National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gas reservoir properties

  1. Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    of SPE copyright. Abstract Pressure testing in very-low-mobility reservoirs is challengingSPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas

  2. DOE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A METHANE HYDRATE DEPOSIT AND GAS RESERVOIR, BLAKE RIDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Steven Holbrook

    2004-11-11

    This report contains a summary of work conducted and results produced under the auspices of award DE-FC26-00NT40921, ''DOE Three-Dimensional Structure and Physical Properties of a Methane Hydrate Deposit and Gas Reservoir, Blake Ridge.'' This award supported acquisition, processing, and interpretation of two- and three-dimensional seismic reflection data over a large methane hydrate reservoir on the Blake Ridge, offshore South Carolina. The work supported by this project has led to important new conclusions regarding (1) the use of seismic reflection data to directly detect methane hydrate, (2) the migration and possible escape of free gas through the hydrate stability zone, and (3) the mechanical controls on the maximum thickness of the free gas zone and gas escape.

  3. Integrated Multi-Well Reservoir and Decision Model to Determine Optimal Well Spacing in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz Prada, Rubiel Paul

    2012-02-14

    Optimizing well spacing in unconventional gas reservoirs is difficult due to complex heterogeneity, large variability and uncertainty in reservoir properties, and lack of data that increase the production uncertainty. Previous methods are either...

  4. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  5. Analysis of Water Flowback Data in Gas Shale Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldaif, Hussain

    2014-09-24

    Properties of both shale gas reservoirs and hydraulic fractures are usually estimated by analyzing hydrocarbon production data while water data is typically ignored. This study introduces a new method to estimate the effective fracture volume...

  6. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01

    cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels, 17(RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburg Eartheffective cushion gas for gas storage reservoirs. Thus at

  7. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

  8. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01

    gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  9. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions....

  10. Geomechanical Development of Fractured Reservoirs During Gas Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jian

    2013-04-05

    Within fractured reservoirs, such as tight gas reservoir, coupled processes between matrix deformation and fluid flow are very important for predicting reservoir behavior, pore pressure evolution and fracture closure. To study the coupling between...

  11. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2005-02-01

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

  12. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Salt Cavern...

  13. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production...

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

  15. Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajayi, Arashi

    2002-01-01

    We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion...

  16. A Variable Cell Model for Simulating Gas Condensate Reservoir Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah

    , SPE-~~~ SPE 21428 A Variable Cell Model for Simulating Gas Condensate Reservoir Performance A of depletion performance of gas condensate reservoirs report the existence of a A variable cell model for simulating gas relatively high, near-constant, oil saturation in condensate reeervoir performance has been

  17. ,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  18. ,"Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  19. Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Trevor Howard

    2011-08-08

    saturation and believed to be a volumetric reservoir with no water drive. The reservoir temperature is at 275 deg F. The gas gravity, relative density to air, is 0.68, and the permeability of the gas reservoir is 0.1 md. Case-specific differences... PLACEMENT OPTIMIZATION IN GAS RESERVOIRS USING GENETIC ALGORITHMS A Thesis by TREVOR HOWARD GIBBS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  20. New inflow performance relationships for gas condensate reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Castillo Maravi, Yanil

    2004-09-30

    - similar to the Vogel IPR trends (the Vogel (quadratic) rate-pressure profile is generally presumed for the case of a solution gas-drive reservoir system). However, in the case of a gas-condensate reservoir system, the coefficients in the quadratic...

  1. AN ADVISORY SYSTEM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNCONVENTIONAL GAS RESERVOIRS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yunan

    2010-01-16

    With the rapidly increasing demand for energy and the increasing prices for oil and gas, the role of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) as energy sources is becoming more important throughout the world. Because of high risks and uncertainties...

  2. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10

    for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each...

  3. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15

    and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability...

  4. Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-01-01

    cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy & Fuels, 17(1),cushion gas for natural gas storage (Oldenburg, 2003). Forstorage of carbon dioxide in depleted natural gas reservoirs

  5. Stress-dependent permeability on tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Cesar Alexander

    2005-02-17

    People in the oil and gas industry sometimes do not consider pressure-dependent permeability in reservoir performance calculations. It basically happens due to lack of lab data to determine level of dependency. This thesis attempts to evaluate...

  6. Analysis of a geopressured gas reservoir using solution plot method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Syed Muqeedul

    1992-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF A GEOPRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR USING SOLUTION PLOT METHOD A Thesis by SYED MUQEEDUL HUSSAIN Submitted to the Office of Cuaduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYSIS OF A GEOPRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR USING SOLUTION PLOT METHOD A Thesis by SYED MUQEEDUL HUSSAIN Approved as to style and content by: S. W. Poston (Chair of Committee) R. R. Berg...

  7. Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unneberg, Arild

    1974-01-01

    RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

  8. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-18

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

  9. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01

    ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

  10. Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-01-01

    dioxide in depleted natural gas reservoirs and in uselessHydrogen production from natural gas, sequestration ofas cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy & Fuels, 17(

  11. The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soemarso, Christophorus

    1978-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATES AND SOME RESERVOIR PARAMETERS ON RECOVERY IN A STRONG WATER DRIVE GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by CHRISTOPHORUS SOEMARSO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATES AND SOME RESERVOIR PARAMETERS ON RECOVERY IN A STRONG WATER DRIVE GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by CHRISTOPHORUS SOEMARSO...

  12. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  13. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Resolving waterinflux and reservoir permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Keers, Henk

    2006-11-27

    Methods for geophysical model assessment, in particuale thecomputation of model parameter resolution, indicate the value and thelimitations of time-lapse data in estimating reservoir flow properties. Atrajectory-based method for computing sensitivities provides an effectivemeans to compute model parameter resolutions. We examine the commonsituation in which water encroaches into a resrvoir from below, as due tothe upward movement of an oil-water contact. Using straight-forwardtechniques we find that, by inclusing reflections off the top and bottomof a reservoir tens of meters thick, we can infer reservoir permeabilitybased upon time-lapse data. We find that, for the caseof water influxfrom below, using multiple time-lapse 'snapshots' does not necessarilyimprove the resolution of reservoir permeability. An application totime-lapse data from the Norne field illustrates that we can resolve thepermeability near a producing well using reflections from threeinterfaces associated with the reservoir.

  14. Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yijie

    2013-07-29

    , with opportunities for improved reservoir simulation & management, such as simulation model design, well placement. Our work develops robust and efficient strategies for improved tight gas reservoir simulation and management. Reservoir simulation models are usually...

  15. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaodan

    2013-12-10

    Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

  16. Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

    2007-04-25

    USING MULTI-LAYER MODELS TO FORECAST GAS FLOW RATES IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SERGIO ARMANDO JEREZ VERA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering USING MULTI-LAYER MODELS TO FORECAST GAS FLOW RATES IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SERGIO ARMANDO JEREZ VERA Submitted...

  17. Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mengal, Salman Akram

    2010-10-12

    FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ACCOUNTING FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL Submitted to the Office...

  18. Numerical modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock alteration induced by CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherardi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    under different reservoir gas saturation initial conditions.to initial reservoir gas saturation has been explored, anddone for initial reservoir gas saturations varying from 0.1

  19. Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Currie, Stephanie M.

    2010-10-12

    for unconventional gas reservoirs using a rate-time analysis approach. This work offers a coherent process to reduce the uncertainty in reserves estimation for unconventional gas reservoirs by quantifying "upper" and "lower" limits of EUR prior to the onset...

  20. Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

    2009-05-15

    and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions...

  1. Impes modeling of volumetric dry gas reservoirs with mobile water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forghany, Saeed

    2004-09-30

    ...................................................70 xi LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 2.1 Averaging of parameters..........................................................................................14 3.1 Units for the PVT properties used in the input file... running the first subroutine in the time loop runs which takes care of reading reservoir, wells, PVT, relative permeabilities and all data required for the program to run from the input file. This subroutine is written in such a way that it is capable...

  2. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gabitto, Jorge F.; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 10 16 ? m 3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detectedmore »by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed. « less

  3. THE INVESTIGATION OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exploration to define geologic features in the subsurface. Recent advancements in seismic exploration haveTHE INVESTIGATION OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION INVESTIGATION OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION", is hereby approved

  4. Application of Fast Marching Method in Shale Gas Reservoir Model Calibration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Changdong

    2013-07-26

    and reservoir heterogeneity but also is time consuming. In this thesis, we propose and apply an efficient technique, fast marching method (FMM), to analyze the shale gas reservoirs. Our proposed approach stands midway between analytic techniques and numerical...

  5. Experimental Investigation of Propped Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using The Dynamic Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero Lugo, Jose 1985-

    2012-10-24

    Hydraulic Fracturing stimulation technology is used to increase the amount of oil and gas produced from low permeability reservoirs. The primary objective of the process is to increase the conductivity of the reservoir by the creation of fractures...

  6. A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Bicheng

    2013-07-15

    The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

  7. EOS7C Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen in Natural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Moridis, George J.; Spycher, Nicholas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy&Fuels ,of CO 2 injection into natural gas reservoirs for carbonDioxide or Nitrogen in Natural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs

  8. Reservoir characterization in an underground gas storage field using joint inversion of flow and geodetic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bottazzi, F.

    Characterization of reservoir properties like porosity and permeability in reservoir models typically relies on history matching of production data, well pressure data, and possibly other fluid-dynamical data. Calibrated ...

  9. The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiajing

    2012-02-14

    Horizontal wells have been used to increase reservoir recovery, especially in unconventional reservoirs, and hydraulic fracturing has been applied to further extend the contact with the reservoir to increase the efficiency of development...

  10. Rate-decline Relations for Unconventional Reservoirs and Development of Parametric Correlations for Estimation of Reservoir Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Askabe, Yohanes 1985-

    2012-10-24

    Time-rate analysis and time-rate-pressure analysis methods are available to estimate reserves and study flow performance of wells in unconventional gas reservoirs. However, these tools are often incorrectly used or the analysis can become difficult...

  11. A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

    2006-01-01

    the middle Capay Shale (depleted gas) and McCormick Sand (depleted gas reservoir located within the Middle Capay shaleCO 2 gas will occur in the 2-3 m thick Capay Shale interval

  12. Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hattori, Kéiko H.

    Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

  13. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01

    a homoge- neous reservoir the condensate saturation will bewater saturation distribution in a tight gas sand reservoirreservoir, the accumulating condensate can become mobile after reaching a certain saturation

  14. Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

  15. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

  16. SHEAR WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MONITORING OF A TIGHT GAS SANDSTONE RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHEAR WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MONITORING OF A TIGHT GAS SANDSTONE RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD focused specifically on the use of time-lapse (4D) poststack migrated shear-wave seismic data of shear wave data as a tool for monitoring 4D changes. The basin centered tight gas sandstone reservoir

  17. New Advances in Shale Gas Reservoir Analysis Using Water Flowback Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkouh, Ahmad

    2014-04-04

    Shale gas reservoirs with multistage hydraulic fractures are commonly characterized by analyzing long-term gas production data, but water flowback data is usually not included in the analysis. However, this work shows there can be benefits...

  18. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01

    THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

  19. Case history of pressure maintenance by gas injection in the 26R gravity drainage reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, M.H.; Yu, J.P.; Moore, D.M.; Ezekwe, N. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Querin, M.E. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); Williams, L.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a field case history on the performance of the 26R Reservoir. This is a gravity drainage reservoir under pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection. The 26R Reservoir is a highly layered Stevens turbidite sandstone. The reservoir is located in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR{number sign}1) in Elk Hills, Kern County, California. The 26R Reservoir is contained within the steeply dipping southwestern limb of the 31S Anticline. The reservoir had an initial oil column of 1800 feet. Original oil-in-place (OOIP) was estimated at 424 million barrels. Pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection was initiated immediately after production began in October 1976. The total volume of gas injected is about 586 BCF. This exceeds one reservoir pore volume. Reservoir pressure has declined from 3030 psi to 2461 psi. This pressure decline believe to be due to migration of injected gas into the overlaying shale reservoirs. Under the gas injection pressure maintenance strategy, reserves are estimated to be approximately 212 million barrels. Reservoir studies have concluded that the aquifer at the base of the reservoir has been relatively inactive. Well recompletions, deepenings, and horizontal wells are used to improve oil recovery. An aggressive program of controlling gas production began in the mid 1980's by the installation of multiple packers and sleeves. As the gas-oil contact (GOC) has dropped, sand intervals have subsequently been isolated behind packers. A cased hole logging program was recently undertaken to identify possible remaining reserves in the gas cap. 15 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Case history of pressure maintenance by gas injection in the 26R gravity drainage reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, M.H.; Yu, J.P.; Moore, D.M.; Ezekwe, N. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); Querin, M.E. [USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States); Williams, L.L. [Chevron U.S.A., Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1992-02-01

    This paper is a field case history on the performance of the 26R Reservoir. This is a gravity drainage reservoir under pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection. The 26R Reservoir is a highly layered Stevens turbidite sandstone. The reservoir is located in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR{number_sign}1) in Elk Hills, Kern County, California. The 26R Reservoir is contained within the steeply dipping southwestern limb of the 31S Anticline. The reservoir had an initial oil column of 1800 feet. Original oil-in-place (OOIP) was estimated at 424 million barrels. Pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection was initiated immediately after production began in October 1976. The total volume of gas injected is about 586 BCF. This exceeds one reservoir pore volume. Reservoir pressure has declined from 3030 psi to 2461 psi. This pressure decline believe to be due to migration of injected gas into the overlaying shale reservoirs. Under the gas injection pressure maintenance strategy, reserves are estimated to be approximately 212 million barrels. Reservoir studies have concluded that the aquifer at the base of the reservoir has been relatively inactive. Well recompletions, deepenings, and horizontal wells are used to improve oil recovery. An aggressive program of controlling gas production began in the mid 1980`s by the installation of multiple packers and sleeves. As the gas-oil contact (GOC) has dropped, sand intervals have subsequently been isolated behind packers. A cased hole logging program was recently undertaken to identify possible remaining reserves in the gas cap. 15 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Modeling effects of diffusion and gravity drainage on oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs under gas injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamili, Ahmad

    2010-04-22

    Gas injection in naturally fractured reservoirs maintains the reservoir pressure, and increases oil recovery primarily by gravity drainage and to a lesser extent by mass transfer between the flowing gas in the fracture and the porous matrix...

  2. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  3. Geophysical and transport properties of reservoir rocks. Final report for task 4: Measurements and analysis of seismic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of research on the seismic properties of reservoir rocks is to develop a basic understanding of the effects of rock microstructure and its contained pore fluids on seismic velocities and attenuation. Ultimately, this knowledge would be used to extract reservoir properties information such as the porosity, permeability, clay content, fluid saturation, and fluid type from borehole, cross-borehole, and surface seismic measurements to improve the planning and control of oil and gas recovery. This thesis presents laboratory ultrasonic measurements for three granular materials and attempts to relate the microstructural properties and the properties of the pore fluids to P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation. These experimental results show that artificial porous materials with sintered grains and a sandstone with partially cemented grains exhibit complexities in P- and S-wave attenuation that cannot be adequately explained by existing micromechanical theories. It is likely that some of the complexity observed in the seismic attenuation is controlled by details of the rock microstructure, such as the grain contact area and grain shape, and by the arrangement of the grain packing. To examine these effects, a numerical method was developed for analyzing wave propagation in a grain packing. The method is based on a dynamic boundary integral equation and incorporates generalized stiffness boundary conditions between individual grains to account for viscous losses and grain contact scattering.

  4. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen production from natural gas, sequestration ofunderground storage of natural gas, Jour. Petrol. Tech. 943,dioxide as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and

  5. Comparison of Single, Double, and Triple Linear Flow Models for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tivayanonda, Vartit

    2012-10-19

    There have been many attempts to use mathematical method in order to characterize shale gas/oil reservoirs with multi-transverse hydraulic fractures horizontal well. Many authors have tried to come up with a suitable and practical mathematical model...

  6. Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Jeong Gyu

    2004-09-30

    he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside...

  7. Analysis of condensate banking dynamics in a gas condensate reservoir under different injection schemes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval Rodriguez, Angelica Patricia

    2002-01-01

    condensate reservoir under natural depletion, and injection of methane, injection of carbon dioxide, produced gas recycling and water injection. To monitor the condensate banking dynamics near the wellbore area, such as oil saturation and compositional...

  8. Comparison of Various Deterministic Forecasting Techniques in Shale Gas Reservoirs with Emphasis on the Duong Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Krunal Jaykant

    2012-10-19

    There is a huge demand in the industry to forecast production in shale gas reservoirs accurately. There are many methods including volumetric, Decline Curve Analysis (DCA), analytical simulation and numerical simulation. Each one of these methods...

  9. A quadratic cumulative production model for the material balance of an abnormally pressured gas reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Felix Eduardo

    2005-02-17

    -1 A QUADRATIC CUMULATIVE PRODUCTION MODEL FOR THE MATERIAL BALANCE OF AN ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by FELIX E. GONZALEZ ROMERO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... OF AN ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by FELIX E. GONZALEZ ROMERO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  10. The effects of production rate and gravitational segregation on gas injection performance of oil reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Ed Martin

    1972-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Approved as. to style...

  11. The performance of a volatile oil reservoir overlain by a gas cap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Joseph Ralph, Jr

    1960-01-01

    THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1960 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

  12. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

    1996-12-31

    Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

  13. A New Type Curve Analysis for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual Porosity Linear System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulal, Haider Jaffar

    2012-02-14

    With increase of interest in exploiting shale gas/oil reservoirs with multiple stage fractured horizontal wells, complexity of production analysis and reservoir description have also increased. Different methods and models were used throughout...

  14. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  15. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

  16. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  17. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013c, Property Modeling Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from this project as well as two other separately funded projects: the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the Verification Well #1 (VW1) and the Injection Well (CCS1), structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. The intention was for 2.2 million tons per annum (2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA]) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the Task Error! Reference source not found., the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010") was re-run using a new injection scenario of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. The models size was insufficient to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case. In the preceding Task [1], the Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the Verification Well #2 (VW2) which was drilled in 2012. The porosity and permeability modeling was revised to take into account the log data from the new well. Revisions of the 2010 modeling assumptions were also done on relative permeability, capillary pressures, formation water salinity, and the maximum allowable well bottomhole pressure. Dynamic simulations were run using the injection target of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. This dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b. In this Task, a new property modeling workflow was applied, where seismic inversion data guided the porosity mapping and geobody extraction. The static reservoir model was fully guided by PorosityCube interpretations and derivations coupled with petrophysical logs from three wells. The two main assumptions are: porosity features in the PorosityCube that correlate with lost circulation zones represent vugular zones, and that these vugular zones are laterally continuous. Extrapolation was done carefully to populate the vugular facies and their corresponding properties outside the seismic footprint up to the boundary of the 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km) model. Dynamic simulations were also run using the injection target of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. This new dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013c. Reservoir simulation with the latest model gives a cumulative injection of 43 million tons (39 MT) in 30 years with a single well, which corresponds to 40% of the injection target. The injection rate is approx. 3.2 MTPA in the first six months as the well is injecting into the surrounding vugs, and declines rapidly to 1.8 million tons per annum (1.6 MTPA) in year 3 once the surrounding vugs are full and the CO2 start to reach the matrix. After, the injection rate declines gradually to 1.2 million tons per annum (1.1 MTPA) in year 18 and stays consta

  18. Geophysical Prospecting, 2015 doi: 10.1111/1365-2478.12211 Geomechanical property estimation of unconventional reservoirs using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Geophysical Prospecting, 2015 doi: 10.1111/1365-2478.12211 Geomechanical property estimation rock property for the geomechanical response of unconventional reservoir fracking) is demonstrated

  19. The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

    2012-02-14

    , such as rank of the coal, coal composition, micropores structure, reservoir pressure, molecular properties of gas adsorbed on the internal surface of coal seam, and reservoir temperature3,7. An idealized model of coalbed methane reservoir consists of a... making process. The uncertainties include the coal density, permeability or gas content as parameters of coal properties. Each coalbed methane reservoir property will govern production performance in a certain degree. Some parameters strongly influence...

  20. Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong

    1997-08-01

    Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

  1. General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

    2009-05-15

    Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of this study is twofold. First aim is to help operators with simple screening criteria which can help...

  2. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01

    M. F. , Northern California oil and gas field production.California, Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources;Beaumont EA, eds. , Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields, Structural

  3. CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir-A Numerical Simulation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 CO2-Driven Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage in Depleted Shale Reservoir- A Numerical Simulation for storage and enhanced gas recovery may be organic-rich shales, which CO2 is preferentially adsorbed comprehensive simulation studies to better understand CO2 injection process in shale gas reservoir. This paper

  4. Study of Fluid Behavior and PVT Properties of Hydrocarbons in Shale Reservoirs Using Molecular Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitakbunkate, Termpan

    2015-08-07

    a detailed account of the changes of PVT properties and phase behavior in a synthetic shale reservoir for pure hydrocarbons and their mixtures. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations are performed to study the effect of confinement...

  5. Estimation Of Reservoir Properties From Seismic Data By Smooth Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saggaf, Muhammad M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional joint inversion methods reqnire an a priori prescribed operator that links the reservoir properties to the observed seismic response. The methods also rely on a linearized approach to the solution that makes ...

  6. Multiscale determination of in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi Karam, Samantha, 1973-

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we address the problem of determining in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs using borehole logs and surface seismic reflection data. The dissertation covers four subtopics. The first is the ...

  7. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  8. Dry gas zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering data, effective August 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-10

    This reservoir study of the dry gas zone of Elk Hills Field is a data compilation with information relating to well: completion; production; pressure; and back pressure. (JF)

  9. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gas causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design production scenarios.

  10. Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, H. D.

    1960-01-01

    EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis By H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Au gus t, 19 60 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Approved as to style and content by: haxrman of ommitte...

  11. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

    2010-11-30

    Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

  12. GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing from tropical and boreal reservoirs are significant. In light of hydropower's potential role as a green to characterize carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from hydropower reservoirs in the US Southeast

  13. Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW, fractured reservoir modeling software developed by NETL's Geological and...

  14. Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yilin

    2009-05-15

    In the coming decades, the world will require additional supplies of natural gas to meet the demand for energy. Tight gas reservoirs can be defined as reservoirs where the formation permeability is so low (< 0.1 md) that advanced stimulation...

  15. Finite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil and Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    the geomechanics of oil and gas reservoirs. The fragile microstructure of some rocks makes it difficult to predict of Steel, Aluminum, Concrete, etc. Moreover, the pattern of rock damage in oil and gas reservoirsFinite Element Solution of Nonlinear Transient Rock Damage with Application in Geomechanics of Oil

  16. Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Agamalian, Michael [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; Bustin, Mark [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less than surface area estimates from SANS/USANS, which is due in part to limited accessibility of the gases to all pores. The similarity between N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-accessible surface area suggests an absence of microporosity in these samples, which is in agreement with SANS analysis. A core gamma ray profile run on the same core from which the core plug samples were taken correlates to profile permeability measurements run on the slabbed core. This correlation is related to clay content, which possibly controls the percentage of open porosity. Continued study of these effects will prove useful in log-core calibration efforts for tight gas.

  17. Seismic signatures of reservoir transport properties and pore fluid distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbar, N. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)); Mavko, G.; Nur, A.; Dvorkin, J. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-08-01

    The authors investigate the effects of permeability, frequency, and fluid distribution on the viscoelastic behavior of rock. The viscoelastic response of rock to seismic waves depends on the relative motion of pore fluid with respect to the solid phase. They consider wave-induced squirt fluid flow at two scales: (1) local microscopic flow at the smallest scale of saturation heterogeneity (e.g., within a single pore) and (2) macroscopic flow at a larger scale of fluid-saturated and dry patches. They explore the circumstances under which each of these mechanisms prevails. They examine such flows under the conditions of uniform confining (bulk) compression and obtain the effective dynamic bulk modulus of rock. The solutions are formulated in terms of generalized frequencies that depend on frequency, saturation, fluid and gas properties, and on the macroscopic properties of rock such as permeability, porosity, and dry bulk modulus. The study includes the whole range of saturation and frequency; therefore, the authors provide the missing link between the low-frequency limit and the high-frequency limit given by Mavko and Jizba. Further, they compare their model with Biot's theory and introduce a geometrical factor whose numeric value gives an indication as to whether local fluid squirt or global mechanisms dominate the viscoelastic properties of porous materials. The important results of their theoretical modeling are: (1) a hysteresis of acoustic velocity versus saturation resulting from variations in fluid distributions, and (2) two peaks of acoustic wave attenuation--one at low frequency and another at higher frequency (caused by local flow). Both theoretical results are compared with experimental data.

  18. Effects of reservoir geometry and permeability anisotropy on ultimate gas recovery in Devonian Shale reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starnes, Lee McKennon

    1989-01-01

    well spacing, k, =0. 1 md, k?=9k?, L, =50 feet, fracture perpendicular to k . 120 100 Comparison of cumulative gas production as a function of time with different drainage patterns, 160-acre well spacing, k, =0. 1 md, k?=9k?, Lr=100 feet, fracture... average permeabilities, 160-acre well spacing, k =25k?, Lr =100 feet, fracture perpendicular to k Comparison of cumulative gas production as a function of time with different fracture half-lengths, 160-acre well spacing, square drainage pattern, k, =0...

  19. Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yamin

    2009-05-15

    produced gas since the 1940s. In this study, well log, 2D seismic, core, and production data were used to evaluate the geologic setting and reservoir characteristics of the Travis Peak formation. The primary objective was to assess the potential...

  20. 3-DIMENSIONAL GEOMECHANICAL MODELING OF A TIGHT GAS RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-DIMENSIONAL GEOMECHANICAL MODELING OF A TIGHT GAS RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Kurtis R. Wikel #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT An integrated 3-dimensional geomechanical model have used the predictive geomechanical model to compare production and effective stress change

  1. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2002-12-31

    This report outlines progress in the first quarter of the third year of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs''. In this report we present an application of compositional streamline simulation in modeling enhanced condensate recovery via gas injection. These processes are inherently compositional and detailed compositional fluid descriptions must be use to represent the flow behavior accurately. Compositional streamline simulation results are compared to those of conventional finite-difference (FD) simulation for evaluation of gas injection schemes in condensate reservoirs. We present and compare streamline and FD results for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) examples, to show that the compositional streamline method is a way to obtain efficiently estimates of reasonable accuracy for condensate recovery by gas injection.

  2. Modeling the heterogeneous hydraulic properties of faults using constraints from reservoir-induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowie, Patience

    Modeling the heterogeneous hydraulic properties of faults using constraints from reservoir the damage zone surrounding faults. The Ac¸u dam is a 34 m high earth-filled dam constructed in 1983 pattern of earthquake clustering and migration that suggests heterogeneous fault zone hydraulic properties

  3. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport: Simulation of Impact of Hydraulic Fracturing on Groundwater

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on twomore »general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.« less

  4. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on twomore »general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.« less

  5. Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkarslan, Gulcan

    2011-10-21

    The ever increasing energy demand brings about widespread interest to rapidly, profitably and efficiently develop unconventional resources, among which tight gas sands hold a significant portion. However, optimization of development strategies...

  6. Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

    2007-04-25

    Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability...

  7. Geological characterization and 3D visualizations of the gas storage reservoir at Hillsboro field, Montgomery County, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udegbunam, E.O.; Huff, B.G. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Geological characterizations, modeling and 3-D computer-generated visualizations of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone at the Hillsboro Gas Storage field in Montgomery County, Illinois, are discussed. Petrophysical analyses reveal four distinct hydraulic flow units in six cored wells. Furthermore, four lithologies, identified by thin section petrography, are associated with the various hydraulic units. Fieldwide visualizations of 3-D distributions of petrophysically-derived attributes reservoir quality index (RQI) and flow zone indicator (FZI) -- show considerable vertical variability but lateral continuity. This finding explains why it is easier to expand the gas bubble laterally than vertically. Advantages of the 3-D reservoir description of Hillsboro Gas Storage field include (1) improved definition of the spatial porosity distribution which leads to better estimation of reservoir volumetrics; (2) improved definition of reservoir hydraulic flow zones; and (3) development of realistic reservoir model(s) for the simulation and management of the gas storage field.

  8. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Nur, A.

    1993-12-31

    Reflection seismic methods are, and will continue to be, the key geophysical tool for imaging these heterogeneities in the subsurface of the earth. However, in spite of great advances in field acquisition techniques and computer processing power, the primary product of conventional seismic work is still only the spatial pattern of reflectivity, which is a measure of velocity variations. Most of the amplitude information goes unused. Although fracture zones may have a reflectivity signature, more often they will not, because of steeply dipping angles, limited offset range in the acquisition, a subtle impedance mismatch, or too thin a fractured zone relative to the wavelength. In fact, there is probably no single seismic attribute that will always tell us what we need to know about fracture zones. Our objective, in the project, is to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative interpretation scheme that exploits the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: anomalous compressional and shear wave velocities; Q and velocity dispersion; increased velocity anisotropy amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response. Our goal is to incorporate four key elements: Acquisition and processing of seismic reflection field data. Theoretical studies of the anisotropic signatures of fractured rocks. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocity, velocity anisotropy, and attenuation in reservoir and cap rocks. Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating forward modeling.

  9. Property:USGSMeanReservoirTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to:SpatialResolution JumpTypes ofUSGSMeanReservoirTemp

  10. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blunt, M.J.; Orr, F.M. Jr.

    2001-03-26

    This report was an integrated study of the physics and chemistry affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involved theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. Specifically, advances were made on streamline-based simulation, analytical solutions to 1D compositional displacements, and modeling and experimental measures of three-phase flow.

  11. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969

  12. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  13. CO2 utilization and storage in shale gas reservoirs: Experimental results and economic impacts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Owen, Antionette Toni; Miller, Quin R. S.; Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-12-31

    Natural gas is considered a cleaner and lower-emission fuel than coal, and its high abundance from advanced drilling techniques has positioned natural gas as a major alternative energy source for the U.S. However, each ton of CO2 emitted from any type of fossil fuel combustion will continue to increase global atmospheric concentrations. One unique approach to reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions involves coupling CO2 based enhanced gas recovery (EGR) operations in depleted shale gas reservoirs with long-term CO2 storage operations. In this paper, we report unique findings about the interactions between important shale minerals and sorbing gases (CH4 and CO2) andmore »associated economic consequences. Where enhanced condensation of CO2 followed by desorption on clay surface is observed under supercritical conditions, a linear sorption profile emerges for CH4. Volumetric changes to montmorillonites occur during exposure to CO2. Theory-based simulations identify interactions with interlayer cations as energetically favorable for CO2 intercalation. Thus, experimental evidence suggests CH4 does not occupy the interlayer and has only the propensity for surface adsorption. Mixed CH4:CO2 gas systems, where CH4 concentrations prevail, indicate preferential CO2 sorption as determined by in situ infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Collectively, these laboratory studies combined with a cost-based economic analysis provide a basis for identifying favorable CO2-EOR opportunities in previously fractured shale gas reservoirs approaching final stages of primary gas production. Moreover, utilization of site-specific laboratory measurements in reservoir simulators provides insight into optimum injection strategies for maximizing CH4/CO2 exchange rates to obtain peak natural gas production.« less

  14. Natural Gas Liquids New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Marthrough 1996) in NevadaYear-Month802 827 788 811 831

  15. Nonassociated Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields, Wet

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Marthrough 1996)Price780Year JanYearFeet)19,981After Lease

  16. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic43,728Configuration Aquifer Storage

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic43,728Configuration Aquifer

  18. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K1,594

  19. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K1,5942,598

  20. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 1522 35 42 44 46 287 5 7 12252

  1. Petroleum Engineering 310 Reservoir Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of oilfield brine properties: Salinity, Bubble Point, formation volume factor, density and solution gas water12 Petroleum Engineering 310 Reservoir Fluids Credit 4: (3-3) Required for Juniors Catalog: Gas Formation Volume Factor. Viscosity. Wet Gas Gravity and Isothermal Compressibility. 5. Definition

  2. Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide- Polyethylenimine- Dextran Sulfate Polymer Gel System as a Water Shut-Off Agent in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayakumar, Swathika 1986-

    2012-07-09

    Technologies such as horizontal wells and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have made ultra-low permeability shale and tight gas reservoirs productive but the industry is still on the learning curve when it comes to addressing ...

  3. The effects of fracture fluid cleanup upon the analysis of pressure buildup tests in tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Atle Thomas

    1988-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF FRACTURE FLUID CLEANUP UPON THE ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE BUILDUP TESTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ATLE THOMAS JOHANSEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECTS OF FRACTURE FLUID CLEANUP UPON THE ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE BUILDUP TESTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ATLE THOMAS JOHANSEN Approved...

  4. Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir Data, Using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 31159 Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir of this methodology to a gas storage field is presented in this paper. The developed neural network can predict for future stimulation treatment in the aforementioned field. INTRODUCTION Gas storage fields have numerous

  5. ThermoElectric Transport Properties of a Chain of Quantum Dots with Self-Consistent Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe A. Jacquet

    2009-02-13

    We introduce a model for charge and heat transport based on the Landauer-Buttiker scattering approach. The system consists of a chain of $N$ quantum dots, each of them being coupled to a particle reservoir. Additionally, the left and right ends of the chain are coupled to two particle reservoirs. All these reservoirs are independent and can be described by any of the standard physical distributions: Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein. In the linear response regime, and under some assumptions, we first describe the general transport properties of the system. Then we impose the self-consistency condition, i.e. we fix the boundary values (T_L,\\mu_L) and (T_R,mu_R), and adjust the parameters (T_i,mu_i), for i = 1,...,N, so that the net average electric and heat currents into all the intermediate reservoirs vanish. This condition leads to expressions for the temperature and chemical potential profiles along the system, which turn out to be independent of the distribution describing the reservoirs. We also determine the average electric and heat currents flowing through the system and present some numerical results, using random matrix theory, showing that these currents are typically governed by Ohm and Fourier laws.

  6. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

  7. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

  8. Property:GeochemReservoirTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeType JumpFuturePlansActionableEntity

  9. Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information PromotingPropertyAvgGeoFluidTemp

  10. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2004-05-01

    This final technical report describes and summarizes results of a research effort to investigate physical mechanisms that control the performance of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs and to represent those physical effects in an efficient way in simulations of gas injection processes. The research effort included four main lines of research: (1) Efficient compositional streamline methods for 3D flow; (2) Analytical methods for one-dimensional displacements; (3) Physics of multiphase flow; and (4) Limitations of streamline methods. In the first area, results are reported that show how the streamline simulation approach can be applied to simulation of gas injection processes that include significant effects of transfer of components between phases. In the second area, the one-dimensional theory of multicomponent gas injection processes is extended to include the effects of volume change as components change phase. In addition an automatic algorithm for solving such problems is described. In the third area, results on an extensive experimental investigation of three-phase flow are reported. The experimental results demonstrate the impact on displacement performance of the low interfacial tensions between the gas and oil phases that can arise in multicontact miscible or near-miscible displacement processes. In the fourth area, the limitations of the streamline approach were explored. Results of an experimental investigation of the scaling of the interplay of viscous, capillary, and gravity forces are described. In addition results of a computational investigation of the limitations of the streamline approach are reported. The results presented in this report establish that it is possible to use the compositional streamline approach in many reservoir settings to predict performance of gas injection processes. When that approach can be used, it requires substantially less (often orders of magnitude) computation time than conventional finite difference compositional simulation.

  11. Fracture Modeling and Flow Behavior in Shale Gas Reservoirs Using Discrete Fracture Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogbechie, Joachim Nwabunwanne

    2012-02-14

    Fluid flow process in fractured reservoirs is controlled primarily by the connectivity of fractures. The presence of fractures in these reservoirs significantly affects the mechanism of fluid flow. They have led to problems in the reservoir which...

  12. Prediction of reservoir properties of the N-sand, vermilion block 50, Gulf of Mexico, from multivariate seismic attributes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaradat, Rasheed Abdelkareem

    2005-08-29

    seismic data and strongly maintain the proposed geological model of the N-sand interval. Results suggest that multivariate seismic attribute technique can be used to predict various reservoir properties and can be applied to a wide variety of geological...

  13. Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

    2012-12-11

    Natural gas is an important energy source that contributes up to 25% of the total US energy reserves (DOE 2011). An increase in natural gas demand spurs further development of unconventional resources, including methane hydrate (Rajnauth 2012...

  14. Numerical Modeling of Fractured Shale-Gas and Tight-Gas Reservoirs Using Unstructured Grids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olorode, Olufemi Morounfopefoluwa

    2012-02-14

    Various models featuring horizontal wells with multiple induced fractures have been proposed to characterize flow behavior over time in tight gas and shale gas systems. Currently, there is little consensus regarding the effects of non...

  15. Study of Multi-scale Transport Phenomena in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Craig Matthew

    2013-11-25

    . These challenges have impeded efficient economic development of shale resources. New fundamental insights and tools are needed to improve the state of shale gas development. Few attempts have been made to model the compositional behavior of fluids in shale gas...

  16. Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2012-01-05

    Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity on reservoir properties is also evaluated.

  17. An evaluation of the deep reservoir conditions of the Bacon-Manito geothermal field, Philippines using well gas chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amore, Franco; Maniquis-Buenviaje, Marinela; Solis, Ramonito P.

    1993-01-28

    Gas chemistry from 28 wells complement water chemistry and physical data in developing a reservoir model for the Bacon-Manito geothermal project (BMGP), Philippines. Reservoir temperature, THSH, and steam fraction, y, are calculated or extrapolated from the grid defined by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) and H2-H2S (HSH) gas equilibria reactions. A correction is made for H2 that is lost due to preferential partitioning into the vapor phase and the reequilibration of H2S after steam loss.

  18. The effect of high-pressure injection of gas on the reservoir volume factor of a crude oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honeycutt, Baxter Bewitt

    1957-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF HIGH-PRESSURE INJECTION OF GAS ON THE RESERVOIR VOLUME FACTOR OF A CRUDE OIL A Thesis By+ BAXTER DS'kONEYCUTT o Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, i957 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECT OF HIGH-PRESSURE INJECTION OF GAS ON THE RESERVOIR VOLUME FACTOR OF A CRUDE OIL A Thesis By BAXTER D. HONEYCUTT Appro d as to style...

  19. Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

  20. Invasion Correction of Acoustic Logs in a Gas Reservoir Shihong Chi*, Jianghui Wu, and Carlos Torres-Verdin, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Invasion Correction of Acoustic Logs in a Gas Reservoir Shihong Chi*, Jianghui Wu, and Carlos-wave velocities in the near-wellbore region. This study focuses on two wells in a gas reservoir. The radial saturation distribution of mud filtrate and connate formation fluids is first obtained by simulating the mud

  1. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (United States)] Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States)] Farrar, C.D. [U.S. Geological Survey, Carnelian Bay, California (United States)] Hainsworth, L.J. [Chemistry Department, Emory and Henry College, Emory, Virginia (United States)] Hausback, B. [Geology Department, California State University, Sacramento

    1998-07-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N{sub 2}/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  2. Layered Pseudo-Steady-State Models for tight commingled gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Banbi, Ahmed

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of commingled reservoirs from limited data can be a challenge to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to find an effective and easy technique that can be used to estimate ...

  3. Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Sigurd Arild

    1980-01-01

    implicit model. The model is thoroughly tested for both coning and other problems, including both gas and oil. It was very stable, allowing a maximum saturation change per timestep as high as 10 per cent. The condition simulated was a well in the center... saturation chanqes are expected to be large, the porosity was set to 100 percent in the gas zone, and 1, 000, 300, and 100 percent in the cells outward from the wellbore in the water zone. This can be seen in Figure 3. These high porosi- ty values were...

  4. Altering Wettability in Gas Condensate Sandstone Reservoirs for Gas Mobillity Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez Martinez, Ruth Gabriela

    2012-07-16

    w 7). well. The li p to 50% i of feet in ra stration bel nce increase mobility in incremental r ). here condens quid saturati n some ca dius, but ev ow we can s. Condens this area adial distanc 2 ate on ses en see ate... (Anderson, W.G. 1987), P? ? P???P?,?????????????...?(1) where ?? is capillary pressure, ??? represents the pressure of the gas phase and ?? represents the pressure of the liquid phase in gas-condensate systems. As the condensate bank is formed...

  5. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  6. Performance analysis of compositional and modified black-oil models for rich gas condensate reservoirs with vertical and horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izgec, Bulent

    2004-09-30

    various production and injection scenarios for a rich gas condensate reservoir. The software used to perform the compositional and MBO runs were Eclipse 300 and Eclipse 100 versions 2002A. The effects of black-oil PVT table generation methods, uniform...

  7. Investigation of gas hydrate-bearing sandstone reservoirs at the "Mount Elbert" stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.; Digert, S. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Hancock, S.; Weeks, M. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Mt. Elbert Science Team

    2008-01-01

    In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc., and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive data collection effort at the "Mount Elbert #1" gas hydrates stratigraphic test well on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The 22-day field program acquired significant gas hydrate-bearing reservoir data, including a full suite of open-hole well logs, over 500 feet of continuous core, and open-hole formation pressure response tests. Hole conditions, and therefore log data quality, were excellent due largely to the use of chilled oil-based drilling fluids. The logging program confirmed the existence of approximately 30 m of gashydrate saturated, fine-grained sand reservoir. Gas hydrate saturations were observed to range from 60% to 75% largely as a function of reservoir quality. Continuous wire-line coring operations (the first conducted on the ANS) achieved 85% recovery through 153 meters of section, providing more than 250 subsamples for analysis. The "Mount Elbert" data collection program culminated with open-hole tests of reservoir flow and pressure responses, as well as gas and water sample collection, using Schlumberger's Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, were conducted. This field program demonstrated the ability to safely and efficiently conduct a research-level openhole data acquisition program in shallow, sub-permafrost sediments. The program also demonstrated the soundness of the program's pre-drill gas hydrate characterization methods and increased confidence in gas hydrate resource assessment methodologies for the ANS.

  8. Using ArcGIS to extrapolate greenhouse gas emissions on the Pengxi River, a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasarer, Lindsey

    2014-11-19

    Using ArcGIS to extrapolate greenhouse gas emissions on the Pengxi River, a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China Lindsey MW Yasarer, PhD Candidate, University of Kansas Dr. Zhe Li, Associate Professor, Chongqing University Dr.... Belinda Sturm, Associate Professor, University of Kansas RESERVOIR GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS (Image from FURNAS www.dsr.inpe.br) HOW TO SCALE UP GHG EMISSIONS? PROJECT OBJECTIVE: Estimate overall greenhouse gas emissions from the Pengxi River Backwater...

  9. Increasing Production from Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs by Optimizing Zone Isolation for Successful Stimulation Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2005-03-31

    Maximizing production from wells drilled in low-permeability reservoirs, such as the Barnett Shale, is determined by cementing, stimulation, and production techniques employed. Studies show that cementing can be effective in terms of improving fracture effectiveness by 'focusing' the frac in the desired zone and improving penetration. Additionally, a method is presented for determining the required properties of the set cement at various places in the well, with the surprising result that uphole cement properties in wells destined for multiple-zone fracturing is more critical than those applied to downhole zones. Stimulation studies show that measuring pressure profiles and response during Pre-Frac Injection Test procedures prior to the frac job are critical in determining if a frac is indicated at all, as well as the type and size of the frac job. This result is contrary to current industry practice, in which frac jobs are designed well before the execution, and carried out as designed on location. Finally, studies show that most wells in the Barnett Shale are production limited by liquid invasion into the wellbore, and determinants are presented for when rod or downhole pumps are indicated.

  10. Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-01-01

    cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy & Fuels, 17(1),cushion gas for natural gas storage (Oldenburg, 2003). For

  11. Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Albert C.; Oliver, Dean S.; Zhang, Fengjun; Dong, Yannong; Skjervheim, Jan Arild; Liu, Ning

    2003-03-10

    The goal of this project was to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem was necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management.

  12. Environment of deposition and reservoir properties of Teapot sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Well Draw field, Converse County, Wyoming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, John Joseph

    1982-01-01

    fossils, and reservoir morphology. Three distinct sandstone facies produce oil and gas at Well Draw field. The main producing zone consists of thicker, channel turbidites. The lower two zones are thinly interbedded with shale and have limited reservoir... to oil ratio was 900 cu ft/bbl (Isbell et al, , 1976). Temperatures within Teapot sandstones yield an average geothermal gradient of 1, 21'F/100 ft (22. 0'C/km). More than 350 wells were drilled on 160 acre spacing in the Well Draw area...

  13. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  14. Implementation of the Ensemble Kalman Filter in the Characterization of Hydraulic Fractures in Shale Gas Reservoirs by Integrating Downhole Temperature Sensing Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, Jose A

    2014-08-12

    Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing in horizontal wells has demonstrated successful results for developing unconventional low-permeability oil and gas reservoirs. Despite being vastly implemented by different operators across North America, hydraulic...

  15. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-10-01

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations.

  16. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01

    production increased. Unconventional gas resources accountedwellbores. ” Unconventional gas resources traditionallysand is an unconventional natural gas resource. According to

  17. Computer Simulation of Reservoir Depletion and Oil Flow from the Macondo Well Following the Deepwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................... 2 Reservoir Model ............................................................................................................................................. 7 Uncertainty Analysis........................................................................................................................................... 8 Tables Table 1. Reservoir and fluid properties used in the reservoir simulation model

  18. A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

    2006-01-01

    cushion gas for natural gas storage. Energy & Fuels, 2003; [demonstrate CO 2 Storage with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR).formations and storage/enhanced recovery projects in gas

  19. Effect of pressure-dependent permeability on tight gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franquet Barbara, Mariela

    2005-08-29

    Tight gas reservoirs are those reservoirs where the matrix has a low permeability range (k < 0.1 md). The literature documents laboratory experiments under restressed conditions that show stress dependent rock properties are more significant...

  20. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2003-09-30

    This report outlines progress in the first quarter of the extension of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs''. This report presents experimental results that demonstrate combined scaling effects of viscous, capillary, and gravity crossflow mechanisms that apply to the situations in which streamline models are used. We designed and ran a series of experiments to investigate combined effects of capillary, viscous, and gravity forces on displacement efficiency in layered systems. Analog liquids (isooctane, isopropanol, and water) were employed to control scaling parameters by changing interfacial tension (IFT), flow rate, and density difference. The porous medium was a two-dimensional (2-D) 2-layered glass bead model with a permeability ratio of about 1:4. In order to analyze the combined effect of only capillary and viscous forces, gravity effects were eliminated by changing the orientation of the glass bead model. We employed a commercial simulator, Eclipse100 to calculate displacement behavior for comparison with the experimental data. Experimental results with minimized gravity effects show that the IFT and flow rate determine how capillary and viscous forces affect behavior of displacement. The limiting behavior for scaling groups for two-phase displacement was verified by experimental results. Analysis of the 2-D images indicates that displacements having a capillary-viscous equilibrium give the best sweep efficiency. Experimental results with gravity effects, but with low IFT fluid systems show that slow displacements produce larger area affected by crossflow. This, in turn, enhances sweep efficiency. The simulation results represent the experimental data well, except for the situations where capillary forces dominate the displacement.

  1. Modeling Performance of Horizontal Wells with Multiple Fractures in Tight Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Guangwei

    2011-02-22

    Multiple transverse fracturing along a horizontal well is a relatively new technology that is designed to increase well productivity by increasing the contact between the reservoir and the wellbore. For multiple transverse fractures, the performance...

  2. Stochastic Modeling of a Fracture Network in a Hydraulically Fractured Shale-Gas Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mhiri, Adnene

    2014-08-10

    The fundamental behavior of fluid production from shale/ultra-low permeability reservoirs that are produced under a constant wellbore pressure remains difficult to quantify, which is believed to be (at least in part) due to the complexity...

  3. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1994-04-29

    The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara, a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock; and the Frontier, a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. This was the tenth quarter of the contract. During this quarter the investigators (1) continued processing the seismic data, and (2) continued modeling some of the P-wave amplitude anomalies that we see in the data.

  4. Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

    1999-01-01

    The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

  5. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01

    adjacent fractures. Natural gas composition consists mostlyNatural gas is called wet or dry depending on how large is the lique?able portion of gas composition.

  6. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01

    include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

  7. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-08-12

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations. The injection pressure and ground surface displacement are often monitored for injection well safety, and are believed can partially reflect the risk of fault reactivation and seismicity. Based on the reduced order model and response surface, the input parameters can be screened for control the risk of induced seismicity. The uncertainty of the subsurface structure properties cause the numerical simulation based on a single or a few samples does not accurately estimate the geomechanical response in the actual injection site. Probability of risk can be used to evaluate and predict the risk of injection when there are great uncertainty in the subsurface properties and operation conditions.

  8. CO2 utilization and storage in shale gas reservoirs: Experimental results and economic impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Owen, Antionette Toni; Miller, Quin R. S.; Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-12-31

    Natural gas is considered a cleaner and lower-emission fuel than coal, and its high abundance from advanced drilling techniques has positioned natural gas as a major alternative energy source for the U.S. However, each ton of CO2 emitted from any type of fossil fuel combustion will continue to increase global atmospheric concentrations. One unique approach to reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions involves coupling CO2 based enhanced gas recovery (EGR) operations in depleted shale gas reservoirs with long-term CO2 storage operations. In this paper, we report unique findings about the interactions between important shale minerals and sorbing gases (CH4 and CO2) and associated economic consequences. Where enhanced condensation of CO2 followed by desorption on clay surface is observed under supercritical conditions, a linear sorption profile emerges for CH4. Volumetric changes to montmorillonites occur during exposure to CO2. Theory-based simulations identify interactions with interlayer cations as energetically favorable for CO2 intercalation. Thus, experimental evidence suggests CH4 does not occupy the interlayer and has only the propensity for surface adsorption. Mixed CH4:CO2 gas systems, where CH4 concentrations prevail, indicate preferential CO2 sorption as determined by in situ infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Collectively, these laboratory studies combined with a cost-based economic analysis provide a basis for identifying favorable CO2-EOR opportunities in previously fractured shale gas reservoirs approaching final stages of primary gas production. Moreover, utilization of site-specific laboratory measurements in reservoir simulators provides insight into optimum injection strategies for maximizing CH4/CO2 exchange rates to obtain peak natural gas production.

  9. Determination of fracture and reservoir properties using an automatic history matching technique for wells with finite-conductivity vertical fractures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santhanam, Kalakad Sundhareswaraiyer

    1985-01-01

    ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering DETERMINATION OF FRACTURE AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES USING AN AUTOMATIC HISTORY MATCHING TECHNIQUE... FOR WELLS WITH FINITE-CONDUCTIVITY VERTICAL FRACTURES A Thesis by KALAKAD SUNDHARESWARAIYER SANTHANAM Approved as to style and content by William John Lee (Chairman of Commitee) Stephen A. Holditch (Member) Robert R. Berg (Member) Willi D. Von...

  10. Factors that affect fracture fluid clean-up and pressure buildup test results in tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Kevin Todd

    1990-01-01

    FACTORS THAT AFFECT FRACTURE FLUID CLEAN-UP AND PRESSURE BUILDUP TEST RESULTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis KEVIN TODD MONTGOMERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of Clean-up of the Invaded Zone Simulation of the Buildup Tests FACTORS AFFECTING FRACTURE FLUID CLEAN-UP Page v 1v 15 17 47 Effect of Dimensionless Fracture Conductivity on Clean-up . . 47 Effect of Fracture Length on Clean-up Effect...

  11. UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills, 26R Reservoir, Elk Hills oil and gas field, Kern County, California: Management Review: Surface operations and measurements of production and injection volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Evans, Carey and Crozier was given the task to conduct a Management Review of the Surface Operations of the 26R Reservoir in UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California. The MER strategy for this reservoir is to maintain pressure, and toward this end, gas injection volumes are scheduled to amount to 110% of calculated withdrawals. In spite of this, however, reservoir pressure continues to decline. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine if, and to what extent, field operating practices and accounting procedures may be contributing to this dilemma and to make appropriate recommendations pertaining to correcting any deficiencies which may have been found.

  12. Geological controls on gas accumulation in a unique Zechstein carbonate reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    anhydrite and halite (salt)), that are well known both for their mobility (halokenesis) and ability to trap hydrocarbons as an effective reservoir seal. Deep in the palaeo-basin centre, salts (anhydrite and halite to two stages of tectonic inversion (re-activation in compression of the initially extensional faults

  13. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

  14. Pressure buildup during supercritical carbon dioxide injection from a partially penetrating borehole into gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2013-01-01

    the physical properties of carbon dioxide, compare thei.e. , Physical Properties of Carbon Dioxide Z ? PV ? 1 ?Thermophysical Properties of Carbon Dioxide, Publishing

  15. Selective gas adsorption and unique phase transition properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selective gas adsorption and unique phase transition properties in a stable magnesium metal-organic framework constructed from infinite metal chains Citation Details In-Document...

  16. CO2 gas/oil ratio prediction in a multi-component reservoir bycombined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-08-28

    Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity and electrical conductivity during a CO2 injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization using Archie's law provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity and the electrical conductivity. The rock properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. The electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation. The estimated changes in water saturation are used with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO2 relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. The residual compressional velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO2 /oil ratio. Resulting images of CO2/oil ratio show CO2 rich zones that are well correlated with the location of injection perforations with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO2. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected CO2 than are any of the individual images of change in geophysical parameters.

  17. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

  18. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering text and exhibits: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The Dry Gas Zone in the Elk Hills field is comprised of fourteen separate productive horizons deposited in the MYA Group of the San Joaquin Formation of Pliocene Age. Eighty-six separate Reservoir Units have been identified within the interval over an area roughly ten miles long and four miles wide. One basal Tulare sand, the Tulare B, was also included in the geologic study. Five earlier studies have been made of the Dry Gas Zone; each is referenced in the Appendix of this report. Most of these studies were geologic in nature, and none provided in-depth reservoir analyses. This report is made up of ten (10) separate volumes which include: engineering text and exhibits (white dot); engineering data (black dot); geologic text and tables (green dot); structure and isochore maps (light blue dot); structural cross sections (dark blue dot); stratigraphic cross sections (brown dot); geologic data sheets -book 1 (yellow dot); geologic data sheets - book 2 (orange dot); geologic data sheets - book 3 (red dot); and geologic data sheets - book 4 (pink or coral dot). Basic production, injection, pressure, and other assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy engineering staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made at independent verification.

  19. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaul, Gilbert John

    1979-01-01

    and structural characteristics of the field. The Upper Wilcox is divided into the following units, in ascending order, "First Lower Massive" sandstones and "D", "C", "B", "A", "Second Wilcox" and "First Wilcox" interbedded sandstones and shales. The reservoir... and are generally abruptly overla1n by sandstones with sharp or erosional bases. The sandstones change laterally to thin sandstones interlaminated with thick shales. The thick sandstones are submarine, constructional- channel deposits with associated thin...

  20. Numerical Simulation and Multiple Realizations for Sensitivity Study of Shale Gas Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 141058 Numerical Simulation and Multiple Realizations for Sensitivity Study of Shale Gas. The abstract must contain conspicuous acknowledgment of SPE copyright. Abstract Shale gas in the United States the largest conventional gas accumulations in the world. Shale gas success is directly the result

  1. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Geologic text and tables: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-29

    The Dry Gas Zone was defined by US Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Engineering Committee (1957) as ''/hor ellipsis/all sands bearing dry gas above the top of the Lower Scalez marker bed. The term is used to include the stratigraphic interval between the Scalez Sand Zone and the Tulare Formation - the Mya Sand Zone. The reservoirs in this upper zone are thin, lenticular, loosely cemented sandstones with relatively high permeabilities.'' Other than the limited Tulare production in the western part of the field, the Dry Gas Zone is the shallowest productive zone in the Elk Hills Reserve and is not included in the Shallow Oil Zone. It is Pliocene in age and makes up approximately eighty percent of the San Joaquin Formation as is summarized in Exhibit TL-1. The lithologic character of the zone is one of interbedded shales and siltstones with intermittent beds of various thickness sands. The stratigraphic thickness of the Dry Gas Zone ranges from 950 to 1150 feet with a general thickening along the flanks and thinning over the crests of the anticlines. The productive part of the Dry Gas Zone covers portions of 30 sections in an area roughly 10 miles long by 4 miles wide. 4 refs.

  2. Reservoir rock properties of the Arun limestone (Miocene), Arun field, North Sumatra, Indonesia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, Suryadi

    1995-01-01

    -dolomitized rocks (2.27 to 2.49 gr/cm3 and 14 to 35 API). Three geological factors: sea-level change, paleoclimate, and tectonic setting during Lower to Middle Miocene affected the reservoir quality of the Arun buildup. Uplift of the North Sumatra basin during Lower...

  3. Evaluating reservoir production strategies in miscible and immiscible gas-injection projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, Iman

    2004-11-15

    Miscible gas injection processes could be among the most widely used enhanced oil recovery processes. Successful design and implementation of a miscible gas injection project depends upon the accurate determination of the minimum miscibility...

  4. Modeling of performance behavior in gas condensate reservoirs using a variable mobility concept 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Benton Wade

    2004-09-30

    of the new model (t (? p /? tD D D) for- mulation (Eq. 1.6)). Solution is plotted versus the inverse of the modified Boltzmann transform variable 2DDD r 10 In Fig. 1.4 we present the radial derivative function pDdr(? D) function plotted versus... the modified Boltzmann transform variable The p2 DDD t Ddr(? D) formulation represents the change in pressure drop with respect to radius as we move out into the reservoir ? clearly there are separate factors at issue ? the behavior of the |rD(? pD/? r...

  5. Study the gas sensing properties of boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Feng, Peter, E-mail: p.feng@upr.edu

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We synthesized boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrate. • We analyzed gas sensing properties of BNNSs-based gas-sensor device. • CH{sub 4} gas is used to measure gas-sensing properties of the device. • Quick response and recovery time of the device is recorded. • BNNSs showed excellent sensitivity to the working gas. - Abstract: In the present communication, we report on the synthesis of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) and study of their gas sensing properties. BNNSs are synthesized by irradiating pyrolytic hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) target using CO{sub 2} laser pulses. High resolution transmission electron microscopic measurements (HRTEM) revealed 2-dientional honeycomb crystal lattice structure of BNNSs. HRTEM, electron diffraction, XRD and Raman scattering measurements clearly identified h-BN. Gas sensing properties of synthesized BNNSs were analyzed with prototype gas sensor using methane as working gas. A systematic response curve of the sensor is recorded in each cycle of gas “in” and “out”; suggesting excellent sensitivity and high performance of BNNSs-based gas-sensor.

  6. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nur, A.

    1993-01-21

    This was the fifth quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) got approval for the NEPA requirements related to the field work, (2) placed the subcontract for the field data acquisition, (3) completed the field work, and (4) began processing the seismic data. As already reported, the field data acquisition was at Acomo`s Powder River Basin site in southeast Wyoming. This is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. The reservoir is highly compartmentalized, due to the low permeability, with the fractures providing the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. The fractures are thought to lie in a roughly northwest-southeast trend, along the strike of a flexure, which forms one of the boundaries of the basin.

  7. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-04-26

    During this quarter we (1) received the last of the field tapes and survey information for the seismic field data acquisition which was finished at the very end of the previous quarter, (2) began the large task of processing the seismic data, (3) collected well logs and other informination to aid in the interpretation, and (4) initiated some seismic modeling studies. As already reported, the field data acquisition was at Amoco`s Powder River Basin site in southeast Wyoming. This is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. The reservoir is highly compartmentalized, due to the low permeability, with the fractures providing the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. The fractures are thought to lie in a roughly northwest-southeast trend, along the strike of a flexure, which forms one of the boundaries of the basin.

  8. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-07-26

    This was the seventh quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued the large task of processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, (3) tied the well log data to the seismic via generation of synthetic seismograms, (4) began integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with our observations of structure in the study area, (5) began constructing a velocity model for time-to-depth conversion and subsequent AVO and raytrace modeling experiments, and (6) completed formulation of some theoretical tools for relating fracture density to observed elastic anisotropy. The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. A basemap is presented with the seismic lines being analyzed for this project plus locations of 13 wells that we are using to supplement the analysis. The arrows point to two wells for which we have constructed synthetic seismograms.

  9. Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Anish Singh

    2011-10-21

    RF Recovery factor at 30 years, percent So Oil saturation, fraction Sorg Residual oil saturation at connate gas saturation, fraction Sgc Critical gas saturation, fraction Sw Water saturation, fraction viii SRV Stimulated reservoir volume PVT.................... 24 Table 3: PVT properties of oil used for Eagle Ford oil window well setup .................... 24 Table 4: Relative permeability end points for fracture and matrix.................................. 25...

  10. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08

    concentrations under reservoirs conditions. The result of this study provides the basis to optimize the fracturing fluids and the polymer loading at different reservoir conditions, which may result in a clean and conductive fracture. Success in improving...

  11. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  12. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400 level receiver array can be used to obtain 3D 9C data. These 9C borehole seismic data provide both compressional wave and shear wave information that can be used for quantitative prediction of rock and pore fluid types. The 400-level borehole receiver array has been deployed successfully in a number of oil and gas wells during the course of this project, and each survey has resulted in marked improvements in imaging of geologic features that are critical for oil or gas production but were previously considered to be below the limits of seismic resolution. This added level of reservoir detail has resulted in improved well placement in the oil and gas fields that have been drilled using the Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} images. In the future, the 400-level downhole seismic receiver array is expected to continue to improve reservoir characterization and drilling success in deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs.

  13. Radionuclide Migration at the Rio Blanco Site, A Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clay A. Cooper; Ming Ye; Jenny Chapman; Craig Shirley

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability gas reservoirs. The third and final project in the program, Project Rio Blanco, was conducted in Rio Blanco County, in northwestern Colorado. In this experiment, three 33-kiloton nuclear explosives were simultaneously detonated in a single emplacement well in the Mesaverde Group and Fort Union Formation, at depths of 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below land surface on May 17, 1973. The objective of this work is to estimate lateral distances that tritium released from the detonations may have traveled in the subsurface and evaluate the possible effect of postulated natural-gas development on radionuclide migration. Other radionuclides were considered in the analysis, but the majority occur in relatively immobile forms (such as nuclear melt glass). Of the radionuclides present in the gas phase, tritium dominates in terms of quantity of radioactivity in the long term and contribution to possible whole body exposure. One simulation is performed for {sup 85}Kr, the second most abundant gaseous radionuclide produced after tritium.

  14. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

    1996-01-01

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

  15. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

    1996-12-17

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

  16. Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Craig M.

    2010-07-14

    Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small...

  17. An Advisory System For Selecting Drilling Technologies and Methods in Tight Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilisi, Nicolas

    2010-01-16

    ranging between 177 Tcf and 379 Tcf. During the past few decades, gas production from tight sands field developments have taken place all around the world from South America (Argentina), Australia, Asia (China, Indonesia), the Russian Federation, Northern...

  18. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  19. Discovery of Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, K Decker; Zabludoff, Ann; Narayanan, Desika; Shirley, Yancy; Walter, Fabian; Smith, John-David; Tremonti, Christy A

    2015-01-01

    Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H$\\alpha$ emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO (1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30m and SMT 10m telescopes in 32 nearby ($0.01gas masses of $M(H_2)=10^{8.6}$-$10^{9.8} M_\\odot$ and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of $\\sim10^{-2}$-$10^{-0.5}$, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on $M(H_2)$ for th...

  20. Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic(Million CubicWorking Gas1) Part

  1. Florida Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun20032,485,331Gas2001

  2. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013(Million Barrels) Natural Gas8 0 0 0

  3. Transport Properties of operational gas mixtures used at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasser Assran; Archana Sharma

    2011-10-31

    This report summarizes some useful data on the transport characteristics of gas mixtures which are required for detection of charged particles in gas detectors. We try to replace Freon used for RPC detector in the CMS experiment with another gas while maintaining the good properties of the Freon gas mixture unchanged. We try to switch to freonless gas mixture because Freon is not a green gas, it is very expensive and its availability is decreasing. Noble gases like Ar, He, Ne and Xe (with some quenchers like carbon dioxide, methane, ethane and isobutene) are investigated. Transport parameters like drift velocity, diffusion, Townsend coefficient, attachment coefficient and Lorentz angle are computed using Garfield software for different gas mixtures and compared with experimental data.

  4. Inferential determination of various properties of a gas mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

    2007-03-27

    Methods for inferentially determining various properties of a gas mixture, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. The method can be applied to natural gas mixtures, where the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for heating value calculations. The method may also be applied to inferentially determine density and molecular weight for gas mixtures other than natural gases.

  5. Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

    2005-11-01

    Previous experiments - injecting pure CO2 into carbonate cores - showed that the process is a win-win technology, sequestrating CO2 while recovering a significant amount of hitherto unrecoverable natural gas that could help defray the cost of CO2...

  6. Optimal Process Design for Coupled CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Gas Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odi, Uchenna

    2013-12-09

    ........................................................................................................ 26 Figure 11: PVT System for Dew Point Measurement (a) Oven (b) Computer Data Gathering Equipment (c) Top Pump B (d) PVT Visual Cell (e) Bottom Pump A... adequate understanding of condensate blockage and its interaction with CO2. Accomplishing this requires a fundamental understanding of the pressure, volume, and temperature (PVT) interactions between gas condensate and CO2. Discerning these PVT...

  7. Rate Transient Analysis in Shale Gas Reservoirs with Transient Linear Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bello, Rasheed O.

    2010-07-14

    of the Major United States Shale Basins............................................ 3 1.3 Microseismic Map of Multi-Stage Hydraulically Fractured Horizontal Well... micro-seismic data used to monitor the hydraulic fractures is shown in Fig. 1.3. The different hydraulic fracture stages are indicated by the different clusters. Shale gas production data from a sample well in the Barnett shale is plotted against...

  8. Transport properties of a meson gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2007-07-09

    We present recent results on a systematic method to calculate transport coefficients for a meson gas (in particular, we analyze a pion gas) at low temperatures in the context of Chiral Perturbation Theory. Our method is based on the study of Feynman diagrams with a power counting which takes into account collisions in the plasma by means of a non-zero particle width. In this way, we obtain results compatible with analysis of Kinetic Theory with just the leading order diagram. We show the behavior with temperature of electrical and thermal conductivities and shear and bulk viscosities, and we discuss the fundamental role played by unitarity. We obtain that bulk viscosity is negligible against shear viscosity near the chiral phase transition. Relations between the different transport coefficients and bounds on them based on different theoretical approximations are also discussed. We also comment on some applications to heavy-ion collisions.

  9. New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Marthrough 1996)Price780 922

  10. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0Proved ReservesData2009 2010Year Jan Feb Mar2009 2010(Million

  11. Alaska Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670Same0 1 2Cubic3,566

  12. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570MonthThousand8 0.8 0.8 0.622 28 21

  13. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724per Thousand CubicSeparation, 263 102

  14. California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724per ThousandLease0Year Jan,835 2,939

  15. Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948CaliforniaFeet) (Million,914 1,886Cubic

  16. Kansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYearDecade Year-0163 258 228 183 189 21164

  17. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014 View Historyto7 2005-2014

  18. Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal ConsumptionperYear Jan

  19. Montana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19FuelYear5) Model37 64 25 11 16

  20. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural Gas Production3,1,50022,3,,0,,6,1,6,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,8,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Separation 362855

  1. Gas energy meter for inferential determination of thermophysical properties of a gas mixture at multiple states of the gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Kelner, Eric (San Antonio, TX); Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

    2008-07-08

    A gas energy meter that acquires the data and performs the processing for an inferential determination of one or more gas properties, such as heating value, molecular weight, or density. The meter has a sensor module that acquires temperature, pressure, CO2, and speed of sound data. Data is acquired at two different states of the gas, which eliminates the need to determine the concentration of nitrogen in the gas. A processing module receives this data and uses it to perform a "two-state" inferential algorithm.

  2. Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

  3. Depositional Environment, Reservoir Properties, and EOR Potential of an Incised-valley-fill Sandstone, Pleasant Prairie Oilfield, Haskell County, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior, Peter

    2012-12-31

    of modeled original oil in place to production data suggests inaccuracy of reservoir models at the scale of individual well drainage areas. Waterflooding of the reservoir has proven successful for >10 years, and remaining oil in place ranges from 7.8&ndash...

  4. Estimating rock properties in two phase petroleum reservoirs: an error analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Anthony Ian

    1983-01-01

    by the same amount from the true porosity value. In Fig. 5, the objective function is slightly better represented by the series approximation in 1/4. A Monte Carlo study was performed using the same history matching conditions as for the permeability... estimates were used in a Monte Carlo study to calculate the predicted well values, after the history matching period. The errors in the rock property estimates increases rapidly with an increasing number of unknowns. In many cases, even when large errors...

  5. Optimizing injected solvent fraction in stratified reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Gary Michael

    1993-01-01

    Waterflooding has become standard practice for extending the productive life of many solution gas drive reservoirs, but has the disadvantage of leaving a substantial residual oil volume in the reservoir. Solvent flooding has been offered as a...

  6. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondoteam and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using theoil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using

  7. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondooil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated usingmaximal flow rates of oil and gas. With the conceptual model

  8. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thuiner, P; Jackman, R B; Müller, H; Nguyen, T T; Oliveri, E; Pfeiffer, D; Resnati, F; Ropelewski, L; Smith, J A; van Stenis, M; Veenhof, R

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  9. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Thuiner; R. Hall-Wilton; R. B. Jackman; H. Müller; T. T. Nguyen; E. Oliveri; D. Pfeiffer; F. Resnati; L. Ropelewski; J. A. Smith; M. van Stenis; R. Veenhof

    2015-03-23

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  10. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report for the period: 7/1/93--9/31/93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-10-23

    The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical paths of production. During this eighth quarter of the seismic study of this area, work continued in processing seismic data, collecting additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, and integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with observations of structure in the study area.

  11. Development and verification of new semi-analytical methods for the analysis and prediction of gas well performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Robert Stephen

    1999-01-01

    regarding gas properties (i.e., [] = constant, [] = constant, etc.), which eliminates the need for the pseudopressure and pseudotime functions. In particular, these new solutions should lend themselves to use for the analysis of low pressure gas reservoirs...

  12. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  13. Please cite this article in press as: Gilfillan, S.M.V., et al., He and Ne as tracers of natural CO2 migration up a fault from a deep reservoir. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.08.008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    in the deep reservoir, can be traced along a fault plane to occur in waters from both groundwater wells2 migration up a fault from a deep reservoir. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j migration up a fault from a deep reservoir Stuart M.V. Gilfillana, , Mark Wilkinsona , R. Stuart Haszeldinea

  14. Table A1 Molar mass, gas constant, and critical-point properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    of carbon dioxide, CO2 Table A­21 Ideal-gas properties of carbon monoxide, CO Table A­22 Ideal Properties of the atmosphere at high altitude Table A­17 Ideal-gas properties of air Table A­18 Ideal-point properties Molar mass, constant, Temperature, Pressure, Volume, Substance Formula M kg/kmol R kJ/kg·K* K MPa

  15. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1994-01-29

    This was the ninth quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional logs to aid in the interpretation, and (3)began modeling some of the P-wave amplitude anomalies that we see in the data. The study area is located at the southern end of the powder river Basin in Converse county in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both has and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due tot he low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara; a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier, a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contract with it by an unconformity.

  16. SMALL, GEOLOGICALLY COMPLEX RESERVOIRS CAN BENEFIT FROM RESERVOIR SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Bennett

    2002-06-24

    The Cascade Sand zone of the Mission-Visco Lease in the Cascade Oil field of Los Angeles County, California, has been under water flood since 1970. Increasing water injection to increase oil production rates was being considered as an opportunity to improve oil recovery. However, a secondary gas cap had formed in the up-dip portion of the reservoir with very low gas cap pressures, creating concern that oil could be displaced into the gas cap resulting in the loss of recoverable oil. Therefore, injecting gas into the gas cap to keep the gas cap pressurized and restrict the influx of oil during water injection was also being considered. Further, it was recognized that the reservoir geology in the gas cap area is very complex with numerous folding and faulting and thus there are potential pressure barriers in several locations throughout the reservoir. With these conditions in mind, there were concerns regarding well to well continuity in the gas cap, which could interfere with the intended repressurization impact. Concerns about the pattern of gas flow from well to well, the possibilities of cycling gas without the desired increased pressure, and the possible loss of oil displaced into the gas cap resulted in the decision to conduct a gas tracer survey in an attempt to better define inter-well communication. Following the gas tracer survey, a reservoir model would be developed to integrate the findings of the gas tracer survey, known geologic and reservoir data, and historic production data. The reservoir model would be used to better define the reservoir characteristics and provide information that could help optimize the waterflood-gas injection project under consideration for efficient water and gas injection management to increase oil production. However, due to inadequate gas sampling procedures in the field and insufficiently developed laboratory analytical techniques, the laboratory was unable to detect the tracer in the gas samples taken. At that point, focus on, and an expansion of the scope of the reservoir simulation and modeling effort was initiated, using DOE's BOAST98 (a visual, dynamic, interactive update of BOAST3), 3D, black oil reservoir simulation package as the basis for developing the reservoir model. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and reservoir simulation resulted in a significant change in the depletion strategy. Information from the reservoir characterization and modeling effort indicate that in-fill drilling and relying on natural water influx from the aquifer could increase remaining reserves by 125,000 barrels of oil per well, and that up to 10 infill wells could be drilled in the field. Through this scenario, field production could be increased two to three times over the current 65 bopd. Based on the results of the study, permits have been applied for to drill a directional infill well to encounter the productive zone at a high angle in order to maximize the amount of pay and reservoirs encountered.

  17. Seismic low-frequency effects from oil-saturated reservoir zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, Gennady M.; Korneev, Valeri A.; Vingalov, Vjacheslav M.

    2002-01-01

    and gas saturation changes in underground reservoirs. Whilereservoir for the cases of oil and water saturation.

  18. Geochemical analysis of reservoir continuity and connectivity, Arab-D and Hanifa Reservoirs, Abqaiq Field, Saudia Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahdi, A.A.; Grover, G. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Hwang, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Organic geochemistry and its integration with geologic and reservoir engineering data is becoming increasingly utilized to assist geologists and petroleum engineers in solving production related problems. In Abqaiq Field of eastern Saudi Arabia, gas chromatographic analysis (FSCOT) of produced oils from the Arab-D and Hanifa reservoirs was used to evaluate vertical and lateral continuity within and between these reservoirs. Bulk and molecular properties of produced Arab-D oils do not vary significantly over the 70 km length and 10 km width of the reservoir. Hanifa oils, however, do reflect two compositionally distinct populations that are hot in lateral communication, compatible with the occurrence of a large oil pool in the southern part of the field, and a separate, and smaller northern accumulation. The Arab-D and underlying Hanifa oil pools are separated by over 450 feet of impermeable carbonates of the Jubaila Formation, yet the Southern Hanifa pool and the Arab-D have been in pressure communication since onset of Hanifa production in 1954. Recent borehole imaging and core data from horizontal Hanifa wells confirmed the long suspected occurrence of fractures responsible for fluid transmissibility within the porous (up to 35%) but tight (<10md matrix K) Hanifa reservoir, and between the Hanifa and Arab-D. The nearly identical hydrocarbon composition of oils from the Arab-D and southern Hanifa pool provided the final confirmation of fluid communication between the two reservoirs, and extension of a Hanifa fracture-fault network via the Jubaila Formation. This work lead to acquisition of 3-D seismic to image and map the fracture-fault system. The molecular fingerprinting approach demonstrated that produced oils can be used to evaluate vertical and lateral reservoir continuity, and at Abqaiq Field confirmed, in part, the need to produce the Hanifa reservoir via horizontal wells to arrest the reservoir communication that occurs with existing vertical wells.

  19. Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

    2013-01-09

    of pore shape distribution is needed to explain the often-encountered complex interrelationship between seismic parameters (e.g. seismic velocity) and the independent physical properties (e.g. porosity) of hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, our knowledge...

  20. Application of the transient, isochronal p/z plotting method to multilayered reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandekar, Rashmin Ramesh

    1992-01-01

    of the crossflow reservoir cases was lower than the error for the corresponding commingled reservoir cases. The error in gas- The error in gas-in-place estimates in all of the crossflow reservoir cases was lower than the error for the corresponding commingled... reservoir cases. The ermr in gas- in-place estimate decreases with increasing permeability contrast. The behavior can be attributed to the fact that crossflow reservoir behavior is similar to the behavior of homogeneous reservoir after the passage...

  1. System and method to determine thermophysical properties of a multi-component gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2003-08-05

    A system and method to characterize natural gas hydrocarbons using a single inferential property, such as standard sound speed, when the concentrations of the diluent gases (e.g., carbon dioxide and nitrogen) are known. The system to determine a thermophysical property of a gas having a first plurality of components comprises a sound velocity measurement device, a concentration measurement device, and a processor to determine a thermophysical property as a function of a correlation between the thermophysical property, the speed of sound, and the concentration measurements, wherein the number of concentration measurements is less than the number of components in the gas. The method includes the steps of determining the speed of sound in the gas, determining a plurality of gas component concentrations in the gas, and determining the thermophysical property as a function of a correlation between the thermophysical property, the speed of sound, and the plurality of concentrations.

  2. PROPERTY TABLES AND CHARTS (SI UNITS) Table A1 Molar mass, gas constant, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Table A­20 Ideal-gas properties of carbon dioxide, CO2 Table A­21 Ideal-gas properties of carbon.1355 n-Butane C4H10 58.124 0.1430 425.2 3.80 0.2547 Carbon dioxide CO2 44.01 0.1889 304.2 7.39 0Appendix 1 PROPERTY TABLES AND CHARTS (SI UNITS) Table A­1 Molar mass, gas constant, and critical

  3. Multi-scale Detection of Organic and Inorganic Signatures Provides Insights into Gas Shale Properties and Evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, S.; Horsfield, B; Schultz, H; Schreiber, A; Wirth, R; Thi AnhVu, T; Perssen, F; Konitzer, S; Volk, H; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Organic geochemical analyses, including solvent extraction or pyrolysis, followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, are generally conducted on bulk gas shale samples to evaluate their source and reservoir properties. While organic petrology has been directed at unravelling the matrix composition and textures of these economically important unconventional resources, their spatial variability in chemistry and structure is still poorly documented at the sub-micrometre scale. Here, a combination of techniques including transmission electron microscopy and a synchrotron-based microscopy tool, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, have been used to characterize at a multiple length scale an overmature organic-rich calcareous mudstone from northern Germany. We document multi-scale chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities within the sample, from the millimetre down to the nanometre-scale. From the detection of different types of bitumen and authigenic minerals associated with the organic matter, we show that the multi-scale approach used in this study may provide new insights into gaseous hydrocarbon generation/retention processes occurring within gas shales and may shed new light on their thermal history.

  4. Sequestration of CO2 in the Altmark natural gas field, Germany: Mobility control to extend enhanced gas recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebscher, D.; May, F.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    OF CO 2 IN THE ALTMARK NATURAL GAS FIELD, GERMANY: MOBILITYin the depleted Altmark natural gas reservoir, Germany. Ourdioxide or nitrogen in natural gas (methane) reservoirs,

  5. Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation on Production from Shale Formations: Application to New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    and the orientation of horizontal wells on gas production in New Albany Shale. The study was conducted using on the Net Present Value of investing on gas wells producing from New Albany Shale. Introduction New Albany Shale Gas -The New Albany Shale is predominantly an organic-rich brownish-black and grayish-black shale

  6. Uncertainty quantification of volumetric and material balance analysis of gas reservoirs with water influx using a Bayesian framework 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aprilia, Asti Wulandari

    2007-04-25

    Accurately estimating hydrocarbon reserves is important, because it affects every phase of the oil and gas business. Unfortunately, reserves estimation is always uncertain, since perfect information is seldom available ...

  7. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  8. Evidence of Reopened Microfractures in Production Data of Hydraulically Fractured Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apiwathanasorn, Sippakorn

    2012-10-19

    the presence of reopened natural fracture network can be observed in pressure and production data of shale gas wells producing from two shale formations with different well and reservoir properties. Homogeneous, dual porosity and triple porosity models...

  9. A Hierarchical Multiscale Approach to History Matching and Optimization for Reservoir Management in Mature Fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Han-Young

    2012-10-19

    Reservoir management typically focuses on maximizing oil and gas recovery from a reservoir based on facts and information while minimizing capital and operating investments. Modern reservoir management uses history-matched simulation model...

  10. Intelligent Upscaling of Static and Dynamic Reservoir Properties V.Gholami, SPE and S.D.Mohaghegh, SPE, West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    that result in definition of different rock types. In most caes rock types that are identified in a reservoir

  11. 4. International reservoir characterization technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  12. High-resolution geostatistical inversion of a seismic data set acquired in a Gulf of Mexico gas reservoir.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    High-resolution geostatistical inversion of a seismic data set acquired in a Gulf of Mexico gas, UNOCAL Corporation Summary Geostatistical inversion is applied on a Gulf-of-Mexico, 3D post-stack seismic in this paper is located in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana. Existing development wells reach two

  13. Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Michael Chase

    2011-08-08

    This thesis integrated geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization models for three gas pay sands in the Grand Isle 33 & 43 fields, offshore Louisiana. The reservoirs are Late Miocene in age...

  14. Diagnosis of "fizz-gas" and gas reservoirs in deep-water environment De-hua Han, X RPL, Houston Unversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 20 40 60 80 10 Brine Volume (%) Modulas(Mpa 0 6.9Mpa, 20C 34.5Mpa, 40C 69Mpa, 70C 103.5Mpa, 90C Oil Mixture of brine (50000ppm) & gas (0.78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000Mixture of brine (50000ppm) & gas (0.78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 20 40 60 80 10 Brine Volume

  15. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

  16. IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND SIMULATION OF A MATURE FIELD USING AN INTEGRATED APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teh, Woan Jing

    2012-05-31

    of the reservoir model. In this study, the systematic assignment of reservoir properties with optimal utilization of very limited data has ensured that the fluid movement through the heterogeneous reservoir rock in a mature field is appropriately established...

  17. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

  18. Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-01-01

    gas leaking from seasonal gas storage, or for modeling ofmigration resulting from a gas storage leak, the gas ?owsof gas, created by a leaking gas storage reservoir, migrates

  19. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  20. Estimation of original gas in place from short-term shut-in pressure data for commingled tight gas reservoirs with no crossflow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuong, Chan Hung

    1995-01-01

    -in pressure data; namely one-point (secant), two-point (tangent), curve fitting, and type curve methods. A two dimensional dry gas simulator (GASSIM simulator) was used in this study. The wellbore storage, non-darcy flow, and backflow phenomenon during shut...

  1. Reservoir Simulation Used to Plan Diatomite Developement in Mountainous Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Richard

    2012-10-19

    -10 md) and high viscosity (~220 cp) at the reservoir temperature. Cyclic steam injection has been widely used in diatomite reservoirs to take advantage of the diatomite rocks unique properties and lower the viscosity of the oil. Some companies used...

  2. Depositional environment and reservoir properties of the Upper Wilcon Group sandstones, Loma Vieja field, Zapata County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Douglas Turner

    1993-01-01

    Eocene strata. Depths are determined using a geothermal gradient of 2. 15oF/100 ft (3. 92oC/100 m) . . 116 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Regional map of the Texas Gulf Coast showing the Wilcox Fault Zone and several important Wilcox oil and gas... in substantial secondary porosity, especially in the "R" sandstone. Higher gas saturations in the "R" sandstone may have inhibited precipitation of silica cements. Fluid pressure gradients range from 0. 465 psi/ft (10. 5 kPa/m) at the top of geopressures...

  3. An Investigation of Regional Variations of Barnett Shale Reservoir Properties, and Resulting Variability of Hydrocarbon Composition and Well Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Yao

    2010-07-14

    wells, Peak Monthly gas production from horizontal wells decreases as follows: Tier 1 (median production 60 MMcf) to Core Area to Parker County to Tier 2 West to Oil Zone-Montague County (median production 10 MMcf). The Peak Monthly oil production from...

  4. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boswell, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    of the reservoir with gas hydrate saturation in excess ofquality reservoirs, consistent with the lower saturationssaturation remains uniformly high wherever the Frio reservoir

  5. Morphology and Gas Adsorption Properties of Palladium-Cobalt-Based Cyanogels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    Morphology and Gas Adsorption Properties of Palladium-Cobalt-Based Cyanogels Rahul S. Deshpande Manuscript Received August 6, 2003 The morphology of cyanide-bridged palladium-cobalt (Pd-Co) gels

  6. Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Marion Denson

    1959-01-01

    EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

  7. Predicting reservoir sedimentation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooten, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    Sediments accumulate in reservoirs and significantly decrease storage capacity. Predicting sedimentation is an important consideration in the design of new reservoir projects and in the management of existing reservoirs. Sedimentation rates may vary...

  8. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benussi, L; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjølbro, J; Sharma, A; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  9. Properties of potential eco-friendly gas replacements for particle detectors in high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benussi, L; Piccolo, D; Saviano, G; Colafranceschi, S; Kjølbro, J; Yang, D; Chen, G; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Sharma, A

    2015-01-01

    Modern gas detectors for detection of particles require F-based gases for op- timal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally un- friendly Freon-based gases to be limited or banned. This review studies properties of potential eco-friendly gas candidate replacements.

  10. EFFECT OF GAS ADSORPTION ON THE ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF SINGLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES MATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    filtration process followed by high temperature annealing under vacuum (1200 °C). In this work we present results on the influence of the surrounding gas nature (N2, H2, CO2, H2O...) on the electrical resistivity1 EFFECT OF GAS ADSORPTION ON THE ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF SINGLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES MATS C

  11. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Batzle

    2006-04-30

    During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Fractured Reservoir Response to Injection/Extraction Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byungtark

    2011-10-21

    In geothermal reservoirs and unconventional gas reservoirs with very low matrix permeability, fractures are the main routes of fluid flow and heat transport, so the fracture permeability change is important. In fact, reservoir development under...

  13. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  14. Using time-lapse seismics as a reservoir-monitoring tool, geophysics can help distinguish different reservoir pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reservoir pro- duction scenarios. For example, Eiken et al. (2000) success- fully detected fluid-saturation life, oil saturation usually decreases, reservoir pressure declines, and gas breakout may occurUsing time-lapse seismics as a reservoir-monitoring tool, geophysics can help distinguish different

  15. Society of Petroleum Engineers Staggered In Time Coupling of Reservoir Flow Simulation and Geomechanical Defor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkoff, Susan E.

    ) the flow of oil, gas, and water fluid phases in the reservoir while the lat- ter has been specialized

  16. Molecular Gas Properties of Early-Type Galaxies A. F. Crocker (UMass Amherst), M. Krips (IRAM Grenoble, France), L. M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bureau, Martin

    Molecular Gas Properties of Early-Type Galaxies A. F. Crocker (UMass Amherst), M. Krips (IRAM Atlas3D sample) has detected 12 CO emission from molecular gas in approximately 25%. To study the properties of the molecular gas in early-type galaxies we have recently followed up the brightest of these 12

  17. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    and the reservoir properties (CO 2 saturation distribution).residual CO 2 saturation and the associated reservoir CO 2reservoir model (top) with zoom of central portion showing predicted CO 2 saturation

  18. Device For Determining Therophysical Properties Of A Multi-Component Gas At Arbitrary Temperature And Pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Gilbert, AZ)

    2005-02-01

    A computer product for determining thermodynamic properties of a natural gas hydrocarbon, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. Thus, the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for mass flow calculations, to determine the speed of sound at standard pressure and temperature, and to determine various thermophysical characteristics of the gas.

  19. Improved gas sensing and dielectric properties of Fe doped hydroxyapatite thick films: Effect of molar concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mene, Ravindra U. [PDEA's, Annasaheb Waghire College of Science, Arts and Commerce, Otur 412409, M.S. (India); School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mahabole, Megha P. [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mohite, K.C. [Haribhai. V. Desai College, Pune 411002, M.S. (India); Khairnar, Rajendra S., E-mail: rskhairnarsps@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We report improved gas sensing and dielectric characteristics of Fe ion exchanged HAp films. • Fe doped HAp film shows maximum gas response at relatively lower temperature. • Response and gas uptake capacity of sensors is improved for appropriate amount of Fe ions in HAp matrix. • Fe-HAp films exhibit remarkable improvement in dielectric properties compared to pure HAp. • Fe doped HAp films show significant improvement in gas sensing as well as in dielectric properties. - Abstract: In the present work Fe doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HAp) thick films has been successfully utilized to improve the gas sensing as well as its dielectric properties. Initially, HAp nano powder is synthesized by chemical precipitation process and later on Fe ions are doped in HAp by ion exchange process. Structural and morphological modifications are observed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The sensing parameters such as operating temperature, response/recovery time and gas uptake capacity are experimentally determined. The Fe-HAp (0.05 M) film shows improved CO and CO{sub 2} gas sensing capacity at lower operating temperature compared to pure HAp. Moreover, variation of dielectric constant and dielectric loss for pure and Fe-HAp thick films are studied as a function of frequency in the range of 10 Hz–1 MHz. The study reveals that Fe doped HAp thick films improve the sensing and dielectric characteristics as compared to pure HAp.

  20. Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

    2004-09-30

    facies A, B and E, with given porosity and permeability values, that corresponded to channel, levee and overbank deposits. They were used to populate the reservoir model. Well correlation helped figure out the extension of these facies....

  1. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-08-12

    We are now entering the final stages of our ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342). We have now developed several techniques to help distinguish economic hydrocarbon deposits from false ''Fizz'' gas signatures. These methods include using the proper in situ rock and fluid properties, evaluating interference effects on data, and doing better constrained inversions for saturations. We are testing these techniques now on seismic data from several locations in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, we are examining the use of seismic attenuation as indicated by frequency shifts below potential reservoirs. During this quarter we have: Began our evaluation of our latest data set over the Neptune Field; Developed software for computing composite reflection coefficients; Designed and implemented stochastic turbidite reservoir models; Produced software & work flow to improve frequency-dependent AVO analysis; Developed improved AVO analysis for data with low signal-to-noise ratio; and Examined feasibility of detecting fizz gas using frequency attenuation. Our focus on technology transfer continues, both by generating numerous presentations for the upcoming SEG annual meeting, and by beginning our planning for our next DHI minisymposium next spring.

  2. Simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saidi, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    A three-dimensional, three-phase reservoir simulator was developed to study the behavior of fully or partially fractured reservoirs. It is also demonstrated, that when a fractured reservoir is subject to a relatively large rate of pressure drop and/or it composed of relatively large blocks, the pseudo steady-state pressure concept gives large errors as compared with transient fromulation. In addition, when gravity drainage and imbibitum processes, which is the most important mechanism in the fractured reservoirs, are represented by a ''lumped parameter'' even larger errors can be produced in exchange flow between matrix and fractures. For these reasons, the matrix blocks are gridded and the transfer between matrix and fractures are calculated using pressure and diffusion transient concept. In this way the gravity drainage is also calculated accurately. As the matrix-fracture exchange flow depends on the location of each matrix grid relative to the GOC and/or WOC in fracture, the exchange flow equation are derived and given for each possible case. The differential equation describing the flow of water, oil, and gas within the matrix and fracture system, each of which may contain six unknowns, are presented. The two sets of equations are solved implicitly for pressure water, and gas stauration in both matrix and fractures. The first twenty two years of the history of Haft Kel field was successfully matched with this model and the results are included.

  3. Gas sorption properties of zwitterion-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surapathi, Anil; Chen, Hang-yan; Marand, Eva; Johnson, J Karl, Zdenka Sedlakova

    2013-02-15

    We have functionalized carbon nanotubes with carboxylic acid and zwitterion groups. We have evaluated the effect of functionalization by measuring the sorption of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} at 35? for pressures up to 10 bar. Zwitterion functionalized nanotubes were found to be highly hygroscopic. Thermal gravimetric analysis indicates that water can be desorbed at about 200°C. The adsorption of gases in zwitterion functionalized nanotubes is dramatically reduced compared with nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic acid groups. The presence of water on the zwitterion functionalized nanotube reduces the sorption even further. Molecular simulations show that three or more zwitterion groups per tube entrance are required to significantly reduce the flux of CO{sub 2} into the tubes. Simulations also show that gas phase water is rapidly sorbed into the zwitterion functionalized nanotubes, both increasing the free energy barrier to CO{sub 2} entering the tube and also lowering the equilibrium adsorption through competitive adsorption.

  4. Analytical model of the temperature dependent properties of microresonators immersed in a gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilin, E. A.; Kehrbusch, J.; Radzio, B.; Oesterschulze, E. [Physics and Technology of Nanostructures, Nano-Bio-Center, University of Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger Strasse 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model of microresonators immersed in a viscous gas of varying temperature is presented and verified by experiments. Analytical expressions for both the temperature dependent resonant frequency and quality factor of the first flexural eigenmode were derived extending Sader's theory of viscous damping to small temperature variations. The model provides useful implications for the thermal stabilization of microresonators immersed in a gas as well as for the reduction in the influence of the temperature dependent gas properties on the resonant frequency. Finally, an analytical expression is deduced for the mass detection capability of a microresonator that undergoes temperature variations.

  5. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Hydraulic Properties of Rice and the Response of Gas Exchange to Water Stress1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiller, Volker

    Hydraulic Properties of Rice and the Response of Gas Exchange to Water Stress1 Volker Stiller*, H.R.L.) We investigated the role of xylem cavitation, plant hydraulic conductance, and root pressure-specific photosynthetic rate, leaf diffusive conductance, and soil-leaf hydraulic conductance that were associated

  7. Smoothing method aids gas-inventory variance trending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.G. )

    1992-03-23

    This paper reports on a method for determining gas-storage inventory and variance in a natural-gas storage field which uses the equations developed to determine gas-in-place in a production field. The calculations use acquired data for shut-in pressures, reservoir pore volume, and storage gas properties. These calculations are then graphed and trends are developed. Evaluating trends in inventory variance can be enhanced by use of a technique, described here, that smooths the peaks and valleys of an inventory-variance curve. Calculations using the acquired data determine inventory for a storage field whose drive mechanism is gas expansion (that is, volumetric). When used for a dry gas, condensate, or gas-condensate reservoir, the formulas require no further modification. Inventory in depleted oil fields can be determined in this same manner, as well. Some additional calculations, however, must be made to assess the influence of oil production on the gas-storage process.

  8. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-01-22

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  9. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  10. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  11. Socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagoe, Bryan Keith

    1994-01-01

    This investigative study presents results on the socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The amount of incremental oil and gas production from infill drilling in 37 carbonate reservoir units...

  12. Data quality enhancement in oil reservoir operations : an application of IPMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Paul Hong-Yi

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of data quality enhancement opportunities in upstream oil and gas industry. Information Product MAP (IPMAP) methodology is used in reservoir pressure and reservoir simulation data, to propose ...

  13. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability trends. The Lower Grandstand sand consists of two coarsening-upward shoreface sands sequences while the Upper Grandstand consists of a single coarsening-upward shoreface sand. Each of the shoreface sands shows a distinctive permeability profile with high horizontal permeability at the top getting progressively poorer towards the base of the sand. In contrast, deltaic sandstones in the overlying Ninuluk are more permeable at the base of the sands, with decreasing permeability towards the sand top. These trends impart a strong permeability anisotropy to the reservoir and are being incorporated into the reservoir model. These observations also suggest that horizontal wells should target the upper part of the major sands. Natural fractures may superimpose another permeability pattern on the Umiat reservoir that need to be accounted for in both the simulation and in drilling. Examination of legacy core from Umiat field indicate that fractures are present in the subsurface, but don't provide information on their orientation and density. Nearby surface exposures of folds in similar stratigraphy indicate there are at least three possible fracture sets: an early, N/S striking set that may predate folding and two sets possibly related to folding: an EW striking set of extension fractures that are parallel to the fold axes and a set of conjugate shear fractures oriented NE and NW. Analysis of fracture spacing suggests that these natural fractures are fairly widely spaced (25-59 cm depending upon the fracture set), but could provide improved reservoir permeability in horizontal legs drilled perpendicular to the open fracture set. The phase behavior of the Umiat fluid needed to be well understood in order for the reservoir simulation to be accurate. However, only a small amount of Umiat oil was available; this oil was collected in the 1940’s and was severely weathered. The composition of this ‘dead’ Umiat fluid was characterized by gas chromatography. This analysis was then compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat

  16. Numerical modeling of gas migration into and through faulted sand reservoirs in Pabst Field (Main Pass East Block 259), northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuqian

    2006-08-16

    allow gas communication among the sands. Meanwhile, three fault families break up the three sands into numerous compartments. A primary fault and large synthetic and antithetic faults act as gas migration pathways: the synthetic and antithetic faults...

  17. Pressure Responses of a Vertically Hydraulic Fractured Well in a Reservoir with Fractal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razminia, Kambiz; Torres, Delfim F M

    2015-01-01

    We obtain an analytical solution for the pressure-transient behavior of a vertically hydraulic fractured well in a heterogeneous reservoir. The heterogeneity of the reservoir is modeled by using the concept of fractal geometry. Such reservoirs are called fractal reservoirs. According to the theory of fractional calculus, a temporal fractional derivative is applied to incorporate the memory properties of the fractal reservoir. The effect of different parameters on the computed wellbore pressure is fully investigated by various synthetic examples.

  18. New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion...

  20. New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

  1. New Mexico Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) New Mexico Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  2. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The first of a three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The objectives of the study are to (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies were conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulator was initialized using properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. Simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicate that the simulator is predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results to-date confirm that horizontal wells can increase both oil recovery rate and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. The year one simulation results will provide the baseline for the ongoing study which will evaluate the performance degradation caused by the sensitivity of fracture permeability to pressure change, and investigate fluid injection pressure maintenance as a means to improve oil recovery performance. The study is likely to conclude that fracture closure decreases oil recovery and that pressure support achieved through fluid injection could be beneficial in improving recovery.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and gas-sensing properties of monodispersed SnO{sub 2} nanocubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runa, A; Bala, Hari E-mail: fuwy56@163.com; Wang, Yan; Chen, Jingkuo; Zhang, Bowen; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou E-mail: fuwy56@163.com; Wang, Xiaodong; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying

    2014-08-04

    Monodispersed single-crystalline SnO{sub 2} nanocubes with exposed a large percentage of high-energy surfaces have been synthesized by a simple solvothermal process at low temperature without any templates and catalysts. The as-prepared samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Many outstanding characters of the final products have been shown, such as uniform particle size, high purity, and monodispersity. In property, superior gas-sensing properties such as high response, rapid response-recovery time, and good selectivity have also been shown to ethanol at an optimal working temperature of as low as 280?°C. It indicates that the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} nanocubes are promising for gas sensors.

  4. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  5. Identification of Pore Structure and Clay Content from Seismic Data within an Argillaceous Sandstone Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schelstrate, Robert

    2014-08-11

    on the depositional environment. Increasing amounts of shale become a limiting factor in reservoir quality by creating baffles to fluid flow. Seismic inversion has been used to map reservoir properties such as lithology and porosity. Previous studies have established...

  6. Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

    2009-06-02

    In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach...

  7. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2002-09-30

    The main objectives of the proposed study are as follows: (1) To understand and evaluate an unusual primary oil production mechanism which results in decreasing (retrograde) oil cut (ROC) behavior as reservoir pressure declines. (2) To improve calculations of initial oil in place so as to determine the economic feasibility of completing and producing a well. (3) To optimize the location of new wells based on understanding of geological and petrophysical properties heterogeneities. (4) To evaluate various secondary recovery techniques for oil reservoirs producing from fractured formations. (5) To enhance the productivity of producing wells by using new completion techniques. These objectives are important for optimizing field performance from West Carney Field located in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. The field, which was discovered in 1980, produces from Hunton Formation in a shallow-shelf carbonate reservoir. The early development in the field was sporadic. Many of the initial wells were abandoned due to high water production and constraints in surface facilities for disposing excess produced water. The field development began in earnest in 1995 by Altex Resources. They had recognized that production from this field was only possible if large volumes of water can be disposed. Being able to dispose large amounts of water, Altex aggressively drilled several producers. With few exceptions, all these wells exhibited similar characteristics. The initial production indicated trace amount of oil and gas with mostly water as dominant phase. As the reservoir was depleted, the oil cut eventually improved, making the overall production feasible. The decreasing oil cut (ROC) behavior has not been well understood. However, the field has been subjected to intense drilling activity because of prior success of Altex Resources. In this work, we will investigate the primary production mechanism by conducting several core flood experiments. After collecting cores from representative wells, we will study the wettability of the rock and simulate the depletion behavior by mimicking such behavior under controlled lab conditions.

  8. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  9. Electrical and gas sensing properties of polyaniline functionalized single-walled carbon This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical and gas sensing properties of polyaniline functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.1088/0957-4484/21/7/075502 Electrical and gas sensing properties of polyaniline functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes Jae Online at stacks.iop.org/Nano/21/075502 Abstract Electrical and gas sensing properties of single

  10. Pendant Functional Groups in Metal-Organic Frameworks - Effects on Crystal Structure, Stability, and Gas Sorption Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makal, Trevor Arnold

    2013-03-14

    The primary goal of this research concerns the synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) grafted with pendant alkyl substituents to enhance stability and gas sorption properties for use in clean-energy related technologies...

  11. A New Method for History Matching and Forecasting Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual and Triple Porosity Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samandarli, Orkhan

    2012-10-19

    Different methods have been proposed for history matching production of shale gas/oil wells which are drilled horizontally and usually hydraulically fractured with multiple stages. These methods are simulation, analytical models, and empirical...

  12. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2002-10-08

    During this reporting period, research was continued on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. This report proposed a model to relate the seismic response to production data to determine crack spacing and aperture, provided details of tests of proposed models to obtain fracture properties from conventional well logs with actual field data, and verification of the naturally fractured reservoir simulator developed in this project.

  13. Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

    2002-01-01

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/info_glance/underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brinestorage projects. Depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine

  14. Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    in this study was on developing a systematic approach to understand and monitor bioclogging at the reservoir). In this study, we created a realistic reservoir model from a heterogeneous gas reservoir in the Southern and phase changes can be attributed to porosity reduction. Our studies suggest that the IP signals provide

  15. Induced Microearthquake Patterns in Hydrocarbon and Geothermal Reservoirs: W. Scott Phillips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Induced Microearthquake Patterns in Hydrocarbon and Geothermal Reservoirs: A Review W. Scott or production of fluids can induce microseismic events in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. By deploying Patterns in Reservoirs Key Words: induced microseismicity, geothermal, oil and gas, fluid flow, location

  16. Application of horizontal wells in steeply dipping reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Navarro, Jose David

    1995-01-01

    and the anisotropy of permeability (kv/kh ratio) are the dominant parameters affecting the oil recovery. For thin reservoirs, the location of the horizontal injector will not significantly affect the oil recovery. Simultaneous gas and water injection through...

  17. The Role of Acidizing in Proppant Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densirimongkol, Jurairat

    2010-10-12

    Today, optimizing well stimulation techniques to obtain maximum return of investment is still a challenge. Hydraulic fracturing is a typical application to improve ultimate recovery from oil and gas reservoirs. Proppant fracturing has become one...

  18. Gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    There is a definite need for the US government to provide leadership for research in gas hydrates and to coordinate its activities with academia, industry, private groups, federal agencies, and their foreign counterparts. In response to this need, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center implemented a gas hydrates R and D program. Understanding the resource will be achieved through: assessment of current technology; characterization of gas hydrate geology and reservoir engineering; and development of diagnostic tools and methods. Research to date has focused on geology. As work progressed, areas where gas hydrates are likely to occur were identified, and specific high potential areas were targeted for future detailed investigation. Initial research activities involved the development of the Geologic Analysis System (GAS); which will provide, through approximately 30 software packages, the capability to manipulate and correlate several types of geologic and petroleum data into maps, graphics, and reports. Preliminary mapping of hydrate prospects for the Alaskan North Slope is underway. Geological research includes physical system characterization which focuses on creating synthetic methane hydrates and developing synthetic hydrate cores using tetrahydrofuran, consolidated rock cores, frost base mixtures, water/ice base mixtures, and water base mixtures. Laboratory work produced measurements of the sonic velocity and electrical resistivity of these synthetic hydrates. During 1983, a sample from a natural hydrate core recovered from the Pacific coast of Guatemala was tested for these properties by METC. More recently, a natural hydrate sample from the Gulf of Mexico was also acquired and testing of this sample is currently underway. In addition to the development of GAS, modeling and systems analysis work focused on the development of conceptual gas hydrate production models. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Simulation of paraffin damage due to natural cooling in reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peddibhotla, Sriram

    1993-01-01

    in the reservoir. Suitable modifications were made to model the paraffin precipitation due to natural cooling. The mechanisms which were modeled include (1) reduction in paraffin solubility due to evolution of dissolved gas and due to temperature changes, (2... independently, after which they were incorporated into a reservoir simulator. Then cases were run to simulate field conditions. Natural cooling is the temperature drop due to the gas leaving solution. The simulation results indicate that natural cooling...

  20. Relation between facies, diagenesis, and reservoir quality of Rotliegende reservoirs in north Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, F.; Gast, R.; Kraft, T. (BEB Erdgas Erdol GmbH, Hannover (Germany))

    1993-09-01

    In north Germany, the majority of Rotliegende gas fields is confined to an approximately 50 km-wide east-west-orientated belt, which is situated on the gently north-dipping flank of the southern Permian basin. Approximately 400 billion m[sup 3] of natural gas has been found in Rotliegende reservoir sandstones with average porosities of depths ranging from 3500 to 5000 m. Rotliegende deposition was controlled by the Autunian paleo-relief, and arid climate and cyclic transgressions of the desert lake. In general, wadis and large dunefields occur in the hinterland, sebkhas with small isolate dunes and shorelines define the coastal area, and a desert lake occurs to the north. The sandstones deposited in large dunefields contain only minor amounts of illite, anhydrite, and calcite and form good reservoirs. In contrast, the small dunes formed in the sebkha areas were affected by fluctuations of the desert lake groundwaters, causing the infiltration of detrital clay and precipitation of gypsum and calcite. These cements were transformed to illite, anhydrite, and calcite-II during later diagenesis, leading to a significant reduction of the reservoir quality. The best reservoirs occur in the shoreline sandstones because porosity and permeability were preserved by early magnesium-chlorite diagenesis. Since facies controls diagenesis and consequently reservoir quality, mapping of facies also indicates the distribution of reservoir and nonreservoir rocks. This information is used to identify play area and to interpret and calibrate three-dimensional seismic data.

  1. SENSITIVITY OF A REACTIVE-TRACER BASED ESTIMATE OF THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN AN EGS TO PROPERTIES OF THE RESERVOIR AND TRACER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Laurence C. Hull; Earl D. Mattson

    2010-02-01

    Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions. Our analyses suggest that modifications to that method, where practical, could provide much greater sensitivity. In particular, if the reaction can be quenched before maximum temperature is reached, the sensitivity is greatly enhanced. Push-pull tracer tests conducted at the injection well demonstrate similar advantages. Other alternatives, such as combinations of tracers, and tracers with parallel or chain decay behavior may offer similar advantages.

  2. Western Shallow Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General Reservoir Study, Executive Summary: Bittium, Wilhelm, Gusher, and Calitroleum Sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, K.B.

    1987-12-22

    The general Reservoir Study of the Western Shallow Oil Zone was prepared by Evans, Carey and Crozier as Task Assignment 009 with the United States Department of Energy. The study addresses the Bittium Wilhelm, Gusher, and Calitroleum Sands and their several sub units and pools. A total of twenty-eight (28) separate reservoir units have been identified and analyzed. Areally, these reservoirs are located in 31 separate sections of land including and lying northwest of sections 5G, 8G, and 32S, all in the Elk Hills Oil Fileds, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County California. Vertically, the reservoirs occur as shallow as 2600 feet and as deep as 4400 feet. Underlying a composite productive area of about 8300 acres, the reservoirs originally contained an estimated 138,022,000 stock tank barrels of oil, and 85,000 MMCF of gas, 6300 MMCF of which occurred as free gas in the Bittium and W-1B Sands. Since original discovery in April 1919, a total of over 500 wells have been drilled into or through the zones, 120 of which were completed as Western Shallow Oil Zone producers. Currently, these wells are producing about 2452 barrels of oil per day, 1135 barrels of water per day and 5119 MCF of gas per day from the collective reservoirs. Basic pressure, production and assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made by Evans, Carey and Crozier for independent vertification. This study has successfully identified the size and location of all commercially productive pools in the Western Shallow Oil Zone. It has identified the petrophysical properties and the past productive performance of the reservoirs. Primary reserves have been determined and general means of enhancing future recovery have been suggested. 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for verification and modification of the techniques and simulator. This report provides the details of the proposed techniques and summarizes the activities undertaken during the course of this project. Technology transfer activities were highlighted by a two-day technical conference held in Oklahoma City in June 2002. This conference attracted over 90 participants and included the presentation of seventeen technical papers from researchers throughout the United States.

  4. Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aydelotte, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

  5. Reservoir Operation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    1985-01-01

    to store and to release or withdraw for flood control and various conservation purposes. The report is intended to provide a comprehensive, indepth description of how reservoirs are operated in Texas...

  6. The Use of Horizontal Wells in Gas Production from Hydrate Accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01

    saturation V G Cumulative volume of free gas in reservoir [reservoir (m) t Time (s) T Temperature [ o C] Aqueous phase saturation

  7. Efficient Double-Beam Characterization for Fractured Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    We proposed an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. Based on the diffraction theory, the scattered wave ...

  8. Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs using 3D double beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    2012-01-01

    We propose an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. We use both singly scattered and multiply scattered ...

  9. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The second year of this three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study are to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies have been conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulation model has been initialized with properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. During year one, simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure charge. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. During the second year the performances of the same vertical and horizontal wells were evaluated with the assumption that fracture permeability was a function of reservoir pressure. This required repetition of most of the natural depletion cases simulated in year one while invoking the pressure-sensitive fracture permeability option. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, two stress conditions were simulated for each primary variable. The water injection cases, begun in year one, were extended to include most of the reservoir parameters investigated for natural depletion, including fracture permeability as a function of net stress and the use of horizontal wells. The results thus far confirm that pressure-sensitive fractures degrade well performance and that the degradation is reduced by water injection pressure maintenance. Furthermore, oil recovery can be significantly increased by water injection pressure maintenance.

  10. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K.; Doublet, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  11. A System And Method To Determine Thermophysical Properties Of A Multi-Component Gas At Arbitrary Temperature And Pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas E. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Gilbert, AZ)

    2004-03-09

    A method to determine thermodynamic properties of a natural gas hydrocarbon, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. Thus, the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for mass flow calculations, to determine the speed of sound at standard pressure and temperature, and to determine various thermophysical characteristics of the gas.

  12. Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

    2004-11-15

    ?????????????????????????... 20 Permeability Determination ???????????????????. 22 Relative Permeability and Capillary Pressure Data ?????????????.? 23 PVT Data ??????????????????????????????. 25 Production and Pressure History Data ???????????????????. 26... ???????????.??. 24 5. Key PVT parameters used ??????????????????????????.??. 25 6. Summary of production forecasts under four different development scenarios ?????.??? 56 7. Reservoir data sheet ???????????????????????????????.. 57 8. Gas...

  13. Electrical and gas sensing properties of self-aligned copper-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonawane, Yogesh S.; Kanade, K.G.; Kale, B.B. Aiyer, R.C.

    2008-10-02

    Electrical and gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline ZnO:Cu, having Cu X wt% (X = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) in ZnO, in the form of pellet were investigated. Copper chloride and zinc acetate were used as precursors along with oxalic acid as a precipitating reagent in methanol. Material characterization was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and inductive coupled plasma with optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). FE-SEM showed the self-aligned Cu-doped ZnO nano-clusters with particles in the range of 40-45 nm. The doping of 0.5% of copper changes the electrical conductivity by an order of magnitude whereas the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) reduces with increase in copper wt% in ZnO. The material has shown an excellent sensitivity for the H{sub 2}, LPG and CO gases with limited temperature selectivity through the optimized operating temperature of 130, 190 and 220 deg. C for H{sub 2}, LPG and CO gases, respectively at 625 ppm gas concentration. The %SF was observed to be 1460 for H{sub 2} at 1% Cu doping whereas the 0.5% Cu doping offered %SF of 950 and 520 for CO and LPG, respectively. The response and recovery time was found to be 6 to 8 s and 16 s, respectively.

  14. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  15. Simulating the physical properties of dark matter and gas inside the cosmic web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Dolag; M. Meneghetti; L. Moscardini; E. Rasia; A. Bonaldi

    2006-05-05

    Using the results of a high-resolution, cosmological hydrodynamical re-simulation of a supercluster-like region we investigate the physical properties of the gas located along the filaments and bridges which constitute the so-called cosmic web. First we analyze the main characteristics of the density, temperature and velocity fields, which have quite different distributions, reflecting the complex dynamics of the structure formation process. Then we quantify the signals which originate from the matter in the filaments by considering different observables. Inside the cosmic web, we find that the halo density is about 4-6 times larger than in the neighbouring region; the bremsstrahlung X-ray surface brightness reaches at most 10e-16 erg/s/cm^2/armin^2; the Compton-y parameter due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is about 10e-6; the reduced shear produced by the weak lensing effect is ~ 0.01-0.02. These results confirm the difficulty of an observational detection of the cosmic web. Finally we find that projection effects of the filamentary network can affect the estimates of the properties of single clusters, increasing their X-ray luminosity by less than 10% and their central Compton-y parameter by up to 30% cent.

  16. Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-06-10

    This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO{sub 2} gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO{sub 2} flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO{sub 2} flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO{sub 2} injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO{sub 2} relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio show CO{sub 2}-rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO{sub 2}. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected CO{sub 2} than are any of the individual images of change in geophysical parameters.

  17. A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

    1998-01-01

    A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data...

  18. Impact of Rotor Surface Velocity, Leakage Models and Real Gas Properties on Rotordynamic Force Predictions of Gas Labyrinth Seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorat, Manish R.

    2010-07-14

    Rotordynamic coefficients of a gas labyrinth seal are assumed to be frequency independent. However, this assumption loses its validity as rotor surface velocity approaches Mach 1. The solution procedure of 1CV model by ...

  19. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  20. Opportunities to improve oil productivity in unstructured deltaic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report contains presentations presented at a technical symposium on oil production. Chapter 1 contains summaries of the presentations given at the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored symposium and key points of the discussions that followed. Chapter 2 characterizes the light oil resource from fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). An analysis of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and advanced secondary recovery (ASR) potential for fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs based on recovery performance and economic modeling as well as the potential resource loss due to well abandonments is presented. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the general reservoir characteristics and properties within deltaic deposits. It is not exhaustive treatise, rather it is intended to provide some basic information about geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of deltaic reservoirs, and the resulting recovery problems.

  1. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  2. Experimental production characteristics of anticlinal reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Charles David

    1959-01-01

    field examples showing the importance of gxavity dxain- age on oil reservoir, perfoxmance have been pubhshed. Among these are the Gook Ranch Field in Shackleford County, Texas, the Mile (5) Six Pool in Peru, the Elk Basin Tensleep Reservoiz in Wyom... through the kerosene until a pressure above the desired bubble point pressure was attained. Kerosene was then circulated through. the gas cap in the mixing cylinder with a Hills-McGanna proportlosing pump until no further pressure drop was noted...

  3. Hydrocarbon Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Hydrocarbon Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using Production Data and Time-Lapse Seismic #12;#12;Hydrocarbon Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using Production Data and Time-Lapse Seismic PROEFSCHRIFT ter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Recovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.3 Field

  4. JOHN W. SNEDDEN RESEARCH INTERESTS: Sequence Stratigraphy, sedimentology, reservoir development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    , Shale Gas, Light Tight Oil). CERTIFIED PETROLEUM GEOLOGIST #5279 AWARDS AND KEY PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY/6, p. 1099-1109. Snedden, J.W., and D.G. Kersey, 1982, Depositional environments and gas production stratigraphic model, 1Y1 Reservoir, Biafra Member, Oso Field, Nigeria: Nigerian Association of Petroleum

  5. Metalorganic frameworks Gas-Sorption Properties of Cobalt(II)Carborane-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catalysis,[3] gas storage,[4] separation processes,[5] ion exchange,[6] small- molecule detection,[7] drug

  6. characterization and visualization of two-phase flow properties of gas diffusion layers used in a PEM fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yan

    2011-04-26

    Due to the low-temperature operation of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), liquid water can build up in either flow channels or gas diffusion layers (GDL). Better understanding of the effect of two-phase transport properties on liquid...

  7. Research program on fractured petroleum reservoirs. Fourth quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1993-01-31

    Progress reports are presented for project 2-supersaturation, critical saturation and residual gas saturation in porous media and for project 5-simulation of fractured reservoirs. Under project 2, a visual high-pressure core-holder has been designed and constructed to be used in critical gas saturation and some other measurements. The apparatus has been used to measure critical gas saturation for a low viscosity mixture. These measurements reconfirm the investigators` previously published data that critical gas saturation for low viscosity fluids are low-around 1 percent. The apparatus is being currently used to measure critical gas saturation of an 11 API oil. Unlike light oils, heavy oil reservoirs, especially fractured heavy oil reservoirs might have an extremely high recovery efficiency with solution gas-drive. The critical gas saturation is an important element of recovery efficiency for such reservoirs.

  8. An Intelligent Systems Approach to Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahab D. Mohaghegh; Jaime Toro; Thomas H. Wilson; Emre Artun; Alejandro Sanchez; Sandeep Pyakurel

    2005-08-01

    Today, the major challenge in reservoir characterization is integrating data coming from different sources in varying scales, in order to obtain an accurate and high-resolution reservoir model. The role of seismic data in this integration is often limited to providing a structural model for the reservoir. Its relatively low resolution usually limits its further use. However, its areal coverage and availability suggest that it has the potential of providing valuable data for more detailed reservoir characterization studies through the process of seismic inversion. In this paper, a novel intelligent seismic inversion methodology is presented to achieve a desirable correlation between relatively low-frequency seismic signals, and the much higher frequency wireline-log data. Vertical seismic profile (VSP) is used as an intermediate step between the well logs and the surface seismic. A synthetic seismic model is developed by using real data and seismic interpretation. In the example presented here, the model represents the Atoka and Morrow formations, and the overlying Pennsylvanian sequence of the Buffalo Valley Field in New Mexico. Generalized regression neural network (GRNN) is used to build two independent correlation models between; (1) Surface seismic and VSP, (2) VSP and well logs. After generating virtual VSP's from the surface seismic, well logs are predicted by using the correlation between VSP and well logs. The values of the density log, which is a surrogate for reservoir porosity, are predicted for each seismic trace through the seismic line with a classification approach having a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The same methodology is then applied to real data taken from the Buffalo Valley Field, to predict inter-well gamma ray and neutron porosity logs through the seismic line of interest. The same procedure can be applied to a complete 3D seismic block to obtain 3D distributions of reservoir properties with less uncertainty than the geostatistical estimation methods. The intelligent seismic inversion method should help to increase the success of drilling new wells during field development.

  9. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  10. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  11. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J. H.; Endoh, T.; Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O.

    2014-05-07

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50?s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5?k? to 39?k?. Moreover, an additional 500?s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5?k? to 13.9?k?. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8?nm and 12.8?nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20?nm.

  12. Shale Gas Application in Hydraulic Fracturing Market is likely...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on unconventional reservoirs such as coal bed methane, tight gas, tight oil, shale gas, and shale oil. Over the period of time, hydraulic fracturing technique has found...

  13. Compressible gas properties of UF/sub 6/ for isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harloff, G.J.

    1984-11-01

    Isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock tables are given for the real gas UF/sub 6/ for Mach numbers up to 22. An evaluation of the real gas effects is given. A computer program listing is included.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of modeling parameters that affect the dual peaking behaviour in coalbed methane reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okeke, Amarachukwu Ngozi

    2006-10-30

    of the various modeling parameters on its reservoir performance. A dual porosity coalbed methane simulator is used to model primary production from a single well coal seam, for a variety of coal properties for this work. Varying different coal properties...

  15. Coarse scale simulation of tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

    2004-09-30

    and in a square drainage area. The case of horizontally fractured well was also discussed. They considered the case of constant rate production. Applicability of the solutions for analyzing pressure- transient test data was illustrated. 7 Cinco-Ley et... infinite fracture conductivity (Gringarten et al.19) approximately. 8 Cinco-Ley et al.24 discussed thoroughly the limitations and advantages of several methods for analyzing pressure-transient data in fractured wells. Their discussion covered all...

  16. Reservoir Outflow (RESOUT) Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purvis, Stuart Travis

    1988-01-01

    rating tables for a comprehensive range of outlet structure types and configurations, simulating a dam breach, routing a hydrograph through the reservoir, and performing drawdown analyses. The thesis describes the basic equations and computational... of Rating Curves Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Ogee Spillways Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Broad-crested Spillways Rating Curves for Spillway Gates Rating Curves for Drop Inlet Spillways Rating Curves for Outlet Works Breach Simulation Storage...

  17. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-04-01

    West Carney Field produces from Hunton Formation. All the wells produce oil, water and gas. The main objective of this study is to understand the unique behavior observed in the field. This behavior includes: (1) Decrease in WOR over time; (2) Decrease in GOR at initial stages; (3) High decline rates of oil and gas; and (4) strong hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. This report specifically addresses two issues relevant to our understanding of the West Carney reservoir. By using core and log data as well as fluorescence information, we demonstrate that our hypothesis of how the reservoir is formed is consistent with these observations. Namely, oil migrated in water wet reservoir, over time, oil changed the wettability of some part of the reservoir, oil eventually leaked to upper formations prompting re-introduction of water into reservoir. Because of change in wettability, different pore size distributions responded differently to water influx. This hypothesis is consistent with fluorescence and porosity data, as we explain it in this quarterly report. The second issue deals with how to best calculate connected oil volume in the reservoir. The log data does not necessarily provide us with relevant information regarding oil in place. However, we have developed a new material balance technique to calculate the connected oil volume based on observed pressure and production data. By using the technique to four different fields producing from Hunton formation, we demonstrate that the technique can be successfully applied to calculate the connected oil in place.

  18. GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 GasTIPS 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 · GasTIPS 5 T he prediction of reservoir parameters such as gas or oil, but is particularly challenging in the case of gas exploration. Current seismic imaging technol- ogy cannot accurately discriminate between economic and non-eco- nomic concentrations of gas. This is primarily because

  19. A project management approach to the integrated reservoir characterization process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsingas, C.; Tyraskis, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    The ultimate goal of an Exploration and Production (E&P) organization is to increase reserves and optimize production in a cost effective manner. Efficient reservoir management requires in depth knowledge of reservoir properties and their distribution within the field. Saudi Aramco`s Exploration organization formed a multi-disciplinary team in order to develop an Integrated Reservoir Characterization Process Model (IRCPM). The IRCPM team produced a quantitative multi-disciplinary model of existing work, data and technology in order to optimize resources and minimize costs during reservoir characterization projects. The activities describing this generic, relational and dynamic model were input into project management software. An extensive analysis from the perspective of organizations, work flow and deliverables was performed, employing various project management concepts and tools. A thorough understanding of the interactions among various disciplines was identified, as well. The ability to incorporate the necessary software/hardware data acquisition, processing, interpretation, integration and management during the reservoir characterization process, resulted in serving to highlight both bridges and barriers in the flow of information and resources. The application of the IRCPM to a specific reservoir characterization process, showed that it can have a direct, positive impact on Saudi Aramco`s core mission - the more efficient production of hydrocarbons - through increasing efficiency of the reservoir projects to which it is applied.

  20. New correlations for dew-point, specific gravity and producing yield for gas condensates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovalle Cortissoz, Adriana Patricia

    2002-01-01

    This work presents four newly developed correlations to estimate dew-point pressure, current specific gravity and producing yield of gas condensate reservoirs. The first correlation may be used to predict the dew-point pressure of the reservoir gas...

  1. All-optical Reservoir Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm which uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  2. Author's personal copy Model-based control of multiphase flow in subsurface oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    of meters. They are typically in the order of tens of meters thick and cover sev- eral square kilometers this primary recovery phase ends, and it will be necessary to inject water or gas into the reservoir in the oil industry under various names, such as `smart fields', `intelligent fields', `real-time reservoir

  3. Documenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Manuel M.

    , natural gas or water ­ and their permeability ­ the amount of such fluids that can flow through a rockDocumenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through Ontology and prediction of the quality (porosity, permeability) of petroleum reservoirs during their exploration

  4. Induced Microearthquake Patterns in Hydrocarbon and Geothermal Reservoirs W. Scott Phillips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Induced Microearthquake Patterns in Hydrocarbon and Geothermal Reservoirs W. Scott Phillips James T microseismic events in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. By deploying sensors downhole, data sets have Key Words: induced microseismicity, geothermal, oil and gas, fluid flow, location #12;2 Introduction

  5. Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg N. Boitnott

    2003-12-14

    Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

  6. Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National NuclearDiscoveringDiscrete Fracture Reservoir

  7. Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01

    41 2.3.7. Leroy Gas Storage Facility, Wyoming,and M.R. Tek, Leroy gas storage facility, Unita County,reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively,

  8. Ni(NiO)/single-walled carbon nanotubes composite: Synthesis of electro-deposition, gas sensing property for NO gas and density functional theory calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Li; Zhang, Guo; Chen, Lei; Bi, Hong-Mei; Shi, Ke-Ying

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The Ni(NiO)/semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes composite collected from the cathode after electro-deposition shows a high sensitivity to low-concentration NO gas at room temperature (18 °C). Display Omitted Highlights: ? Ni(NiO) nanoparticles were deposited on semiconducting SWCNTs by electro-deposition. ? Ni(NiO)/semiconducting SWCNTs film shows a high sensitivity to NO gas at 18 °C. ?Theoretical calculation reveals electron transfer from SWCNTs to NO via Ni. -- Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes which contains metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) and semiconducting SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs) have been obtained under electric arc discharge. Their separation can be effectively achieved by the electro-deposition method. The Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite was found on cathode where Ni was partially oxidized to NiO at ambient condition with Ni(NiO) nanoparticles deposited uniformly on the bundles of SWCNTs. These results were confirmed by Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis–NIR and TG characterizations. Furthermore, investigation of the gas sensing property of Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite film to NO gas at 18 °C demonstrated the sensitivity was approximately 5% at the concentration of 97 ppb. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to explore the sensing mechanism which suggested the adsorption of NO molecules onto the composite through N–Ni interaction as well as the proposition of electron transfer mechanisms from SWCNTs to NO via the Ni medium.

  9. Alpana Bhatt Reservoir properties from well logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ursin, Bjørn

    Engineering and Applied Geophysics Norwegian University of Science and Technology November 2002 #12;ii #12;iii of a committee machine is a multilayer perceptron network (MLP) whose optimum architecture and size of training the neural network reproduces the same data with high accuracy. In permeability prediction by CM we have

  10. Simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir) models of chemical evolution: an application to the inner Galactic halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caimmi, R

    2010-01-01

    Simple closed-box (CB) models of chemical evolution are extended on two respects: (i) simple closed-(box+reservoir) (CBR) models allowing gas outflow from the box into the reservoir or gas inflow into the box from the reservoir with same composition as the preexisting gas and rate proportional to the star formation rate, and (ii) simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir) (MCBR) models allowing different stages of evolution characterized by different inflow or outflow rates. The stellar initial mass function is assumed to be universal, and mass conservation holds for the whole system (box+reservoir) while it is violated for each subsystem (box and reservoir). The theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD) predicted by the model, under the assumption of instantaneous recycling, is a continuous broken line, where different slopes are related to different inflow rates. For an application of the model (a) a fictitious sample is built up from two distinct samples and taken as representative of the...

  11. 120 GRC BULLETIN Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    of The Geysers geothermal area. The production area is shaded grey. Red dots: seismometers with vertical sensors120 GRC BULLETIN Reservoir Engineering nergy production at geothermal areas causes physical changes Tool Use of Time-Dependent MEQ Tomography for Monitoring Producing Geothermal Reservoirs G. R. Foulger

  12. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  13. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2005-02-01

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

  14. Effect of low and high storage temperatures on head space gas concentrations and physical properties of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; C. Jim Lim; Tony Bi; Xingya Kuang; Staffan Melin

    2013-11-01

    Headspace gas concentrations and wood pellet properties were studied in sealed glass canisters at 5–40 degrees C storage temperatures. CO2 and CO concentrations at 5, 10, 20 and 40 degrees C at the end of 23–28 days of storage were 1600 and 200, 4700 and 1200, and 31 200 and 15 800 parts per million by volume (ppmv) respectively. Corresponding O2 concentration was about 19•49, 19•20, 18•0 and 2•07% respectively. Non-linear regression equations adequately described the gas concentrations in the storage container as a function of time. Safe level estimation functions developed were linear for O2 and logarithmic for CO and CO2 concentrations. Measured pellet properties moisture, length, diameter, unit, bulk and tapped density, durability, calorific value, ash content and per cent fines were in the range of 4•6–5•02%, 14–15 mm, 6•4–6•5 mm, 1125–1175 kg m-3, 750–770 kg m-3, 825–840 kg m-3, 73–74%, 18•32–18•78 MJ kg-1, 0•65–0•74% and 0•13–0•15%. Durability values of pellets decreased by 13% at 40 degrees C storage temperature and other properties changed marginally.

  15. Why perform time-lapse seismic monitoring? Is it to ver-ify the reservoir model? No! We should conduct time-lapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ued "brightening" of this class III AVO reservoir with pro- duction as the gas saturation continuouslyWhy perform time-lapse seismic monitoring? Is it to ver- ify the reservoir model? No! We should conduct time-lapse seismic surveys in order to find out what is incorrect in the reservoir model, in a way

  16. Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

    2009-05-15

    Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs...

  17. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2001-10-01

    The main objectives of the proposed study are as follows: (1) To understand and evaluate an unusual primary oil production mechanism which results in decreasing (retrograde) oil cut (ROC) behavior as reservoir pressure declines. (2) To develop better, produced water, disposal techniques so as to minimize lifting costs, surface separation costs and water disposal costs. (3) To improve calculations of initial oil in place so as to determine the economic feasibility of completing and producing a well. (4) To optimize the location of new wells based on understanding of geological and petrophysical properties heterogeneities. (5) To evaluate various secondary recovery techniques for oil reservoirs producing from fractured formations. (6) To enhance the productivity of producing wells by using new completion techniques. These objectives are important for optimizing field performance from West Carney Field located in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. The field, which was discovered in 1980, produces from Hunton Formation in a shallow-shelf carbonate reservoir. The early development in the field was sporadic. Many of the initial wells were abandoned due to high water production and constraints in surface facilities for disposing excess produced water. The field development began in earnest in 1995 by Altex Resources. They had recognized that production from this field was only possible if large volumes of water can be disposed. Being able to dispose large amounts of water, Altex aggressively drilled several producers. With few exceptions, all these wells exhibited similar characteristics. The initial production indicated trace amount of oil and gas with mostly water as dominant phase. As the reservoir was depleted, the oil cut eventually improved, making the overall production feasible. The decreasing oil cut (ROC) behavior has not been well understood. However, the field has been subjected to intense drilling activity because of prior success of Altex Resources. In this work, we will investigate the primary production mechanism by conducting several core flood experiments. After collecting cores from representative wells, we will study the wettability of the rock and simulate the depletion behavior by mimicking such behavior under controlled lab conditions. The overall project goal would be to validate our hypothesis and to determine the best method to exploit reservoirs exhibiting ROC behavior. To that end, we will collect and analyze core samples, and run a single well tracer test during the Budget Period I. We will continue to drill vertical wells during this period. Once we understand the mechanism and are able to quantify the geological model, in Budget Period II we will drill several, additional wells. Depending on the feasibility, we will equip some of the vertical wells with downhole separator, as well as surface compact separator. This will allow us to compare the new technology with the existing one. In the Budget Period III, we will monitor the field performance and revise and refine our models to further optimize the performance.

  18. Application of Surrogate Reservoir Model (SRM) to an Onshore Green Field in Saudi Arabia; Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    at the North Africa Technical Conference and Exhibition held in Cairo, Egypt, 20­22 February 2012. This paper (KPIs) that rank the influence of different reservoir characteristics on the oil and gas production

  19. Rock Physics-Based Carbonate Reservoir Pore Type Evaluation by Combining Geological, Petrophysical and Seismic Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dou, Qifeng

    2012-07-16

    Pore type variations account for complex velocity-porosity relationship and intensive permeability heterogeneity and consequently low oil and gas recovery in carbonate reservoir. However, it is a challenge for geologist ...

  20. Modeling and Analysis of Reservoir Response to Stimulation by Water Injection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Jun

    2011-02-22

    The distributions of pore pressure and stresses around a fracture are of interest in conventional hydraulic fracturing operations, fracturing during water-flooding of petroleum reservoirs, shale gas, and injection/extraction operations in a...

  1. Well Performance Analysis for Low to Ultra-low Permeability Reservoir Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilk, Dilhan

    2010-10-12

    Unconventional reservoir systems can best be described as petroleum (oil and/or gas) accumulations which are difficult to be characterized and produced by conventional technologies. In this work we present the development of a systematic procedure...

  2. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01

    Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

  3. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir...

  4. The feasibility of reservoir monitoring using time-lapse marine CSEM Arnold Orange1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    , and Steven Constable1 ABSTRACT Monitoring changes in hydrocarbon reservoir geometry and pore-fluid properties reservoir is replaced by conductive pore fluids. However, to avoid corrupting the rel- atively small signal as a tool for assessing the resistivity of targets identi- fied by seismic surveys prior to drilling e

  5. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    Ecological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. AnnualEcological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. Annual

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of Enhanced CBM Production via CO2 Injection Using a Surrogate Reservoir Model Jalal Jalali, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Dept. of Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Model Jalal Jalali, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Dept. of Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia

  7. Modeling, History Matching, Forecasting and Analysis of Shale Reservoirs Performance Using Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    matching, forecasting and analyzing oil and gas production in shale reservoirs. In this new approach and analysis of oil and gas production from shale formations. Examples of three case studies in Lower Huron and New Albany shale formations (gas producing) and Bakken Shale (oil producing) is presented

  8. Gas hydrates: technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) implemented a gas hydrates R and D program that emphasized an understanding of the resource through (1) an assessment of current technology, (2) the characterization of gas hydrate geology and reservoir engineering, and (3) the development of diagnostic tools and methods. Recovery of natural gas from gas hydrates will be made possible through (1) improved instrumentation and recovery methods, (2) developing the capability to predict production performance, and (3) field verification of recovery methods. Gas hydrates research has focused primarily on geology. As work progressed, areas where gas hydrates are likely to occur were identified, and specific high potential areas were targeted for detailed investigation. A Geologic Analysis System (GAS) was developed. GAS contains approximately 30 software packages and can manipulate and correlate several types of geologic and petroleum data into maps, graphics, and reports. The system also contains all well information currently available from the Alaskan North Slope area. Laboratory research on gas hydrates includes the characterization of the physical system, which focuses on creating synthetic methane hydrates and developing synthetic hydrate cores using tetrahydrofuran (THF), consolidated rock cores, frost base mixtures, water/ice-base mixtures, and water-base mixtures. Laboratory work produced measurements of the sonic velocity and electrical resistivity of these synthetic hydrates. During 1983, a sample from a natural hydrate core recovered from the Pacific coast of Guatemala was tested for these properties by DOE/METC. More recently, natural hydrate samples acquired from the Gulf of Mexico are being tested. Modeling and systems analysis work has focused on the development of GAS and preliminary gas hydrate production models. 23 refs., 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-4-2014_CO2 Storage and Enhanced Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation of CO 2 Storage and Enhanced Gas Recovery in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Using a Dual- PorosityDual-Permeability, Multiphase Reservoir Simulator 25 September 2014...

  10. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    reservoir engineering research program a t the University of Colorado is described. Physical characterization

  11. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01

    oil and gas reservoirs, or even to the large (and rapidly increasing) data-base of information on unconventional

  12. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2004-10-01

    West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on surfactant injection in near well bore region. We demonstrate that by injecting the surfactant, the relative permeability of water could be decreased, and that of gas could be increased. This should result in improved gas recovery from the reservoir. Our geological analysis of the reservoir develops the detailed stratigraphic description of the reservoir. Two new stratigraphic units, previously unrecognized, are identified. Additional lithofacies are recognized in new core descriptions. Our engineering analysis has determined that well density is an important parameter in optimally producing Hunton reservoirs. It appears that 160 acre is an optimal spacing. The reservoir pressure appears to decline over time; however, recovery per well is only weakly influenced by the pressure. This indicates that additional opportunity to drill wells exists in relatively depleted fields. A simple material balance technique is developed to validate the recovery of gas, oil and water. This technique can be used to further extrapolate recoveries from other fields with similar field characteristics.

  13. The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be...

  14. Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2010-01-14

    To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

  15. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    2004-09-30

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal...

  16. New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulsson, B.N.P.

    1997-08-01

    Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

  17. Geophysical characterization of the effects of fractures and stress on subsurface reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of fractures on reservoir characterization and subsurface rock property measurements using seismic data. Based on the scale of a fracture relative to seismic wavelength, we divide the dissertation into ...

  18. Integration of Rock Physics and Seismic Inversion for Carbonate Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tingting

    2014-12-12

    Carbonate reservoir characterization based on rock physics and seismic inversion helps in better understanding the influence of deposition and diagenesis on rock property. In this dissertation, I first study a modern carbonate platform to understand...

  19. Permeability characterization and spatial modeling in complex reservoirs: use of tree classifiers and Markov Random Field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Vega, Hector H

    2002-01-01

    This research presents two approaches for working with reservoir properties. The first is the application of decision tree classifiers for predicting partitioning or classifications based on well logs for improving the permeability estimations...

  20. Factors controlling permeability of cataclastic deformation bands and faults in porous sandstone reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    Factors controlling permeability of cataclastic deformation bands and faults in porous sandstone March 2015 Available online 18 April 2015 Keywords: Cataclastic band Permeability Porous sandstone Fluid and their petrophysical properties is essential for realistic characterization of deformed sandstone reservoirs

  1. Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

  2. Dynamics of entropic measurement-induced nonlocality in structured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming-Liang Hu; Heng Fan

    2012-02-03

    We propose the entropic measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) as the maximal increment of von Neumann entropy induced by the locally non-disturbing measurement, and study behaviors of it both in the independent and common structured reservoirs. We present schemes for preserving the MIN, and show that for certain initial states the MIN, including the quantum correlations, can even be enhanced by the common reservoir. Additionally, we also show that the different measures of MIN may give different qualitative characterizations of nonlocal properties, i.e., it is rather measure dependent than state dependent.

  3. Dynamics of entropic measurement-induced nonlocality in structured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Ming-Liang

    2012-01-01

    We propose the entropic measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) as the maximal increment of von Neumann entropy induced by the locally non-disturbing measurement, and study behaviors of it both in the independent and common structured reservoirs. We present schemes for preserving the MIN, and show that for certain initial states the MIN, including the quantum correlations, can even be enhanced by the common reservoir. Additionally, we also show that the different measures of MIN may give different qualitative characterizations of nonlocal properties, i.e., it is rather measure dependent than state dependent.

  4. Sudden change of geometric quantum discord in finite temperature reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming-Liang Hu; Jian Sun

    2015-04-10

    We investigate sudden change (SC) behaviors of the distance-based measures of geometric quantum discords (GQDs) for two non-interacting qubits subject to the two-sided and the one-sided thermal reservoirs. We found that the GQDs defined by different distances exhibit different SCs, and thus the SCs are the combined result of the chosen discord measure and the property of a state. We also found that the thermal reservoir may generate states having different orderings related to different GQDs. These inherent differences of the GQDs reveal that they are incompatible in characterizing quantum correlations both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  5. Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2DigesterLandfillGas | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy Information DigesterLandfillGas Jump to: navigation,

  6. Data Integration for the Generation of High Resolution Reservoir Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Reynolds; Dean Oliver; Gaoming Li; Yong Zhao; Chaohui Che; Kai Zhang; Yannong Dong; Chinedu Abgalaka; Mei Han

    2009-01-07

    The goal of this three-year project was to develop a theoretical basis and practical technology for the integration of geologic, production and time-lapse seismic data in a way that makes best use of the information for reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. The methodology and practical tools for data integration that were developed in this research project have been incorporated into computational algorithms that are feasible for large scale reservoir simulation models. As the integration of production and seismic data require calibrating geological/geostatistical models to these data sets, the main computational tool is an automatic history matching algorithm. The following specific goals were accomplished during this research. (1) We developed algorithms for calibrating the location of the boundaries of geologic facies and the distribution of rock properties so that production and time-lapse seismic data are honored. (2) We developed and implemented specific procedures for conditioning reservoir models to time-lapse seismic data. (3) We developed and implemented algorithms for the characterization of measurement errors which are needed to determine the relative weights of data when conditioning reservoir models to production and time-lapse seismic data by automatic history matching. (4) We developed and implemented algorithms for the adjustment of relative permeability curves during the history matching process. (5) We developed algorithms for production optimization which accounts for geological uncertainty within the context of closed-loop reservoir management. (6) To ensure the research results will lead to practical public tools for independent oil companies, as part of the project we built a graphical user interface for the reservoir simulator and history matching software using Visual Basic.

  7. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    on the properties of the Soultz fractured reservoir.Conference, March 17-18, 2005, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France.Chemical Modelling at the Soultz-sous-Forêts HDR reservoir (

  8. Reservoir Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of EGS

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Fernandez, Carlos A.

    EGS field projects have not sustained production at rates greater than ½ of what is needed for economic viability. The primary limitation that makes commercial EGS infeasible is our current inability to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs from impermeable, igneous rock within the 3,000-10,000 ft depth range. Our goal is to develop a novel fracturing fluid technology that maximizes reservoir permeability while reducing stimulation cost and environmental impact. Laboratory equipment development to advance laboratory characterization/monitoring is also a priority of this project to study and optimize the physicochemical properties of these fracturing fluids in a range of reservoir conditions. Barrier G is the primarily intended GTO barrier to be addressed as well as support addressing barriers D, E and I.

  9. Seismic and Rockphysics Diagnostics of Multiscale Reservoir Textures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2005-07-01

    This final technical report summarizes the results of the work done in this project. The main objective was to quantify rock microstructures and their effects in terms of elastic impedances in order to quantify the seismic signatures of microstructures. Acoustic microscopy and ultrasonic measurements were used to quantify microstructures and their effects on elastic impedances in sands and shales. The project led to the development of technologies for quantitatively interpreting rock microstructure images, understanding the effects of sorting, compaction and stratification in sediments, and linking elastic data with geologic models to estimate reservoir properties. For the public, ultimately, better technologies for reservoir characterization translates to better reservoir development, reduced risks, and hence reduced energy costs.

  10. Reservoir Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of EGS

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2013-09-25

    EGS field projects have not sustained production at rates greater than ½ of what is needed for economic viability. The primary limitation that makes commercial EGS infeasible is our current inability to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs from impermeable, igneous rock within the 3,000-10,000 ft depth range. Our goal is to develop a novel fracturing fluid technology that maximizes reservoir permeability while reducing stimulation cost and environmental impact. Laboratory equipment development to advance laboratory characterization/monitoring is also a priority of this project to study and optimize the physicochemical properties of these fracturing fluids in a range of reservoir conditions. Barrier G is the primarily intended GTO barrier to be addressed as well as support addressing barriers D, E and I.

  11. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    fields are partially depleted gas (or oil) fields which have been converted to storage. Where depleted oil and gas reservoir are not available, gas can be stored in water bearing sandstones or aquifersNATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia

  12. Potosi Reservoir Modeling; History and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO?) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from two projects: the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois, as well as data from the Illinois – Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (IL-ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the Verification Well 1 (VW1) and the Injection Well (CCS1), structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for the Potosi Formation. The intention was for two million tonnes per annum (MTPA) of CO? to be injected for 20 years into the Potosi Formation. In 2013, updated reservoir models for the Cambrian Potosi Formation were evaluated. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the CCS1, VW1, and Verification Well 2 (VW2) wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from a larger 3D seismic survey, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. The objective is to simulate the injection of CO? at a rate 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA]) for 30 years 106 million tons (96 MT total) into the Potosi Formation. The Potosi geomodeling efforts have evolved from using data from a single well in 2010 to the inclusion of data from three wells in 2013 which largely leverage the porosity and permeability logs plus knowledge of lost circulation zones. The first Potosi model (Potosi Geobody Model 2010) attempted to use the available seismic inversion data to inform the geomodel and predict vugular zones in advance of drilling VW1. Lost circulation zones in VW1 came in as the geologists predicted. The model was not implemented in subsequent simulation work. To date, reservoir models used for flow simulation work have relied predominately on Gaussian distributed properties (porosity and permeability) and have employed a single injection well. Potosi Model 2013b incorporated the new VW2 logs, and exhibited an extra level of sophistication by delineating the vugular intervals. This method added further realism that likely represents the best reservoir approximation to date. Where the 2010 reservoir models were 10 by 10 mi (16 by 16 km) in area, the 2013 models were expanded in size to 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km). The latest reservoir simulations show that a minimum of four injectors might be required to meet target injection rates. Still, there is data that requires further scrutiny and modeling methodologies that require testing for the Potosi Formation. This work is currently ongoing, and the next phase of the reservoir modeling intends to implement valuable data like porosity derived from seismic inversion, seismically derived geobodies, or a combination of both to further define vugular zones and the porosity distribution within the Potosi Formation. Understanding the dual porosity, dual permeability character of the Potosi remains the greatest challenge in representing this formation. Further analysis of the FMI* fullbore formation microimager data may aid in assessing this uncertainty. The Potosi Formation is indeed an interesting formation, and recommendations to further characterize it are included in the following list: - Data acquisition to identify the vugs permeability, distribution, and interconnectivity could b

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Study of the Ground-State Properties of a Fermi Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgini, S.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.

    2006-11-07

    The ground-state properties of a two-component Fermi gas with attractive short-range interactions are calculated using the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method. The interaction strength is varied over a wide range by tuning the value of the s-wave scattering length of the two-body potential. We calculate the ground-state energy per particle and we characterize the equation of state of the system. Off-diagonal long-range order is investigated through the asymptotic behavior of the two-body density matrix. The condensate fraction of pairs is calculated in the unitary limit and on both sides of the BCS-BEC crossover.

  14. TOP-DOWN MODELING; PRACTICAL, FAST TRACK, RESERVOIR SIMULATION & MODELING FOR SHALE FORMATIONS Shahab D. Mohaghegh1 & Grant Bromhal2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    development in the oil and gas industry and is being used on some shale formations. BAKKEN SHALE MuchTOP-DOWN MODELING; PRACTICAL, FAST TRACK, RESERVOIR SIMULATION & MODELING FOR SHALE FORMATIONS based on measure data, called Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling for the shale formations

  15. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

  16. Integration of well test analysis into naturally fractured reservoir simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Garcia, Laura Elena

    2006-04-12

    Naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) represent an important percentage of the worldwide hydrocarbon reserves and production. Reservoir simulation is a fundamental technique in characterizing this type of reservoir. Fracture ...

  17. A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.

    2011-01-01

    FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andFLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andachieve optimal recovery of petroleum from a reservoir, it

  18. THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ? Continuum through Discontinuum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs...

  19. NGC 1266: Characterization of the Nuclear Molecular Gas in an Unusual SB0 Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip R; Kamenetzky, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    With a substantial nuclear molecular gas reservoir and broad, high-velocity CO molecular line wings previously interpreted as an outflow, NGC 1266 is a rare SB$0$ galaxy. Previous analyses of interferometry, spectrally resolved low-$J$ CO emission lines, and unresolved high-$J$ emission lines have established basic properties of the molecular gas and the likely presence of an AGN. Here, new spectrally resolved CO $J = 5 - 4$ to $J = 8 - 7$ lines from {\\it Herschel Space Observatory} HIFI observations are combined with ground-based observations and high-$J$ {\\it Herschel} SPIRE observations to decompose the nuclear and putative outflow velocity components and to model the molecular gas to quantify its properties. Details of the modeling and results are described, with comparisons to previous results and exploration of the implications for the gas excitation mechanisms. Among the findings, like for other galaxies, the nuclear and putative outflow molecular gas are well represented by components that are cool ($...

  20. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  1. Alleviation of effective permeability reduction of gas-condensate due to condensate buildup near wellbore 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carballo Salas, Jose Gilberto

    2006-04-12

    When the reservoir pressure is decreased below dew point pressure of the gas near the wellbore, gas-condensate wells start to decrease production because condensate is separated from the gas around the wellbore causing a decrease in gas relative...

  2. UONPR No. 1 Elk Hills: 26R reservoir: Reservoir analysis, reserves and economics, and alternative exploitation strategies: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-12

    The 26R Stevens Reservoir is located along the southern, west-central flank of the Elk Hills structure in western Kern County, California. In September 1988, the 26R Reservoir produced an average of 22,447 barrels of oil per day from 46 producing wells. The average producing gas-oil ratio was 5912 cubic feet per barrel and the average water cut was 8.4%. The 26R Reservoir was put on production in July 1976, and gas injection for the purpose of pressure maintenance was initiated soon thereafter in October 1976. In September 1988, injection was an average of 168,911 Mcf/D into nine wells, which was in keeping with the policy of injecting 110% of calculated withdrawals. Gas production and residue gas injection are at or near current plant capacity. The purpose of this report is, therefore, to determine if current policy of full pressure maintenance is still viable, or if there is another exploitation option which would better result in maximizing both recovery of hydrocarbons and economic return. 16 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program,Of Methane Hydrate Production Methods To Reservoirs WithNumerical Studies of Gas Production From Methane Hydrates,

  4. A cesium gas strongly confined in one dimension : sideband cooling and collisional properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bouchoule; M. Morinaga; D. S. Petrov; C. Salomon

    2001-06-06

    We study one-dimensional sideband cooling of Cesium atoms strongly confined in a far-detuned optical lattice. The Lamb-Dicke regime is achieved in the lattice direction whereas the transverse confinement is much weaker. The employed sideband cooling method, first studied by Vuletic et al.\\cite{Vule98}, uses Raman transitions between Zeeman levels and produces a spin-polarized sample. We present a detailed study of this cooling method and investigate the role of elastic collisions in the system. We accumulate $83(5)%$ of the atoms in the vibrational ground state of the strongly confined motion, and elastic collisions cool the transverse motion to a temperature of $2.8 \\mu $K=$0.7 \\hbar\\omega_{\\rm osc}/k_{\\rm B}$, where $\\omega_{\\rm osc}$ is the oscillation frequency in the strongly confined direction. The sample then approaches the regime of a quasi-2D cold gas. We analyze the limits of this cooling method and propose a dynamical change of the trapping potential as a mean of cooling the atomic sample to still lower temperatures. Measurements of the rate of thermalization between the weakly and strongly confined degrees of freedom are compatible with the zero energy scattering resonance observed previously in weak 3D traps. For the explored temperature range the measurements agree with recent calculations of quasi-2D collisions\\cite{Petr01}. Transparent analytical models reproduce the expected behavior for $k_{\\rm B}T \\gg \\hbar \\omega_{\\rm osc}$ and also for $k_{\\rm B}T \\ll \\hbar \\omega_{\\rm osc}$ where the 2D features are prominent.

  5. Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Fouling in Diesel Applications: Fundamental Studies Deposit Properties and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Styles, Dan [Ford Motor Company; Simko, Steve [Ford Motor Company

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of experimental efforts aimed at improving the understanding of the mechanisms and conditions at play in the fouling of EGR coolers. An experimental apparatus was constructed to utilize simplified surrogate heat exchanger tubes in lieu of full-size heat exchangers. The use of these surrogate tubes allowed removal of the tubes after exposure to engine exhaust for study of the deposit layer and its properties. The exhaust used for fouling the surrogate tubes was produced using a modern medium-duty diesel engine fueled with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and biodiesel blends. At long exposure times, no significant difference in the fouling rate was observed between fuel types and HC levels. Surface coatings for the tubes were also evaluated to determine their impact on deposit growth. No surface treatment or coating produced a reduction in the fouling rate or any evidence of deposit removal. In addition, microstructural analysis of the fouling layers was performed using optical and electron microscopy in order to better understand the deposition mechanism. The experimental results are consistent with thermophoretic deposition for deposit formation, and van der Waals attraction between the deposit surface and exhaust-borne particulate.

  6. Depositional environments, lithofacies types, and reservoir development of the Permian Khuff Formation in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Jallal, I.A. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-08-01

    The Later Permian carbonates and evaporites of the Khuff Formation contain considerable amounts of gas in Ghawar field, eastern Saudi Arabia. Sedimentary structures, textures, and grain types were used to interpret the depositional environments and to define the different lithofacies types which determine the original reservoir face is distribution within this 1,500-ft-thick formation. There are three major depositional environments: subtidal, intertidal, and sabkha. Locally, these include shoals, belts, bars, bays, lagoons, ponds, tidal channels, sabkha. Locally, these include shoals, belts, bars, bays, lagoons, ponds, tidal channels, sabkha islands, and sabkha pans. Tidal flooding and storms are represented. These environments represent four major transgressive-regressive cycles, which conform to four Khuff units: Khuff A, B, C and D (from youngest to oldest). Transgressive phases (subtidal), with lithofacies of grainstones and horizontally burrowed mudstones usually comprise the reservoir facies. The regressive phases (intertidal and sabkha) with lithofacies of anhydritic mudstones and anhydrites, usually seal the Khuff reservoirs. Later disappearance of reservoir facies are due to deposition or diagenesis. Depositionally, the lateral change in facies may occur, for example, from a non-reservoir anhydrite and mudstone facies to a reservoir grainstone facies, or from a non-reservoir anhydritic mudstones to a reservoir burrowed-mudstone facies. Diagenetically, ooid grainstones may be greatly cemented by anhydrite. A combination of dolomitization and leaching may create intercrystalline porosity in mudstone. Leaching creates poorly connected moldic porosity in grainstones because the resulting calcite cement plugs the interparticle porosity.

  7. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Bo; Pupillo, Guido; Zoller, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We discuss laser dressed dipolar and Van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the \\mu K regime by cold atoms.

  8. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Zhao; Alexander Glätzle; Guido Pupillo; Peter Zoller

    2011-12-18

    We discuss laser dressed dipolar and Van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the \\mu K regime by cold atoms.

  9. Design and life-cycle considerations for unconventional-reservoir wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskimins, J.L.

    2009-05-15

    This paper provides an overview of design and life-cycle considerations for certain unconventional-reservoir wells. An overview of unconventional-reservoir definitions is provided. Well design and life-cycle considerations are addressed from three aspects: upfront reservoir development, initial well completion, and well-life and long-term considerations. Upfront-reservoir-development issues discussed include well spacing, well orientation, reservoir stress orientations, and tubular metallurgy. Initial-well-completion issues include maximum treatment pressures and rates, treatment diversion, treatment staging, flowback and cleanup, and dewatering needs. Well-life and long-term discussions include liquid loading, corrosion, refracturing and associated fracture reorientation, and the cost of abandonment. These design considerations are evaluated with case studies for five unconventional-reservoir types: shale gas (Barnett shale), tight gas (Jonah feld), tight oil (Bakken play), coalbed methane (CBM) (San Juan basin), and tight heavy oil (Lost Hills field). In evaluating the life cycle and design of unconventional-reservoir wells, 'one size' does not fit all and valuable knowledge and a shortening of the learning curve can be achieved for new developments by studying similar, more-mature fields.

  10. Optimization of condensing gas drive 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofton, Larry Keith

    1977-01-01

    - cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

  11. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the VW1 and the CCS1 wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. Intention was for two million tons per annum (MTPA) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the preceding, the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010" in this topical report) was re-run using a new injection scenario; 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. It was not sufficiently large enough to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 miles x 30 miles (48.3km x48.3km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case of Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a. The Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the verification well VW2 which was drilled in 2012. The new porosity and permeability modeling was performed to take into account the log data from the new well. Revisions of the 2010 modeling assumptions were also done on relative permeability, capillary pressures, formation water salinity, and the maximum allowable well bottomhole pressure. Dynamic simulations were run using the injection target of 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. This new dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b. Due to the major uncertainties on the vugs permeability, two models were built; the Pessimistic and Optimistic Cases. The Optimistic Case assumes vugs permeability of 9,000 mD, which is analog to the vugs permeability identified in the pressure fall off test of a waste water injector in the Tuscola site, approx. 40 miles (64.4km) away from the IBDP area. The Pessimistic Case assumes that the vugs permeability is equal to the log data, which does not take into account the permeability from secondary porosity. The probability of such case is deemed low and could be treated as the worst case scenario, since the contribution of secondary porosity to the permeability is neglected and the loss circulation events might correspond to a much higher permeability. It is considered important, however, to identify the range of possible reservoir performance since there are no rigorous data available for the vugs permeability. The Optimistic Case gives an average CO2 injection rate of 0.8 MTPA and cumulative injection of 26 MT in 30 years, which corresponds to 27% of the injection target. The injection rate is approx. 3.2 MTPA in the first year as the well is injecting into the surrounding vugs, and declines rapidly to 0.8 MTPA in year 4 once the surrounding vugs are full and the CO2 start to reach the matrix. This implies that according to this preliminary model, a minimum of four (4) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. This result is lower than the injectivity estimated in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a (43 MT in 30 years), since the permeability model applied in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b is more conservative. This revision was deemed necessary to treat the uncerta

  12. Automated Optimization Strategies for Horizontal Wellbore and Hydraulic Fracture Stages Placement in Unconventional Gas Reseroirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaksina, Tatyana

    2015-05-05

    In the last decades rapid advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies ensure production of commercial quantities of natural gas from many unconventional reservoirs. Reservoir management and development strategies for shale...

  13. Seismic modeling of complex stratified reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hung-Liang

    2009-05-15

    Turbidite reservoirs in deep-water depositional systems, such as the oil fields in the offshore Gulf of Mexico and North Sea, are becoming an important exploration target in the petroleum industry. Accurate seismic reservoir characterization...

  14. Research on improved and enhanced oil recovery in Illinois through reservoir characterization, March 28, 1992--June 28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oltz, D.F.

    1992-09-01

    This project will provide information that can maximize hydrocarbon production, minimize formation damage and stimulate new production in Illinois. Such information includes definition of hydrocarbon resources, characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and the implementation of methods that will improve hydrocarbon extractive technology. Increased understanding of reservoir heterogeneities that affect oil recovery can aid in identifying producible resources. The transfer of technology to industry and the general public is a significant component of the program. The project is designed to examine selected subsurface oil reservoirs in Illinois. Scientists use advanced scientific techniques to gain a better understanding of reservoir components and behavior and address ways of potentially increasing the amount of recoverable oil. Initial production rates for wells in the Illinois Basin commonly decline quite rapidly and as much as 60 percent of the oil in place can be unrecoverable using standard operating procedures. Heterogeneities (geological differences in reservoir make-up) affect a reservoir`s capability to release fluids. By-passed mobile and immobile oil remain in the reservoir. To learn how to get more of the oil out of reservoirs, the ISGS is studying the nature of reservoir rock heterogeneities and their control on the distribution and production of bypassed, mobile oil. Accomplishment for this period are summarized for the following tasks: mapping, cross-sections; subsurface depo-systems; outcrop studies; oil and gas development maps; engineering work; SEM/EDX; and clay minerals.

  15. OPTIMIZING GEO-CELLULAR RESERVOIR MODELING IN A BRAIDED RIVER INCISED VALLEY FILL: POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA by Tiffany Dawn Jobe #12;#12;ABSTRACT Reservoir characterization, modeling Field is a mature oil and gas field in Texas County, Oklahoma which produces from Pennsylvanian valley

  16. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between micro-seismicity; reservoir flow and geomechanical characteristics. seismicghassmireservoirstimulation.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis of...

  17. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Krafla reservoir. Temperature, pressure and vapor saturationreservoirs because i·t does not residual immobile steam saturation

  18. Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation...

  19. Particle and Energy Transport in quantum disordered and quasi-periodic chains connected to mesoscopic Fermi reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ajisaka; F. Barra; C. Mejia-Monasterio; T. Prosen

    2012-05-06

    We study a model of nonequilibrium quantum transport of particles and energy in a many-body system connected to mesoscopic Fermi reservoirs (the so-called meso-reservoirs). We discuss the conservation laws of particles and energy within our setup as well as the transport properties of quasi-periodic and disordered chains.

  20. Defect Creation by Linker Fragmentation in Metal-Organic Frameworks and Its Effects on Gas Uptake Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    range of applications, including but not limited to gas storage,7-10 gas separations,11-14 catalysis,15, thereby increasing the capacity of MOFs, particularly for gas storage purposes. Additionally volumes, with concomitant damage to MOF capacities for gas storage. Alternatively, mixed-linker approach

  1. A reservoir management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allis, R.G.

    1989-06-16

    There are numerous documented cases of extraction of fluids from the ground causing surface subsidence. The cases include groundwater, oil and gas, as well as geothermal fluid withdrawal. A recent comprehensive review of all types of man-induced land subsidence was published by the Geological Survey of America. At the early stages of a geothermal power development project it is standard practice in most countries for an environmental impact report to be required. The possibility of geothermal subsidence has to be addressed, and usually it falls on the geophysicists and/or geologists to make some predictions. The advice given is vital for planning the power plant location and the borefield pipe and drain layout. It is not so much the vertical settlement that occurs with subsidence but the accompanying horizontal ground strains that can do the most damage to any man-made structure.

  2. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  3. Asia Pacific oil and gas conference: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This book is a compilation of conference proceedings on oil and gas development technologies for the Pacific Rim countries. It includes papers on horizontal drilling technologies, reservoir modeling, corrosion protection techniques, pipeline design and flow measurement, and well logging instrumentation. Other papers deal with resource management and reservoir engineering techniques and modeling. Reservoir engineering papers include enhanced recovery and well stimulation techniques as well as optimizing field depletion.

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  5. -Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    For the Period October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986 DE-ASO7-84ID12529 Stanford Geothermal Program was initiated in fiscal year 1981. The report covers the period from October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986SGP-TR-107 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

  6. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  7. Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

    2001-01-01

    for the entire reservoir that considers the new geological model developed during reservoir description. Furthermore, it provides PDVSA with a powerful tool for planning and reservoir management decisions, especially in the eastern area of the reservoir...

  8. Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbogast, Todd

    Summary Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs is one of the most important, challenging, and computationally intensive problems in reservoir engineering. Parallel reservoir simulators developed for naturally fractured

  9. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  10. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  11. The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P.

    1997-08-01

    Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

  12. Reservoir engineering applications for development and exploitation of geothermal fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasquez, N.C.; Sarmiento, Z.F.

    1986-07-01

    After a geothermal well is completed, several tests and downhole measurements are conducted to help evaluate the subsurface fluid and reservoir properties intersected. From these tests, a conceptual model of the well can be developed by integrating data from the various parts of the field. This paper presents the completion techniques applied in geothermal wells, as well as the role of reservoir engineering science in delineating a field for development. Monitoring techniques and other reservoir engineering aspects of a field under exploitation are also discussed, with examples from the Philippines.

  13. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation and Acid Treatment of Well Baca 20; Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1983-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program was initiated in February 1979 to pursue industry interest in geothermal well stimulation work and to develop technical expertise in areas directly related to geothermal well stimulation activities. This report provides an overview of the two experiments conducted in the high-temperature reservoir in Baca, New Mexico. The report discusses resource and reservoir properties, and provides a description of the stimulation experiment, a description of the treatment evaluation, and a summary of the experiment costs. (DJE-2005)

  14. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2004-01-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  15. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2002-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  16. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2003-07-30

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  17. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2003-10-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  18. Effect of Sputtering Gas environments on the Properties of Aluminum-doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films for Photovoltaic Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauhan, Ram Narayan; Kumar, Jitendra [Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016 (India); Singh, C.; Anand, R. S. [Electrical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016 (India)

    2011-10-20

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide thin films have been deposited on glass substrates by R.F. sputtering using ZnO(98%)-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(2%) target in different sputtering gaseous environments, viz., Ar, Ar/O{sub 2} and Ar/N{sub 2}+H{sub 2} at 80 deg. C. These films have been studied with regard to phase, microstructure, optical absorption and sheet resistance for application in photovoltaic devices as transparent conducting electrodes. The properties of the films are shown to strongly depend on the sputtering gas(es). The films exhibit a wurtzite-type hexagonal structure with the (00.2) preferred orientation, the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. The intensity of 00.2 diffraction peak and the average crystallite size remain almost the same when the films are prepared under pure Ar or Ar/O{sub 2} environment. However the average crystallite size increases while electrical resistance decreases with introduction of nitrogen and hydrogen in comparison to oxygen in argon. Nevertheless, the optimum value of optical transmittance and sheet resistance of the films deposited in pure argon are found to be 85-96% in the wavelength range 400-800 nm and 65 {Omega}/{open_square}, respectively.

  19. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Huron Shale - Gas production from Devonian Shale in Eastern Kentucky goes all the way back to 1892, when of the reservoir, efficient gas production was established. The most prolific horizon of Devonian Shale in Eastern Kentucky is the Lower Huron Shale, which is Ohio Shale member. Over 80% of Devonian gas production comes

  20. Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.; Brame, Scott; Current, Caitlin J.

    2003-02-07

    Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

  1. Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

    2003-02-07

    Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity is needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

  2. Fluid pressure arrival time tomography: Estimation and assessment in the presence of inequality constraints, with an application to a producing gas field at Krechba, Algeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucci, A.; Vasco, D.W.; Novali, F.

    2010-04-01

    Deformation in the overburden proves useful in deducing spatial and temporal changes in the volume of a producing reservoir. Based upon these changes we estimate diffusive travel times associated with the transient flow due to production, and then, as the solution of a linear inverse problem, the effective permeability of the reservoir. An advantage an approach based upon travel times, as opposed to one based upon the amplitude of surface deformation, is that it is much less sensitive to the exact geomechanical properties of the reservoir and overburden. Inequalities constrain the inversion, under the assumption that the fluid production only results in pore volume decreases within the reservoir. We apply the formulation to satellite-based estimates of deformation in the material overlying a thin gas production zone at the Krechba field in Algeria. The peak displacement after three years of gas production is approximately 0.5 cm, overlying the eastern margin of the anticlinal structure defining the gas field. Using data from 15 irregularly-spaced images of range change, we calculate the diffusive travel times associated with the startup of a gas production well. The inequality constraints are incorporated into the estimates of model parameter resolution and covariance, improving the resolution by roughly 30 to 40%.

  3. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  4. Adequate description of heavy oil viscosities and a method to assess optimal steam cyclic periods for thermal reservoir simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mago, Alonso Luis

    2006-08-16

    exceeding 2.5 trillion barrels. Management decisions and production strategies from thermal oil recovery processes are frequently based on reservoir simulation. A proper description of the physical properties, particularly oil viscosity, is essential...

  5. Research on improved and enhanced oil recovery in Illinois through reservoir characterization, March 28, 1992--June 28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oltz, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    This project will provide information that can maximize hydrocarbon production, minimize formation damage and stimulate new production in Illinois. Such information includes definition of hydrocarbon resources, characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and the implementation of methods that will improve hydrocarbon extractive technology. Increased understanding of reservoir heterogeneities that affect oil recovery can aid in identifying producible resources. The transfer of technology to industry and the general public is a significant component of the program. The project is designed to examine selected subsurface oil reservoirs in Illinois. Scientists use advanced scientific techniques to gain a better understanding of reservoir components and behavior and address ways of potentially increasing the amount of recoverable oil. Initial production rates for wells in the Illinois Basin commonly decline quite rapidly and as much as 60 percent of the oil in place can be unrecoverable using standard operating procedures. Heterogeneities (geological differences in reservoir make-up) affect a reservoir's capability to release fluids. By-passed mobile and immobile oil remain in the reservoir. To learn how to get more of the oil out of reservoirs, the ISGS is studying the nature of reservoir rock heterogeneities and their control on the distribution and production of bypassed, mobile oil. Accomplishment for this period are summarized for the following tasks: mapping, cross-sections; subsurface depo-systems; outcrop studies; oil and gas development maps; engineering work; SEM/EDX; and clay minerals.

  6. Direct estimation of gas reserves using production data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buba, Ibrahim Muhammad

    2004-09-30

    This thesis presents the development of a semi-analytical technique that can be used to estimate the gas-in-place for volumetric gas reservoirs. This new methodology utilizes plotting functions, plots, extrapolations, ...

  7. A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Zhenzhen

    2012-10-19

    In 1997, Rogner published a paper containing an estimate of the natural gas in place in unconventional reservoirs for 11 world regions. Rogner's work was assessing the unconventional gas resource base, and is now considered to be very conservative...

  8. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  9. Utilization of low-quality natural gas: A current assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acheson, W.P.; Hackworth, J.H.; Kasper, S.; McIlvried, H.G.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the low quality natural gas (LQNG) resource base, current utilization of LQNG, and environmental issues relative to its use, to review processes for upgrading LQNG to pipeline quality, and to make recommendations of research needs to improve the potential for LQNG utilization. LQNG is gas from any reservoir which contains amounts of nonhydrocarbon gases sufficient to lower the heating value or other properties of the gas below commercial, pipeline standards. For the purposes of this study, LQNG is defined as natural gas that contains more than 2% carbon dioxide, more than 4% nitrogen, or more than 4% combined CO{sub 2} plus N{sub 2}. The other contaminant of concern is hydrogen sulfide. A minor contaminant in some natural gases is helium, but this inert gas usually presents no problems.

  10. Deliverable 3.1.4 -- Final reservoir report and field-scale models Bluebell Field, Utah, Class 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2000-07-12

    The objective of this project were to: (1) Simulate parts of the reservoir using the conventional dual-porosity, dual-permeability approach, generate progressively complex reservoir models and use the production history match results to quantify formation damage; (2) Examine the effect of the numerical aspects such as grid sizes and fracture properties on the simulations results; (3) Evaluate the effect of fluid thermodynamic properties on production; and (4) Study effect of inclusion of fractures on variability in production from stochastically generated reservoir models.

  11. Evaluation and Prediction of Unconventional Gas Resources in Underexplored Basins Worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Kun

    2012-07-16

    As gas production from conventional gas reservoirs in the United States decreases, industry is turning more attention to the exploration and development of unconventional gas resources (UGR). This trend is expanding quickly ...

  12. Olig sand, shallow oil zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Olig Sand Reservoirs, classified as part of the Shallow Oil Zone, were studied and evaluated. The reservoirs are located in Section 30R, T30S, R23E and Section 24Z, T30S, R22E, M.D.B. and M., all in Elk Hills Oil Field, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California. The three productive reservoirs studied cover an area of 255 acres, and originally contained 3311 MMCF of gas condensate in 4292 acre-feet of sand. The main reservoir, Fault Block I in Section 30R, has been on production since 1982 and is largely depleted. The reservoirs around wells 324-30R and 385-24Z should still be in a virgin state. They can be depleted either through those wells, when their service as Stevens Zone producers is completed, or by twin well replacements drilled specifically as Olig Sand completions. Thirty-six exhibits have been included to present basic data and study results in a manner that will enhance the readers's understanding of the reservoirs. These exhibits include six maps in the M-series, six sections in the S-Series, and fourteen figures in the F-Series, as well as ten tables. The Appendix includes miscellaneous basic data such as well logs, core analyses, pressure measurements, and well tests. The Calculations Section of the report develops and explains the analytical methods used to define well productivity, determine reserves, and schedule future production of those reserves. Although no MER recommendations have been made for these gas condensate reservoirs, recommended depletion schemes and schedules are presented. These schemes include one eventual recompletion and one new well to maximize present worth of these reservoirs which carry proved reserves of 289 MMCF and probable reserves of 853 MMCF, effective August 1, 1986. In addition, potential future testing is earmarked for wells 322-30R and 344-30R. 11 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF A CHAIN OF ANHARMONIC OSCILLATORS WITH RANDOM FLIP OF VELOCITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF A CHAIN OF ANHARMONIC OSCILLATORS WITH RANDOM FLIP OF VELOCITIES C into the hot reservoir, but it is impossible to extract energy for the cold reservoir. In other wo

  14. Sedimentation in Shallow ReservoirsPoster n 21 Large shallow reservoirs of run-of-river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Sedimentation in Shallow ReservoirsPoster n° 21 Large shallow reservoirs of run-of-river power plants on rivers with high suspended sediments are endangered by significant sedimentation. INTRODUCTION

  15. A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbana, Enis

    2002-01-01

    The Green River Formation is located in the Uinta basin of northeastern Utah. It contains several reservoirs that can be classified as lacustrine such as the Altamont-Bluebell and Red Wash. Lacustrine reservoirs are ...

  16. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian “Clinton” sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (“Huff-n-Puff”) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a “Clinton”-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day “soak” period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the “Clinton” sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3½ months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the “Clinton” in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic- CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the “Clinton” reservoir in the ECOF.

  17. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 1/2 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the 'Clinton' in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic-CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the 'Clinton' reservoir in the ECOF.

  18. Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

    1997-08-01

    A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

  19. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2005-04-27

    This report describes the work performed during the fourth year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificially fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT scanner to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in hydraulically fractured reservoirs (HFR) and naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) that eventually result in more efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. In Chapter 1, we worked with DOE-RMOTC to investigate fracture properties in the Tensleep Formation at Teapot Dome Naval Reserve as part of their CO{sub 2} sequestration project. In Chapter 2, we continue our investigation to determine the primary oil recovery mechanism in a short vertically fractured core. Finally in Chapter 3, we report our numerical modeling efforts to develop compositional simulator with irregular grid blocks.

  20. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of...

  1. 201202 Reservoir System Modeling Technologies Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Applied To The Columbia River - PSR Adjoint Modeling Framework for Real-Time Control of Water - Deltares Reservoir Operations Analysis in the Willamette Water 2100...

  2. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  3. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  4. Assessing the relative permeability of heterogeneous reservoir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    susceptible to error and may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding displacement efficiency, wettability and reservoir performance. This paper focuses on new techniques for...

  5. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  6. Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with form History Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  7. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  8. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-04-01

    Wave-induced variations of pore pressure in a partially-saturated reservoir result in oscillatory liquid flow. The viscous losses during this flow are responsible for wave attenuation. The same viscous effects determine the changes in the dynamic bulk modulus of the system versus frequency. These changes are necessarily linked to attenuation via the causality condition. We analytically quantify the frequency dependence of the bulk modulus of a partially saturated rock by assuming that saturation is patchy and then link these changes to the inverse quality factor. As a result, the P-wave attenuation is quantitatively linked to saturation and thus can serve as a saturation indicator.

  9. The verification of a semi-analytical reservoir simulator using a finite difference reservoir simulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Hans Gerhardt

    1990-01-01

    of Cases Fundamental Difference Between the Reservoir Simulators. Data Sets. . General Process of Verification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 24 25 25 26 29 32 36 SINGLE LAYER, RADIAL FLOW DRAWDOWN CASES. . 38 viii Page Infinite Cylindrical... Drawdown Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 41 43 45 49 50 52 MULTIPLE LAYER RESERVOIR, RADIAL FLOW DRAWDOWN CASES. 63 Simulation of Multiple Layer Reservoirs. . . . . . Simulation Parameters. Constant Rate Drawdown Tests in an Infinite...

  10. The inferred evolution of the cold gas properties of CANDELS galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popping, G; Trager, S C; Somerville, R S; Dekel, A; Kassin, S A; Kocevski, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Faber, S M; Ferguson, H C; Galametz, A; Grogin, N A; Guo, Y; Lu, Y; van der Wel, A; Weiner, B J

    2015-01-01

    We derive the total cold gas, atomic hydrogen, and molecular gas masses of approximately 24 000 galaxies covering four decades in stellar mass at redshifts 0.5 HI and H2), HI, and H2 mass and the stellar mass of galaxies down to stellar masses of 10^8 Msun already in place at z = 3; 2) the molecular fractions of cold gas increase with increasing stellar mass and look-back time; 3) there is hardly any evolution in the mean HI content of galaxies at fixed stellar mass; 4) the cold gas fraction and relative amount of molecular hydrogen in galaxies decrease at a relatively constant rate with time, independent of stellar mass; 5) there is a large population of low-stellar mass galaxies dominated by atomic gas. These galaxies are very ga...

  11. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  12. Computed microtomography of reservoir core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, M.E.; Muegge, E.L.; Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.

    1995-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is often utilized to evaluate and characterize structural characteristics within reservoir core material systems. Generally, medical CT scanners have been employed because of their availability and ease of use. Of interest lately has been the acquisition of three-dimensional, high resolution descriptions of rock and pore structures for characterization of the porous media and for modeling of single and multiphase transport processes. The spatial resolution of current medical CT scanners is too coarse for pore level imaging of most core samples. Recently developed high resolution computed microtomography (CMT) using synchrotron X-ray sources is analogous to conventional medical CT scanning and provides the ability to obtain three-dimensional images of specimens with a spatial resolution on the order of micrometers. Application of this technique to the study of core samples provides two- and three-dimensional high resolution description of pore structure and mineral distributions. Pore space and interconnectivity is accurately characterized and visualized. Computed microtomography data can serve as input into pore-level simulation techniques. A generalized explanation of the technique is provided, with comparison to conventional CT scanning techniques and results. Computed microtomographic results of several sandstone samples are presented and discussed. Bulk porosity values and mineralogical identification were obtained from the microtomograms and compared with gas porosity and scanning electron microscope results on tandem samples.

  13. Mapping steam and water flow in petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Daley, T.; Peterson, J.; Majer, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Murer, A.S. [Mobil Exploration and Producing US (United States); Johnston, R.M. [SPE, CalResources LLC (United States); Klonsky, L. [Chevron USA Production Co. (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Over the past 5 years, we have applied high-resolution geophysical methods (crosswell seismic and electromagnetics (EM), and passive seismic) to map and characterize petroleum reservoirs in the San Joaquin Valley and to monitor changes during secondary recovery operations. The two techniques provide complementary information. Seismic data reveal the reservoir structure, whereas EM measurements are more sensitive to the pore fluid distribution. Seismic surveys at the south Belridge field were used to map fracture generation and monitor formation changes due to the onset of steam flooding. Early results show possible sensitivity to changes in gas saturation caused by the steam flooding. Crosswell EM surveys were applied at a shallow pilot at Lost Hills for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. Images made from baselines data clearly show the distribution of the target oil sands; repeated surveys during the steam flood allowed us to identify the boundaries of the steam chest and to accurately predict breakthrough. Applications of the EM techniques in steel-cased wells are at an early stage, but preliminary results at Lost Hills show sensitivity to formation resistivity in a water-flood pilot. Finally, passive seismic surveys during hydrofracture operations measured events corelatable in frequency content and magnitude with the size and orientation of induced fractures.

  14. Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in Southeastern Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Mattson, Earl D.; McLing, Travis L.; Palmer, Carl D.; Smith, Robert W.; Wood, Thomas R.; Podgorney, Robert K.

    2015-03-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water within oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. Although the area exhibits several thermal expressions, the measured geothermal gradients vary substantially (19 – 61 ºC/km) within this area, potentially suggesting a redistribution of heat in the overlying ground water from deeper geothermal reservoirs. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. Compositions of a selected group of thermal waters representing southeastern Idaho hot/warm springs and wells were used for the development of temperature estimates. The temperature estimates in the the region varied from moderately warm (59 ºC) to over 175 ºC. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho resulted in the highest temperature estimates in the region.

  15. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining Hydrocarbons Charles#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013 Outcrop for heavy oil deposits within the Canadian Grosmont Formation. #12;iii Reservoir Characterization Research

  16. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics...

  17. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Don; Koerner, Roy; Moos, Dan; Nguyen, John; Phillips, Chris; Tagbor, Kwasi; Walker, Scott

    1999-11-09

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  18. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1997-04-10

    This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  19. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-05

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1989, and production volumes for the year 1989 for the total United States and for selected states and state sub-divisions. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production reported separately. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. 28 refs., 9 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-09

    The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.