Sample records for gas research results

  1. DOE to Unveil New Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to introduce a new, user-friendly online repository of oil and natural gas research results at the Society of Petroleum Engineers' Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, to be held in New Orleans, La., October 4-7, 2009.

  2. First results on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Yaowei [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Hak-Kun; Kim, Hong-Tack; Kim, Woong-Chae; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Son, Soo-Hyun; Bang, Eun-Nam; Hong, Suk-Ho; Yoon, Si-Woo [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Zhuang Huidong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen Zhongyong [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive gas injection (MGI) system was developed on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) in 2011 campaign for disruption studies. The MGI valve has a volume of 80 ml and maximum injection pressure of 50 bar, the diameter of valve orifice to vacuum vessel is 18.4 mm, the distance between MGI valve and plasma edge is {approx}3.4 m. The MGI power supply employs a large capacitor of 1 mF with the maximum voltage of 3 kV, the valve can be opened in less than 0.1 ms, and the amount of MGI can be controlled by the imposed voltage. During KSTAR 2011 campaign, MGI disruptions are carried out by triggering MGI during the flat top of circular and limiter discharges with plasma current 400 kA and magnetic field 2-3.5 T, deuterium injection pressure 39.7 bar, and imposed voltage 1.1-1.4 kV. The results show that MGI could mitigate the heat load and prevent runaway electrons with proper MGI amount, and MGI penetration is deeper under higher amount of MGI or lower magnetic field. However, plasma start-up is difficult after some of D{sub 2} MGI disruptions due to the high deuterium retention and consequently strong outgassing of deuterium in next shot, special effort should be made to get successful plasma start-up after deuterium MGI under the graphite first wall.

  3. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGRSR) program are described in the quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education) and Research. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  4. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  5. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  6. RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY METHODS Prepared For: California Energy Commission.........................................................................................................................1 Roadmap Organization

  7. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  8. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  9. Research results and utility experience workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop was sponsored by the Distributed Utility Valuation (DUV) Project-a joint effort of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E). The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for utilities, other research organizations, and regulatory agencies to share results and data on Distributed Utility (DU)-related research and applications. Up-to-date information provided insight into the various technologies available to utilities, the methods used to select the technologies, and case study results. The workshop was divided into three sessions: Planning Tools; Utility Experience; and Policy and Technology Implications. Brief summaries of the individual presentations from each session are attached as appendices.

  10. Oil and Gas Research| GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeeding accessOffice ofOfficesOil &

  11. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  12. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities of the AGTSR Program during this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report text is divided into discussions on Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education) and Research. Items worthy of note are highlighted below with additional detail following in the text of the report.

  13. Proceedings of the natural gas research and development contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Byrer, C.W. (eds.)

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this meeting was to present results of the research in the DOE-sponsored Natural Gas Program, and simultaneously to provide a forum for real-time technology transfer, to the active research community, to the interested public, and to the natural gas industry, who are the primary users of this technology. The current research focus is to expand the base of near-term and mid-term economic gas resources through research activities in Eastern Tight Gas, Western Tight Gas, Secondary Gas Recovery (increased recovery of gas from mature fields); to enhance utilization, particularly of remote gas resources through research in Natural Gas to Liquids Conversion; and to develop additional, long term, potential gas resources through research in Gas Hydrates and Deep Gas. With the increased national emphasis on the use of natural gas, this forum has been expanded to include summaries of DOE-sponsored research in energy-related programs and perspectives on the importance of gas to future world energy. Thirty-two papers and fourteen poster presentations were given in seven formal, and one informal, sessions: Three general sessions (4 papers); Western Tight Gas (6 papers); Eastern Tight Gas (8 papers); Conventional/Speculative Resources (8 papers); and Gas to Liquids (6 papers). Individual reports are processed separately on the data bases.

  14. DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has led to a new licensing agreement that will improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines, resulting in cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy.

  15. Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology Energy Systems Research/index.html January 2012 The Issue California is the secondlargest natural gas consuming state in the United States, just behind Texas. About 85% of the natural gas consumed in California is delivered on interstate

  16. Building America Expert Meeting: Foundations Research Results...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an expert meeting on Foundations Research Results on November 15, 2011 at the University Hotel Minneapolis on the campus of the...

  17. Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

  18. Videos of Experiments from ORNL Gas Hydrate Research

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gas hydrate research performed by the Environmental Sciences Division utilizes the ORNL Seafloor Process Simulator, the Parr Vessel, the Sapphire Cell, a fiber optic distributed sensing system, and Raman spectroscopy. The group studies carbon sequestration in the ocean, desalination, gas hydrates in the solar system, and nucleation and dissociation kinetics. The videos available at the gas hydrates website are very short clips from experiments.

  19. Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Ruckelshaus

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming is one of the most active areas of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development in the western United States. This resource provides clean energy but raises environmental concerns. Primary among these is the disposal of water that is co-produced with the gas during depressurization of the coal seam. Beginning with a few producing wells in Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) in 1987, CBNG well numbers in this area increased to over 13,600 in 2004, with projected growth to 20,900 producing wells in the PRB by 2010. CBNG development is continuing apace since 2004, and CBNG is now being produced or evaluated in four other Wyoming coal basins in addition to the PRB, with roughly 3500-4000 new CBNG wells permitted statewide each year since 2004. This is clearly a very valuable source of clean fuel for the nation, and for Wyoming the economic benefits are substantial. For instance, in 2003 alone the total value of Wyoming CBNG production was about $1.5 billion, with tax and royalty income of about $90 million to counties, $140 million to the state, and $27 million to the federal government. In Wyoming, cumulative CBNG water production from 1987 through December 2004 was just over 380,000 acre-feet (2.9 billion barrels), while producing almost 1.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of CBNG gas statewide. Annual Wyoming CBNG water production in 2003 was 74,457 acre-feet (577 million barrels). Total production of CBNG water across all Wyoming coal fields could total roughly 7 million acre-feet (55.5 billion barrels), if all of the recoverable CBNG in the projected reserves of 31.7 tcf were produced over the coming decades. Pumping water from coals to produce CBNG has been designated a beneficial water use by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office (SEO), though recently the SEO has limited this beneficial use designation by requiring a certain gas/water production ratio. In the eastern part of the PRB where CBNG water is generally of good quality, most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination of trace elements from CBNG disposal ponds; (4) use of environmental tracers in assessing wate

  20. Oil & Gas Research | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data and modeling tools needed to predict and quantify potential risks associated with oil and gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing or other...

  1. Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micheal Frenkel; Kenneth Kroenlein; V Diky; R.D. Chirico; A. Kazakow; C.D. Muzny; M. Frenkel

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a United States database containing experimentally-derived information about those materials was developed. The Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (NIST Standard Reference Database {number_sign} 156) was developed by the TRC Group at NIST in Boulder, Colorado paralleling a highly-successful database of thermodynamic properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures and in association with an international effort on the part of CODATA to aid in international data sharing. Development and population of this database relied on the development of three components of information-processing infrastructure: (1) guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert data and metadata into a well-organized, electronic format, (2) a relational data storage facility to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project, and (3) a gas hydrate markup language (GHML) developed to standardize data communications between 'data producers' and 'data users'. Having developed the appropriate data storage and communication technologies, a web-based interface for both the new Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database, as well as Scientific Results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program was developed and deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov.

  2. Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas cylinders. Safe procedures for their use are as follows: · All compressed gas combustible material. · Keep cylinders out of the direct sun and do not allow them to be overheated. · Gas

  3. Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Zigang

    Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

  4. The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

  5. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this task is to accurately measure the elongation and shrinkage exhibited by coal as it sorbs and desorbs methane gas at elevated pressure. Our research group has discussed several possible methods to measure this strain, including: optical microscopy, laser interferometry, conventional strain gauges, and LVDT strain gauges. There are advantages and disadvantages of each method. We had planned to use optical microscopy but, on further investigation, this approach will be less satisfactory than the strain gauge method. Accordingly, we have switched our focws to the use of strain gauges. Conventional strain gauges also involve potential problems which must be overcome, including: (1) Contrast in strength between the coal and the strain gauge must be minimized, (2) The proper glue that is neither too strong or too weak must be used to affix the strain gauge to the coal or the strain in the coal will not be accurately transmitted to the gauge, and (3) We must be aware that the total strain in the coal may not be homogeneously distributed through the specimen (due either either to boundary effects or contrast in composition of the coal layers). A high pressure chamber for sorption-strain experiments is currently being tested an modified and tested. The chamber will accommodate several small blocks of coal simultaneously. This will optimize efficiency, owing to the long times required to reequilibrate the coal blocks to changes in methane pressure.

  6. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 7. Combustion Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7. Combustion Research 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 7. Combustion Research DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review 2008meritreview7.pdf More Documents &...

  7. Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesinger, M. E.

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 5 years of NSF grant ATM 95-22681 (Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change, $1,605,000, 9/15/1995 to 8/31/2000) we have performed work which we are described in this report under three topics: (1) Development and Application of Atmosphere, Ocean, Photochemical-Transport, and Coupled Models; (2) Analysis Methods and Estimation; and (3) Climate-Change Scenarios, Impacts and Policy.

  8. Building America: Research for Real-World Results | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America: Research for Real-World Results Building America: Research for Real-World Results December 17, 2014 3:00PM to 4:30PM EST For 20 years, the U.S. Department of...

  9. Community Solar Public Opinion Research Results (Seattle)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    500 Seattle City Light customers were polled to determine interest in a community solar program, how people would participate and at what price levels. This is a presentation of the results.

  10. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, J.R.; Tsay, F.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of sorption capacity of coals by microbalance in a high pressure environment requires that corrections be made for the buoyancy of the gas that is displaced by the solid coal. As the pressure increases, the gas density increases, requiring that a correction factor be applied to the weight of the sample as measured by microbalance. A brief report summarizing this correction is attached as Appendix A.

  11. Iodine as a tracer of organic material: 129 I results from gas hydrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehn, Udo

    Iodine as a tracer of organic material: 129 I results from gas hydrate systems and fore arc fluids of this system, investigations of gas hydrates from the Peru Margin (ODP 201, Site 1230) and of fluids collected for these fluids. The results are in good agreement with earlier investigations of gas hydrate systems at Blake

  12. First results from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates offshore Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    First results from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates 13 December 2005; accepted 19 December 2005; published 3 February 2006. [1] Submarine gas hydrate from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates offshore Oregon, Geophys

  13. REVISED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARDS Advanced Natural Gas Engine Research and Development for Class 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVISED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARDS Advanced Natural Gas Engine Research and Development for Class 3 Notice (PON-12-504) entitled "Advanced Natural Gas Engine research and Development for Class 3 through of natural gas engine concepts for application in light heavy-duty vehicles (LHDV) and medium heavy duty

  14. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, J.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure chamber with a microbalance inside was designed and constructed for the purpose of measuring weight changes due to gas sorption at increasing pressure steps from 0 to 1000 psig. The raw weight changes recorded during the experiments had to be corrected for buoyancy and sample swelling. As the pressure in the balance chamber increases, the buoyancy forces tend to increase. The data were corrected and examined on the basis of five different sets of assumptions. At high pressures gas volumes measured have to be corrected for compressibility. The experimental data was analysed using five cases. The different cases were developed with certain assumptions. The five cases and the equations involved in each of them are discussed here.

  15. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANCE HAYS

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

  16. Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newsroom > Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking Oil & Gas Technology Center Groundbreaking Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in...

  17. Review of Current Literature and Research on Gas Supersaturation and Gas Bubble Trauma: Special Publication Number 1, 1986.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colt, John; Bouck, Gerald R.; Fidler, Larry

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents recently published information and on-going research on the various areas of gas supersaturation. Growing interest in the effects of chronic gas supersaturation on aquatic animals has been due primarily to heavy mortality of salmonid species under hatchery conditions. Extensive examination of affected animals has failed to consistently identify pathogenic organisms. Water quality sampling has shown that chronic levels of gas supersaturation are commonly present during a significant period of the year. Small marine fish larvae are significantly more sensitive to gas supersaturation than salmonids. Present water quality criteria for gas supersaturation are not adequate for the protection of either salmonids under chronic exposure or marine fish larvae, especially in aquaria or hatcheries. To increase communication between interested parties in the field of gas supersaturation research and control, addresses and telephone numbers of all people responding to the questionnaire are included. 102 refs.

  18. Original Research Article Influence of anodic gas recirculation on solid oxide fuel cells in a micro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    Original Research Article Influence of anodic gas recirculation on solid oxide fuel cells Anode off-gas recycle a b s t r a c t The recycle of anode depleted gas has been employed in solid oxide fuel cell systems for the advantage of reusing a fraction of the exhaust rich in steam

  19. Development of a new type shock tube without a diaphragm for gas-dynamic laser research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    tube are shown in Fig.2. The cylinder sections C and D are filled with a higher pressure gas than A to the left side, and this makes the high pressure gas in the driver section flowing into the driven sectionDevelopment of a new type shock tube without a diaphragm for gas-dynamic laser research S.Kugimiya1

  20. IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1 Jeffrey L and natural gas development on grouse populations and habitats. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge on the effects of oil and gas development and production on prairie grouse based

  1. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold to infer the canyon-infilling, fold uplift, and gas hydrate occurrences beneath the frontal fold at the toe simu- lating reflector (BSR) on seismic sections indicates the base of gas hydrate stability zone

  2. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Geothermal modeling of the gas hydrate stability zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Geothermal modeling of the gas hydrate stability zone along the Krishna simulating reflector (BSR), interpreted to mark the thermally controlled base of the gas hydrate stability of the eastern continental margin of India. The seismic data reveal that gas hydrate occurs in the Krishna

  3. BETO Live Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Dr. Jose Olivares of Los Alamos National Laboratory will present the results of algal biofuels research conducted by the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB). NAABB is...

  4. Film Cooling, Heat Transfer and Aerodynamic Measurements in a Three Stage Research Gas Turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryanarayanan, Arun

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing 3-stage turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A and M University, is re-designed and newly installed to enable coolant gas injection on the first ...

  5. Film Cooling, Heat Transfer and Aerodynamic Measurements in a Three Stage Research Gas Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryanarayanan, Arun

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing 3-stage turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A and M University, is re-designed and newly installed to enable coolant gas injection on the first stage rotor platform...

  6. Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

  7. AVTA: Ford Escape PHEV Advanced Research Vehicle 2010 Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a plug-in hybrid electric Ford Escape Advanced Research Vehicle, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  8. Oxford Institute for Energy Studies Natural Gas Research Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    demand and price dynamics than by crude oil or oil product prices. The author, Dr Michelle Michot Foss concludes that the relationship between petroleum liquids and natural gas prices going forward will be less, this means that as long as crude oil prices remain significantly in excess of $35/bbl, European gas markets

  9. Research on the mitigation of explosions on offshore oil and gas platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.M.; Shale, G.A. [British Gas plc, Loughborough (United Kingdom). Research and Technology Div.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of congestion, and confinement is characteristic of many offshore oil and gas platforms in the UK and Norwegian sectors of the North Sea. These conditions can result in severe explosion overpressures following the ignition of an accidental release of gas. The consequences of such an incident were illustrated by the Piper Alpha disaster in which an explosion initiated a sequence of events which rapidly lead to total destruction of the platform and the loss of 167 lives. A number of techniques can be considered for the control and mitigation of explosions on offshore platforms, including explosion relief, blast containment, explosion suppression, changes to platform layout and platform strengthening. These techniques are reviewed in the paper. However, many of them are difficult and expensive to implement on existing structures and, their use, even within new installations has limitations. Most offshore platforms are fitted with deluge systems for protection against fire. Recent research has shown that, under certain conditions, the water spray generated by a fire deluge system, typical of those currently installed on offshore platforms, can provide effective explosion mitigation. The paper describes the large-scale experimental research which has been carried out, and indicates the mechanisms by which water spray mitigates a gas explosion.

  10. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for rotordynamic coefficients for labyrinth gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharrer, Joseph Kirk

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL RESULTS FOR ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS FOR LABYRINTH GAS SEALS A Thesis by JOSEPH KIRK SCHARRER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19B5 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL RESULTS FOR ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS FOR LABYRINTH GAS SEALS A Thesis by JOSEPH KIRK SCHARRER Approved as to style...

  11. Gas hydrate research in the Gulf of Mexico: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, R.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy seismic sections on the continental slope showed no evidence of a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), which would indicate the presence of gas hydrates. There was no indication of metastable hydrates in continental shelf or slope sediments outside of the conventionally accepted temperature and pressure environment. Tracing the path of migrating gas from the source is much more straight forward than intercepting gas being transported and tracing it back to the source. Our study of low and medium energy seismic methods has shown that they could identify migrating gas. We feel strongly that there are hydrate zones in the Gulf of Mexico that are decomposing; they build up pressure and periodically release the trapped hydrocarbon gases. The released gases migrate vertically and/or laterally to mix with other types of gas or to form discrete pockets. Some of this gas may be emitted from underwater seeps into the overlying water column where it could be identified by a geochemical survey. The ratio of isobutane to normal butane determined by the geochemical survey can be used to assess the probability of the hydrocarbons emanating from a hydrate source. (The more the ratio exceeds 1.0 the greater the probability that the gas could be from a hydrate source.) As no indications of a hydrate zone (e.g., a BSR) were located, we were not able to establish a geophysical signature for gas hydrates; but the records indicate there are large volumes of gas migrating up the continental slope, some of which may have originated from a decomposing hydrate zone or from gas trapped below the hydrate cap. 20 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  13. Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

  14. PEGASUS, a European research project on the effects of gas in underground storage facilities for radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haijtink, B.; McMenamin, T. [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Whereas the subject of gas generation and possible gas release from radioactive waste repositories has gained in interest on the international scene, the Commission of the European Communities has increased its research efforts on this issue. In particular in the 4th five year R and D program on Management and Storage of Radioactive Waste (1990--1994), a framework has been set up in which research efforts on the subject of gas generation and migration, supported by the CEC, are brought together and coordinated. In this project, called PEGASUS, Project on the Effects of GAS in Underground Storage facilities for radioactive waste, about 20 organizations and research institutes from 7 European countries are involved. The project covers both experimental and theoretical studies of the processes of gas formation and possible gas release from the different waste types, LLW, ILW and HLW, under typical repository conditions in suitable geological formations as clay, salt and granite. In this paper an overview is given of the various studies undertaken in the project as well as some first results presented.

  15. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 series: Gallia County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. On September 28, 1978 the Department of Energy entered into a cooperative agreement with Mitchell Energy Corporation to explore Devonian shale gas potential in Gallia County, Ohio. Objectives of the cost-sharing contract were the following: (1) to select locations for a series of five wells to be drilled around the periphery of a possible gas reservoir in Gallia County, Ohio; (2) to drill, core, log, case, fracture, clean up, and test each well, and to monitor production from the wells for a five-year period. This report summarizes the procedures and results of core characterization work performed at the Eastern Gas Shales Project Core Laboratory on core retrieved from the Gallia County EGSP wells, designated OH No. 6/1, OH No. 6/2, OH No. 6/3, OH No. 6/4, and OH No. 6/5. Characterization work performed includes photographic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition the following tests were performed by Michigan Technological University to obtain the following data: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength, strength in point load; trends of microfractures; and hydraulic fracturing characteristics.

  16. RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    technology analysis Noon Lunch 1:15 California off-shore wind technology assessment 1:45 Technical assessmentRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS Public Workshop at the California Energy Commission (CEC) September 3, 2014 California Renewable Energy Center #12;California

  17. RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    / RECs #12;CGECTask 7. Biomass Gasification Technology Assessment · Task is still in progress · UpdateRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS Public Workshop at the California Energy Commission (CEC) September 3, 2014 California Renewable Energy Center #12;Biomass/MSW Gap

  18. RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Renewable Energy Center California Off-shore Wind Technology Assessment #12;California Renewable EnergyRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS Public Workshop at the California Energy Commission (CEC) September 3, 2014 California Renewable Energy Center #12;California

  19. Thermoelectric Research Takes Spotlight Improvements in Efficiency Help Fuel Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoelectric Research Takes Spotlight Improvements in Efficiency Help Fuel Results m i c h i g of alternative energy sources, thermoelectrics may not immediately come to mind, but MSU and the College interest in alternative energy sources certainly has helped to bring thermoelectrics into the limelight

  20. RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS Public Workshop different renewable resources are co-located. How best to take advantage of this opportunity? PURPOSE resource base and geographic characteristics, a two-part analysis was conducted. #12;California Renewable

  1. Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research The value of peat bogs as open habitats may suffice on lowland raised bogs. Damming furrows is ineffective if the peat is severely cracked sundew, Drosera anglica #12;Introduction In their natural state, peat bogs provide unique habitats

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several perialpine and alpine hydropower reservoirs by diffusion and loss in turbines T. Diem · S. Koch · S. Schwarzenbach · B. Wehrli · C investigated greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from reservoirs located across an altitude gradient

  3. SOLID/GAS BIOREACTORS: POWERFUL TOOLS FOR FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH AND EFFICIENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SOLID/GAS BIOREACTORS: POWERFUL TOOLS FOR FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH AND EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGY of the bioreactor can be avoided. Finally, the downstream process is simplified due to the absence of a solvent

  4. Breaking Ground for GE Oil & Gas Tech Center|GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnership with Devon Energy at Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens...

  5. Limitless Hot Gas Path Cooling Design | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization at GE Global Research, one such potent combination already taking shape is Additive Manufacturing and High Pressure Turbine Blade Cooling. Additive Manufacturing...

  6. Shale Gas Spreads to the South | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSetting the Stage forScienceShale Gas

  7. Driving Sensing Technology in Oil & Gas | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a bit more about Bill's work. Bill joined GE Global Research in 2010. For the past four years his emphasis has been on developing advanced photonics technologies for multiple GE...

  8. Oil & Gas Technology at Oklahoma City | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearch & Development »Research

  9. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  10. FIRST OPERATING RESULTS OF A DYNAMIC GAS BEARING TURBINE IN AN INDUSTRIAL HYDROGEN LIQUEFIER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L. [Linde Kryotechnik AG, Pfungen, CH-8042 (Switzerland)

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  11. Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - army research institute Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: army research institute Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

  13. The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92: Exhaust emissions testing and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Zammit, M.G. [Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States); Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Bruetsch, R.I. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge `92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

  14. Models, Simulators, and Data-driven Resources for Oil and Natural Gas Research

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NETL provides a number of analytical tools to assist in conducting oil and natural gas research. Software, developed under various DOE/NETL projects, includes numerical simulators, analytical models, databases, and documentation.[copied from http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/Software_main.html] Links lead users to methane hydrates models, preedictive models, simulators, databases, and other software tools or resources.

  15. Gas-phase CO2 emission toward Cepheus A East: the result of shock activity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sonnentrucker; E. González-Alfonso; D. A. Neufeld; E. A. Bergin; G. J. Melnick; W. J. Forrest; J. L. Pipher; D. M. Watson

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first detection of gas-phase CO2 emission in the star-forming region Cepheus A East, obtained by spectral line mapping of the v2 bending mode at 14.98 micron with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The gaseous CO2 emission covers a region about 35'' x 25'' in extent, and results from radiative pumping by 15 micron continuum photons emanating predominantly from the HW2 protostellar region. The gaseous CO2 exhibits a temperature distribution ranging from 50 K to 200 K. A correlation between the gas-phase CO2 distribution and that of H2 S(2), a tracer of shock activity, indicates that the CO2 molecules originate in a cool post-shock gas component associated with the outflow powered by HW2. The presence of CO2 ice absorption features at 15.20 micron toward this region and the lack of correlation between the IR continuum emission and the CO2 gas emission distribution further suggest that the gaseous CO2 molecules are mainly sputtered off grain mantles -- by the passage of slow non-dissociative shocks with velocities of 15-30 km/s -- rather than sublimated through grain heating.

  16. Researchers | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PVResearch

  17. Researchers | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PVResearchTechnologies |

  18. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  19. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loui, A; McCall, S K

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant concentration ranges and distinguished from other chemical species that may be simultaneously present, is particularly challenging. Aside from the laboratory-based method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), where samples may be collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or cryofocusing, the other major approaches for gas-phase detection employ lasers typically operating in the mid-infrared wavelength region. While mass spectrometry can readily detect noble gases - the helium leak detector is an obvious example - laser-based methods such as infrared (IR) or Raman spectroscopy are completely insensitive to them as their monatomic nature precludes a non-zero dipole moment or changes in polarizability upon excitation. Therefore, noble gases can only be detected by one of two methods: (1) atomic emission spectroscopies which require the generation of plasmas through laser-induced breakdown, electrical arcing, or similar means; (2) non-spectroscopic methods which measure one or more physical properties (e.g., mass, thermal conductivity, density). In this report, we present our progress during Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) in the research and development of a non-spectroscopic method for noble gas detection. During Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), we demonstrated via proof-of-concept experiments that the combination of thermal conductivity detection (TCD) and coating-free damped resonance detection (CFDRD) using micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could provide selective sensing of these inert species. Since the MEMS-based TCD technology was directly adapted from a brassboard prototype commissioned by a previous chemical sensing project, FY11 efforts focused on advancing the state of the newer CFDRD method. This work, guided by observations previously reported in the open literature, has not only resulted in a substantially measureable increase in selectivity but has also revealed a potential method for mitigating or eliminating thermal drift that does not require a secondary reference sensor. The design of an apparatus to test this drift compensation scheme will be described. We will conclude this report with a discussion of planned efforts in Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12).

  20. Resin-coated sand slurry pack gas deliverabilities: Field and laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, B.; Nelson, C.; Stadleman, J.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although through-tubing resin-coated sand slurry packs (RCSSP's) are significantly less expensive than conventional gravel packs, they have not been widely used as a sand control completion technique. This low usage is mainly due to two inherent problems. The first is the high risk of localized pack failure in the perforation tunnels when the RCSSP casing plug is milled out. The second problem is the difficulty associated with predicting flow rates (and therefore economics) of RCSSP completed wells, especially if the casing plug is not milled out. This paper presents a modified velocity coefficient correlation for gas turbulence, an innovative RCSSP completion configuration with an associated simulation technique, and supporting field results that demonstrate an expanded application for RCSSP's in the area of gas well through-tubing plugbacks where, until recently, their general application was thought to be uneconomical.

  1. A Uniqueness Result for Minimizers of the 1D Log-gas Renormalized Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Leblé

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandier and Serfaty studied the one-dimensional Log-gas model, in particular they gave a crystallization result by showing that the one-dimensional lattice $\\mathbb{z}$ is a minimizer for the so-called renormalized energy which they obtained as a limit of the $N$-particle Log-gas Hamiltonian for $N \\to \\infty$. However, this minimizer is not unique among infinite point configurations (for example small perturbations of $\\mathbb{z}$ leave the renormalized energy unchanged). In this paper, we establish that uniqueness holds at the level of (stationary) point processes, the only minimizer being given by averaging $\\mathbb{z}$ over a choice of the origin in $[0,1]$. This is proved by showing a quantitative estimate on the two-point correlation function of a process in terms of its renormalized energy.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced flue gas Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flue gas losses and minimized in... generated from flue gas condensation for district heating. Twence is another example, where a high degree... into a reusable ash and that...

  3. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

  4. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

  5. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.

  6. GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

  7. The Potential of Using Natural Gas in HCCI Engines: Results from Zero- and Multi-dimensional Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Junnian

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    .1.6 Potential of using natural gas and dimethyl ether mixtures .................. 53 6.1.7 NOx emissions characteristics of natural gas HCCI engines ................ 61 6.2 Results from cold-flow CFD and multi-zone simulations... .......................................... 40 Fig.13 TIVC,min as a function of compression ratio for natural gas, gasoline and dimethyl ether ......................................................................... 42 x Page Fig.14 TIVC,min as a function of equivalence ratio...

  8. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  9. Composition, preparation, and gas generation results from simulated wastes of Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews the preparation and composition of simulants that have been developed to mimic the wastes temporarily stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at Hanford. The kinetics and stoichiometry of gases that are generated using these simulants are also compared, considering the roles of hydroxide, chloride, and transition metal ions; the identities of organic constituents; and the effects of dilution, radiation, and temperature. Work described in this report was conducted for the Flammable Gas Safety Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (a) whose purpose is to develop information that is necessary to mitigate potential safety hazards associated with waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The goal of this research and of related efforts at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is to determine the thermal and thermal/radiolytic mechanisms by which flammable and other gases are produced in Hanford wastes, emphasizing those stored in Tank 241-SY-101. A variety of Tank 241-SY-101 simulants have been developed to date. The use of simulants in laboratory testing activities provides a number of advantages, including elimination of radiological risks to researchers, lower costs associated with experimentation, and the ability to systematically alter simulant compositions to study the chemical mechanisms of reactions responsible for gas generation. The earliest simulants contained the principal inorganic components of the actual waste and generally a single complexant such as N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (EDTA). Both homogeneous and heterogeneous compositional forms were developed. Aggressive core sampling and analysis activities conducted during Windows C and E provided information that was used to design new simulants that more accurately reflected major and minor inorganic components.

  10. Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir Data, Using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 31159 Predicting Well Stimulation Results in a Gas Storage Field in the Absence of Reservoir Data, Using Neural Networks Mohaghegh, S., West Virginia University, McVey, D., National Gas and Oil for presentation by an SPE Program Committee following review of date wells with the highest potential

  11. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  12. Experimental measurement of gas diffusivity in bitumen: Results for carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upreti, S.R.; Mehrotra, A.K.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technique is developed to measure the diffusivity of gas in bitumen as a function of composition. Results are presented for a carbon dioxide-bitumen system, which is of considerable industrial relevance. The technique employs transient pressure data obtained from a nonintrusive pressure decay experiment at constant temperature and volume. The underlying theory is presented along with a computational algorithm to calculate diffusivity. Using experimental pressure decay data in the range 25--90 C at 4 MPa, the diffusivity of carbon dioxide in bitumen is calculated. The results are compared with the limited data available in the literature. The approach is straightforward and can be easily applied to other nonvolatile liquid systems.

  13. results.Research and Graduate Studies at North Carolina State University Achievements in Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    it comes to this global challenge. Research here is expanding North Carolina's biofuels industries, smart

  14. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly report, January--March, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring a series of studies related to advanced gas turbine systems. Ten universities participated in the first round studies, and an additional 13 studies have been funded this year. The five areas being covered are heat transfer, aerodynamics, materials, combustion, and dynamics. Summaries are given for the 6-month progress on the 1993 subcontract studies and on the planned research for the new subcontract studies.

  15. Carbon brainprint – An estimate of the intellectual contribution of research institutions to reducing greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterton, Julia; Parsons, David; Nicholls, John; Longhurst, Phil; Bernon, Mike; Palmer, Andrew; Brennan, Feargal; Kolios, Athanasios; Wilson, Ian; Ishiyama, Edward; Clements-Croome, Derek; Elmualim, Abbas; Darby, Howard; Yearley, Thomas; Davies, Gareth

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    turbine blades to improve engine efficiency Cranfield Improved delivery vehicle logistics to save fuel Cranfield Training for landfill gas inspectors to improve methane capture Cranfield Novel offshore vertical axis wind turbines compared... , this was 196 excluded from the assessment. 197 3.2 Novel offshore vertical axis wind turbines 198 Researchers within the School of Engineering at Cranfield University were part of a 199 consortium to develop further the concept of Novel Offshore Vertical...

  16. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on July 6 and 7, 2010. Additionally, a water sample was obtained at one well known as the 29-6 Water Hole, several miles west of the Gasbuggy site. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. The one water well sample was analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  17. Effects of soil rewetting and thawing on soil gas fluxes: a review of current literature and suggestions for future research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Gill; Vargas, Rodrigo; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Turetsky, Merritt

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rewetting of dry soils and thawing of frozen soils are short-term, transitional phenomena in terms of hydrology and thermodynamics in soil systems. The impact of these short-term phenomena on larger-scale ecosystem fluxes has only recently been fully appreciated, and a growing number of studies show that these events affect various biogeochemical processes including fluxes of biogenic gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and nitric oxide (NO). Global climate models predict that future climatic change is likely to alter the frequency and intensity of drying-rewetting events and thawing of frozen soils, highlighting the importance of understanding how rewetting and thawing will influence biogenic gas fluxes. Here we summarize findings in an acquired database from 338 studies conducted from 1956-2010, and propose future research questions. Studies have reported conflicting results, ranging from large increases in gas fluxes to non-significant changes following rewetting and thawing in various terrestrial ecosystems. An analysis of published data revealed that CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes increase 7.6 (standard error 1.1) times following rewetting and thawing with no significant difference between these events. We explore possible mechanisms and controls that regulate flux responses, and note that there is a lack of studies on variation of CH{sub 4}, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes following rewetting and thawing events. High temporal resolution of flux measurements is critical to capture rapid changes in the gas fluxes after these soil perturbations. Finally, we propose that future studies should investigate the interactions between biological (i.e., microbial community) and physical (i.e., gas production, flux, and dissolution) changes in biogenic gas fluxes, and explore synergistic experimental and modelling approaches.

  18. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Quarterly report, August 16, 1989--November 15, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this task is to accurately measure the elongation and shrinkage exhibited by coal as it sorbs and desorbs methane gas at elevated pressure. Our research group has discussed several possible methods to measure this strain, including: optical microscopy, laser interferometry, conventional strain gauges, and LVDT strain gauges. There are advantages and disadvantages of each method. We had planned to use optical microscopy but, on further investigation, this approach will be less satisfactory than the strain gauge method. Accordingly, we have switched our focws to the use of strain gauges. Conventional strain gauges also involve potential problems which must be overcome, including: (1) Contrast in strength between the coal and the strain gauge must be minimized, (2) The proper glue that is neither too strong or too weak must be used to affix the strain gauge to the coal or the strain in the coal will not be accurately transmitted to the gauge, and (3) We must be aware that the total strain in the coal may not be homogeneously distributed through the specimen (due either either to boundary effects or contrast in composition of the coal layers). A high pressure chamber for sorption-strain experiments is currently being tested an modified and tested. The chamber will accommodate several small blocks of coal simultaneously. This will optimize efficiency, owing to the long times required to reequilibrate the coal blocks to changes in methane pressure.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Vadose Zone Research Park Geohydrological Monitoring Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristine Baker

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vadose zone lithology, hydrological characterization of interbed sediments, and hydrological data from subsurface monitoring of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center wastewater infiltration are presented. Three-dimensional subsurface lithology of the vadose zone beneath the Vadose Zone Research Park is represented in a 2 dimensional (2 D) diagram showing interpolated lithology between monitoring wells. Laboratory-measured values for saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity are given for three major interbeds, denoted as the B BC interbed (20 to 35 m bls), the C D interbed (40 to 45 m bls), and the DE 1 2 interbed (55 to 65 m bls), along with an overall physical description of the sediments and geologic depositional environments. Pre-operational pore water pressure conditions are presented to show the presence and location of perched water zones before pond discharge at the New Percolation Ponds. Subsurface infiltration conditions during initial high-volume discharge are presented to show water arrival times and arrival sequences. Steady-state conditions are then presented to show formation and locations of perched water zones and recharge sources after several months of discharge to the New Percolation Ponds.

  20. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradient, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elrod, David Alan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL RESULTS FOR LEAKAGE, PRESSURE GRADIENT, AND ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS FOR TAPERED ANNULAR GAS SEALS A Thesis by DAVID ALAN ELROD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... FOR TAPERED ANNULAR GAS SEALS A Thesis by DAVID ALAN ELROD Approved as to style and content by: Dar a Childs (Co-Chair of Committee) Clayton Ne son (C -Chair of Committee) Der aid Hantfiel (Member ) W. D. Tun ner (Head of Department) December 1986...

  1. Developments in flue gas cleanup research at the Federal Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Hargis, R.A.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.S.; O`Dowd, W.J.; Warzinski, R.P.; Yeh, J.T.; Scierka, S.J.; Granite, E.J. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A major research effort in the cleanup of flue gas, which is produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, is being conducted by the in-house research program at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Novel technologies being developed can abate sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), hazardous air pollutants (also referred to as air toxics), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas. Laws within the US mandate the control of some of these pollutants and the initial characterization of others, while potential new regulations impact the status of others. Techniques that can control one or more of the targeted pollutants in an environmentally and economically acceptable manner are of prime interest. Past efforts have included low-temperature dry scrubbing SO{sub 2} removal techniques that typically use a calcium or sodium-based disposable sorbent either in a spray drying mode or in a duct injection mode of operation; novel techniques for enhancing sorbent utilization in conventional wet or dry scrubbing processes; and control of emissions produced from small-scale combustors (residential or commercial-size) that burn coal or coal/sorbent briquettes. Recent research at FETC has focused on investigations of air toxics produced by burning various coals, with a particular emphasis on the speciation of mercury and the control of the various mercury species; dry, regenerable sorbent processes that use a metal oxide sorbent to simultaneously remove SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}; catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR)-type NO{sub x} control; and the utilization and sequestering of CO{sub 2} removed from flue gas produced by fossil fuel combustion. The research projects range from laboratory-scale work to testing with the combustion products of coal at a scale equivalent to about 0.75 megawatt of electric power generation. An overview and status of the in-house flue gas cleanup projects at FETC are reported.

  2. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  3. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  4. Results for Phase I of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Friederike Bostelmann

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has its own peculiarities, coated particle design, large graphite quantities, different materials and high temperatures that also require other simulation requirements. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the HTR-PM (INET, China). This report summarizes the contributions of the HTGR Methods Simulation group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) up to this point of the CRP. The activities at INL have been focused so far on creating the problem specifications for the prismatic design, as well as providing reference solutions for the exercises defined for Phase I. An overview is provided of the HTGR UAM objectives and scope, and the detailed specifications for Exercises I-1, I-2, I-3 and I-4 are also included here for completeness. The main focus of the report is the compilation and discussion of reference results for Phase I (i.e. for input parameters at their nominal or best-estimate values), which is defined as the first step of the uncertainty quantification process. These reference results can be used by other CRP participants for comparison with other codes or their own reference results. The status on the Monte Carlo modeling of the experimental VHTRC facility is also discussed. Reference results were obtained for the neutronics stand-alone cases (Ex. I-1 and Ex. I-2) using the (relatively new) Monte Carlo code Serpent, and comparisons were performed with the more established Monte Carlo codes MCNP and KENO-VI. For the thermal-fluids stand-alone cases (Ex. I-3 and I-4) the commercial CFD code CFX was utilized to obtain reference results that can be compared with lower fidelity tools.

  5. Basic research model of gas combustion in turbulent flow. Annual report, 1 June 1988-30 June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahm, W.J.A.; Tryggvason, G.; Krasny, R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the development currently underway of a basic research model for gas combustion in turbulent flow. The model being developed is fundamentally different from the conventional types of turbulence models currently in use for flame calculations, both in terms of the underlying physical approximations made and in the numerical techniques used to implement them. The present approach is based on the idea that many of the precise and detailed fine scale processes at work in turbulent combustion have a simple self-similar structure, and as a result do not need to be continually recomputed in full detail. These can be modeled using results from recent experimental research into the fine scales of turbulent flows. Results obtained to date from this model have been carefully compared with finite difference simulations of the full governing equations for several simple test cases, and show that even complex and highly nonlinear phenomena such as local extinction of reactions in the flow field are correctly reproduced by the model. The model directly incorporates the strong coupling between the fluid dynamics and combustion chemistry in the flame. Work presently underway is incorporating volume source effects into the model.

  6. 2008 New Mexico State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    2008 New Mexico State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results Status: Submitted Date Submitted: 06/08/09 2008 New Mexico State University Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results 1. Executive Summary I. Report Overview New Mexico

  7. Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

  8. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  9. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO2 particle fuel up to about 10% FIMA and 1150°C, UO2 fuel is known to have limitations because of CO formation and kernel migration at the high burnups, power densities, temperatures, and temperature gradients that may be encountered in the prismatic modular HTGRs. With uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel, the kernel composition is engineered to prevent CO formation and kernel migration, which are key threats to fuel integrity at higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients. Furthermore, the recent poor fuel performance of UO2 TRISO fuel pebbles measured in Chinese irradiation testing in Russia and in German pebbles irradiated at 1250°C, and historic data on poorer fuel performance in safety testing of German pebbles that experienced burnups in excess of 10% FIMA [1] have each raised concern about the use of UO2 TRISO above 10% FIMA and 1150°C and the degree of margin available in the fuel system. This continues to be an active area of study internationally.

  10. The deployment of urban logistics solutions from research, development and pilot results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The deployment of urban logistics solutions from research, development and pilot results Lessons logistics solutions is one of the main pending questions in the field of urban goods transport research demonstration project, this paper presents the main issues related to the deployment of urban logistics

  11. Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R. D.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, and biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparcity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected sections of this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  12. Applications of Nd:YAG laser micromanufacturing in High Temperature Gas Reactor research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. J. van Rooyen; C. A. Smal; J. Steyn; H. Greyling

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two innovative applications of Nd:YAG laser micromachining techniques are demonstrated in this publication. Research projects to determine the fission product transport mechanisms in TRISO coated particles necessitate heat treatment studies as well as the manufacturing of a unique sealed system for experimentation at very high temperatures. This article describes firstly the design and creation of an alumina jig designed to contain 500 {mu}m diameter ZrO2 spheres intended for annealing experiments at temperatures up to 1600 C. Functional requirements of this jig are the precision positioning of spheres for laser ablation, welding and post weld heat treatment in order to ensure process repeatability and accurate indexing of individual spheres. The design challenges and the performance of the holding device are reported. Secondly the manufacture of a sealing system using laser micromachining is reported. ZrO2 micro plugs isolate the openings of micro-machined cavities to produce a gas-tight seal fit for application in a high temperature environment. The technique is described along with a discussion of the problems experienced during the sealing process. Typical problems experienced were seating dimensions and the relative small size ({approx} 200 {mu}m) of these plugs that posed handling challenges. Manufacturing processes for both the tapered seating cavity and the plug are demonstrated. In conclusion, this article demonstrates the application of Nd-YAG micromachining in an innovative way to solve practical research problems.

  13. Microsoft Word - 4Q2012_Gas PW_Samp_Results.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENaturalWater Vapor in GasMonitoring

  14. THE SMALL ISOLATED GAS-RICH IRREGULAR DWARF (SIGRID) GALAXY SAMPLE: DESCRIPTION AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Jerjen, Helmut [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Meurer, Gerhardt R., E-mail: david@mso.anu.edu.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, M468, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an optically unbiased selection process based on the HIPASS neutral hydrogen survey, we have selected a sample of 83 spatially isolated, gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the southern hemisphere with cz between 350 and 1650 km s{sup -1}, and with R-band luminosities and H I masses less than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The sample is an important population of dwarf galaxies in the local universe, all with ongoing star formation, and most of which have no existing spectroscopic data. We are measuring the chemical abundances of these galaxies, using the integral-field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope, the Wide-Field Spectrograph. This paper describes our survey criteria and procedures, lists the survey sample, and reports on initial observations.

  15. Access to DOE Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Expanded |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 of 5)

  16. Design and initial results from a kilojoule level dense plasma focus with hollow anode and cylindrically symmetric gas puff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellsworth, J. L., E-mail: ellsworth7@llnl.gov; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.; Schmidt, A.; Guethlein, G.; Hawkins, S.; Rusnak, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and built a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Z-pinch device using a kJ-level capacitor bank and a hollow anode, and fueled by a cylindrically symmetric gas puff. Using this device, we have measured peak deuteron beam energies of up to 400 keV at 0.8 kJ capacitor bank energy and pinch lengths of ?6 mm, indicating accelerating fields greater than 50 MV/m. Neutron yields of on the order of 10{sup 7} per shot were measured during deuterium operation. The cylindrical gas puff system permitted simultaneous operation of DPF with a radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator for beam-into-plasma experiments. This paper describes the machine design, the diagnostic systems, and our first results.

  17. Planck intermediate results. CV. Evidence of unbound gas from the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kitaura, F; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Ma, Y -Z; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mak, D S Y; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Puget, J -L; Puisieux, S; Rachen, J P; Racine, B; Reach, W T; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wang, W; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By looking at the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ) in Planck nominal mission data, we present a significant detection of baryons participating in large-scale bulk flows around central galaxies (CGs) at redshift $z\\approx 0.1$. We estimate the pairwise momentum of the kSZ temperature fluctuations at the positions of the CGC (Central Galaxy Catalogue) samples extracted from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7) data. For the foreground-cleaned maps, we find $1.8$-$2.5\\sigma$ detections of the kSZ signal, which are consistent with the kSZ evidence found in individual Planck raw frequency maps, although lower than found in the WMAP-9yr W band ($3.3\\sigma$). We further reconstruct the peculiar velocity field from the CG density field, and compute for the first time the cross-correlation function between kSZ temperature fluctuations and estimates of CG radial peculiar velocities. This correlation function yields a $3.0$-$3.7$$\\sigma$ detection of the peculiar motion of extended gas on Mpc scales, in flows correlated...

  18. Evaluation of oil palm research and the dissemination of its results in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agiobenebo, T.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation evaluates public investment in oil palm research and the dissemination of research results in Nigeria using the economic surplus technique adapted to suit the specific setting in which these activities are carried out. The issues raised include: (1) development of appropriate test of investment effectiveness suitable for appraising public investment in hybrid palm research and extension; (2) specification and econometric estimation of supply and demand functions for oil and kernels; (3) computation of the social returns to research; (4) sensitivity of returns to variations in extraction rates for both oil and kernels; (5) sensitivity of returns to research to types of supply shift; and (6) isolation of qualitative implications for public policy with respect to maximum exploitation of the economic opportunities offered by the knowledge generated by oil palm research. The author found that investments in hybrid palm research and extension are socially profitable under a wide range of conditions. The returns to research and related activities were computed and reported by periods according to the data situation and accrued, expected and total benefits over the investment.

  19. Results of gas-fired flash-smelting tests. Phase 1-3. Topical technical report, November 1987-April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pusateri, J.F.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural gas-fired burner for the HRD FLAME REACTOR Process was designed and successfully tested on over 450 tons of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) dust, and over a wide range of operating conditions. The coal/coke-fired FLAME REACTOR Process has already been demonstrated as an efficient and economic means of recovering zinc from EAF dust as a salable oxide product, and a salable nonhazardous, iron-rich slag product. The results of the work indicate that the natural gas-fired process has a higher zinc capacity for a given reactor size, with zinc recoveries 5-10 percentage points higher than coal/coke processing at high throughputs. Gas-fired capital costs are about 15% less than coal for a 20,000 STPY EAF dust plant. Smaller plants show even higher break-even costs. Net processing costs are about $100/ton of EAF dust, which is extremely competitive with land-filling and other recycling options.

  20. Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

  1. Summary results of an assessment of research projects in the National Photovoltaics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Research (OER) undertook an assessment of 115 research projects (listed in Appendix A) sponsored by the National Photovoltaics Program. The Program is located within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). This report summarizes the results of that review. The Office of Solar Energy Conversion is responsible for the management of the National Photovoltaics Program. This program focuses on assisting US industry in development of fundamental technology to bring advanced photovoltaic energy systems to commercial use. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the following: (1) the quality of research of individual projects; (2) the impact of these individual projects on the mission of the program; and (3) the priority of future research opportunities.

  2. Over the Energy Edge: Results from a Seven Year New Commercial Buildings Research and Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    Over the Energy Edge: Results from a Seven Year New Commercial Buildings Research and Demonstration is that the actual, installed energy-efficiency measures and building characteristics changed from the design practice rather than assumptions based on the regional building code. For example, the Energy Edge small

  3. Oil and gas seeps, often the result of geological defor-mation of the oil-saturated strata, are a common global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Milton

    1-12 2-1 Oil and gas seeps, often the result of geological defor- mation of the oil, is just one of many seeps found in California. Offshore, seeps are visible on the ocean surface as oil slicks or gas bubbles.As noted by California ResourcesAgency(1971),"Some[seeps]remaindormant for extended

  4. New Global Oil & Gas Hub in Oklahoma City | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selects Oklahoma City Site for New Global Hub of Oil & Gas Technology Innovation Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click...

  5. Oil & Gas Tech Center Breaks Ground in Oklahoma | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    footprint. Given all the energy around the Oil & Gas Technology Center here in Oklahoma City, I thought I'd share with you the top 10 reasons why our team is excited about...

  6. The Potential of Using Natural Gas in HCCI Engines: Results from Zero- and Multi-dimensional Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Junnian

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With the depletion of petroleum based fuels and the corresponding concerns of national energy security issues, natural gas as an alternative fuel in IC engine applications has become an attractive option. Natural gas requires minimum mixture...

  7. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - asme research committee Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -8544 Research Interests Energy Harvesting, Dynamics and Vibration, Control Systems, Vehicle Technologies, Smart... Research Scientist, Department Automation Engineering,...

  9. Gas and liquid fuel system test facilities for research, development, and production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, L.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meeting the challenges associated with the support of both mature product lines and new high flow, high accuracy DLE (dry low emissions) control valves and systems has been complex. This paper deals with the design and capabilities of the gas and liquid test facility at the Woodward Governor Company Turbomachinery Controls in Loveland, Colorado.

  10. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 163, January 1, 2005. Battelle, Assessment of Technologymodel, TANK, was developed by Battelle for the Gas Research93/0186. Prepared by Battelle for Gas Research Institute

  11. First results from the LUX dark matter experiment at the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LUX Collaboration; D. S. Akerib; H. M. Araujo; X. Bai; A. J. Bailey; J. Balajthy; S. Bedikian; E. Bernard; A. Bernstein; A. Bolozdynya; A. Bradley; D. Byram; S. B. Cahn; M. C. Carmona-Benitez; C. Chan; J. J. Chapman; A. A. Chiller; C. Chiller; K. Clark; T. Coffey; A. Currie; A. Curioni; S. Dazeley; L. de Viveiros; A. Dobi; J. Dobson; E. M. Dragowsky; E. Druszkiewicz; B. Edwards; C. H. Faham; S. Fiorucci; C. Flores; R. J. Gaitskell; V. M. Gehman; C. Ghag; K. R. Gibson; M. G. D. Gilchriese; C. Hall; M. Hanhardt; S. A. Hertel; M. Horn; D. Q. Huang; M. Ihm; R. G. Jacobsen; L. Kastens; K. Kazkaz; R. Knoche; S. Kyre; R. Lander; N. A. Larsen; C. Lee; D. S. Leonard; K. T. Lesko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; A. Lyashenko; D. C. Malling; R. Mannino; D. N. McKinsey; D. -M. Mei; J. Mock; M. Moongweluwan; J. Morad; M. Morii; A. St. J. Murphy; C. Nehrkorn; H. Nelson; F. Neves; J. A. Nikkel; R. A. Ott; M. Pangilinan; P. D. Parker; E. K. Pease; K. Pech; P. Phelps; L. Reichhart; T. Shutt; C. Silva; W. Skulski; C. J. Sofka; V. N. Solovov; P. Sorensen; T. Stiegler; K. O`Sullivan; T. J. Sumner; R. Svoboda; M. Sweany; M. Szydagis; D. Taylor; B. Tennyson; D. R. Tiedt; M. Tripathi; S. Uvarov; J. R. Verbus; N. Walsh; R. Webb; J. T. White; D. White; M. S. Witherell; M. Wlasenko; F. L. H. Wolfs; M. Woods; C. Zhang

    2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment, a dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota), was cooled and filled in February 2013. We report results of the first WIMP search dataset, taken during the period April to August 2013, presenting the analysis of 85.3 live-days of data with a fiducial volume of 118 kg. A profile-likelihood analysis technique shows our data to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis, allowing 90% confidence limits to be set on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering with a minimum upper limit on the cross section of $7.6 \\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^{2}$ at a WIMP mass of 33 GeV/c$^2$. We find that the LUX data are in strong disagreement with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of the results from several recent direct detection experiments.

  12. First results from the LUX dark matter experiment at the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akerib, D S; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Bedikian, S; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Clark, K; Coffey, T; Currie, A; Curioni, A; Dazeley, S; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J; Dragowsky, E M; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Flores, C; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C; Hanhardt, M; Hertel, S A; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Kyre, S; Lander, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Leonard, D S; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lyashenko, A; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J; Morii, M; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Nikkel, J A; Ott, R A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Skulski, W; Sofka, C J; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stiegler, T; O`Sullivan, K; Sumner, T J; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Tennyson, B; Tiedt, D R; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J T; White, D; Witherell, M S; Wlasenko, M; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment, a dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota), was cooled and filled in February 2013. We report results of the first WIMP search dataset, taken during the period April to August 2013, presenting the analysis of 85.3 live-days of data with a fiducial volume of 118 kg. A profile-likelihood analysis technique shows our data to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis, allowing 90% confidence limits to be set on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering with a minimum upper limit on the cross section of $7.6 \\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^{2}$ at a WIMP mass of 33 GeV/c$^2$. We find that the LUX data are in strong disagreement with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of the results from several recent direct detection experiments.

  13. PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH SECTION The Physics Education Research Section (PERS) publishes articles describing important results from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Mimi

    of junior-level electricity and magnetism Stephanie V. Chasteen and Steven J. Pollock Science Education to learn physics as a major: upper-division Electricity & Magnetism I (E&M I). While physics educationPHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH SECTION The Physics Education Research Section (PERS) publishes articles

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - army medical research Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waterways Experiment Station Vicksburg, MS Collection: Engineering 2 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

  15. Initial test results from the Department of Energy`s pressurized fluidized bed combustion Hot Gas Cleanup Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, R.A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Alvin, M.A. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Mudd, M.J. [Ohio Power Co., Columbus, OH (United States)]|[American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1989 a cooperative agreement was signed between Ohio Power Company, through its agent the American Electric Power Service Corporation, and the United States Department of Energy to assess the readiness and economic viability of high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) particulate filter systems for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) applications. In this agreement, known as the PFBC Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program, two HTHP particulate filtration systems are to be tested with one seventh of the flow from the Tidd 70-MWe PFBC Clean Coal Demonstration Plant. This paper describes the initial results from the first PFBC HGCU test and an additional proof-of-concept, pilot-scale test used to validate a ceramic candle filter element, which may be used in the second test of the PFBC HGCU Program. The first test consisted of a three-cluster filter system, incorporating 384, 1.5-meter long silicon carbide candle filters. This system utilized a one-seventh flow slipstream, approximately 7360 actual cubic feet per minute, from the Tidd 70-MWe PFBC. The proof-of-concept test is being used to qualify mullite candle filters as a potential candidate for the second test at the Tidd 70-MWe PFBC. Both filter systems were designed and fabricated by the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center.

  16. Digital Pulse-Shape Discrimination Applied to an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System: First Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A new ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (~30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a "self-calibrating" template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed.

  17. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  18. Frost effects on soil liner systems results of a research project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, A.E. [CH2M Hill, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Chamberlain, E.J. [Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, NH (United States); Benson, C.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A research study was completed on the impact of frost action (freeze-thaw) on compacted clay liners, sand-bentonite liners, and geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) under field and laboratory conditions. The goal of the research discussed in this paper was to improve understanding of the effect of freeze-thaw on these parts of liner systems so that design and construction could be improved. The U.S. Army Corps Cold Regions Research Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), CH2M HILL, Inc., and a team of industrial partners joined together in a cooperative effort to fund and complete this study under the U.S. Army Corps Construction Productivity Advancement Research (CPAR) program. IN 1992 and 1993, five large-scale compacted-soil test pads, and nine GCL test pans were constructed at WMX, Inc.`s Parkview Landfill in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Two of the large-scale test pads were constructed of a low-plasticity clay, two were of a medium-plasticity clay, and one was a sand-bentonite mixture manufactured in a mobile mixer onsite. Three different GCL products were used in the GCL test pans. All of these materials were tested in the field for at least one winter; in the CRREL laboratory in Hanover, New Hampshire; and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Results of these tests indicate that the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay increases significantly in the field after one winter of freezing. In laboratory testing, the use of thin-walled shelby tubes changes the clay structure and masks the effect of freeze-thaw. These tests indicated that the detrimental effects of freeze-thaw were reversed by increasing confining pressure. The hydraulic conductivity of the sand-bentonite test pad was found to be below 1x10{sup {minus}8} cm/s after two winter seasons. The GCLs showed no increase in hydraulic conductivity from freeze-thaw action. However, the field test results raised questions that need to be resolved.

  19. Flue Gas Desulfurization Market Research Report 2018 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy InformationFlue Gas

  20. Oil and natural gas reserve prices : addendum to CEEPR WP 03-016 ; including results for 2003 revisions to 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction. A working paper entitled "Oil and Natural Gas Reserve Prices 1982-2002: Implications for Depletion and Investment Cost" was published in October 2003 (cited hereafter as Adelman & Watkins [2003]). Since then ...

  1. Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines...

  2. Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, ...

  3. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Second quarterly report, November 15, 1989--February 15, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, J.R.; Tsay, F.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of sorption capacity of coals by microbalance in a high pressure environment requires that corrections be made for the buoyancy of the gas that is displaced by the solid coal. As the pressure increases, the gas density increases, requiring that a correction factor be applied to the weight of the sample as measured by microbalance. A brief report summarizing this correction is attached as Appendix A.

  4. Review of research results for the photocatalytic oxidation of hazardous wastes in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimlos, M.R.; Wolfrum, E.J.; Gratson, D.A.; Watt, A.S.; Jacoby, W.A.; Turchi, C.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments of gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) at NREL have focused on measurements that can help commercialize this technology for treating gaseous air streams. This effort proceeds earlier NREL work and studies conducted elsewhere which demonstrated the general applicability of PCO. The more recent work has concentrated on: (1) the kinetics of the PCO process; (2) the formation and destruction of intermediates; and (3) possible enhancements to improve the destruction rates. The results from these studies will be used to help design large scale PCO equipment and they will be used to evaluate the economics of the PCO process. For trichloroethylene and ethanol, extensive studies of the rates of destruction have yielded kinetic parameters for the destruction of intermediates as well as the substrate. The kinetics of intermediates is essential for sizing a large scale reactor, as complete conversion to carbon dioxide is often desired. The kinetic data from these laboratory studies has been used for analyzing IT`s pilot PCO reactor and has been used to suggest modifications to this unit. For compounds that are more difficult to destroy (such as the components of BTEX), rate enhancement experiments have been conducted. These compounds represent a very large market for this technology and improvement of the rate of the process should make it competitive. Towards this goal, the enhancement of the destruction of BTEX components have been studied. Experiments have demonstrated that there is a significant increase in the rates of destruction of BTEX with the addition of ozone. Preliminary economic assessments have shown that PCO with ozone may be cost competitive. Future laboratory experiments of PCO will focus on refinements of what has been learned. Rate measurements will also be expanded to include other compounds representing significant markets for the PCO technology.

  5. Recent results of. mu. CF experiments at SIN (Swiss Institute For Nuclear Research)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breunlich, W.H.; Cargnelli, M.; Bistirlich, J.; Crowe, K.M.; Justice, M.; Kurck, J.; Petitjean, C.; Sherman, R.H.; Bossy, H.; Daniel, H.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Important topics concerning Muon Catalyzed Fusion were investigated in experiments at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN), including transient and steady state rates for the main d..mu..t cycle as well as detailed information about the competing d..mu..d and t..mu..t fusion branches. The basic kinetic parameters were determined and striking features of the resonant d..mu..t formation process were revealed (density effect, epithermal behavior). DT sticking was measured with independent techniques, i.e., detection of fusion neutrons as well as ..mu..He x-rays after fusion. Fusion yields per muon of 113 +- 10 were observed at liquid conditions, yields exceeding 200 are anticipated for optimal conditions from our results. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  7. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  8. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  9. Oil & Gas Tech Center Breaks Ground in Oklahoma | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearch & Development »Research Oil10

  10. Post Doctoral Research Fellowship Simulating the greenhouse gas emission from boreal region reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of greenhouse gases from northern boreal reservoirs as part of a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research modified the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model to simulate the exchange of CO2 between boreal by the creation of reservoirs for the production of hydro-electricity. We have recently developed a water column

  11. Initial results from the Pawnee Eddy Correlation system for dry acid-deposition research. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stedman, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pawnee Grassland Eddy Correlation Dry Deposition Project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with: previously observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO/sub 2/ and NOx; micrometeorological theory; micrometeorological site characteristics.

  12. Analytical description of a trapped semi-ideal Bose-Gas One focus of research on dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensates is the study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Einstein condensates is the study of thermodynamic quantities such as the transition temperature to Bose-Einstein condensation, and the condensate fraction. In particular, for the dilute gas Bose condensates, the weak of interactions on a trapped partially condensed gas using an intuitive and accessible description

  13. Factors that affect fracture fluid clean-up and pressure buildup test results in tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Kevin Todd

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Backflow of Injected Liquids, Lf = 750 ft. , Cr = 1. 0, k = 0. 01 md. 70 The Effect of Capillary Pressure on Gas/Water Ratio Lf = 750 it. , Cr = 1. 0, k = 0. 01 md. Gas and Water Pressure Profiles for a Fracture, Damage Zone, and Reservoir System..., ft. CREATED FRACTURE LENGTH, ft. 250, 750 378, 1150 DIMENSIONLESS FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY 0. 1, 1. 0, 10. 0, 100. 0 19 Z 0 a 0 IZ III Z III III Q K O IK 4 I III III 0 g N O O O CO O O ill O O O O O Cl O N O O O O O ISd '3BASS...

  14. Oil and Gas Technology at Rio de Janeiro | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearch & DevelopmentTechnology &

  15. Oil and Natural Gas Program Commericialized Technologies and Significant Research Accomplishments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearch & DevelopmentTechnology

  16. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

  17. Nuclear fuels technologies Fiscal Year 1996 research and development test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, C.A.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Farish, T.J.; Hanrahan, R.J.; Ramsey, K.B.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1996, the Department of Energy`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) funded Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate issues associated with the fabrication of plutonium from dismantled weapons into mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel for disposition in nuclear power reactors. These issues can be divided into two main categories: issues associated with the fact that the plutonium from dismantled weapons contains gallium, and issues associated with the unique characteristics of the PuO[sub 2] produced by the dry conversion process that OFMD is proposing to convert the weapons material. Initial descriptions of the experimental work performed in fiscal year 1996 to address these issues can be found in Nuclear Fuels Technologies Fiscal Year 1996 Research and Development Test Matrices. However, in some instances the change in programmatic emphasis towards the Parallex program either altered the manner in which some of these experiments were performed (i.e., the work was done as part of the Parallex fabrication development and not as individual separate-effects tests as originally envisioned) or delayed the experiments into Fiscal Year 1997. This report reviews the experiments that were conducted and presents the results.

  18. Sudipto Das RESEARCH STATEMENT Summer 2011 Data drives knowledge which engenders innovation. Be it personalizing search results, recommending movies or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    research. My research philosophy is to build database management systems (DBMSs) designed for large scale, the ability to autonomically load balance and scale up and down the number of nodes in the system (elasticity detailed level possible, resulting in massive and ever-growing data repositories. Such massive scale

  19. Research | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PV thrust, weSoftware|

  20. Research and development of a high efficiency gas-fired water heater. Volume 2. Task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilakis, A.D.; Pearson, J.F.; Gerstmann, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and development of a cost-effective high efficiency gas-fired water heater to attain a service efficiency of 70% (including the effect of exfiltration) and a service efficiency of 78% (excluding exfiltration) for a 75 GPD draw at a 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, with a stored water to conditioned air temperature difference of 80/sup 0/F, are described in detail. Based on concept evaluation, a non-powered natural draft water heater was chosen as the most cost-effective design to develop. The projected installed cost is $374 compared to $200 for a conventional unit. When the project water heater is compared to a conventional unit, it has a payback of 3.7 years and life cycle savings of $350 to the consumer. A prototype water heater was designed, constructed, and tested. When operated with sealed combustion, the unit has a service efficiency of 66.4% (including the effect of exfiltration) below a burner input of 32,000 Btu/h. In the open combustion configuration, the unit operated at a measured efficiency of 66.4% Btu/h (excluding exfiltration). This compares with a service efficiency of 51.3% for a conventional water heater and 61% for a conventional high efficiency unit capable of meeting ASHRAE 90-75. Operational tests showed the unit performed well with no evidence of stacking or hot spots. It met or exceeded all capacity or usage tests specified in the program test plan and met all emission goals. Future work will concentrate on designing, building, and testing pre-production units. It is anticipated that both sealed combustion and open draft models will be pursued.

  1. Natural gas repowering experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bautista, P.J.; Fay, J.M. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Gerber, F.B. [BENTEK Energy Research, DeSoto, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Research Institute has led a variety of projects in the past two years with respect to repowering with natural gas. These activities, including workshops, technology evaluations, and market assessments, have indicated that a significant opportunity for repowering exists. It is obvious that the electric power industry`s restructuring and the actual implementation of environmental regulations from the Clean Air Act Amendments will have significant impact on repowering with respect to timing and ultimate size of the market. This paper summarizes the results and implications of these activities in repowering with natural gas. It first addresses the size of the potential market and discusses some of the significant issues with respect to this market potential. It then provides a perspective on technical options for repowering which are likely to be competitive in the current environment. Finally, it addresses possible actions by the gas industry and GRI to facilitate development of the repowering market.

  2. Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine Transportation Research PIER Transportation of natural gas vehicles as a clean alternative is currently limited to smaller engine displacements and spark ignition, which results in lower performance. A large displacement natural gas engine has

  3. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Eighth quarterly report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, J.R.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure chamber with a microbalance inside was designed and constructed for the purpose of measuring weight changes due to gas sorption at increasing pressure steps from 0 to 1000 psig. The raw weight changes recorded during the experiments had to be corrected for buoyancy and sample swelling. As the pressure in the balance chamber increases, the buoyancy forces tend to increase. The data were corrected and examined on the basis of five different sets of assumptions. At high pressures gas volumes measured have to be corrected for compressibility. The experimental data was analysed using five cases. The different cases were developed with certain assumptions. The five cases and the equations involved in each of them are discussed here.

  4. Formation of gas-phase peroxides in a rural atmosphere: An interpretation of the recent SOS/SERON field results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.H.; Tang, I.N. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Weinstein-Lloyd, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Old Westbury, NY (United States). Chemistry/Physics Dept.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen perioxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and certain organic peroxides such as hydroxymethyl-hydroperoxide (HMHP), are gas-phase oxidants present in the atmosphere at ppbv concentration levels. These oxidants play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. In addition, precipitation containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is toxic to trees, and it has also been suggested that organic peroxides formed presumably by ozone reactions with biogenic alkenes are responsible for leaf disorders. Recently, we have developed a nonenzymatic method or aqueous-phase H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measurement, using Fenton reagent and fluorescent hydroxy- benzoic acid. The new method, in conjunction with the well-known method of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and horseradish peroxidase for total peroxides, and together with an improved gas scrubber to mitigate sampling line problems, has been successfully deployed in recent SOS/SERON field measurements in rural Georgia. For the first time, continuously measured and speciated gas-phase peroxide data have become available, making it possible to examine some aspects of the ozone chemistry leading to the formation of these oxidants. It is observed that daily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} maximum frequently occurs at a different time than does HMHP, and that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, but not HMHP, tends to correlate with solar fluxes measured at the same location. These findings seem to indicate that the formation mechanisms for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides are basically different. It is likely that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed from radical-radical recombination, while HMHP is formed by ozone-alkene reactions. Since the gas-phase ozone-alkene reactions are usually too slow to account for the diurnal concentration variations observed for HMHP, heterogeneous processes involving ozone and alkenes are also a possibility.

  5. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

  6. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  7. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Research for Real-World Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Dec. 17, 2014, featured Eric Werling, Building America Program Coordinator, providing an overview of key Building America accomplishments, current research focus areas, and future strategies for advancing market adoption of energy efficient building technologies and practices.

  8. Researchers are working towards fabricating state-of-the-art artificial lungs using gas-permeable materials containing myriads of microchannels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    Researchers are working towards fabricating state-of-the-art artificial lungs using gas function of most internal organs (e.g., lungs, kidneys, liver, and pancreas) is the transport of chemical of artificial organs, of which lungs are the primary target. Organ function replacements devices that contain

  9. Measured Results for a New Hole-Pattern Annular Gas Seal Incorporating Larger Diameter Holes, Comparisons to Results for a Traditional Hole-Pattern Seal and Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vannarsdall, Michael Lloyd

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    damping for 0.2 mm (8 mils), three PR, high inlet preswirl, and 20,200 RPM .......................................................................................................... 95 Figure 63. Effective damping for 0.2 mm (8 mils), PR=0.4, three....1 General Comments about Data ............................................................................. 47 6.2 Experimental Results ............................................................................................ 53 6.3 Experimental Results...

  10. The Effect of Gas Absorption on the Scattered Radiation in the Solar Almucantar: Results of Numerical Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,Audit ReportThe EECBG Program:Gas

  11. Developing an Online Tool for Delivering Research Results: An Update to the Oregon Department of Transportation's Crash Reduction Factor Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Developing an Online Tool for Delivering Research Results: An Update to the Oregon Department interactive online report (tool) can produce results that are easier for the user to access of Transportation's crash reduction factor (CRF) database were incorporated into an online tool. The paper describes

  12. Research results from the Ashland Exploration, Inc., Ford Motor Company 80 (COOP 2) well, Pike County, KY. Topical report, October 1991-November 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, J.H.; Lancaster, D.E.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the work performed on the Ashland Exploration, Inc. (AEI) Ford Motor Company 80 (COOP 2) well in Pike County, KY. The COOP 2 was the second well in a three-well research project being conducted by GRI in eastern Kentucky targeting both the Devonian Shales and the Berea Sand; the FMC 80 focused on the Berea. The primary objective of the research was to use and transfer technologies developed in GRI`s Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales programs to evaluate the Berea in Pike Co., KY.

  13. Effect of Blade Torsion on Modeling Results for the Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT): Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Hansen, A. C.; Minnema, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes modeling results from both the FAST and ADAMS aeroelastic simulators characterizing small wind turbine loads and dynamic behavior.

  14. Predictive building automation Research results from a field trial Special event in Allschwil, Thursday, September 20, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Predictive building automation ­ Research results from a field trial Special event in Allschwil-efficient control while maintaining a high level of comfort for the building users. Predictive building automation of computer simulations. The project partners focused on the so-called integrated room automation, which deals

  15. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 3.4 -- Hot-gas cleaning. Topical report (includes semiannual report for January--June 1995)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, G.F.; Swanson, M.L.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of three subtasks completed in support of the current and future hot-gas cleanup activities at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The overall objective of the EERC hot-gas cleanup task is to develop reliable methods to remove particulate matter from high-temperature, high-pressure gas streams produced from coal combustion and/or gasification. Near-term task objectives include (1) design, fabrication, and assembly of a high-temperature, high-pressure bench-scale filter vessel; (2) design, fabrication, and assembly of a high-temperature, high-pressure sampling train; and (3) the preliminary design of a pilot-scale high-temperature, high-pressure filter vessel and support systems. Bench-scale hot-gas filter research will be performed with the pressurized fluid-bed reactor (PFBR) or the continuous fluid-bed reactor (CFBR) and a hot-gas filter vessel. The objectives of future work with the bench-scale system will be to determine particulate and vapor-phase alkali degradation of candidate ceramic filter structures as well as filter performance relative to particulate collection efficiency, differential pressure, and filter cleanability. Construction of the high-temperature, high-pressure sampling system was intended to support bench- and pilot-scale activities with respect to conventional particulate sampling (total mass and particle-size distribution) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) sampling. Finally, pilot-scale tests will be performed to evaluate filter performance and determine alkali corrosion of ceramic materials with a hot-gas filter vessel attached to the EERC Transport Reactor Development Unit (TRDU).

  16. Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novak, C.F. [ed.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

  17. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  18. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  19. Atmospheric and climatic consequences of a major nuclear war: Results of recent research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golitsyn, G.S.; MacCracken, M.C.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last several years, comprehensive three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models, including detailed parametric formulations of a wide range of climatologically significant processes, have been applied to study the potential consequences of a major nuclear war involving the injection of smoke which could result from the large-scale fires ignited by such an exchange. For plausible smoke injections during the warm season of the year, all model calculations suggest that a significant climatic perturbation would result. In the lower range of smoke injection scenarios (producing of order 10 Tg of highly carbonaceous smoke), smoke would act primarily to inhibit convection and rainfall, especially over land areas, including possibly some disruption of the summer monsoon. The upper range of smoke scenarios (of order 100 Tg of highly carbonaceous smoke) would cause not only rapid and sharp decreases in land temperature and precipitation (a mid-latitude average land-temperature drop of the order of 20/sup 0/C, up to perhaps twice this amount in continental interiors), but also seems likely to leave enough smoke in the atmosphere to persist into the following warm season, inducing a cooling of several degrees.

  20. A comparison of experimental results and theoretical predictions for the rotordynamic coefficients of stepped annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Mark Stephen

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FLOV r eser volr (o, ) sump (lo) Fig. 3. Cross-section of stepped annular seal. CHAPTER II STEP SEAL THEORY Fleming [2] developed a, bulk-flow solution for the rotordynamic coeffi- cients for stepped (figure 3) and tapered (figure 4) liquid seals.... His work showed that the use of a, taper or a step resulted in significant increases in the direct stiffness over the corresponding straight seal. However, Fleming's anal- ysis neglects the circumferential velocity. Childs [3, 4] developed a finite...

  1. Description and commissioning of NEXT-MM prototype: first results from operation in a Xenon-Trimethylamine gas mixture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Álvarez, V; Borges, F I G M; Calvet, D; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Druillole, F; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Giomataris, I; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Coguie, A Le; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Martínez-Lema, G; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Mols, J P; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot-Guinot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical description of NEXT-MM and its commissioning and first performance is reported. Having an active volume of ~35 cm drift $\\times$ 28 cm diameter, it constitutes the largest Micromegas-read TPC operated in Xenon ever constructed, made by a sectorial arrangement of the 4 largest single wafers manufactured with the Microbulk technique to date. It is equipped with a suitably pixelized readout and with a sufficiently large sensitive volume (~23 l) so as to contain long (~20 cm) electron tracks. First results obtained at 1 bar for Xenon and trimethylamine (Xe-(2 %)TMA) mixture are presented. The TPC can accurately reconstruct extended background tracks. An encouraging full-width half-maximum of 11.6 % was obtained for ~29 keV gammas without resorting to any data post-processing.

  2. Key Research Results Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as: · Methods to significantly improve lighting power densities and building envelopes · Detailed

  3. Key Research Results Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    market. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency Transparent Conductors Have Potential for Thin-Film Photovoltaics Possible alternatives to transparent-film photovoltaics (PV). Networks made of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), metallic NWs, and graphene thin

  4. Letter Report for Analytical Results for five Swipe Samples from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility, Muskegon Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Wade

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received five swipe samples on December 10, 2013 from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility in Norton Shores, Michigan. The samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14 according to the NRC Form 303 supplied with the samples. The sample identification numbers are presented in Table 1 and the tritium and carbon-14 results are provided in Table 2. The pertinent procedure references are included with the data tables.

  5. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  6. Unaccounted-for gas; Lost or just misplaced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstead, J.R.; Cowgill, R.M. (Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (US))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lost and unaccounted for gas is the term used by the gas industry to define the difference between the quantity of gas received into and delivered out of a system over a specific period of time. For Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG and E) the gas is not really lost, just misplaced. The proper term is unaccounted for gas (UAF). PG and E has conducted a comprehensive research project to evaluate UAF on its gas transmission and distribution systems. This project was cofunded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI). GRI's involvement was directed, by Kirin Kothari, Manager of Metering and Operations Research. While PG and E's work began as a reaction to state regulatory agency concerns, this work will be invaluable to the rest of the gas industry in that it provides results and, more importantly, methodologies for the gas utility industry to use in taking the lead with regulatory agencies and with the energy industry regarding: Prudence of the UAF aspects of operations, Equity of allocation of UAF costs to various customer classes, Support for the position that the gas industry's contribution to the country's unburned methane emissions is small.

  7. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, M. C.; Griffith, P. J.; Kreevoy, E. P.; Turner, III, H. J.; Tatman, D. A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project.

  8. Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netter, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

  9. Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: Hot-Gas Filtration; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, R.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypothesis that was tested in this task was that separation of char, with its associated mineral matter from pyrolysis vapors before condensation, will lead to improved oil quality and stability with respect to storage and transportation. The metric used to evaluate stability in this case was a 10-fold reduction in the rate of increase of viscosity as determined by ASTM D445 (the accelerated aging test). The primary unit operation that was investigated for this purpose was hot-gas filtration. A custom-built heated candle filter system was fabricated by the Pall Corporation and furnished to NREL for this test campaign. This system consisted of a candle filter element in a containment vessel surrounded by heating elements on the external surface of the vessel. The filter element and housing were interfaced to NREL?s existing 0.5 MTD pyrolysis Process Development Unit (PDU). For these tests the pyrolysis reactor of the PDU was operated in the entrained-flow mode. The HGF test stand was installed on a slipstream from the PDU so that both hot-gas filtered oil and bio-oil that was not hot-gas filtered could be collected for purposes of comparison. Two filter elements from Pall were tested: (1) porous stainless steel (PSS) sintered metal powder; (2) sintered ceramic powder. An extremely sophisticated bio-oil condensation and collection system was designed and fabricated at NREL and interfaced to the filter unit.

  10. Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    to generation and propagation of noise from gas turbine engines. Aircraft noise is a critical technical issueReport Title: A brief history of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise and systems engineering, gas turbine transmission systems and gas turbine noise. The UTC in gas turbine noise

  11. Results of the radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania (ANK001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed on November 12, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally [sup 238]U, as a result of work done for the Manhattan Engineer District in 1944. The survey included measurement of direct alpha and beta-gamma levels in the northeast comer of the basement of Building 29, and the collection of a debris sample from a floor drain for radionuclide analysis. The survey area was used for experimental canning of uranium slugs prior to production activities at the former New Kensington Works nearby.

  12. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Mixed-Humid Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Mixed-Humid Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

  13. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  14. Eastern Gas Shales Program. Completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority Wells Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rdissi, A.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate the potential of the Devonian Shales as a source of natural gas, DOE/METC in Morgantown, West Virginia, has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shale Program (EGSP); not only to characterize and identify the resource, but also to enhance and improve the productivity of wells completed in the shale. One of the methods used to achieve improved productivity is hydraulic fracturing and, more specifically, foam fracturing. The efforts by DOE/METC included completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) wells; located in western Allegany County and southwestern Cattaraugus County, New York. The five wells were drilled on high shcool and college properties during the months of June and July 1981. DOE/METC's contribution to the program funded the stimulation and completion of the wells. This work was done under the engineering and field supervision of Gruy Federal, Inc. as contractor to DOE. The completion work took place in the months of July and August 1981. This consisted of running a cement bond log in each well. All logs showed good bonding. This was followed by perforating the Marcellus Shale through the 4-1/2-inch casing. During the next phase, the formation was broken down with 1500 gallons of regular HF acid and, then, foam fractured using 50,000 gallons of foam consisting of water and nitrogen; the fractures were propped with 60,000 pounds of sand. After the cleanout operations, open flow potentials and rock pressures were measured in each well. None of the wells had a gas show before fracturing but, after fracturing, open flow ranged from a low of 19 Mcf/D to a high of 73 Mcf/D. 1 reference, 6 figures, 1 table.

  15. The Gas/Electric Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as this occurs. Through an Electric Power Research Institute initiative, an inter-industry organization, the Gas/Electric Partnership, has formed between the electric utilities and gas pipelines. The initial focus of this partnership is to explore issues...

  16. Development of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, E.; Tanaka, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Japan)] [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Japan); Toda, K.; Ikeda, M.; Teranishi, T.; Inaba, M.; Yanari, T. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)] [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of population and business activities result in high electricity demand in urban areas. This requires the construction of large-capacity underground substations. Oilless, non-flammable and non-explosive equipment is recommended for underground substations. Therefore, several types of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer have been developed. Because the gas forced cooling type was considered to be available up to approximately 60 MVA, all of these gas-insulated transformers are liquid cooled. But the liquid cooling type has the disadvantage of a complex structure for liquid cooling. For this reason, the authors have been studying the development of a simple design for a gas forced cooling, large-capacity gas-insulated transformer. This paper discusses research and development of cooling and insulation technology for a large-capacity gas-insulated transformer and the development of a 275 kV, 300 MVA gas-insulated transformer.

  17. Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Access to different pore structure evaluation techniques including low pressure nitrogen adsorptionAustralian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee Unconventional Gas Research Group of natural gas in many countries. According to recent assessments, Australia has around 437 trillion cubic

  18. Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

  19. LOCA simulation in the national research universal reactor program: postirradiation examination results for the third materials experiment (MT-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, W.N.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. The third materials experiment (MT-3) was the sixth in the series of thermal-hydraulic and materials deformation/rutpure experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The main objective of the experiment was to evaluate ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling in the temperature range from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F (1030 to 1090 K). The 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 550 psi (3.8 MPa) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 of the rods ruptured, with an average peak bundle strain of approx. 55%. The UKAEA also funded destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) of several of the ruptured rods from the MT-3 experiment. This report describes the work performed and presents the PIE results. Information obtained during the PIE included cladding thickness measurements metallography, and particle size analysis of the cracked and broken fuel pellets.

  20. Measure Guideline: High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.; Rose, W.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Measure Guideline covers installation of high-efficiency gas furnaces. Topics covered include when to install a high-efficiency gas furnace as a retrofit measure, how to identify and address risks, and the steps to be used in the selection and installation process. The guideline is written for Building America practitioners and HVAC contractors and installers. It includes a compilation of information provided by manufacturers, researchers, and the Department of Energy as well as recent research results from the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Building America team.

  1. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  2. Cooperative research on the combustion characteristics of cofired desulfurized Illinois coal and char with natural gas. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckius, R.O.; Wu, Cheng-Kang; Krier, H.; Peters, J.E. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The DTFF is extended to larger sample collecting capability and higher temperatures, resulting in the establishment of the Ash Characterization Facility and the High Temperature Drop Tube Furnace. The Ash Characterization Facility enables continuous coal injection and sampling under controlled conditions. Several hundred milligrams of char or ash can be collected in one-half hour. The High Temperature Drop Tube Furnace uses a plasma torch to preheat the gas to over 2000 K and inject it into a ceramic tube which enters a furnace designed for 1700{degrees}C (1973 K) operation, so that temperatures and heating rates encountered by pulverized coal particles in the flames of large boilers or in the advanced slagging cyclone combustors can be simulated. An aerodynamic coal feeder works well in supplying coal continuously to the drop tube. A watercooled, Helium-quench sampling probe collects the solid samples. A scanning electron microscope is used to study the morphology of ash and char particles. A sulfur determinator, a gas chromatograph provide analytical means in the laboratory, and the Illinois State Geological Survey performs other necessary analyses of the samples. Tests on cofiring coal with I to 4% methane show that sulfur retention in ash was related to temperature and residence time. The addition of methane caused changes in gas temperature profile in the tube and also changes in chemical composition of the gases. The overall effect on sulfur retention is seen to be a result of several complex interacting factors. Further detailed studies are necessary to clarify the contribution of each factor and to provide clues to the mechanism of the process.

  3. Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagan, Colin R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimates shown here for Marcellus gas are similar toGreenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_.research- ers acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production

  4. Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (orifice meter studies). Volume 2B. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godkin, B.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Wlasenko, R.G.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. Activities and methods are described and results are presented for research conducted on orifice meter accuracy. The Measurement Task Force determined that orifice metering inaccuracies were the largest single contributor to 1987 UAF.

  5. Basic research model of natural gas combustion in turbulent flow. Phase 2, Annual report, 1 August 1991-31 July 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahm, W.J.A.; Tryggvason, G.; Krasny, R.

    1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes progress made in the past twelve months in developing a local integral method (LIM) model for numerically simulating natural gas mixing and combustion in complex flames. The LIM model is fundamentally different from conventional approaches for numerically simulating combustion in turbulent flames. It is based on the experimental observation that the strain-diffusion balance which establishes the mixing and reaction scales in turbulent flames leads to a self-similar internal structure in the diffusion-reaction layers which does not need to be continually re-computed. Instead, these diffusion and reaction scales are represented by a set of self-similar profile shapes whose moments are allowed to evolve freely to satisfy the governing equations. The resulting LIM computations thus need only follow the evolution of material surface in the flow, and then solve ODE's (ordinary differential equations) on the surface, rather than PDE's (partial differential equations) throughout the whole flame. Results obtained to date show that the model is capable of correctly predicting even highly sensitive non-linear characteristics associated with the combustion processes in turbulent natural gas flames, including the local flame extinction phenomenon in large Zeldovich number Arrhenius kinetics. The simplicity of the LIM technique allows large reductions in computational time in comparison with traditional computational approaches, thus allowing far more complex reaction chemistry to be addressed, as well as ranges of Reynolds, Schmidt and Damkohler numbers which are otherwise completely inaccessible to simulation.

  6. Gas Kick Mechanistic Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubairy, Raheel

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    -gain and temperature profile in the annulus. This research focuses on these changes in these parameters to be able to detect the occurrence of gas kick and the circulation of the gas kick out from the well. In this thesis, we have developed a model that incorporates...

  7. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipal Investigators PostdoctoralResearch

  8. Numerical studies of gas production from several CH4-hydrate zones at the Mallik Site, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy S.; Dallimore, Scott R.; Satoh, Tohru; Hancock, Steven; Weatherill, Brian

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 Gas Hydrate Research Well, Mackenziepermafrost- associated gas hydrate accumulation in theTerritories, Canada. A gas hydrate research well was drilled

  9. Noble metal catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of precious metals and platinum group metals as catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas is an active area of study. To date, field studies have recently focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot-scale. In this work, we introduce bench-scale results for gold, platinum, and palladium catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Initial results reveal intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research.

  10. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  11. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  12. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Gas Technology Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gas Technology Institute will conduct research and development on hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion processes to make gasoline and diesel.

  13. Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dever, S.A. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia) and GHD Pty. Ltd., 10 Bond Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart_dever@ghd.com.au; Swarbrick, G.E. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: g.swarbrick@unsw.edu.au; Stuetz, R.M. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions.

  14. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 498 (2003) 101111 First results of the large COMPASS 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutz, Hartmut

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; DNP; Lithium deuteride 1. Introduction The EMC result that the quarks carry unexpect- edly a small

  15. PhD in Food Science This is a programme of advanced study and research, the results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jing

    to meet internationally recognised standards (PhD Statute). Enquiries relating to the administration staff member's name to learn about their research interests and projects available. Please visit www is made to ensure accuracy, the information in this document is provided as a general guide only

  16. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Hot-Dry/Mixed-Dry Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  17. Basic research model of natural gas combustion in turbulent flow. Phase 2. Annual report, 1 August 1990-31 July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahm, W.J.A.; Tryggvason, G.; Krasny, R.

    1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes progress made in extending a local integral method (LIM) model for approximately simulating vorticity transport and mixing, as well as molecular diffusion and reaction of chemical species, in natural gas combustion. The LIM model is fundamentally different from conventional approaches for numerically simulating combustion in turbulent flames, and is based on the experimental observation that the strain-diffusion balance which establishes the mixing and reaction scales in turbulent flames leads to a self-similar internal structure which does not need to be continually re-computed. Instead, these scales are represented by a family of self-similar profile shapes, whose moments are allowed to evolve freely to satisfy the governing equations. The resulting LIM computations thus need only to track the evolution of a material surface in the flow, and solve ODE's (ordinary differential equations) on the surface, rather than PDE's (partial differential equations) throughout the whole flame. The present report describes the application of the LIM model for computing the evolution of conserved scalar fields and the resulting equilibrium reaction processes, and presents results from sample calculations. It also describes the extension of the model to relatively detailed four-step methane-air kinetics together with the thermal nitric oxide mechanism, incorporating asymmetric profiles, and presents results from validation calculations. The application of the LIM approach to the vorticity field is also described.

  18. Oil and Gas Research| GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and Evaluation | NationalNovember 11, 2013,OilOil

  19. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reagan, M. T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial distributions of gas and hydrate phase saturations (from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Wellsimulating the behavior of gas hydrates, Energy Conversion

  20. Strategies for gas production from hydrate accumulations under various geologic conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.; Collett, T.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L- 38 Gas Hydrate Research Well, Mackenziedeposits. INTRODUCTION Gas hydrates are solid crystallinequantity of hydrocarbon gas hydrates range between 10 15 to

  1. Gas Turbine Fired Heater Integration: Achieve Significant Energy Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iaquaniello, G.; Pietrogrande, P.

    GAS TURBINE FIRED HEATER INTEGRATION: ACHIEVE SIGNIFICANT ENERGY SAVINGS G. Iaquaniello**, P. Pietrogrande* *KTI Corp., Research and Development Division, Monrovia, California **KTI SpA, Rome, Italy ABSTRAer Faster payout will result if gas... turbine exhaust is used as combustion air for fired heaters. Here are economic examples and system design considera-, tions. INTRODUCT ION Heat and power cogeneration is a potentially rewarding tecnique for achieving savings when applied to process...

  2. Liquefied Natural Gas Safety Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and Emissions EstimatesLindseyLiquefaction ofMay

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: More California Gas Stations Can...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI)More California Gas Stations Can Provide Hydrogen than Previously Thought, Sandia Study Says More California Gas Stations Can Provide...

  4. PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant Program PON-13-503 http ............................................................................................................................5 PIER NATURAL GAS RESEARCH PROGRAM

  5. Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

  6. US/French Joint Research Program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation. Volume 1. Phase-1 normalization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, F.J.; Buckalew, W.H.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the ongoing multi-year joint NRC/CEA international cooperative test program to investigate the dose-damage equivalence of gamma and beta radiation on polymer base materials, dosimetry and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) specimens were exchanged, irradiated, and evaluated for property changes at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). The purpose of this Phase-1 test series was to normalize and cross-correlate the results obtained by one research center to the other, in terms of exposure (1.0 MeV accelerated electrons and /sup 60/Co gammas) and postirradiation testing (ultimate elongation and tensile strength, hardness, and density) techniques. The dosimetry and material specimen results indicate good agreement between the two countries regarding the exposure conditions and postirradiation evaluation techniques employed.

  7. Researchers, Appointments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Aviation Gas Turbine Combustion/Emissions Research and Design System Optimization (UTIAS) Luca ScardoviInnovative Researchers, Devoted Educators Academic Appointments 2009­2012 #12;Innovative is a centre of immense inspiration, remarkable innovation and endless possibilities. And since 2009, we have

  8. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  9. North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E. [eds.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E. (eds.)

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent...

  13. Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels -- Final Report under the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; Philippe Martin; Mayeul Phélip; Ronald Ballinger; Petti does not have NT account

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this INERI project was to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated-particle fuels and to explore improved coated-particle fuel designs that could be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in gas-cooled fast reactors. Project participants included the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), Centre Étude Atomique (CEA), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). To accomplish the project objectives, work was organized into five tasks.

  14. Invited Article: Coherent imaging using seeded free-electron laser pulses with variable polarization: First results and research opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capotondi, F.; Pedersoli, E.; Mahne, N.; Menk, R. H.; Passos, G.; Raimondi, L.; Svetina, C.; Sandrin, G.; Kiskinova, M. [FERMI, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Zangrando, M. [FERMI, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali - TASC, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Fleckenstein, H.; Chapman, H. N. [CFEL-DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Schulz, J. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Bach, J.; Froemter, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Schleitzer, S.; Mueller, L.; Gutt, C. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI-Elettra, the first vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) using by default a 'seeded' scheme, became operational in 2011 and has been opened to users since December 2012. The parameters of the seeded FERMI FEL pulses and, in particular, the superior control of emitted radiation in terms of spectral purity and stability meet the stringent requirements for single-shot and resonant coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments. The advantages of the intense seeded FERMI pulses with variable polarization have been demonstrated with the first experiments performed using the multipurpose experimental station operated at the diffraction and projection imaging (DiProI) beamline. The results reported here were obtained with fixed non-periodic targets during the commissioning period in 2012 using 20-32 nm wavelength range. They demonstrate that the performance of the FERMI FEL source and the experimental station meets the requirements of CDI, holography, and resonant magnetic scattering in both multi- and single-shot modes. Moreover, we present the first magnetic scattering experiments employing the fully circularly polarized FERMI pulses. The ongoing developments aim at pushing the lateral resolution by using shorter wavelengths provided by double-stage cascaded FERMI FEL-2 and probing ultrafast dynamic processes using different pump-probe schemes, including jitter-free seed laser pump or FEL-pump/FEL-probe with two color FEL pulses generated by the same electron bunch.

  15. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW-COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Kelner; T.E. Owen; D.L. George; A. Minachi; M.G. Nored; C.J. Schwartz

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} began a multi-year project co-funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The project goal is to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype retrofit natural gas energy flow meter in 2000-2001 included: (1) evaluation of the inferential gas energy analysis algorithm using supplemental gas databases and anticipated worst-case gas mixtures; (2) identification and feasibility review of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen diluent content; (3) experimental performance evaluation of infrared absorption sensors for carbon dioxide diluent content; and (4) procurement of a custom ultrasonic transducer and redesign of the ultrasonic pulse reflection correlation sensor for precision speed-of-sound measurements. A prototype energy meter module containing improved carbon dioxide and speed-of-sound sensors was constructed and tested in the GRI Metering Research Facility at SwRI. Performance of this module using transmission-quality natural gas and gas containing supplemental carbon dioxide up to 9 mol% resulted in gas energy determinations well within the inferential algorithm worst-case tolerance of {+-}2.4 Btu/scf (nitrogen diluent gas measured by gas chromatograph). A two-week field test was performed at a gas-fired power plant to evaluate the inferential algorithm and the data acquisition requirements needed to adapt the prototype energy meter module to practical field site conditions.

  17. Vertical silicon nanowire arrays for gas sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hangbo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to fabricate and characterize vertically aligned silicon nanowire gas sensors. Silicon nanowires are very attractive for gas sensing applications and vertically aligned silicon nanowires are ...

  18. OWAQ supports social science research that enables NOAA to test research results that improve communication during dangerous weather situations. For example, researchers from University of Oklahoma are using social

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the adverse effects on humans, surface transportation and aviation. The Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 President's budget request for OWAQ through NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is $10.2M. The FY 2014 Omnibus funding for OWAQ is $7.1M and the FY 2013 actual budget was $3.9M. The Office of Weather

  19. Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

    Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

  20. Eastern Gas Shales Project: West Virginia No. 7 well, Wetzel County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-West Virginia No. 7 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithiology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 533 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Wetzel county of north-central West Virginia.

  1. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 5 well, Lawrence County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 5 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technology University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 604 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Lawrence County of west-central Pennsylvania.

  2. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 3 well, Erie County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 3 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. This data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 422 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Erie County of north-western Pennsylvania.

  3. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 1 well, McKean County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 1 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 741 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in MeKean County of north-central Pennsylvania.

  4. Eastern Gas Shales Project: Pennsylvania No. 4 well, Indiana County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Pennsylvania No. 4 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 891 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Indiana County of west-central Pennsylvania.

  5. 202-328-5000 www.rff.orgSector Effects of the Shale Gas Revolution in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper reviews the impact of the shale gas revolution on the sectors of electricity generation, transportation, and manufacturing in the United States. Natural gas is being substituted for other fuels, particularly coal, in electricity generation, resulting in lower greenhouse gas emissions from this sector. The use of natural gas in the transportation sector is currently negligible but is projected to increase with investments in refueling infrastructure and natural gas vehicle technologies. Petrochemical and other manufacturing industries have responded to lower natural gas prices by investing in domestically located manufacturing projects. This paper also speculates on the impact of a possible shale gas boom in China. Key Words: shale gas, electricity, transportation, and manufacturing JEL Classification Numbers: L71, L9, Q4 © 2013 Resources for the Future. All rights reserved. No portion of this paper may be reproduced without permission of the authors. Discussion papers are research materials circulated by their authors for purposes of information and discussion.

  6. Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  7. Refinery gas waste heat energy conversion optimization in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.D.; Francuz, D.J.; West, E.W. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of refinery fuel gas in gas turbines poses special challenges due to the combustion characteristics of the fuel gas which contains significant concentrations of hydrogen. Proper modifications to the combustion system of the existing gas turbines are required in order to combust such fuel gas streams in gas turbines while minimizing the NO{sub x} emissions. A novel approach to the utilization of this hydrogen bearing fuel gas in gas turbines consists of humidifying the fuel gas with water vapor by direct contact with hot water in a counter-current column, the feed water to the humidifier being first circulated through the refinery to recover waste heat. The refinery waste heat produces additional motive fluid with a result that the waste heat is converted to power in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the water vapor introduced into the fuel gas reduces the NO{sub x} formation and increases the gas turbine output, while the hydrogen present in the fuel gas provides the flame stability required when combusting a fuel gas containing a large concentration of water vapor.

  8. Gas Turbine Emissions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies...

  9. Gas-Saving Tips

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Properly Tuned Fixing a car that is noticeably out of tune or has failed an emis- sions test can improve its gas mileage by an average of 4 percent. However, results vary based on...

  10. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  11. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  12. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  13. Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

  14. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on October 16, 1996. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, K.B.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-B-103 (Tank B-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constituents. Two risers (Riser 2 and Riser 7) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL.

  15. Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komar, C.A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

  16. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-BX-104 fifth temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on June 10, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.270% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.675% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  17. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-S-102 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results from analysis of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm as specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank S-102 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 2.948% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <3.659% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Tables S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  18. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  19. Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating surface emissions. Until recently, dedicated research-grade instruments have been required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHG columns · Quantifying local to regional GHG enhancements for emissions inventory verificationAbstract Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating with another Cessna 210 over Central California quantified enhancements in CO2 and CH4 from urban

  20. Heat transfer and flow on the first-stage blade tip of a power generation gas turbine: Part 2 -- Simulation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameri, A.A.; Bunker, R.S.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the detailed distribution of convective heat transfer coefficients on the first-stage blade tip surface for a geometry typical of large power generation turbines (> 100 MW). This paper is concerned with the numerical prediction of the tip surface heat transfer. Good comparison with the experimental measured distribution was achieved through accurate modeling of the most important features of the blade passage and heating arrangement as well as the details of experimental rig likely to affect the tip heat transfer. A sharp edge and a radiused edge tip was considered. The results using the radiused edge tip agreed better with the experimental data. This improved agreement was attributed to the absence of edge separation on the tip of the radiused edge blade.

  1. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium compatibility studies: results of 10,000-hour exposure of selected alloys in simulated reactor helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.; Stevenson, R.D.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on the HTGR Helium Compatibility Task accomplished during the period March 31, 1977 through September 30, 1979, is documented in this report. Emphasis is on the results and analyses of creep data to 10,000 h and the detailed metallurgical evaluations performed on candidate alloy specimens tested for up to 10,000 h. Long-term creep and unstressed aging data in controlled-impurity helium and in air at 800, 900, and 1000/sup 0/C are reported for alloys included in the program in FY-76, including the wrought solid-solution-strengthened alloys, Hastelloy X, Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556, and the centrifugally cast austenitic alloys, HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurite 36XS, and Manaurite 900.

  2. Tank vapor characterization project - Tank 241-U-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on December 6, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklarew, D.S.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C. [and others] [and others

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-U-112 (Tank U-112) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constitutents. Two risers (Riser 3 and Riser 6) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan.

  3. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  4. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  7. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  8. Noble Metal Catalysts for Mercury Oxidation in Utility Flue Gas: Gold, Palladium and Platinum Formulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of noble metals as catalysts for mercury oxidation in flue gas remains an area of active study. To date, field studies have focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot scale. In this article, we introduce bench-scale experimental results for gold, palladium and platinum catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Our initial results reveal some intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research into this potentially important process.

  9. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  10. Optimization Problems in Natural Gas Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Z. Ríos-Mercado

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Abstract: This paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline ...

  11. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  12. Geomechanical response of permafrost-associated hydrate deposits to depressurization-induced gas production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, BritishGSC et al. Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research wellfrom the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well

  13. Fluctuations and Correlations of net baryon number, electric charge, and strangeness: A comparison of lattice QCD results with the hadron resonance gas model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bazavov; Tanmoy Bhattacharya; C. E. DeTar; H. -T. Ding; Steven Gottlieb; Rajan Gupta; P. Hegde; Urs Heller; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; L. Levkova; Swagato Mukherjee; P. Petreczky; Christian Schmidt; R. A. Soltz; W. Soeldner; R. Sugar; Pavlos M. Vranas

    2012-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the quadratic fluctuations of net baryon number, electric charge and strangeness as well as correlations among these conserved charges in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD at zero chemical potential. Results are obtained using calculations with tree level improved gauge and the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) actions with almost physical light and strange quark masses at three different values of the lattice cut-off. Our choice of parameters corresponds to a value of 160 MeV for the lightest pseudo scalar Goldstone mass and a physical value of the kaon mass. The three diagonal charge susceptibilities and the correlations among conserved charges have been extrapolated to the continuum limit in the temperature interval 150 MeV net baryon number fluctuations in QCD agree with HRG model calculations while, the net electric charge fluctuations in QCD are about 10% smaller and net strangeness fluctuations are about 20% larger. These findings are relevant to the discussion of freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it...

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it...

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    terms Search Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it...

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    terms Search Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it...

  19. Heat transfer and flow on the first-stage blade tip of a power generation gas turbine: Part 1 -- Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunker, R.S.; Bailey, J.C.; Ameri, A.A.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the detailed distribution of convective heat transfer coefficients on the first-stage blade tip surface for a geometry typical of large power generation turbines (> 100 MW). This paper is concerned with the design and execution of the experimental portion of the study, which represents the first reported investigation to obtain nearly full surface information on heat transfer coefficients within an environment that develops an appropriate pressure distribution about an airfoil blade tip and shroud model. A stationary blade cascade experiment has been run consisting of three airfoils, the center airfoil having a variable tip gap clearance. The airfoil models the aerodynamic tip section of a high-pressure turbine blade with inlet Mach number of 0.30, exit Mach number of 0.75, pressure ratio of 1.45, exit Reynolds number based on axial chord of 2.57 x 10{sup 6}, and total turning of about 110 degrees. A hue detection based liquid crystal method is used to obtain the detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution on the blade tip surface for flat, smooth tip surfaces with both sharp and rounded edges. The cascade inlet turbulence intensity level took on values of either 5 or 9%. The cascade also models the casing recess in the shroud surface ahead of the blade. Experimental results are shown for the pressure distribution measurements on the airfoil near the tip gap, on the blade tip surface, and on the opposite shroud surface. Tip surface heat transfer coefficient distributions are shown for sharp edge and rounded edge tip geometries at each of the inlet turbulence intensity levels.

  20. Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

  1. The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Davies, J. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Zammit, M. [AC Rochester, NY (United States); Patterson, P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

  2. The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Davies, J. (General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)); Zammit, M. (AC Rochester, NY (United States)); Patterson, P. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

  3. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Research, Development, and Deployment in Meeting Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Goals: The Case of the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2007 (S.2191)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, S.; Wood, F.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. federal government is considering actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, so the cost of these technologies could significantly influence the overall cost of meeting greenhouse gas limits. This paper examines the potential benefit of reduced technology cost by analyzing the case of the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2007 (S.2191). This act had a goal of reducing national carbon emissions in 2050 to levels 72 percent below 2006 emission levels. In April 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA) published an analysis of the effects of S.2191 on the U.S. energy sector. This report presents a similar analysis: both analyses examined the impacts of S.2191, and both used versions of the National Energy Modeling System. The analysis reported here used modified technology assumptions to reflect U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program goals. The results show that achieving EERE program goals could reduce the cost of meeting greenhouse gas limits, reduce the cost of renewable electricity generation and biofuels, and reduce energy intensity.

  4. Energy Research and Development Division DRAFT PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Energy Research and Development Division DRAFT PROJECT REPORT NATURAL GAS ENERGY EFFICIENCY in Buildings ­ Roadmap for Future Research is the final report for the Buildings Natural Gas Roadmap

  5. Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peletier, Reynier

    Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

  6. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarny, Vijay A. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  7. Ternary gas mixture for diffuse discharge switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hunter, Scott R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new diffuse discharge gas switch wherein a mixture of gases is used to take advantage of desirable properties of the respective gases. There is a conducting gas, an insulating gas, and a third gas that has low ionization energy resulting in a net increase in the number of electrons available to produce a current.

  8. Ambient Laboratory Coater for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane D. Bruns; Robert M. Counce; Irma D. Lima Rojas

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    this research is targeted at developing improved experimentally-based scaling relationships for the hydrodynamics of shallow, gas-spouted beds of dense particles. The work is motivated by the need to more effctively scale up shallow spouted beds used in processes such as in the coating of nuclear fuel particles where precise control of solids and gas circulation is critically important. Experimental results reported here are for a 50 mm diameter spouted bed containing two different types of bed solids (alumina and zirconia) at different static bed depths and fluidized by air and helium. Measurements of multiple local average pressures, inlet gas pressure fluctuations, and spout height were used to characterize the bed hydrodynamics for each operating condition. Follow-on studies are planned that include additional variations in bed size, particle properties, and fluidizing gas. The ultimate objective is to identify the most important non-dimensional hydrodynamic scaling groups and possible spouted-bed design correlations based on these groups.

  9. Anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Borghini; Clement Gombeaud

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical results for the anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas of massless particles scattering on fixed centres are presented.

  10. Results of the radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania (ANK001). Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed on November 12, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U, as a result of work done for the Manhattan Engineer District in 1944. The survey included measurement of direct alpha and beta-gamma levels in the northeast comer of the basement of Building 29, and the collection of a debris sample from a floor drain for radionuclide analysis. The survey area was used for experimental canning of uranium slugs prior to production activities at the former New Kensington Works nearby.

  11. WELDING RESEARCH -s11WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH -s11WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Double-electrode gas metal arc welding (DE-GMAW) is a novel weld- ing process recently developed to increase welding productivity while maintaining the base its non- consumable tungsten electrode with a consumable welding wire electrode result- ing in a new

  12. Heavy duty transport research needs assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the desire to decrease the dependence of the US on foreign petroleum as a transportation fuel, this report assesses the research needs to further develop heavy duty engines. The topics covered include diesel engines, alternative fuels, electric vehicle technology, gas turbine engines, and stirling cycle alternative engines. (GHH)

  13. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  14. Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Research Report #12;#12;Research Report Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Forestry forest soil survey 29 3.5.2 Carbon storage in the main British forest soil types 30 3.5.3 Changes in soil

  15. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  16. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  17. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Ponnusamy, Senthil [ORNL; Ferguson, Harley Douglas [ORNL; Williams, Aaron M [ORNL; Tassitano, James B [ORNL

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

  18. Natural gas: available today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingram, C.C. Jr.

    1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas energy is becoming the centerpiece in the future-energy strategies for the US as policymakers recognize that (1) up to 60 years of recoverable conventional gas supplies remain to be discovered and produced in the US and (2) supplemental sources promise to offset an anticipated decline in Lower-48 production, resulting in a net increase in the total gas supply. The US gas industry expects to provide 23-33 trillion CF/yr of gas for domestic consumption by the year 2000, with supplemental sources (SNG, pipeline and LNG imports, Alaskan gas, and natural gas from unconventional sources) contributing 40-60%.

  19. Oil and Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil ResearchEnergy OfficeProjectsResearch in

  20. Nitrogen oxides reduction by staged combustion of LCV gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabrera Sixto, Jose Manuel

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the high nitrogen content (1-2%) of the agricultural wastes, burning of the LCV gas derived from them can result in NO?emissions in excess of 2000 ppm. NO?emissions during combustion of LCV gas derived from gasification of cotton gin trash have been... and the life. In second place, to Luci, Maria Luz, and Jose Manuel for att the love and happiness they have tpven to me, and for all their patience during the time that I was working on this research. Finally, I also dedicate this work to my mother, sisters...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Mini Rockets Groups of students produce hydrogen and oxygen gas. Using pipette mini rockets, students investigate which mixture of the two gases...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Mini Rockets Groups of students produce hydrogen and oxygen gas. Using pipette mini rockets, students investigate which mixture of the two gases...

  3. Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas distribution including installing and maintaining pipelines,pipeline From a research perspective, a signi?cant advantage of natural gas distribution

  4. Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process modeling of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas2001. Reichle, D. et al.. Carbon sequestration research andCarbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying

  5. Fiscal Policy and Utah's Oil and Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiscal Policy and Utah's Oil and Gas Industry Michael T. Hogue, Research Analyst Introduction for oil and gas extraction firms. A recent review by the Government Accountability Office indicates features of Utah's oil and gas industry. The Oil and Gas Industry in Utah Reserves and Production Oil

  6. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  7. Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800ºC.

  8. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Master Curve Approach to Monitor Fracture Toughness of RPV Steels: Final Results of the Experimental Exercise to Support Constraint Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The precracked Charpy single-edge notched bend, SE(B), specimen (PCC) is the most likely specimen type to be used for determination of the reference temperature, T0, with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance specimens. Unfortunately, for many RPV steels, significant differences have been observed between the T0 temperature for the PCC specimen and that obtained from the 25-mm thick compact specimen [1TC(T)], generally considered the standard reference specimen for T0. This difference in T0 has often been designated a specimen bias effect, and the primary focus for explaining this effect is loss of constraint in the PCC specimen. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has developed a coordinated research project (CRP) to evaluate various issues associated with the fracture toughness Master Curve for application to light-water RPVs. Topic Area 1 of the CRP is focused on the issue of test specimen geometry effects, with emphasis on determination of T0 with the PCC specimen and the bias effect. Topic Area 1 has an experimental part and an analytical part. Participating organizations for the experimental part of the CRP performed fracture toughness testing of various steels, including the reference steel JRQ (A533-B-1) often used for IAEA studies, with various types of specimens under various conditions. Additionally, many of the participants took part in a round robin exercise on finite element modeling of the PCVN specimen, discussed in a separate paper. Results from fracture toughness tests are compared with regard to effects of specimen size and type on the reference temperature T0. It is apparent from the results presented that the bias observed between the PCC specimen and larger specimens for Plate JRQ is not nearly as large as that obtained for Plate 13B (-11 C vs -37 C) and for some of the results in the literature (bias values as much as -45 C). This observation is consistent with observations in the literature that show significant variations in the bias that are dependent on the specific materials being tested. There are various methods for constraint adjustments and two methods were used that reduced the bias for Plate 13B from -37 C to -13 C in one case and to -11 C in the second case. Unfortunately, there is not a consensus methodology available that accounts for the differences observed with different materials. Increasing the Mlim value in the ASTM E-1921 to ensure no loss of constraint for the PCC specimen is not a practicable solution because the PCC specimen is derived from CVN specimens in RPV surveillance capsules and larger specimens are normally not available. Resolution of these differences are needed for application of the master curve procedure to operating RPVs, but the research needed for such resolution is beyond the scope of this CRP.

  9. Optimizing Natural Gas Use: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatesan, V. V.; Schweikert, P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of Steam & Energy systems in any continuously operating process plant results in substantial reduction in Natural gas purchases. During periods of natural gas price hikes, this would benefit the plant to control their fuel budget...

  10. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

  11. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  12. Natural Gas Purchasing Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower...

  13. Natural Gas Purchasing Options 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower...

  14. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD); Tiller, Dale B. (Lincoln, NE); Wienhold, Paul D. (Baltimore, MD); Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  15. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  16. Natural gas monthly, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through February 1998 for many data series, and through November 1997 for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the natural gas data contained in this issue are: Preliminary estimates for January and February 1998 show that dry natural gas production, net imports, and consumption are all within 1 percent of their levels in 1997. Warmer-than-normal weather in recent months has resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by the residential sector and lower net withdrawals of gas from under round storage facilities compared with a year ago. This has resulted in an estimate of the amount of working gas in storage at the end of February 1998 that is 18 percent higher than in February 1997. The national average natural gas wellhead price is estimated to be $3.05 per thousand cubic feet in November 1997, 7 percent higher than in October. The cumulative average wellhead price for January through November 1997 is estimated to be $2.42 per thousand cubic feet, 17 percent above that of the same period in 1996. This price increase is far less than 36-percent rise that occurred between 1995 and 1996. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1992. Volume 2, Energy production research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II includes: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology.

  18. Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and private sources, including the Department of Energy, manufacturers' groups, and the various academic and other research institutes. Although, these generally tend to be increasingly optimistic about the gas supply outlook and the contribution... that gas can make to U.S. energy needs in the future, questions about price deregulation continue to cloud the gas outlook in many minds. Given this, the purposes of this paper are (a) to describe briefly the prospects for natural and supplemental gas...

  19. The Intense Radiation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

  20. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  1. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume III. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: production, unsponsored research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document consists of the following papers: inorganic geochemistry studies of the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; lithology studies of upper Devonian well cuttings in the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; possible effects of plate tectonics on the Appalachian Devonian black shale production in eastern Kentucky; preliminary depositional model for upper Devonian Huron age organic black shale in the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field; the anatomy of a large Devonian black shale gas field; the Cottageville (Mount Alto) Gas Field, Jackson County, West Virginia: a case study of Devonian shale gas production; the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field: a geological study of the relationships of Ohio Shale gas occurrences to structure, stratigraphy, lithology, and inorganic geochemical parameters; and a statistical analysis of geochemical data for the Eastern Kentucky Gas Field.

  2. Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

    2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

  4. A Gas-Fired Heat Pipe Zone Heater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, C. B.; Burns, P.; Guire, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-fired vented zone heater has recently been developed by the Altar Corporation for Colorado State University (CSU) under a Gas Research Institute (GRI) contract. The unit war developed for auxiliary heating applications in passive solar...

  5. Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various...

  6. A Gas-Fired Heat Pipe Zone Heater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, C. B.; Burns, P.; Guire, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-fired vented zone heater has recently been developed by the Altar Corporation for Colorado State University (CSU) under a Gas Research Institute (GRI) contract. The unit war developed for auxiliary heating applications in passive solar...

  7. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choe, Hwang (Saratoga, CA); Fallas, Thomas T. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gasliquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

  8. Methodology for flammable gas evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 177 radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste generates flammable gases. The waste releases gas continuously, but in some tanks the waste has shown a tendency to trap these flammable gases. When enough gas is trapped in a tank`s waste matrix, it may be released in a way that renders part or all of the tank atmosphere flammable for a period of time. Tanks must be evaluated against previously defined criteria to determine whether they can present a flammable gas hazard. This document presents the methodology for evaluating tanks in two areas of concern in the tank headspace:steady-state flammable-gas concentration resulting from continuous release, and concentration resulting from an episodic gas release.

  9. Depressurization-induced gas production from Class 1 and Class 2 hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Kowalsky, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrate (Class 1W) or gas and hydrate (Class 1G). In Class 1Class 1G (involving gas and hydrate in the HBL). In Class 2JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 Gas Hydrate Research Well, Mackenzie

  10. US Department of Energy Region IV Unconventional Gas Program: summary and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telle, W.R.; Thompson, D.A.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Region IV Unconventional Gas Program involved the evaluation of unconventional gas resources at ten sites in the coal fields of the Eastern US. These projects dealt mainly with coalbed methane resources, although three of them also examined potential gas resources in Devonian black shales. The resource evaluations were accomplished primarily through recovery of core samples of potential gas-bearing strata and determination of specific gas content using the US Bureau of Mines direct method. In some cases actual gas production from the test holes was evaluated. Four of the projects were sited in the Warrior Basin, three in the Central Appalachian Basin, and one each in the Northern Appalachian Basin, the Deep River Basin of North Carolina, and the Valley Coal Fields of Virginia. Results from three of the projects, two in the Warrior Basin and one in the Northern Appalachian Basin, indicated the potential for economic recovery of coalbed methane. The projects included in this program provided a large body of data which is valuable to subsequent unconventional gas research. The program also provides new direction for unconventional gas exploration. Adjustments to coalbed methane resource estimates for some Eastern coal basins may be indicated by the results obtained. An update on the legal status of coalbed methane ownership in states where projects were conducted is provided in Appendix I. 5 references, 33 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  12. Economics of natural gas upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

  13. Flammable gas project topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  15. Research results from the Ashland Exploration, Inc. Ford Motor Company 78 (ed) well, Pike County, Kentucky. Topical report, April 1992-December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, C.W.; Frantz, J.H.; Lancaster, D.E.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed on the Ashland Exploration, Inc. Ford Motor Company 78 (Experimental Development (ED)) Well, in Pike County, KY. The ED well was the third well drilled in a research project conducted by GRI in eastern Kentucky targeting both the Devonian Shales and Berea Sandstone. Both the Shales and Berea were completed and tested in the ED well. The primary objective of the ED well was to apply what was learned from studying the Shalers in COOP 1 (first well drilled) and the Berea in COOP 2 (second well drilled) to both the Shales and the Berea in the ED well. Additionally, the ED well was used to evaluate the impact of different stimulation treatments on Shales production. Research in the ED well brings to a close GRI`s extensive field-based research program in the Appalachian Basin over the last ten years.

  16. LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRELIMINARY MODELING RESULTS O.BOUR*, E,UniversitéLaval, Sainte-Foy, Canada SUMMARY: Lateral landfill gas migration occurs in the surroundings of a MSW landfill complementary physical measures were used to build a conceptual model of lateral landfill gas migration

  17. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

  18. NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results and Findings Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Factsheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity...

  19. Innovative Telemetry System Will Help Tap Hard-to-Reach Natural Gas Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The commercialization of an innovative telemetry communications system developed through a U.S. Department of Energy research program will help U.S. producers tap previously hard-to-reach natural gas resources deep underground, resulting in access to additional supplies that will help enhance national energy security.

  20. Interpreting the results of this study will depend both on the chosen research methodology and on the instructional setting. This chapter will discuss the setting,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in engineering, mathematics, or science. To meet this requirement, about 800 students enrolled in the course graduate students from the Department of Physics, with the exception of three advanced undergraduate of introductory, calculus-based physics at a large, public research university during the 1995/1996 academic year

  1. Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2001 3 Large-eddy simulation of gas turbine, and solver capable of performing large-eddy simulation in geometries as complex as the combustor of a gas-turbine' grids encountered in complex geometries such as the Pratt & Whitney combustor. · Turbulent validations

  2. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOil & Gas Efficient recovery

  3. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efforts are focused on securing stable and economical storage, transportation, and delivery of natural gas-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation California Natural Gas StorageEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT CALIFORNIA NATURAL GAS STORAGE

  4. Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

    1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  5. Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  6. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

  7. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reza, Rostami Ravari

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas...

  8. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report describes and summarizes results of a research effort to investigate physical mechanisms that control the performance of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs and to represent those physical effects in an efficient way in simulations of gas injection processes. The research effort included four main lines of research: (1) Efficient compositional streamline methods for 3D flow; (2) Analytical methods for one-dimensional displacements; (3) Physics of multiphase flow; and (4) Limitations of streamline methods. In the first area, results are reported that show how the streamline simulation approach can be applied to simulation of gas injection processes that include significant effects of transfer of components between phases. In the second area, the one-dimensional theory of multicomponent gas injection processes is extended to include the effects of volume change as components change phase. In addition an automatic algorithm for solving such problems is described. In the third area, results on an extensive experimental investigation of three-phase flow are reported. The experimental results demonstrate the impact on displacement performance of the low interfacial tensions between the gas and oil phases that can arise in multicontact miscible or near-miscible displacement processes. In the fourth area, the limitations of the streamline approach were explored. Results of an experimental investigation of the scaling of the interplay of viscous, capillary, and gravity forces are described. In addition results of a computational investigation of the limitations of the streamline approach are reported. The results presented in this report establish that it is possible to use the compositional streamline approach in many reservoir settings to predict performance of gas injection processes. When that approach can be used, it requires substantially less (often orders of magnitude) computation time than conventional finite difference compositional simulation.

  9. Functionally graded materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems research. Semi-annual report, May 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of two new production methods, reaction-bonded metal oxide (RBMO) and electrochemical processing, have been utilized to create a functionally graded thermal barrier coating. Electrochemical processing, which includes both electrodeposition (EDEP) and electrophoretic deposition (EPD), has been used to deposit both the metallic and ceramic layers of the coating. EPD has been used to deposit the RBMO precursor powders, which exhibit the dual properties of both a metal and ceramic due to its composite nature. A summary of the FGM production methods and resulting characterization of the produced coatings for the eleventh and twelfth quarters (5/96--12/96), as well as a project summary, are outlined in this final report.

  10. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  11. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  12. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  13. Oil and Gas R&D Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication describes the major components of the research and development programs of the Department of Energy`s Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology. These programs are commonly referred to collectively as the `Oil and Gas Program.` This document provides customers with a single source of information describing the details of the individual technology program components. This document reflects the results of a planning cycle that began in early 1996 with the development of a scenario analysis for the programs, followed by the development of the coordinated strategic plan. The technology program plans, which are the most recent products of the planning cycle, expand on the program descriptions presented in the coordinated strategic plan, and represent an initial effort to coordinate the Oil and Gas Program exploration and production programs and budgets. Each technology program plan includes a `roadmap` that summarizes the progress of the program to the present and indicates its future direction. The roadmaps describe the program drivers, vision, mission, strategies, and measures of success. Both the individual technology program plans and the strategic plan are dynamic and are intended to be updated regularly.

  14. Climate change: A crack in the natural-gas bridge.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Shearer, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESEARCH NEWS & VIEWS renewable energy sources in thefuture when carbon-free, renewable-energy technolo- gies areRelative growth of gas and renewable electricity. The ratio

  15. A crack in the natural-gas bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Shearer, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESEARCH NEWS & VIEWS renewable energy sources in thefuture when carbon-free, renewable-energy technolo- gies areRelative growth of gas and renewable electricity. The ratio

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: power-to-gas applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power-to-gas applications Storing Hydrogen Underground Could Boost Transportation, Energy Security On February 26, 2015, in Capabilities, Center for Infrastructure Research and...

  17. Heavy duty transport research needs assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the desire to decrease the dependence of the US on foreign petroleum as a transportation fuel, this report assesses the research needs to further develop heavy duty engines. The topics covered include diesel engines, alternative fuels, electric vehicle technology, gas turbine engines, and stirling cycle alternative engines. (GHH)

  18. AVTA: 2012 CNG Honda Civic Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2012 Compressed Natural Gas Honda Civic GX. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  19. Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery research is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center to advance the application of miscible carbon dioxide flooding. This research is an integral part of a multidisciplinary effort to improve the technology for producing additional oil from US resources. This report summarizes the problems of the technology and the 1986 results of the ongoing research that was conducted to solve those problems. Poor reservoir volumetric sweep efficiency is the major problem associated with gas flooding and all miscible displacements. This problem results from the channeling and viscous fingering that occur due to the large differences between viscosity or density of the displacing and displaced fluids (i.e., carbon dioxide and oil, respectively). Simple modeling and core flooding studies indicate that, because of differences in fluid viscosities, breakthrough can occur after only 30% of the total pore volume (PV) of the rock has been injected with gas, while field tests have shown breakthrough occurring much earlier. The differences in fluid densities lead to gravity segregation. The lower density carbon dioxide tends to override the residual fluids in the reservoir. This process would be considerably more efficient if a larger area of the reservoir could be contacted by the gas. Current research has focused on the mobility control, computer simulation, and reservoir heterogeneity studies. Three mobility control methods have been investigated: (1) the use of polymers for direct thickening of high-density carbon dioxide, (2) mobile ''foam-like dispersions'' of carbon dioxide and an aqueous surfactant, and (3) in situ deposition of chemical precipitates. 22 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. A Wood-Fired Gas Turbine Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, S. H.; Hamrick, J. T.

    A WOOD-FIRED GAS TURBINE PLANT Sam H. Powell, Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, Tennessee Joseph T. Hamrick, Aerospace Research Corporation, RBS Electric, Roanoke, VA Abstract This paper covers the research and development of a wood...-fired gas turbine unit that is used for generating electricity. The system uses one large cyclonic combustor and a cyclone cleaning system in series to provide hot gases to drive an Allison T-56 aircraft engine (the industrial version is the 50l-k). A...

  1. The efficient use of natural gas in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

  2. The efficient use of natural gas in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

  3. Natural Gas Supply SBIR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker, H.D.; Gwilliam, W.J.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was created in 1982 by Public Law 97-219 and reauthorized in 1992 until the year 2000 by Public Law 102-564. The purposes of the new law are to (1) expand and improve the SBIR program, 2) emphasize the program`s goal of increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through Federal R&D, (3) increase small business participation in Federal R&D, and (4) improve the Federal Government`s dissemination of information concerning the SBIR program. DOE`s SBIR pro-ram has two features that are unique. In the 1995 DOE SBIR solicitation, the DOE Fossil Energy topics were: environmental technology for natural gas, oil, and coal; advanced recovery of oil; natural gas supply; natural gas utilization; advanced coal-based power systems; and advanced fossil fuels research. The subtopics for this solicitation`s Natural Gas Supply topic are (1) drilling, completion, and stimulation; (2) low-permeability Formations; (3) delivery and storage; and (4) natural gas upgrading.

  4. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Pastore; L.P. Swiler; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; L. Luzzi; P. Van Uffelen; R.L. Williamson

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code and a recently implemented physics-based model for the coupled fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information from the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior modeling with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  5. Molecular gas and AGN fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO emission, tracing the molecular content and distribution in galaxies, is a privileged tool to trace gas towards the nucleus, since the HI tracer is in general depleted there. A review is done of recent CO line observations, with sufficient spatial resolution to indicate the morphology and kinematics of the gas near the nucleus. The puzzling result that nuclei presently observed in an active phase have little sign of fueling, is discussed.

  6. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Opportunities Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download What Makes A Home 'Energy Efficient'? As energy demands increase and...

  7. Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a Government­University­Industry Research Initiative P o l i c y m a k e r G u i d e #12;Shale gas production is increasing at a rapid rate initiative is needed to fill critical gaps in knowledge at the interface of shale gas development

  8. Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Shale Gas and the Environment: Critical Need for a Government­University­Industry Research Initiative P O L I C Y M A K E R G U I D E #12;Shale gas production is increasing at a rapid rate initiative is needed to fill critical gaps in knowledge at the interface of shale gas development

  9. Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development Mitchell J. Small,*, Paul C, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, United States 1. INTRODUCTION The recent U.S. shale gas Issue: Understanding the Risks of Unconventional Shale Gas Development Published: July 1, 2014 A broad

  10. A NEW GAS TURBINE ENGINE CONCEPT FOR ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A NEW GAS TURBINE ENGINE CONCEPT FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATION WITH INCREASED EFFICIENCY AND POWER REPORT (FAR) A NEW GAS TURBINE ENGINE CONCEPT FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATION WITH INCREASED EFFICIENCY://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 A New Gas Turbine Engine Concept For Electricity Generation With Increased

  11. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  12. Gas Companies Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Companies program is a set of rules that encourage the development of the natural gas industry in Tennessee. They empower gas companies to lay piped and extend conductors through the...

  13. Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one...

  14. Gas Utilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

  15. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts *...

  16. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  17. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE A Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    - servation competitions to energy efficiency projects to renewable-energy installations such as wind­2008. UIC conducted a commuter survey to obtain data regarding the commuting habits of its faculty, staff materials consumed ~e.g., food, water, paper!, energy to waste man- agement practices, and emissions

  19. BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials EA-1321: Final Environmental Assessment...

  20. BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BNL Complex Metal Hydride Project Team Dr. James Wegrzyn (ES&T) Project Manager James Reilly (ES&T) Nanocomposite metal hydride; 95 papers and 17 patents Dr. Gary...

  1. Natural Gas Locomotive | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new tableDual Fuel

  2. Oil & Gas Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofCDepartmentthe Chief HumanOfficial

  3. Gas Sensing Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbell isOklahomaStatus o f t heMills

  4. Natural gas storage - end user interaction. Task 2. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New opportunities have been created for underground gas storage as a result of recent regulatory developments in the energy industry. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 directly changed the economics of gas storage nationwide. This paper discusses the storage of natural gas, storage facilities, and factors affecting the current, and future situation for natural gas storage.

  5. Application of advanced Stirling engine technology to a commercial size gas-fired heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, L.; Agno, J.; Wurm, J.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Research Institute sponsored work on the kinematic Stirling engine-driven heat pump, which offers practical improvements in the use of natural gas. Results from the first phase of the program led to the selection of a method of introducing low pressure natural gas into the V160 engine's combustor and testing of the ejector system. Further engine modifications will be needed as well as demonstrations of the performance and reliability of the units. The first phase found all developmental needs to be achievable, making the concept technically feasible. Computer projections based on the system performance of components indicate the gas-fired pump will work better than electric models and be economically feasible as well. 5 figures, 1 table.

  6. Effect of asphaltene deposition on the internal corrosion in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palacios T, C.A. [CORPOVEN S.A., Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela). Gerencia de Ingenieria de Petroleo; Morales, J.L.; Viloria, A. [INTEVEP, S.A., Los Teques (Venezuela). Gerencia de Tecnologia de Materiales

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil from Norte de Monagas field, in Venezuela, contains large amounts of asphaltenes. Some of them are very unstable with a tendency to precipitate. Because liquid is carried over from the separation process in the flow stations, asphaltenes are also present in the gas gathering and transmission lines, precipitating on the inner wall of pipelines. The gas gathering and transmission lines contain gas with high partial pressures of CO{sub 2}, some H{sub 2}S and are water saturated; therefore, inhibitors are used to control internal corrosion. There is uncertainty on how inhibitors perform in the presence of asphaltene deposition. The purpose of this paper is to describe the causes that enhance asphaltene deposition in gas pipelines and present some results from an ongoing research project carried out by the Venezuelan Oil Companies.

  7. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] 1991 annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report provides research accomplishments, publications, and presentations resulting from the FY91 research conducted under the following Base Program projects: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; three-phase relative permeability; imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; development of improved mobility- control methods; gas flooding; mobility control and sweep improvement in gas flooding; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom- containing compounds; and development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes.

  8. Development of biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, J T [Aerospace Research Corp., Roanoke, VA (USA)

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to develop biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines was started at Aerospace Research Corporation in 1980. The research culminated in construction and installation of a power generation system using an Allison T-56 gas turbine at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. The system has been successfully operated with delivery of power to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Emissions from the system meet or exceed EPA requirements. No erosion of the turbine has been detected in over 760 hours of operation, 106 of which were on line generating power for the TVA. It was necessary to limit the turbine inlet temperature to 1450{degrees}F to control the rate of ash deposition on the turbine blades and stators and facilitate periodic cleaning of these components. Results of tests by researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute -- Columbus Division, give promise that deposits on the turbine blades, which must be periodically removed with milled walnut hulls, can be eliminated with addition of lime to the fuel. Operational problems, which are centered primarily around the feed system and engine configuration, have been adequately identified and can be corrected in an upgraded design. The system is now ready for development of a commercial version. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provided support only for the evaluation of wood as an alternative fuel for gas turbines. However, the system appears to have high potential for integration into a hybrid system for the production of ethanol from sorghum or sugar cane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

  9. C.1. RESULTS FROM PREVIOUS NSF SUPPORT. The PIs of the proposed research have each received NSF support within the last five years. One PI on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    and bootstrapping in assessing phylogenetic confidence. Molecular Biology and Evolution (in review). C.1.3 David Mc NSF support within the last five years. One PI on this project (JW Spatafora) is also a Co five years has resulted in 110 unique peer-reviewed publications and numerous presentations, and has

  10. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 106, NO. B7, PAGES 13,541-13,564, JULY 10, 2001 Upper crustal structure in Puget Lowland, Washington: Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    structure in Puget Lowland, Washington: Results from the 1998SeismicHazards Investigationin PugetA.Fisher,·RayE.Wells,·andtheSHIPSWorkingGroup3 Abstract. A newthree-dimensional(3-D) modelshowsseismicvelocitiesbeneaththePuget Lowlandtoa-arrivaltraveltimesrecordedduringthe1998SeismicHazardsInvestigationinPuget Sound

  11. Natural Gas Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue...

  12. Gas Production Tax (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tax of 7.5 percent of the market value of natural gas produced in the state of Texas is imposed on every producer of gas.

  13. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  14. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  15. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  16. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  17. Assessment of hot gas contaminant control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

  18. Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of P, T, and gas and hydrate phase saturations (S G and SJNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 Gas Hydrate Research-Well Sediments,interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North

  19. Numerical simulation studies of gas production scenarios from hydrate accumulations at the Mallik Site, McKenzie Delta, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy S.; Dallimore, Scott R.; Satoh, Tohru; Hancock, Stephen; Weatherhill, Brian

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    permafrost-associated gas hydrate accumulation in theCanada. An 1150 m deep gas hydrate research well was drilledscenarios from several gas-hydrate-bearing zones at the

  20. Fundamental research on gas–solid reaction between CO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} linking application for solid CO{sub 2} absorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh-ishi, Katsuyoshi, E-mail: oh-ishi@kc.chuo-u.ac.jp; Matsukura, Yusuke; Okumura, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Yuuki; Kobayashi, Ryota

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compared reactivity between CO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} with that between CO{sub 2} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} by using XRD, SEM observation, and thermogravimetry in order to study fundamentally a potential of Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} oxide for application to solid CO{sub 2} absorbents. The CO{sub 2} absorption ability of Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} was examined by measuring rate constants for the gas–solid reaction between perfectly single-phase Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at various temperatures in 100 vol% CO{sub 2} atmosphere using the rate theory with thermogravimetry using rapid heating. The measured rate constants were compared with those reported previously for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} at various temperatures. Almost no difference was found between these rate constants of Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} at temperatures less than 660 °C, but at temperatures higher than 670 °C, the rate constants of Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} were greater than those of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. These results demonstrate that Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} can outstrip the ability of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} to absorb CO{sub 2}. Moreover, different from Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, the CO{sub 2} absorption ability of Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} decays only slightly, even if the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration decreases. -- Graphical abstract: Surface changes of Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} particles by progression of the gas–solid reactions between CO{sub 2} and these oxides. Highlights: • The CO{sub 2} absorption ability of perfect single-phase Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} is reported. • Results show that Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2} can outstrip the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} ability to absorb CO{sub 2}. • The oxide particle CO{sub 2} absorption ability is size- and surface-state-dependent.

  1. Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen-Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles in China Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of...

  2. Energy Department Lab Researcher Wins HENAAC Award for Outstanding...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Outstanding Technical Achievement. Dr. Hakala serves as the technical coordinator for shale gas research, managing multiple projects within NETL's Office of Research and...

  3. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  4. Heat conductivity of a pion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Dobado Gonzalez; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres Rincon

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the heat conductivity of a dilute pion gas employing the Uehling-Uehlenbeck equation and experimental phase-shifts parameterized by means of the SU(2) Inverse Amplitude Method. Our results are consistent with previous evaluations. For comparison we also give results for an (unphysical) hard sphere gas.

  5. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on their own and find it quite amusing, but this time they'll do it by heating wood pellets or wood splints in a test tube. They will collect the resulting gases and use the gas...

  6. Comparison of thermoelectric and permeation dryers for sulfur dioxide removal during sample conditioning of wet gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunder, T.A. [Entropy, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Research Div.; Leighty, D.A. [Perma Pure, Inc., Toms River, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue gas conditioning for moisture removal is commonly performed for criteria pollutant measurements, in particular for extractive CEM systems at combustion sources. An implicit assumption is that conditioning systems specifically remove moisture without affecting pollutant and diluent concentrations. Gas conditioning is usually performed by passing the flue gas through a cold trap (Peltier or thermoelectric dryer) to remove moisture by condensation, which is subsequently extracted by a peristaltic pump. Many air pollutants are water-soluble and potentially susceptible to removal in a condensation dryer from gas interaction with liquid water. An alternative technology for gas conditioning is the permeation dryer, where the flue gas passes through a selectively permeable membrane for moisture removal. In this case water is transferred through the membrane while other pollutants are excluded, and the gas does not contact condensed liquid. Laboratory experiments were performed to measure the relative removal of a water-soluble pollutant (sulfur dioxide, SO{sub 2}) by the two conditioning techniques. A wet gas generating system was used to create hot, wet gas streams of known composition (15% and 30% moisture, balance nitrogen) and flow rate. Pre-heated SO{sub 2} was dynamically spiked into the wet stream using mass flow meters to achieve concentrations of 20, 50, and 100 ppm. The spiked gas was directed through a heated sample line to either a thermoelectric or a permeation conditioning system. Two gas analyzers (Western Research UV gas monitor, KVB/Analect FTIR spectrometer) were used to measure the SO{sub 2} concentration after conditioning. Both analytic methods demonstrated that SO{sub 2} is removed to a significantly greater extent by the thermoelectric dryer. These results have important implications for SO{sub 2} monitoring and emissions trading.

  7. Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low Natural Gas Price Environment: Case Study of a Midwestern Residential Energy Upgrade Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Ian M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practices in a Low Natural Gas Price Environment: Case Studyare now resulting in some natural gas efficiency programscriteria in the new low natural gas price environment.

  8. National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, Bonnie L.; Liave, Feliciano M.; Noll, Leo A.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II includes: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology.

  9. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The interaction between the sensing material and fossil fuel gas results in a refractive index change and optical absorption in the sensing layer. This induces mode coupling strength and boundary conditions changes and thereby shifts the central wavelengths of the guiding mode and cladding modes propagation. GE's experiments demonstrated that such an interaction between the fossil fuel gas and sensing material not only shifts the central wavelengths of the guide mode and cladding modes propagation, but also alters their power loss characteristics. The integrated fiber gas sensing system includes multiple fiber gas sensors, fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensors, fiber optical interrogator, and signal processing software.

  10. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

  11. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD); Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  12. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  13. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  14. Look at natural gas supplies: room for cautious optimism. [USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teitelbaum, D.F.

    1981-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of natural gas availability made only on a national level tend to mask major changes in regional reserves and production, resulting in overly optimistic estiamtes of future supplies. The Zinder annual gas-supply report - based on regional analyses - projects that conventional production will decline more than 50% below current levels by 2000. The development of alternative sources of natural gas (through unconventional production and importation) could maintain a constant level of total gas supplies despite the falling supply of conventional gas.

  15. Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, C.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

  16. NEW AND NOVEL FRACTURE STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF EXISTING GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage wells are prone to continued deliverability loss at a reported average rate of 5% per annum (in the U.S.). This is a result of formation damage due to the introduction of foreign materials during gas injection, scale deposition and/or fines mobilization during gas withdrawal, and even the formation and growth of bacteria. As a means to bypass this damage and sustain/enhance well deliverability, several new and novel fracture stimulation technologies were tested in gas storage fields across the U.S. as part of a joint U.S. Department of Energy and Gas Research Institute R&D program. These new technologies include tip-screenout fracturing, hydraulic fracturing with liquid CO{sub 2} and proppant, extreme overbalance fracturing, and high-energy gas fracturing. Each of these technologies in some way address concerns with fracturing on the part of gas storage operators, such as fracture height growth, high permeability formations, and fluid sensitivity. Given the historical operator concerns over hydraulic fracturing in gas storage wells, plus the many other unique characteristics and resulting stimulation requirements of gas storage reservoirs (which are described later), the specific objective of this project was to identify new and novel fracture stimulation technologies that directly address these concerns and requirements, and to demonstrate/test their potential application in gas storage wells in various reservoir settings across the country. To compare these new methods to current industry deliverability enhancement norms in a consistent manner, their application was evaluated on a cost per unit of added deliverability basis, using typical non-fracturing well remediation methods as the benchmark and considering both short-term and long-term deliverability enhancement results. Based on the success (or lack thereof) of the various fracture stimulation technologies investigated, guidelines for their application, design and implementation have been developed. A final research objective was to effectively deploy the knowledge and experience gained from the project to the gas storage industry at-large.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

  18. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

  19. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory energy-related history, research, managerial reorganization proposals, actions taken, and results. History report, 1945--1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammel, E.F.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development of major energy-related programs at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory between 1945 and 1979. Although the Laboratory`s primary mission during that era was the design and development of nuclear weapons and most of the Laboratory`s funding came from a single source, a number of factors were at work that led to the development of these other programs. Some of those factors were affected by the Laboratory`s internal management structure and organization; others were the result of increasing environmental awareness within the general population and the political consequences of that awareness; still others were related to the increasing demand for energy and the increasing turmoil in the energy-rich Middle East. This report also describes the various activities in Los Alamos, in Washington, and in other areas of the world that contributed to the development of major energy-related programs at Los Alamos. The author has a unique historical perspective because of his involvement as a scientist and manager at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the time period described within the report. In addition, in numerous footnotes and references, he cites a large body of documents that include the opinions and perspectives of many others who were involved at one time or another in these programs. Finally the report includes a detailed chronology of geopolitical events that led to the development of energy-related programs at Los Alamos.

  20. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  1. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  2. Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

  3. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

  4. An investigation of the use of odorants in liquefied natural gas used as a vehicle fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, T.; Williams, T. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an alternative vehicle fuel has increased significantly. Its greater storage density relative to compressed natural gas makes it an attractive option for both volume and weight constrained vehicle applications. The public transportation market, specifically transit bus properties, have been very aggressive in pursuing LNG as an alternative vehicle fuel. Naturally, when dealing with the general public and a new transportation fuel, the issue of safety must be addressed. With this in mind, the Gas Research Institute has initiated a number of safety related studies including an investigation of the use of odorants in LNG. This paper presents the preliminary results of an investigation performed by the Institute of Gas Technology to determine both the applicability and effectiveness of odorizing LNG. This includes an overview of the current state-of-the-art in LNG vehicle fueling and safety systems as well as a discussion of an LNG odorization program conducted by San Diego Gas & Electric in the mid 70`s. Finally, the paper discusses the results of the modeling effort to determine whether conventional odorants used in natural gas can be injected and remain soluble in LNG at temperatures and pressures encountered in LNG fueling and on-board storage systems.

  5. Soil and soil gas sampling in Old Ellenton, the SRL test site, the fire training area and the miscellaneous chemicals basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center, PA (United States)

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil and gas analytical results are presented which were carried out at the SRL site. Gas chromatography was utilized.

  6. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) technology development. Eighth semiannual progress report, July-December 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project effort conducted under this contract is part of the DOE Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle System Program. This program is oriented at providing the United States automotive industry the high-risk long-range technology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced environmental impact. It is intended that technology resulting from this program reach the marketplace by the early 1990s. This report reviews the power section (metal and ceramic engine) effort conducted to date, followed by a review of the component/ceramic technology development. Appendices include reports of progress from Ford, AiResearch Casting Company, and the Carborundum Company.

  7. Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

  8. NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Brett C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heater.  Gas Quality and LNG Research Study.  Southern device performance impacts of LNG use in California.    5.02005): FVIR  Water Heater.  LNG Gas Acceptability Research 

  9. Automatic isochoric apparatus for PVT and phase equilibrium studies of natural gas mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jingjun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................ 51 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION .................................................................................... 54 Carbon Dioxide and Propane Measurement........................................................... 54 91% Methane Natural Gas... 94% Methane Natural Gas ..................................................................................... 65 Phase Boundary....................................................................................... 65...

  10. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVries, Kerry L; Mellegard, Kirby D; Callahan, Gary D; Goodman, William M

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  11. Computational investigation of thermal gas separation for CO2 capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bryan, Charles R.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Torczynski, John Robert; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 09-1351, 'Computational Investigation of Thermal Gas Separation for CO{sub 2} Capture'. Thermal gas separation for a binary mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Molecular models for nitrogen and carbon dioxide are developed, implemented, compared to theoretical results, and compared to several experimental thermophysical properties. The molecular models include three translational modes, two fully excited rotational modes, and vibrational modes, whose degree of excitation depends on the temperature. Nitrogen has one vibrational mode, and carbon dioxide has four vibrational modes (two of which are degenerate). These models are used to perform a parameter study for mixtures of carbon dioxide and nitrogen confined between parallel walls over realistic ranges of gas temperatures and nominal concentrations of carbon dioxide. The degree of thermal separation predicted by DSMC is slightly higher than experimental values and is sensitive to the details of the molecular models.

  12. Energy usage in oil and gas extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honeycutt, B.D.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in partial fulfillment of Subcontract No. C90-103207 by Baxter D. Honeycutt, P.E., Richardson Texas, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the US DOE, INEL requirements, for the requested report were outlined by letter dated September 4, 1990, included the following: process flow diagrams and descriptive discussions of technical operations; mass and energy balances; a summary of energy-saving opportunities with the cross-cutting technologies emphasized; trends of oil and gas production versus energy expended to achieve new production; conclusions and recommendations for future research. The National Energy Account (NEA) data on energy usage in oil and gas related extraction processes are reproduced for reference. Energy cost and production are given for oil and gas well drilling, crude oil and production, national gas production, and natural gas liquid production.

  13. An Analysis of the DER Adoption Climate in Japan Using Optimization Results for Prototype Buildings with U.S. Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Results of a Micro Gas Turbine, The Japan Society ofof the P15 07 micro gas turbine, and determined economicallyby natural gas engine (GE), gas turbine (GT), microturbine (

  14. An Analysis of the DER Adoption Climate in Japan Using Optimization Results for Prototype Buildings with U.S. Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the P15 07 micro gas turbine, and determined economicallyTest Results of a Micro Gas Turbine, The Japan Society ofby natural gas engine (GE), gas turbine (GT), microturbine (

  15. Markets slow to develop for Niger delta gas reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. [Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nigeria produces a very high quality, light, sweet crude oil but with a large percentage of associated gas derived from a high gas-to-oil ratio. Official proved gas reserves, both associated and nonassociated, are 120 tcf. Proved and probable reserves are estimated as high as 300 tcf. The internal market for gas has only begun to develop since the 1980s, and as a result approximately 77% of associated gas production is flared. Domestic gas consumption is currently approximately 700 MMcfd and is projected to have a medium term potential of 1.450 bcfd. The article discusses resource development, gas markets, gas flaring, gas use programs, the Bonny LNG scheme, the gas reserve base, LNG project status, competition, and energy opportunities.

  16. Unaccounted-for gas project. Data bases. Volume 5. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, R.; Waller, R.L.; Grinstead, J.R.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study identifies, explains, and quantifies unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric (PG E) Co.'s gas transmission and distribution systems during 1987. The results demonstrate that the UAF volumes are reasonable for determining the indirectly billed gas requirements component of the gas cost and for operating the PG E gas system. Gas leakage is a small percentage of UAF. Summaries of studies on gas leakage, gas theft, measurement inaccuracies, and accounting methodologies are presented along with recommendations for further work which could reduce or more accurately measure UAF.

  17. Understanding Combustion Processes Through Microgravity Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as Lewis number effects. Examples from premixed-gas combustion, non-premixed gas-jet flames, droplet. COMPARISON OF TIME SCALES FOR PREMIXED-GAS COMBUSTION To determine the conditions where gravity can affectUnderstanding Combustion Processes Through Microgravity Research Paul D. Ronney Department

  18. RESEARCH REPORT 2012 ResearchResearchResearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    research on batteries and energy storage, and are part of a multimillion- dollar investment by Johnson Controls that aims to make Wisconsin a hub for energy-storage technology. #12;Chancellor's Welcome A great powerful UW-MILWAUKEE RESEARCH REPORT 2012 As Wisconsin's premier public urban institution, the University

  19. Gas phase 129Xe NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Lana G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 l l Dynamic NMR microscopy of gas phase Poiseuille flowmetal vapors and noble gases can be used to efficientlypolarize the nuclei ofthe noble-gas atoms. As a result, the

  20. CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX Natural Gas Engine and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Integration Research TRANSPORTATION ENERGY ­ including natural gas ­ that can substantially reduce GHG emissions while reducing petroleum dependence. This research would increase the use of natural gas as a transportation fuel by developing advanced natural

  1. Natural Gas Engine Development Gaps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigler, B.T.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of current natural gas vehicle offerings is presented for both light-duty and medium- and heavy-duty applications. Recent gaps in the marketplace are discussed, along with how they have been or may be addressed. The stakeholder input process for guiding research and development needs via the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) to the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission is reviewed. Current high-level natural gas engine development gap areas are highlighted, including efficiency, emissions, and the certification process.

  2. Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W; Granite, E.J.; Luebke, D.R; Kitchin, J.R; Landon, J.; Weiland, L.M.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation, However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e" sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area, Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO 2 and 02 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effiuent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide, A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent.

  3. Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports...

  4. Tidd hot gas clean up program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report on the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up Program covers the period from initial Proof-of-Concept testing in August, 1990, through final equipment inspections in May, 1995. The Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) system was installed in the Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Demonstration Plant, which is the first utility-scale PFBC plant in the United States. Detailed design work on the project began in July, 1990, and site construction began in December, 1991. Initial operation of the system occurred in May, 1992, and the hot gas filter was commissioned in October, 1992. The test program ended in March, 1995, when the Tidd Plant was shut down following its four-year test program. Section 1.0 of this report is an executive summary of the project covering the project background, system description, test results and conclusions. Section 2.0 is an introduction covering the program objectives and schedule. Section 3.0 provides detailed descriptions of the system and its major components. Section 4.0 provides detailed results of all testing including observations and posttest inspection results. Sections 5.0 and 6.0 list the program conclusions and recommendations, respectively. Appendix I is a report prepared by Southern Research Institute on the properties of Tidd PFBC ash sampled during the test program. Appendix II is a report prepared by Westinghouse STC on the performance of candle filter fail-safe regenerator devices.

  5. Gas power, its promises and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seay, J.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the recent decline in natural gas supply, it is still the dominant domestic source of energy supply and the most widely used fuel in the industrial, commercial, and household sectors. The basic problem of the gas industry is that of finding new supplies cost-competitive with other fuels in order to maintain the delivery of adequate gaseous energy to its customers, utilizing the existing and literally irreplaceable underground transmission and distribution system. The decline in gas supplies is traced to regulation of the field price of natural gas at a level too low to insure continuing additions to reserves at a rate sufficient to balance production. As a result, the US is drawing down its inventory of gas supply. The higher prices for gas in the field established by the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 provides additional economic incentives for exploration and development of new natural gas, and it is hoped that the higher prices will elicit new supplies. The US has available a large resource base of gas yet to be discovered, natural gas in unconventional sources, and the potential of additional incremental supplies from gasification of coal, the largest remaining fossil fuel resource.

  6. Recovering Flare Gas Energy - A Different Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, W.

    depend on a compressor to pull suction on the pressurized flare line and pump the gas into a plant-wide fuer gas system. Because SunOlin shares its flare system with an adjacent oil refinery, any change to the flare system operation could have far... design and operating scheme incorporating the results of the HAZOP study. The major features of our flare gas recovery system, then, are as follows: A 30" main flare gas header originating in the adjacent oil refinery is routed through the Sun...

  7. Gas Permeability of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples under Variable Confining Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiqun; Li, Yushou; Wang, Bo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    argillite under con?nement: gas and water testing. Phys.Gascoyne, M. , Wuschke, D.M. : Gas migration through water-fractured rock: results of a gas injection test. J.

  8. The Mathematics of the Bose Gas and its Condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott H. Lieb; Robert Seiringer; Jan Philip Solovej; Jakob Yngvason

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This book surveys results about the quantum mechanical many-body problem of the Bose gas that have been obtained by the authors over the last seven years. These topics are relevant to current experiments on ultra-cold gases; they are also mathematically rigorous, using many analytic techniques developed over the years to handle such problems. Some of the topics treated are the ground state energy, the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, Bose-Einstein condensation, superfluidity, one-dimensional gases, and rotating gases. The book also provides a pedagogical entry into the field for graduate students and researchers.

  9. Expert Meeting Report: Foundations Research Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Huelman, P.; Carmody, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Expert Meeting Plan, the NorthernSTAR Team proposed to host two Expert Meetings in calendar year 2011. Invitees to the meetings would include experts in the current field of study, other BA team members, and representatives from DOE and NREL. They will invite leading industry experts to present at these meetings. The Expert Meetings will focus on key systems areas that will be required to meet the Building America performance goals and shall be sufficiently narrow in scope that specific conclusions, action items, and delegation of future tasks can be identified and completed. The two expert meeting topics are 'Foundations' and 'Window Retrofit.' The first session is designed as a webinar only and the second will be a live meeting.

  10. Expert Meeting Report: Foundations Research Results

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: Final EnvironmentalCounties,UnitedCommunication,1] U.S.EducationalJanuary

  11. 8.03 ARM Research Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . S .1α, X).Way of

  12. ZEBRAlliance Research Project Shows Promising Results | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognizedThesis

  13. Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sequestration. In this thesis, I report my findings on the effect of flue gas ??impurities?? on the displacement of natural gas during CO2 sequestration, and results on unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests to carbonate samples. In displacement experiments...

  14. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  15. Energy Research and Development Division STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research and Development Division STAFF REPORT NATURAL GAS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 2013 Annual Report CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown Jr., Governor OCTOBER 2013 CEC5002013111 #12; CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Linda Schrupp Primary Authors Prepared for: California

  16. Natural gas contracts in efficient portfolios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the {open_quotes}contracts portfolio{close_quotes} issue of natural gas contracts in support of the Domestic Natural Gas and Oil Initiative (DGOI) published by the U.S. Department of Energy in 1994. The analysis is a result of a collaborative effort with the Public Service Commission of the State of Maryland to consider {open_quotes}reforms that enhance the industry`s competitiveness{close_quotes}. The initial focus of our collaborative effort was on gas purchasing and contract portfolios; however, it became apparent that efficient contracting to purchase and use gas requires a broader consideration of regulatory reform. Efficient portfolios are obtained when the holder of the portfolio is affected by and is responsible for the performance of the portfolio. Natural gas distribution companies may prefer a diversity of contracts, but the efficient use of gas requires that the local distribution company be held accountable for its own purchases. Ultimate customers are affected by their own portfolios, which they manage efficiently by making their own choices. The objectives of the DGOI, particularly the efficient use of gas, can be achieved when customers have access to suppliers of gas and energy services under an improved regulatory framework. The evolution of the natural gas market during the last 15 years is described to account for the changing preferences toward gas contracts. Long-term contracts for natural gas were prevalent before the early 1980s, primarily because gas producers had few options other than to sell to a single pipeline company, and this pipeline company, in turn, was the only seller to a gas distribution company.

  17. Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E. (Chevron); Latham, T. (Chevron); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Hunt, J. (Minerals Management Service); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger); Boswell, R.M. (NETL); Rose, K.K. (NETL); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Hutchinson, D. (USGS); Collett, T. (USGS); Dugan, B. (Rice University); Wood, W. (Naval Research Laboratory)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand-prone sedimentary section that rises stratigraphically across the base of the gas hydrate stability zone and that has seismic indicators of gas hydrate. Copyright 2008, Offshore Technology Conference

  18. COMPUTATIONAL OPTIMIZATION OF GAS COMPRESSOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2015 ... When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport net- works ..... The four most frequently used drive types are gas turbines, gas driven.

  19. Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas...

  20. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  1. Natural gas vehicles : Status, barriers, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood Werpy, M.; Santini, D.; Burnham, A.; Mintz, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancements in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.

  2. Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

  3. Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

  4. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  5. Gas and Oil (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

  6. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  7. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  8. Geoscience research for energy security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the nation's geoscience needs and recommends DOE activities to mitigate major problems that effect energy security. The report recommends new or redirected DOE geoscience research initiatives for oil and gas, coal, nuclear resources, structures and processes in the earth's crust, geothermal resources, oil shale, and waste disposal. In light of the current and near-term national energy requirements, federal budget constraints, and the diminished R and D efforts from the domestic energy industry, the Board recommends that DOE: assign highest geoscience research emphasis to shorter-term, energy priorities of the nation; particularly advanced oil and gas exploration and production technologies; establish in DOE an Office of Geoscience Research to develop and administer a strategic plan for geoscience research activities; establish oil and gas research centers within each of the six major oil and gas provinces of the United States to conduct and coordinate interdisciplinary problem-oriented research; increase oil and gas research funding by an initial annual increment of $50 million, primarily to support the regional research centers.

  9. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  10. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  11. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  12. Estimating the amount of gas hydrate and free gas from marine seismic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecker, C.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.M.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine seismic data and well-log measurements at the Blake Ridge offshore South Carolina show that prominent seismic bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) are caused by sediment layers with gas hydrate overlying sediments with free gas. The authors apply a theoretical rock-physics model to 2-D Blake Ridge marine seismic data to determine gas-hydrate and free-gas saturation. High-porosity marine sediment is modeled as a granular system where the elastic wave velocities are linked to porosity; effective pressure; mineralogy; elastic properties of the pore-filling material; and water, gas, and gas-hydrate saturation of the pore space. To apply this model to seismic data, the authors first obtain interval velocity using stacking velocity analysis. Next, all input parameters to the rock-physics model, except porosity and water, gas and gas hydrate saturation, are estimated from geologic information. To estimate porosity and saturation from interval velocity, they first assume that the entire sediment does not contain gas hydrate or free gas. Then they use the rock-physics model to calculate porosity directly from the interval velocity. Such porosity profiles appear to have anomalies where gas hydrate and free gas are present (as compared to typical profiles expected and obtained in sediment without gas hydrate of gas). Porosity is underestimated in the hydrate region and is overestimated in the free-gas region. The authors calculate the porosity residuals by subtracting a typical porosity profile (without gas hydrate and gas) from that with anomalies. Next they use the rock-physics model to eliminate these anomalies by introducing gas-hydrate of gas saturation. As a result, they obtain the desired 2-D saturation map. The maximum gas-hydrate saturation thus obtained is between 13% and 18% of the pore space (depending on the version of the model used). These saturation values are consistent with those measured in the Blake Ridge wells (away from the seismic line), which are about 12%. Free-gas saturation varies between 1% and 2%. The saturation estimates are extremely sensitive to the input velocity values. Therefore, accurate velocity determination is crucial for correct reservoir characterization.

  13. Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

  14. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for DST and SST representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant structures, systems and components (SSCs) and/or technical safety requirements (TSRs) were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support WP-13033, Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  15. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for double shell tank (DST) and single shell tank (SST) representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant SSCs and/or TSRS were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  16. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  17. Gas Cylinders: Proper Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

  18. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  19. Natural Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    . Exploration and extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus shale is a potentially valuable economic stimulus for landowners. You might be wondering how the nation's economic situation is affecting the market for naturalNatural Gas Exploration: A Landowners Guide to Financial Management Natural Gas Exploration

  20. Long term performance of boilers using landfill gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulledge, J.; Cosulich, J.; Ahmed, S.L.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US EPA estimates that approximately 600 to 700 landfills produce sufficient gas for profitable energy production in the United States. The gas from these landfills could provide enough electricity for about 3 million homes. Yet, there are only about 120 operating landfill gas to energy facilities. A lack of information on successful projects may cause part of this shortfall. This paper provides information on 4 successful projects using landfill gas fired boilers, some of which have operated over a decade. Natural gas fired boilers can be easily converted to bum landfill gas. Several modifications to Districts` boilers, described in this paper, have resulted in many years of safe and corrosion free operation. Most of the modifications are minor. Conversion can be accomplished for under $100,000 in many cases. Information on the reliability and longevity of landfill gas supplies is also provided. Gas from a given landfill is generally available over 99.5% of the time with about 5 brief flow interruptions annually. Actual data from 3 landfills document the high availability of landfill gas. To show the longevity of landfill gas flows, data from the Palos Verdes Landfill are provided. The Palos Verdes Landfill closed in 1980. The Palos Verdes. Landfill Gas to Energy Facility is currently producing over 8 megawatts. Landfill gas pretreatment is not required for boilers. In cases where the landfill gas is being piped offsite, it is usually cost effective to dehydrate the landfill gas. Landfill gas bums cleaner than natural gas. NO{sub x} emissions from landfill gas fired boilers are lower because of the carbon dioxide in the landfill gas. Trace organic destruction efficiency is usually over 99% in landfill gas fired boilers. In addition, flare emissions are eliminated when landfill gas is used to displace fossil fuels in boilers.

  1. Cost-Effective Gas-Fueled Cooling Systems for Commercial/Industrial Buildings and Process Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, B. B.

    Gas Research Institute initiated a program in 1985 to develop cost-effective gas engine-driven cooling systems for commercial and industrial applications. Tecogen, Inc., has designed, fabricated, and tested a nominal 150-ton engine-driven water...

  2. Gas -Fueled Engine-Driven Air Conditioning Systems for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, B. B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1985, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) initiated a program with Tecogen, Inc., to develop a nominal 150-ton gas-fueled engine-driven water chiller for commercial buildings. The packaged system has been designed, fabricated, and operated...

  3. Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Childers

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

  4. Synthesis of Isobutene and Isobutane from Synthesis Gas. A Literature Review Since 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isosynthesis reaction is commonly referred as the reaction that converts selectively synthesis gas to isobutene and isobutane. The main feature of this reaction is the production of branched hydrocarbons in higher proportion with respect to linear hydrocarbons than expected from thermodynamic equilibrium and with a molecular weight distribution favoring iso-C4 hydrocarbons. This article reviews and summarizes isosynthesis research results reported in the open scientific literature with emphasis on the articles published in the last two decades.

  5. MELCOR validation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, C.D.; Byers, R.K.; Shaffer, C.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent comparisons of MELCOR predictions to three sets of experiments, the ABCOVE Aerosol Experiments, the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, and the Battelle-Frankfurt Gas Mixing Experiments are presentd. All three comparisons involve conditions that are of concern in an LWR containment during a severe accident. MELCOR results are compared to the experimental data and the predictions of at least one other state-of-the-art code for each test. In the ABCOVE comparisons, the MELCOR aerosol modeling is demonstrated. In comparisons to the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, MELCOR predictions of the response of the containment to the release of steam from the primary system are shown, and in the Battelle-Frankfurt comparisons, MELCOR predictions of the diffusion in a containment of an injected hydrogen-nitrogen gas are studied. These comparisons provide critical testing of the MELCOR control volume hydrodynamics package, the radionuclide package, and the flow path package.

  6. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

  7. Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

    2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

  8. Natural gas recovery, storage, and utilization SBIR program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker, H.D.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A Fossil Energy natural-gas topic has been a part of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program since 1988. To date, 50 Phase SBIR natural-gas applications have been funded. Of these 50, 24 were successful in obtaining Phase II SBIR funding. The current Phase II natural-gas research projects awarded under the SBIR program and managed by METC are presented by award year. The presented information on these 2-year projects includes project title, awardee, and a project summary. The 1992 Phase II projects are: landfill gas recovery for vehicular natural gas and food grade carbon dioxide; brine disposal process for coalbed gas production; spontaneous natural as oxidative dimerization across mixed conducting ceramic membranes; low-cost offshore drilling system for natural gas hydrates; motorless directional drill for oil and gas wells; and development of a multiple fracture creation process for stimulation of horizontally drilled wells.The 1993 Phase II projects include: process for sweetening sour gas by direct thermolysis of hydrogen sulfide; remote leak survey capability for natural gas transport storage and distribution systems; reinterpretation of existing wellbore log data using neural-based patter recognition processes; and advanced liquid membrane system for natural gas purification.

  9. Gas reburn and cofiring technologies entering the market place

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratapas, J.M. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Research Institute, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, is delivering information products and evaluation tools for applying gas reburn, gas cofiring and seasonal gas switching at utility boilers originally designed for coal or oil firing. Version 1.2 of the Coal Quality Impact Model (CQIM) was released in February 1995 with the inclusion of gas cofiring and seasonal gas conversion. A technology module for the State of the Art Power Plant (SOAAP) Workstation developed by EPRI that will include gas cofiring, gas reburn and seasonal gas switching is under development. A beta release is targeted for fall 1995. An EPRI/GRI guidelines report for gas conversions is being issued this summer. The paper describes how these guidelines and software products are being developed and validated from ongoing and completed full-scale field experiments and tests conducted at units totaling over 4,950 MW of capacity. Future plans for deployment and possible enhancement of information products dealing with gas reburn and cofiring technologies are discussed.

  10. Welcome FUPWG- Natural Gas Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides an overview of natural gas, including emissions, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, and landfill gas supplement for natural gas system.

  11. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  12. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  13. Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

  14. Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dimock

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

  15. Ultracold Fermi gas with repulsive interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ye-Ryoung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents results from experiments of ultracold atomic Fermi gases with repulsive interaction. Itinerant ferromagnetism was studied by simulating the Stoner model with a strongly interacting Fermi gas of ultracold ...

  16. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, “Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle,” May 2008.

  17. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results No measured results exist at this time in terms of greenhouse gas intensity reductions, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program and evolving industry...

  18. Gas Dynamics of NGC 4472 R. P. Kraft(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarazin, Craig

    Gas Dynamics of NGC 4472 R. P. Kraft(1) , W. R. Forman(1) , C. Jones(1) , P. E. J. Nulsen(1) M. J present preliminary results from a 100 ks XMM-Newton observation of the hot gas in the nearby massive to be falling into the Virgo cluster. We find several structures in the gas indicative of a previous epoch

  19. Multi-Gas Assessment of the Kyoto Protocol John Reilly,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-Gas Assessment of the Kyoto Protocol John Reilly,* Ronald G. Prinn,* Jochen Harnisch,* Jean in the protocol appear to be an adequate representation of trace gas climatic effects. The principal reason for the success of this simplified GWP approach in our calculations is that the mix of gas emissions resulting

  20. Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random