities.

  4. 1 Environmental Resource Policy ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Environmental Resource Policy ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE POLICY GRADUATE Master's program · Master of Arts in the field of environmental resource policy (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/environmental CERTIFICATE · Graduate certificate in contexts of environmental policy (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/environmental

  5. WATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of transportation, urban blight, agricultural practices, land use, etc. Water resources problems often result fromWATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING formulate sound policy without a good deal of knowledge not presently available. Without adequate models

  6. The impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    of Climate, 21, 638 Sriver & Huber, 2007, Observational evidence for an ocean heat pump induced by tropicalThe impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface. One way to parameterise this process

  7. OpenEI Community - resource

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0

  8. OpenEI Community - resources

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0

  9. A Low-Velocity Zone in the Basement Beneath the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy Information FlashingEvaluation || OpenA Low|

  10. A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy InformationOf TheLtd APWR JumpArea

  11. A Temperature Model Of The Crust Beneath The Barents Sea- Investigations

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy InformationOfandInformationAlong

  12. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown, Florida:Inerjy Jump to: navigation,

  13. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown, Florida:Inerjy Jump to: navigation,Valley

  14. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An Assessment of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to:IncMelissa, Texas:

  15. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to:IncMelissa, Texas:shallow magma

  16. Mapping the Hydrothermal System Beneath the Western Moat of Long Valley

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez PuebloManteca, California:Park,Maplewood,

  17. Temperatures at the Base of the Seismogenic Crust Beneath Long Valley

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrill Hole RD08, Mammoth Lakes,

  18. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCpWing County, Minnesota: EnergyCrowsNew Mexico-

  19. Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System Beneath the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric Power

  20. Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Materials produced from natural gas or crude oil, such as plastics Fertilizers for agriculture, phosphate tons per year. Gold and silver have annual consumption rates of 10,000 tons or less. Worldwide consumption of minerals #12; The fundamental problem associated with the availability of mineral resources

  1. Proceedings of the natural gas research and development contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this meeting was to present results of the research in the DOE-sponsored Natural Gas Program, and simultaneously to provide a forum for real-time technology transfer, to the active research community, to the interested public, and to the natural gas industry, who are the primary users of this technology. The current research focus is to expand the base of near-term and mid-term economic gas resources through research activities in Eastern Tight Gas, Western Tight Gas, Secondary Gas Recovery (increased recovery of gas from mature fields); to enhance utilization, particularly of remote gas resources through research in Natural Gas to Liquids Conversion; and to develop additional, long term, potential gas resources through research in Gas Hydrates and Deep Gas. With the increased national emphasis on the use of natural gas, this forum has been expanded to include summaries of DOE-sponsored research in energy-related programs and perspectives on the importance of gas to future world energy. Thirty-two papers and fourteen poster presentations were given in seven formal, and one informal, sessions: Three general sessions (4 papers); Western Tight Gas (6 papers); Eastern Tight Gas (8 papers); Conventional/Speculative Resources (8 papers); and Gas to Liquids (6 papers). Individual reports are processed separately on the data bases.

  2. Unconventional gas sources. Executive summary. [Coal seams, Devonian shale, geopressured brines, tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long lead time required for conversion from oil or gas to coal and for development of a synthetic fuel industry dictates that oil and gas must continue to supply the United States with the majority of its energy requirements over the near term. In the interim period, the nation must seek a resource that can be developed quickly, incrementally, and with as few environmental concerns as possible. One option which could potentially fit these requirements is to explore for, drill, and produce unconventional gas: Devonian Shale gas, coal seam gas, gas dissolved in geopressured brines, and gas from tight reservoirs. This report addresses the significance of these sources and the economic and technical conditions under which they could be developed.

  3. Licensing East Asian Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Victoria; Eggleston, Holly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    our licensing of East Asian Resources here at UCSD. y It isthe history of electronic resources and the use of licensesclick through, or even use a resource with posted terms on a

  4. Natural Resources Districts (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes Natural Resources District, encompassing all of the area of the state, to conserve, protect, develop, and manage Nebraska's natural resources. These districts replace and...

  5. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  6. Final Flue Gas Cleaning (FFGC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinger, D. H.; Romero, M. H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the surrounding area but can also be carried thousands of miles by trade winds before falling to ground level to pollute soil, vegetation and water resources. An obvious question is: why doesn’t industry cool the flue gas; condense out the pollutants... of handling and disposing of these pollutants at the plant site. 2. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen can condense out as an acid, including carbonic acid that attacks materials of construction. By keeping temperatures elevated, carbon steel construction can...

  7. Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCalifornia State Fire

  8. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  9. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  10. Unconventional gas recovery: state of knowledge document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, C.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a synthesis of environmental data and information relevant to the four areas of unconventional gas recovery (UGR) resource recovery: methane from coal, tight western sands, Devonian shales and geopressurized aquifers. Where appropriate, it provides details of work reviewed; while in other cases, it refers the reader to relevant sources of information. This report consists of three main sections, 2, 3, and 4. Section 2 describes the energy resource base involved and characteristics of the technology and introduces the environmental concerns of implementing the technology. Section 3 reviews the concerns related to unconventional gas recovery systems which are of significance to the environment. The potential health and safety concerns of the recovery of natural gas from these resources are outlined in Section 4.

  11. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  12. Writing Assessment: Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    29 Appendix A Writing Assessment: Additional Resources #12;30 Where can I find out more into the assessment process. On-campus resources give you with a "real person" to contact should you have questions Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/survey/resource.htm Ohio

  13. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  14. 1.0 INTRODUCTION As the world's demand for energy continues to grow, unconventional gas will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION As the world's demand for energy continues to grow, unconventional gas energy source in the world and plays host to a lot of natural gas resources. Between 3,500 and 9

  15. Interdependency of electricity and natural gas markets in the United States : a dynamic computational model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Sandra Elizabeth

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to high storage costs and limited storage availability, natural gas is generally used as a just-in- time resource that needs to be delivered as it is consumed. With the shale gas revolution, coal retirements and ...

  16. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  17. mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration Locating earth resources deals with the exploration for oil, which is important to Louisiana, the Gulf of Mexico area oil (petroleum) and natural gas, that are refined for use as fuels. When sediments are deposited

  18. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  19. Gas Companies Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Companies program is a set of rules that encourage the development of the natural gas industry in Tennessee. They empower gas companies to lay piped and extend conductors through the...

  20. Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one...

  1. Gas Utilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

  2. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts *...

  3. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  4. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  5. Application analysis of Monte Carlo to estimate the capacity of geothermal resources in Lawu Mount

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supriyadi, E-mail: supriyadi-uno@yahoo.co.nz [Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Jember, Jl. Kalimantan Kampus Bumi Tegal Boto, Jember 68181 (Indonesia); Srigutomo, Wahyu [Complex system and earth physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Munandar, Arif [Kelompok Program Penelitian Panas Bumi, PSDG, Badan Geologi, Kementrian ESDM, Jl. Soekarno Hatta No. 444 Bandung 40254 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo analysis has been applied in calculation of geothermal resource capacity based on volumetric method issued by Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI). A deterministic formula is converted into a stochastic formula to take into account the nature of uncertainties in input parameters. The method yields a range of potential power probability stored beneath Lawu Mount geothermal area. For 10,000 iterations, the capacity of geothermal resources is in the range of 139.30-218.24 MWe with the most likely value is 177.77 MWe. The risk of resource capacity above 196.19 MWe is less than 10%. The power density of the prospect area covering 17 km{sup 2} is 9.41 MWe/km{sup 2} with probability 80%.

  6. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

  7. Crustal structure beneath RSTN stations inferred from teleseismic P-waveforms: preliminary results at RSCP, RSSD, and RSNY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, T.J.; Taylor, S.R.; Zandt, G.

    1983-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have modeled teleseismic P-waveforms recorded at three Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) stations (RSCP, Cumberland Plateau Observatory, TN; RSSD, Black Hills, SD; RSNY, Adirondack Mtns, NY) to determine local crustal structures. After source effects are removed by deconvolution, seismograms from events clustered in both distance and back azimuth were stacked to enhance the signal and improve confidence in interpreting converted phases at each station. Preliminary analysis indicates that seismograms from RSCP and RSNY generally exhibit less well-developed converted and reflected phases from the crust-mantle boundary than are observed at RSSD and LLNL broadband station ELK (Elko, NV). These differences are likely due to a gradational crust-mantle boundary in the eastern United States. Comparisons of seismograms recorded at the RSTN stations indicate that the waveforms at RSSD and RSCP are much more complex than waveforms from RSNY. This complexity is largely due to low-velocity sedimentary layers at the RSSD and RSCP sites, whereas RSNY is located directly on crystalline basement. At RSCP, we find a crustal thickness of 41 km, which agrees with early refraction profiles in the area. Our data require a 10 km thick transition zone between the crust and upper mantle beneath RSCP. The crustal thickness determined at RSSD is 47 to 50 km. 14 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  8. Natural Gas Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue...

  9. Gas Production Tax (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tax of 7.5 percent of the market value of natural gas produced in the state of Texas is imposed on every producer of gas.

  10. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  11. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  12. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  13. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  14. Generating Resources1 Generating resources available for future development in the Pacific Northwest are described in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy, solar radiation, energy from processes driven by solar radiation (wind, hydropower, biomass is collection of the primary energy resource. Natural gas wells, hydroelectric dams and solar concentrators be relatively simple, such as chipping of wood for firing a steam-electric power plant or complex

  15. Baseline mapping study of the Steed Pond aquifer and vadose zone beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G. Jr.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the second phase of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this second phase is to map the structure and distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized sediment) within the vadose zone beneath A/M Area. The results presented in this report will assist future characterization and remediation activities in the vadose zone and upper aquifer zones in A/M Area.

  16. Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in research on methane recovery from coalbeds, eastern gas shales, western gas sands, and geopressured aquifers. In the methane from coalbeds project, data on information evaluation and management, resource and site assessment and characterization, model development, instrumentation, basic research, and production technology development are reported. In the methane from eastern gas shales project, data on resource characterization and inventory, extraction technology, and technology testing and verification are presented. In the western gas sands project, data on resource assessments, field tests and demonstrations and project management are reported. In the methane from geopressured aquifers project, data on resource assessment, supporting research, field tests and demonstrations, and technology transfer are reported.

  17. Conservation Conservation ResourcesConservation Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sequestration,, coal gasification, carbon sequestration, energy storage, highenergy storage, highConfirm cost & availability of promising resources ­­ Oil sandsOil sands cogencogen, coal gasification, carbon

  18. Energy Efficient Radio Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Energy Efficient Radio Resource Management in a Coordinated Multi-Cell Distributed Antenna System Omer HALILOGLU Introduction System Model Performance Evaluation Conclusion References Energy Efficient Hacettepe University 5 September 2014 Omer HALILOGLU (Hacettepe University) Energy Efficient Radio Resource

  19. Solar Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

  20. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Imperial College London The Imperial College London provides research into the use and storage of energy by buildings and how energy may be supplied to buildings in the future, and...

  1. Center for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation through Natural Resource Management (CGGM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    production can increase animal productivity, yield renewable energy (CH4 capture from manure storage), and improve air quality. Over the longer term, renewable energy from agricultural biomass offers great within the US and abroad, working with representatives of industries, state and federal agencies, and non

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    upgrades, and savings and effectiveness of energy efficiency measures. DOE Processing Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Qualification (PHAST) PHAST assists users to survey...

  3. Department of Natural Resources Division of Oil, Gas and Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    . The division will continue to work with companies involved in energy development, government agencies of the population within Utah. Worldwide and regional commodity prices have historically been the most significant of few states with this incentive.) 2. Half-price day-use access for seniors who choose not to purchase

  4. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Software Tools DOE BestPractices Software Tools DOE BestPractices offers a range of software tools and databases that help manufacturers assess their plant's steam, compressed air,...

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Assessments DOE Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Programmost companies realize a minimum of 1 million...

  6. Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and national laboratories to create a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This program is largely focused on biomass fuels,...

  7. Business Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business Planning Resources, a presentation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  8. Cape Verde: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits ManualCanisteo,Verde: Energy Resources (Redirected

  9. Woodland, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill Gas

  10. Woodland, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill GasUtah: Energy

  11. Woodlawn, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill GasUtah:Woodlawn,

  12. Mining and Gas and Oil Production (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the North Dakota Code contains provisions for oil, gas, and coal mining and the development of geothermal resources. This chapter addresses claims to mines, licensing and control of...

  13. Process Design and Integration of Shale Gas to Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehlinger, Victoria M.

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent breakthroughs in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technology have made huge reservoirs of previously untapped shale gas and shale oil formations available for use. These new resources have already made a significant impact...

  14. Statewide Forest Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Assessment (assessment). The assessment and strategy identify important forest lands and provideColorado Statewide Forest Resource Strategy #12;June 2010 Acknowledgments The Colorado State Forest Forest Resource Strategy. We also offer our thanks and acknowledgement to Greg Sundstrom, assistant staff

  15. Standard Nine: Financial Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    105 Standard Nine: Financial Resources Overview The 1996 NEASC team report was critical of Brandeis's financial management, and focused on the need to increase financial resources, improve faculty and staff displays the University resource profile for FY1995 compared to the FY2005 profile. During this decade

  16. Life Sciences Shared Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Life Sciences Shared Resources Cancer.Dartmouth.eduMarch 2012 201202-19201202-19 #12;SHARED RESOURCES MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT TEAM: Mark Israel, MD Director, Norris Cotton Cancer Center Bob Gerlach, MPA Associate Director, Norris Cotton Cancer Center CraigTomlinson, PhD Associate Director for Shared Resources

  17. Medical Student Resource Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    20132014 O.H.S.U. Medical Student Resource Guide #12;2013-2014 Medical Student Resource Guide 1 Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine - Medical Student Resource Guide Welcome This is an exciting time to be in medicine. Advances in the sciences basic to the study and practice of medicine

  18. Resource Adequacy INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) have acquired sufficient resources to satisfy forecasted future loads reliably. This definition whether there are sufficient non-hydro resources available to meet loads when the "fuel" for hydroelectric. For a number of reasons, resource development in the 1990s failed to keep pace with growth in the region and

  19. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

  20. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD); Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  1. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  2. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  3. Geothermal resources of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezore, S.P.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal resources may be classified into two types: high temperature, >150 C, suitable for electrical generation and low- to moderate-temperature, 20-150 C, suitable for direct use. To further the development of geothermal resources in California, a concentrated study of low-temperature and moderate-temperature geothermal resources has been conducted by the California Department of Conservation. As part of that study a map containing technical data on the geothermal resources of California is now available to help planners, local governments, etc. develop their local resources.

  4. Think Tank: Delaware Department of Natural Resources

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNew England New23,Spring

  5. Increases in 3He/4He in Fumarolic Gas Associated with the 1989 Earthquake

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua New EnergyIT PowerImagine EnergySwarm Beneath Mammoth

  6. Natural gas product and strategic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne, A.W.; Duda, J.R.; Zammerilli, A.M.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Product and strategic analysis at the Department of Energy (DOE)/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) crosscuts all sectors of the natural gas industry. This includes the supply, transportation, and end-use sectors of the natural-gas market. Projects in the Natural Gas Resource and Extraction supply program have been integrated into a new product focus. Product development facilitates commercialization and technology transfer through DOE/industry cost-shared research, development, and demonstration (RD&D). Four products under the Resource and Extraction program include Resource and Reserves; Low Permeability Formations; Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation: and Natural Gas Upgrading. Engineering process analyses have been performed for the Slant Hole Completion Test project. These analyses focused on evaluation of horizontal-well recovery potential and applications of slant-hole technology. Figures 2 and 3 depict slant-well in situ stress conditions and hydraulic fracture configurations. Figure 4 presents Paludal Formation coal-gas production curves used to optimize the hydraulic fracture design for the slant well. Economic analyses have utilized data generated from vertical test wells to evaluate the profitability of horizontal technology for low-permeability formations in Yuma County, Colorado, and Maverick County, Texas.

  7. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  8. An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Analysis ­ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of OceanAn Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted Clean Energy Standards Prepared for the U Hawai`i Distributed Energy Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask 12.3 Second Deliverable

  9. Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    landfill biomethane to liquefied natural gas for use as transportation fuel. The aim is to develop, and liquefaction of biomethane. The resulting liquefied natural gas will consist of cryogenically liquefied. This project will also serve as a model for similar facilities in California to use native biogas resources

  10. Liquid Fuels and Natural Gas in the Americas

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Liquid Fuels and Natural Gas in the Americas report, published today, is a Congressionally-requested study examining the energy trends and developments in the Americas over the past decade. The report focuses on liquid fuels and natural gas—particularly reserves and resources, production, consumption, trade, and investment—given their scale and significance to the region.

  11. Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Abstract--South America has emerged in recent years as one of the most dynamic regions for natural gas and electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    for natural gas and electricity development. The continent boasts natural gas reserves and high- growth energy countries to promote the use of natural gas, especially for power generation. On the other hand, challenges-country natural gas agreements, competition between natural gas and other resources for power generation

  13. Missouri Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)SameThousandYearBase Gas)

  14. Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Week 2

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (MillionTotalVented and FlaredGas

  16. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing | Department of EnergyLieko Earlefrom the

  17. Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Natural Gas Liquids

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In thisProduct: Natural Gas LiquidsNatural

  18. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges are Associated with Shale GasItWater

  19. Gas energy supply outlook through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalisch, R.B.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1984 the American Gas Association published a study by the Gas Supply Committee titled, ''The Outlook for Gas Energy Through 2010.'' This study was a joint effort by many people of the gas industry including GRI, IGT and AGA. The study observed that come 1646 Tcf of natural gas is judged to be ultimately recoverable in the US. Of this total, 665 Tcf were produced up to year-end 1984. At that time an additional 197 Tcf were categorized as proved reserves, i.e., known to exist with reasonable certainty and producible under current economic and operating conditions. An additional 784 Tcf were classified as potential supply. In short, about 60 % of the nation's ultimately recoverable resource still is available; only 40 % has been produced to data. This is a formidable gas resource for the lower-48; in 1984 the production level was about 17 Tcf; proved reserves were approximately 163 Tcf - more than nine times the 1984 production. 2 references, 2 tables.

  20. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  1. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Novan, Kevin; Rausser, Gordon; Iho, Antti; Parker, Doug; Zilberman, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the United States comes from natural gas—even more importantthe world by vessel, natural gas is almost exclusivelyover 95%) of the natural gas consumed in the United States

  2. Resources for Consumers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As technologies supported by the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) come on to the market, regular drivers will benefit from lower fuel costs and less time spent at the gas station.  VTO also...

  3. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, the Minnesota legislature passed the Next Generation Energy Act (NGEA), which requires both electric and natural gas investor-owned utilities to reduce energy sales, and spend a minimum ...

  4. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, the Minnesota legislature passed the Next Generation Energy Act (NGEA), which requires both electric and natural gas investor-owned utilities to reduce energy sales by 1.5% of average...

  5. A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Archna

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    used for transportation fuel and several TCF of natural gas annually. However, there is a very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of gas in place in just the gas shale formations that have been identified...

  6. Number of Producing Gas Wells

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5Producing Gas

  7. Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 JumpGas Sampling Jump to:

  8. Natural Gas and Other Petroleum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports3 Annual Plan

  9. Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in61999 The

  10. New Mexico Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural GasCubic2008 20092009

  11. New Mexico Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural GasCubic2008

  12. Island Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunanInformation sourceInvensysIsland Gas Jump to: navigation,

  13. Natural Gas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDSEnergy|Natural Gas Production and

  14. Geothermal Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of geothermal energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply geothermal systems within the Federal sector.

  15. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Resources The links below describe equipment, laboratories, capabilities, and sample environments that are available to users. Users must plan ahead and specify their needs...

  16. Resources | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the InorganicResourcesResources Resources

  17. Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports...

  18. What lies beneath | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and users are interested in understanding all of these large processes and more, by examining them at the size that matters most: the pore scale. Through creation of...

  19. Natural resources law - 1984: a year in review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, J.S. (ed.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first issue of the American Bar Association Natural Resources Section's Monograph Series is a departure from the traditional form of publication in order to enhance the usefulness of committee reports to practitioners. The volume includes reports from the committees on oil, natural gas, electric power, alternate energy sources, water resources, water quality, marine resources, forest resources, air quality, environmental quality, and solid and hazardous waste. A separate abstract was prepared for nine of the reports selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  20. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand CubicElements) Gas and

  1. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion Cubic Feet) Gas,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar

  2. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1Decade Year-0 Year-1Elements) Gas

  3. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)Elements) Gas

  4. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale% ofElements) Gas and

  5. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  6. Non-depleted sub-continental mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield: Nd-Sr isotopic and trace element evidence from Midcontinent Rift basalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paces, J.B. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton (USA)); Bell, K. (Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midcontinent Rift flood basalts represent a sample of the relatively shallow, sub-continental upper mantle beneath the Canadian Shield at 1.1 Ga. A thick sequence of olivine tholeiite lavas, including minor intermediate to rhyolitic lavas, from the Portage Lake Volcanics (PLV) in northern Michigan have initial Nd and Sr isotopic compositions which cluster near Bulk Earth values. The effects of assimilation of old LREE-enriched continental crust into mantle-derived fractionating liquids are isotopically discernible in evolved lavas as well as in olivine tholeiites from the lowest portion of the volcanic pile. However, the effects of crustal contamination decrease with stratigraphic height and are absent in more primitive lavas in the upper half of the section. The source for PLV tholeiites is substantially less depleted than previously reported mantle values from the Superior Province. An origin for the PLV source is compatible with either of several mantle evolution models. The PLV source may have been associated with upwelling of a LIL element-enriched, asthenospheric plume which emplaced non-depleted material from deeper sources into the shallow sub-continental mantle beneath the Midcontinent Rift during continental break-up. Alternatively, the PLV source may have originated by enrichment of refractory sub-continental lithospheric mantle which was previously depleted in incompatible trace elements during Archean-aged melt extraction and continental crust formation. Concurrent generation of carbonatite magmas in other areas beneath the Superior Province indicates the widespread presence of sub-continental mantle with substantially higher {epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) and lower {epsilon}{sub Sr}(T) than the PLV source.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL OPTIMIZATION OF GAS COMPRESSOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2015 ... When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport net- works ..... The four most frequently used drive types are gas turbines, gas driven.

  8. Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas...

  9. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  10. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkansas Water Resources Center WATER RESOURCES ASPECTS OF COAL TRANSPORTATION BY SLURRY PIPELINE Electric Power Production with Transmission by EHV Power lines 8 Coal Slurry Pipelining versus Rail Shipment. 10 General Description of the Coal Slurry Pipelining Process. 14 History of Coal Slurry Pipelines

  11. RESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    ://www.thesoftlanding.com/ AVOIDING BISPHENOL-A Eden Organics Beans http://www.edenfoods.com/ CD and DVD recycling httpRESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS Batteries and Accessories Office Depot Cell Phones Any Verizon Plastics Call your local Solid Waste Management Facility eCycling resource (EPA) http

  12. SPACE RESOURCES ROUNDTABLE IX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    SPACE RESOURCES ROUNDTABLE IX Colorado School of Mines October 25-27, 2007 http://www.ISRUinfo.com Sponsored by: Colorado School of Mines Lunar and Planetary Institute Space Resources Roundtable, Inc. First Space Michael B. Duke, Colorado School of Mines Leslie Gertsch, University of Missouri-Rolla Alex

  13. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  14. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  15. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  16. Gas and Oil (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

  17. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  18. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  19. Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment existing coal power plants to gas and renewable power under a carbon budget. It solves a model of polluting, exhaustible resources with capacity constraints and adjustment costs (to build coal, gas, and renewable power

  20. Visual Impact Assessment in British Oil and Gas Developments1 Dennis F. Gillespie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Visual Impact Assessment in British Oil and Gas Developments1 2/ Dennis F. Gillespie 3/ Brian D Unit, Department of Geography, University of Aberdeen, Scotland. Abstract: Development of oil and gas these effects into account. Since 1970, the offshore discovery and development of oil and gas resources

  1. Operational, technological and economic drivers for convergence of the electric power and gas industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, H.R.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economically recoverable natural gas resource base continues to grow as a result of exploration and production technology advances, and improvements in gas storage and delivery. As a result, the convergence of the electric power and gas industries and the parallel development of distributed generation will benefit consumers and minimize environmental impacts cost-effectively.

  2. The Influence of Shale gas on U.S. Energy and Environmental Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, H.D.

    The emergence of U.S. shale gas resources to economic viability affects the nation’s energy outlook and the expected role of natural gas in climate policy. Even in the face of the current shale gas boom, however, questions ...

  3. Planning and Installation Guide: North Carolina Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Planning and Installation Guide: North Carolina Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations Introduction Are you considering installing a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station for your fleet to provide your fleet with fuel. One resource for locating and identifying public compressed natural gas

  4. Natural Gas as a Fuel for Heavy Trucks: Issues and Incentives (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks.

  5. Using Gasoline, Diesel, and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles, Characterize the Significance of Lube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Gasoline, Diesel, and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles, Characterize the Significance from natural gas vehicles will help in the development of PM mitigation technologies. This in turn emissions beyond applicable standards, and that benefit natural gas ratepayers (Public Resources Code 25620

  6. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  7. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  8. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  9. Latina/o Archival Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Clara M.; Dean, Rebecca; Keilty, Patrick; Leong, Lindy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    database which can serve as a resource on and for Hispanics.Latino/a Archival Resources Updated by Clara M. Chu, RebeccaLatino Film and Video Resources Filmmaking Resources Latino

  10. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  11. Gas Cylinders: Proper Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

  12. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  13. Natural Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    . Exploration and extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus shale is a potentially valuable economic stimulus for landowners. You might be wondering how the nation's economic situation is affecting the market for naturalNatural Gas Exploration: A Landowners Guide to Financial Management Natural Gas Exploration

  14. Survey of potential geopressured resource areas in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Robertson-Tait, A.; Kraemer, M.; Buening, N.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the initial results of a survey of the occurrence and characteristics of geopressured fluid resources in California using the publicly- available database involving more than 150,000 oil and gas wells drilled in the State. Of the 975 documented on-shore oil and gas pools studied, about 42% were identified as potentially geopressured. Geothermal gradients in California oil and gas fields lie within the normal range of 1 F to 2 F per 100 feet. Except for the Los Angeles Basin, there was no evidence of higher temperatures or temperature gradients in geopressured pools.

  15. The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

  16. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human Resources

  17. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHuman Resources Human Resources

  18. Resources for Academia | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the InorganicResources ResourcesUniversity

  19. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the InorganicResourcesResources The

  20. Resources | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About one in every four

  1. Resources | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource Resources

  2. Resources: ADEPS: LANL Inside

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 ResourceADEPS Resources

  3. ORISE Resources: Consumer Health Resource Information Service

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project *1980-1981 U.S. OR I GI N A L SHow

  4. EFRC Resources-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering HowAnaDynamic SwitchingE xProcess |EEOEFRC

  5. Welcome FUPWG- Natural Gas Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides an overview of natural gas, including emissions, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, and landfill gas supplement for natural gas system.

  6. Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Methodology

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan FebFeet) Gas WellsNatural Gas Glossary

  7. NOTICE OF DECISION BY -rHE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Project's S-100 Gas Turbine Generator and revised applicable air quality conditions of certification) combustor unit on the Project's S-100 Gas Turbine Generator and revised applicable air quality conditions of Resources under Section 21080.5 of the California Public Resources Code. 1. The project will not have

  8. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  9. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  10. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008, New Mexico enacted H.B. 305, the Efficient Use of Energy Act, which created an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS) for New Mexico’s electric utilities, and a requirement that all ...

  11. Human Resource Management Delegation

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The notice is to clarifies and updates existing Human Resource Management Delegation Authorities and the levels to which they are delegated. Expired 6-28-97. Does not cancel any directives.

  12. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  13. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkansas Water Resources Center DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD WASTEWATER IN SOILS OF HIGH STONE CONTENT Agricultural Engineering and Civil Engineering University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 Arkansas and D. T. Mitchell Departments of Agronomy, Agricultural Engineering and Civil Engineering, University

  14. Natural Resource Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a Natural Resource Specialist responsible for participating in the development and implementation of short-term and long-term regional (multi...

  15. Geothermal Resources Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state of Texas is to encourage the rapid and orderly development of geothermal energy and associated resources. The primary consideration of the development process is to provide...

  16. Utility Metering- AGL Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses AGL Resources metering, including interruptible rate customers, large users, and meeting federal metering goals.

  17. Energy Programs and Recent Initiatives Environment, Energy & Natural Resources Center: Located in the heart of the energy industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    , and Natural Resources Meet As the global demand for energy increases and U.S. oil and gas production soars Bar: Environmental Law, Oil, Gas and Energy Law, and International Law. · EENR Speaker Series energy-specific courses, especially those in oil and gas, and its faculty is internationally

  18. Resources & Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource

  19. Help for declining natural gas production seen in the unconventional sources of natural gas. [Eastern shales, tight sands, coal beds, geopressured zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staats, E.B.

    1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil imports could be reduced and domestic gas production increased if additional gas production is obtained from four unconventional resources-eastern Devonian shales, tight sands, coal beds, and geopressured zones. Gas produced from these resources can help maintain overall production levels as supplies from conventional gas sources gradually decline. The eastern shales and western sands are the chief potential contributors in the near term. Further demonstrations of coal bed methane's recovery feasibility could improve the prospects for its production while future geopressured methane production remains speculative at this time.

  20. Resource characteristics and development of Sumatera`s geothermal prospects, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prijanto, M.B.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sumatera`s regional geologic setting has created appropriate conditions for the occurrence of wide spread, commercial geothermal resources distributed along the elongation of the island. A peculiar oblique approach of the India-Australian plate subduction beneath the Southeast Asian plate has led to island arc volcanic activity and major faulting that run along the entire island. Exploitable geothermal systems are developed beneath the volcanic complexes that are fed by shallow magma chamber and commercial viability is intensely enhanced by the presence of fault related zones of fracturing. The existence of shallow crustal magmatic heat sources and fracturing enhanced permeability provides Sumatera with the Indonesia`s largest concentration of geothermal prospects. Geological surveys of Sumatera have currently identified approximately 30 high enthalpy geothermal prospects which are mostly confined to the major zones of crustal weaknesses created by the northwest-southeast Sumatera fault system. High-temperature geothermal prospects in Sumatera are primarily associated with Quaternary andesitic to rhyotitic volcanics that emerge through this faulting system. Sumatera`s geothermal resources are typical of high-temperature hot water system with main reservoir rocks are composed of fractured Tertiary-Mesozoic sediments encountered at depth on the order of a few hundred meter to about 1,000 m overlain by low permeability layer of Quaternary volcanic rocks. The estimate on the Sumatera`s geothermal resource capability from 30 high-temperature prospects reveals a value of approximately 9,500 MW and presently, non of this capacity is commercially utilised and only less than 1% (65 MW) of this capacity, derived from two fields (Sibayak and Lempur), have been proven by exploratory drilling. The proven reserve capacity of the other field (Sarulla) in North Sumatera is still being calculated.

  1. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  2. Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, David

    Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer Departments. #12;Resources, framing, and transfer p. 2 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer, Andrew Elby of activating resources, a language with an explicitly manifold view of cognitive structure. In this chapter, we

  3. RESOURCE ETH, 1ml RESOURCE ISO, 1 ml

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    RESOURCE ETH, 1ml RESOURCE ISO, 1 ml RESOURCE PHE, 1 ml RESOURCE HIC Test Kit instructions i 56-1188-26 AB #12;Introduction RESOURCETM ETH (ether), ISO (isopropyl) and PHE (phenyl) are pre-packed high will have the strongest hydrophobicity followed by RESOURCE ISO and RESOUR- CE ETH succesively. Fig. 1

  4. Determination of leakage and unaccounted-for gas-distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It was leakage from ill fitting pipes and the resultant danger of explosions, fires, and asphxiation that delayed for a long time the use of gas in private homes. The industry has solved the problem of ill fitting pipes but safety, profits, and the conservation of a natural resource still demands a keen concern over leakage and unaccounted-for gas. The generally accepted definition of unaccountedfor gas is simple. It is the difference between the amount of gas supplied to and taken out of a piping system. By this definition, leakage is only a part of unaccounted-for gas, although the terms are sometimes used synonymously. It is the need to determine the ''tightness'' or freedom from leaks of the distribution system that requires an operator to evaluate all other components of unaccounted-for gas.

  5. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  6. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

  7. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

  8. Washington Gas Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide PermitInformationIsland: Energy ResourcesProcessWashington Gas

  9. Natural gas storage in bedded salt formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macha, G.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990 Western Resources Inc. (WRI) identified the need for additional natural gas storage capacity for its intrastate natural gas system operated in the state of Kansas. Western Resources primary need was identified as peak day deliverability with annual storage balancing a secondary objective. Consequently, an underground bedded salt storage facility, Yaggy Storage Field, was developed and placed in operation in November 1993. The current working capacity of the new field is 2.1 BCF. Seventy individual caverns are in service on the 300 acre site. The caverns vary in size from 310,000 CF to 2,600,000 CF. Additional capacity can be added on the existing acreage by increasing the size of some of the smaller existing caverns by further solution mining and by development of an additional 30 potential well sites on the property.

  10. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  11. Resource Contingency Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP) to fulfill its statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later if needed. Three option development agreements were signed in September 1993 with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop Washington and near Hermiston, Oregon. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options.

  12. DPC Resources - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGas SeparationsRelevantDOE Progress Review ofDOE-ORPOrganizersDPC

  13. Hanford Natural Resource Trustee Council - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged In You|DidYouKnowStation

  14. Cabazon, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to:ROWCV-2a:Cabazon,

  15. Cabot, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility JumpCabot, Vermont: Energy

  16. Calabasas, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility80 Jump370 JumpCal. Wat.

  17. Calais, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility80 Jump370 JumpCal. Wat.Calais,

  18. Caledonia, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility80Caldyne AutomaticsCaledonia,

  19. Calexico, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013 Next » Monday2014 Next

  20. Calhan, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013 Next » Monday2014 NextCalhan,