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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

2

Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Promising technology for recovery and use of liquefied natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of liquefied natural gas is proposed as an alternative to motor fuel. Technology for recovering liquid natural gas based on the principle of internal gas cooling in a turbo-expander, and the equipment require...

E. B. Fedorova; V. V. Fedorov; A. D. Shakhov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio.

5

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy

6

Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas recovery ... However, by referring to landfills as dumps, the article creates a misimpression. ... The answers revolve around the relative emissions from composting facilities and landfills and the degree to which either finished compost or landfill gas is used beneficially. ...

Morton A. Barlaz

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

8

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology ETR Report Date: July 2007 ETR-7 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Caustic Recovery Technology Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (EM-21) has been developing caustic recovery technology for application to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to reduce the amount of Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrified. Recycle of sodium hydroxide with an efficient caustic recovery process could reduce the amount of waste glass produced by greater than 30%. The Ceramatec Sodium (Na), Super fast Ionic CONductors (NaSICON) membrane has shown promise for directly producing 50% caustic with high sodium selectivity. The external review

9

Caustic Recovery Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Caustic Recovery Technology Summary - Caustic Recovery...

10

Recovery of gas from hydrate deposits using conventional production technology. [Salt-frac technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane hydrate gas could be a sizeable energy resource if methods can be devised to produce this gas economically. This paper examines two methods of producing gas from hydrate deposits by the injection of hot water or steam, and also examines the feasibility of hydraulic fracturing and pressure reduction as a hydrate gas production technique. A hydraulic fracturing technique suitable for hydrate reservoirs is also described.

McGuire, P.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Caustic Recovery Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

366, REVISON 0 366, REVISON 0 Key Words: Waste Treatment Plant Sodium Recovery Electrochemical Retention: Permanent Review of Ceramatec's Caustic Recovery Technology W. R. Wilmarth D. T. Hobbs W. A. Averill E. B. Fox R. A. Peterson UNCLASSIFIED DOES NOT CONTAIN UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION ADC & Reviewing Official:_______________________________________ (E. Stevens, Manager, Solid Waste and Special Programs) Date:______________________________________ JULY 20, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U. S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-96SR18500 Page 1 of 28 WSRC-STI-2007-00366, REVISON 0 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under

12

Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Low Level Heat Recovery Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

O'Brien, W. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Enhancing landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfilling of municipal solid waste (MSW) may cause potential environmental impacts like global warming (GW), soil contaminations, and groundwater pollution. The degradation of MSW in anaerobic circumstances generates methane emissions, and can hence contribute the GW. As the GW is nowadays considered as one of the most serious environmental threats, the mitigation of methane emissions should obviously be aimed at on every landfill site where methane generation occurs. In this study, the treatment and utilization options for the generated LFG at case landfills which are located next to each other are examined. The yearly GHG emission balances are estimated for three different gas management scenarios. The first scenario is the combined heat and power (CHP) production with a gas engine. The second scenario is the combination of heat generation for the asphalt production process in the summer and district heat production by a water boiler in the winter. The third scenario is the LFG upgrading to biomethane. The estimation results illustrate that the LFG collection efficiency affects strongly on the magnitudes of GHG emissions. According to the results, the CHP production gives the highest GHG emission savings and is hence recommended as a gas utilization option for case landfills. Furthermore, aspects related to the case landfills' extraction are discussed.

Antti Niskanen; Hanna Värri; Jouni Havukainen; Ville Uusitalo; Mika Horttanainen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

16

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

17

Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Funding Recovery Act Funding Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Recovery Act Funding Opportunities on AddThis.com... Recovery Act Funding Opportunities President Barack Obama announced on March 19 that the DOE is offering up to $2.4 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to support next-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and their advanced

18

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

19

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

22

(Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber trademark , March 1992)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} has been built and is being demonstrated on-line at the Dragon Products Plant in Thomaston, Maine. This Innovative Clean Coal Technology is using waste cement kiln dust (CKD) to scrub sulfur dioxide, some NO{sub x}, as well as a small amount of carbon dioxide from a coal burning kiln exhaust flue gas. The process also enables the cement plant to reuse the treated CKD, eliminating the need to landfill this material. Potassium, the offending contaminant in the CKD, is extracted in a useful form, potassium sulfate, which is used as a fertilizer. These useful products generate income from operation of this Recovery Scrubber. System start-up was begun in late December of 1990. At that time, several mechanical problems were encountered. These relatively minor problems were resolved enabling Phase III to begin on August 20, 1991. While inefficiencies are still being worked out, major program objectives are being met. Resolution of remaining operability problems is well in hand and should not hamper attainment of all project goals.

Not Available

1992-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

Recovery rates, enhanced oil recovery and technological limits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Oman-initial results and future plans. In Proc. SP EOR Conf...Moradi-Araghi, A . 2000 A review of thermally stable gels...through EOR: policy and regulatory considerations for greenhouse...TE Burchfield. 1989 Review of microbial technology...enhanced-oil-recovery technologies: a review of the past present and...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Enhancing Shale Gas Recovery by High-Temperature Supercritical CO2 Flooding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine a new technology for shale gas recovery: high-temperature supercritical carbon dioxide flooding ... of supercritical carbon dioxide, the characteristics of shale gas reservoirs, the adsorption/desorpti...

Feiying Ma; Yongqing Wang; Lin Wang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs (August 2013) Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid...

26

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source Heat Pumps Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program:Ground Source Heat Pumps A detailled description of the...

27

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Small gas turbine technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small Gas Turbine Technology: Small gas turbine, in the power range up to 500 kW, requires a recuperated thermodynamic cycle to achieve an electrical efficiency of about 30%. This efficiency is the optimum, which is possible for a cycle pressure ratio of about 4–1. The cycle airflow is function of the power requirement. To increase the efficiency, in view to reduce the CO2 emission, it is mandatory to develop a more efficient thermodynamic cycle. Different thermodynamic cycles were examined and the final choice was made for an Intercooled, Recuperated cycle. The advantage of this cycle, for the same final electrical efficiency of about 35%, is the smaller cycle airflow, which is the most dimensional parameter for the important components as the heat exchanger recuperator and the combustion chamber. In parallel with the thermodynamic cycle it is necessary to develop the High Speed Alternator technology, integrated on the same shaft that the gas turbine rotating components, to achieve the constant efficiency at part loads, from 50% up to 100%, by the capacity to adjust the engine speed at the required load. To satisfy the stringent requirement in pollutant emissions of \\{NOx\\} and CO, the catalytic combustion system is the most efficient and this advance technology has to be proven. The major constraints for the small gas turbine technology development are the production cost and the maintenance cost of the unit. In the power range of 0–500 kW the gas turbine technology is in competition with small reciprocating engines, which are produced in large quantity for automotive industry, at a very low production cost.

Andre Romier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Develop thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery with a 10% fuel economy improvement without increasing emissions.

30

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector.

31

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Natural Gas Rate and Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

37

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

38

Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery - Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I results of a C0{sub 2}-assisted oil recovery demonstration project in selected Cypress Sandstone reservoirs at Mattoon Field, Illinois are reported. The design and scope of this project included C0{sub 2} injectvity testing in the Pinnell and Sawyer units, well stimulaton treatments with C0{sub 2} in the Strong unit and infill well drilling, completion and oil production. The field activities were supported by extensive C0{sub 2}-oil-water coreflood experiments, CO{sub 2} oil-phase interaction experiments, and integrated geologic modeling and reservoir simulations. The progress of the project was made public through presentations at an industry meeting and a DOEs contractors` symposium, through quarterly reports and one-to-one consultations with interested operators. Phase II of this project was not implemented. It would have been a water-alternating-gas (WAG) project of longer duration.

Baroni, M. [American Oil Recovery, Inc., Decatur, IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Incremental natural gas resources through infield reserve growth/secondary natural gas recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gasfrom conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas gulf coast basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields. To transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

Finley, R.J.; Levey, R.A.; Hardage, B.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Act Act Pie chart diagram shows the breakdown of how cost-sharing funds related to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act from industry participants, totaling $54 million (for a grand total of $96 million), are allocated within the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, updated September 2010. The diagram shows that $18.5 million is allocated to backup power, $9.7 million is allocated to lift truck, $7.6 million is allocated to portable power, $3.4 million is allocated to residential and commercial CHP, and $2.4 million is allocated to auxiliary power research. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) presents opportunities with potential for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Signed into law by President Obama on February 17, 2009, the Recovery Act is an unprecedented effort to jumpstart our economy, create or save millions of jobs, and put a down payment on addressing long-neglected challenges so our country can thrive in the twenty-first century.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

Berthelot, Jan Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Oil & Gas Technology Center | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center GE Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center Mark Little, SVP and chief technology officer for GE, and Eric Gebhardt, vice president...

43

HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. This report describes testing using the laboratory apparatus but operated at the pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas, which contains far more contaminants than can be simulated in the laboratory. The results are very encouraging, with stable and efficient operation being obtained for a prolonged period of time.

Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during drilling. The method developed in this study involves analysis of the surface morphology of the broken end of the core as a top indicator. Together with information on the working of the tool (rotation direction), fracture-surface features, such as arrest lines and plume structures, not only give a top direction for the cores but also indicate the direction of fracture propagation in the tough, fine-grained Cataract/Medina sandstones. The study determined that microresistivity logs or other image logs can be used to obtain accurate sidewall core azimuths and to determine the precise depths of the sidewall cores. Two seismic S-wave technologies were developed in this study. The first was a special explosive package that, when detonated in a conventional seismic shot hole, produces more robust S-waves than do standard seismic explosives. The importance of this source development is that it allows S-wave seismic data to be generated across all of the Appalachian Basin. Previously, Appalachian operators have not been able to use S-wave seismic technology to detect fractured reservoirs because the industry-standard S-wave energy source, the horizontal vibrator, is not a practical source option in the heavy timber cover that extends across most of the basin. The second S-wave seismic technology that was investigated was used to verify that standard P-wave seismic sources can create robust downgoing S-waves by P-to-S mode conversion in the shallow stratigraphic layering in the Appalachian Basin. This verification was done by recording and analyzing a 3-component vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Atlas Montgomery No. 4 well at Henderson Dome, Mercer County, Pennsylvania. The VSP data confirmed that robust S-waves are generated by P-to-S mode conversion at the basinwide Onondaga stratigraphic level. Appalachian operators can thus use converted-mode seismic technology to create S-wave images of fractured and unfractured rock systems throughout the basin.

BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

1998-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods- can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, M.B.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

NETL: E&P Technologies - Improved Recovery - Stripper Well Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploration & Production Technologies Improved Recovery - Stripper Well Technology image of a well linking to Stripper Well Consortium “Stripper well" is a term used to describe wells that produce natural gas or oil at very low rates—less than 10 barrels per day of oil or less than 60 thousand cubic feet per day of gas. Despite their small output, stripper oil and gas wells make a significant contribution to the Nation’s energy supply—and they are the lifeblood of thousands of small, independent oil and gas operating companies. About 80 percent of the roughly 500,000 producing oil wells in the United States are classified as stripper wells. Despite their small volumes, they add up. The >400,000 stripper oil wells in the United States produce, in aggregate, nearly 1 million barrels per day of oil, which represents almost 19% of domestic oil production.

49

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HVAC Research Projects to someone by E-mail HVAC Research Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded HVAC Research Projects on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

50

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working Fluid Projects to someone by E-mail Working Fluid Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Working Fluid Projects on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

51

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Altamont Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CSL Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Broward County, Florida Coordinates 26.190096°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.190096,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Lake Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name CID Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility CID Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Chestnut Ridge Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Anderson County, Tennessee Coordinates 36.0809574°, -84.2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0809574,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Biomass Facility Facility Olinda Landfill Gas Recovery Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility BJ Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Gwinnett County, Georgia Coordinates 33.9190653°, -84.0167423° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9190653,"lon":-84.0167423,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Settlers Hill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Greene Valley Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Greene Valley Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Du Page County, Illinois Coordinates 41.8243831°, -88.0900762° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8243831,"lon":-88.0900762,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Kane County, Illinois Coordinates 41.987884°, -88.4016041° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.987884,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location St. Joseph County, Indiana Coordinates 41.6228085°, -86.3376761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6228085,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name DFW Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility DFW Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Denton County, Texas Coordinates 33.1418611°, -97.179026° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1418611,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Deepwater Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deepwater Technology Deepwater Technology Research Project Summaries Reference Shelf O&G Document Archive Deepwater (and Ultra-Deepwater, 5000 feet of water depth and beyond) is recognized as one of the last remaining areas of the world were oil and natural gas resources remain to be discovered and produced. The architecture of the systems employed to cost-effectively develop these resources in an environmentally safe manner, reflect some of industryÂ’s most advanced engineering accomplishments. NETL is funding research to catalyze further advances that can help Gulf of Mexico discoveries progress to production quickly and safely, and that can help maximize oil and gas recovery from fields that are currently at the edge of industry capabilities. Many of these efforts are focused on subsea production

64

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Natural Gas Research Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and...

65

Gas to Liquid Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The liquefaction energy required in a LNG plant typically has been reported as 9–12% of the heat energy in the natural gas, and 9–10% energy shrinkage is ... energy. LNG projects have a very high capital cost, in...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes the objectives, technical approach, results and conclusions for a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept is a configuration of CrystaTech, Inc.'s CrystaSulf{reg_sign} process which utilizes a direct oxidation catalyst upstream of the absorber tower to oxidize a portion of the inlet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and elemental sulfur. This hybrid configuration of CrystaSulf has been named CrystaSulf-DO and represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day and more. This hybrid process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both onshore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf is a nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes H{sub 2}S from gas streams and converts it to elemental sulfur. In CrystaSulf, H{sub 2}S in the inlet gas is reacted with SO{sub 2} to make elemental sulfur according to the liquid phase Claus reaction: 2H{sub 2}S + SO{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O + 3S. The SO{sub 2} for the reaction can be supplied from external sources by purchasing liquid SO{sub 2} and injecting it into the CrystaSulf solution, or produced internally by converting a portion of the inlet gas H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} or by burning a portion of the sulfur produced to make SO{sub 2}. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, the needed SO{sub 2} is produced by placing a bed of direct oxidation catalyst in the inlet gas stream to oxidize a portion of the inlet H{sub 2}S. Oxidation catalysts may also produce some elemental sulfur under these conditions, which can be removed and recovered prior to the CrystaSulf absorber. The CrystaSulf-DO process can utilize direct oxidation catalyst from many sources. Numerous direct oxidation catalysts are available from many suppliers worldwide. They have been used for H{sub 2}S oxidation to sulfur and/or SO{sub 2} for decades. It was believed at the outset of the project that TDA Research, Inc., a subcontractor, could develop a direct oxidation catalyst that would offer advantages over other commercially available catalysts for this CrystaSulf-DO process application. This project involved the development of several of TDA's candidate proprietary direct oxidation catalysts through laboratory bench-scale testing. These catalysts were shown to be effective for conversion of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} and to elemental sulfur under certain operating conditions. One of these catalysts was subsequently tested on a commercial gas stream in a bench-scale reactor at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas with good results. However, commercial developments have precluded the use of TDA catalysts in the CrystaSulf-DO process. Nonetheless, this project has advanced direct oxidation catalyst technology for H{sub 2}S control in energy industries and led to several viable paths to commercialization. TDA is commercializing the use of its direct oxidation catalyst technology in conjunction with the SulfaTreat{reg_sign} solid scavenger for natural gas applications and in conjunction with ConocoPhillips and DOE for gasification applications using ConocoPhillips gasification technology. CrystaTech is commercializing its CrystaSulf-DO process in conjunction with Gas Technology Institute for natural gas applications (using direct oxidation catalysts from other commercial sources) and in conjunction with ChevronTexaco and DOE for gasification applications using ChevronTexaco's gasification technology.

Dennis Dalrymple

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Landfill Gas Formation, Recovery and Emission in The Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfills are one of the main sources of methane in The Netherlands. Methane emissions from landfills are estimated to be about 180–580 ... at a total of 760–1730 ktonnes. Landfill gas recovery and utilization is...

Hans Oonk

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

Unneberg, Arild

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Recovery rates, enhanced oil recovery and technological limits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly extend global oil reserves once oil prices are high enough to make these techniques...last plan on the assumption that the oil price is likely to remain relatively high...1970s at a time of relatively high oil prices. Improved oil recovery (IOR) is...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Energy Recovery Systems...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

penalties associated with many emission control technologies. These technologies include diesel particulate filters, catalysts, filter substrates, and exhaust-gas recirculation...

72

[Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark}, March 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} has been built and is being demonstrated on-line at the Dragon Products Plant in Thomaston, Maine. This Innovative Clean Coal Technology is using waste cement kiln dust (CKD) to scrub sulfur dioxide, some NO{sub x}, as well as a small amount of carbon dioxide from a coal burning kiln exhaust flue gas. The process also enables the cement plant to reuse the treated CKD, eliminating the need to landfill this material. Potassium, the offending contaminant in the CKD, is extracted in a useful form, potassium sulfate, which is used as a fertilizer. These useful products generate income from operation of this Recovery Scrubber. System start-up was begun in late December of 1990. At that time, several mechanical problems were encountered. These relatively minor problems were resolved enabling Phase III to begin on August 20, 1991. While inefficiencies are still being worked out, major program objectives are being met. Resolution of remaining operability problems is well in hand and should not hamper attainment of all project goals.

Not Available

1992-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

75

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015 June 23, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An industry-driven consortium initiated in 2000, SWC's goal is to keep "stripper wells" productive in an environmentally safe manner, maximizing the recovery of domestic hydrocarbon resources. The consortium is managed and administered by The Pennsylvania State University on behalf of DOE; the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

76

Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs (August 2013) Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs (August 2013) The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided $4.5 billion for the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG), Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP), and other DOE smart grid programs. These programs provided grants to the electric utility industry to deploy smart grid technologies to modernize the nation's electric grid. As a part of these programs, independent system operators, regional transmission organizations, and electric utilities installed synchrophasor and supporting technologies and systems in their electric power transmission systems.

77

Secondary natural gas recovery -- infield reserve growth joint venture: Applications in midcontinent sandstones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from deltaic and valley-fill sandstones of the Midcontinent as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas; to demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields; and to transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided more than $36 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE) to accelerate work on existing projects, undertake new and transformative research, and deploy clean energy technologies across the nation. Of this funding, $1029 million is supporting innovative work to advance biomass research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

79

Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm29jody.pdf More Documents & Publications Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology...

80

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

Dennis Castonguay

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Status report on energy recovery from municipal solid waste: technologies, lessons and issues. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is presented of the lessons learned and issues raised regarding the recovery of energy from solid wastes. The review focuses on technologies and issues significant to currently operating energy recovery systems in the US - waterwall incineration, modular incineration, refuse derived fuels systems, landfill gas recovery systems. Chapters are: Energy Recovery and Solid Waste Disposal; Energy Recovery Systems; Lessons in Energy Recovery; Issues in Energy Recovery. Some basic conclusions are presented concerning the state of the art of energy from waste. Plants in shakedown or under construction, along with technologies in the development stages, are briefly described. Sources of additional information and a bibliography are included. (MCW)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Gas Technology Institute  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Gas Technology Institute will conduct research and development on hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion processes to make gasoline and diesel.

84

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry. This is the twenty-eighth quarterly progress report on the project. Results obtained to date are summarized.

Mark B. Murphy

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Report on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in Report on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in Recovery Act Projects Now Available Report on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in Recovery Act Projects Now Available August 15, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a new report that explains synchrophasor technologies and how they can be used to improve the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of grid operations. The report also includes an analysis of the costs and benefits of synchrophasors, based on data and initial results from Recovery Act-funded projects that are deploying the technologies. The report is available now for downloading. Addthis Related Articles Reports on the Impact of the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Now

86

Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1366 Technologies 1366 Technologies Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies Addthis Description LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production. Speakers President Obama, Ely Sachs, Frank van Mierlo Duration 4:00 Topic Energy Economy Recovery Act Solar ARPA-E Summit Emerging Technologies Credit Energy Department Video PRESIDENT OBAMA: Next we need to encourage American innovation. Last year we made the largest investment in basic research funding in history - (applause) - an investment - an investment that could lead to the world's cheapest solar cells or treatment that kills cancer cells but leaves healthy ones untouched. And no area is more ripe for such

87

Report on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in Recovery Act Projects Now Available Report on Synchrophasor Technologies and Their Deployment in Recovery Act Projects Now Available August 15, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a new report that explains synchrophasor technologies and how they can be used to improve the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of grid operations. The report also includes an analysis of the costs and benefits of synchrophasors, based on data and initial results from Recovery Act-funded projects that are deploying the technologies. The report is available now for downloading. Addthis Related Articles Reports on the Impact of the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Now

88

Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible multiphase mechanisms at work, namely, Darcy-type displacement until gas breakthrough, gravity drainage after breakthrough and film-drainage in gas-invaded zones throughout the duration of the process. The partially-scaled physical model was used in a series of experiments to study the effects of wettability, gas-oil miscibility, secondary versus tertiary mode gas injection, and the presence of fractures on GAGD oil recovery. In addition to yielding recoveries of up to 80% IOIP, even in the immiscible gas injection mode, the partially-scaled physical model confirmed the positive influence of fractures and oil-wet characteristics in enhancing oil recoveries over those measured in the homogeneous (unfractured) water-wet models. An interesting observation was that a single logarithmic relationship between the oil recovery and the gravity number was obeyed by the physical model, the high-pressure corefloods and the field data.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Natural gas engine technology has evolved to meet the...

90

A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery...

Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Membrane Technology and Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR), based in Menlo Park, CA, is a privately- owned developer, manufacturer, and supplier of customized membrane process solutions. Currently, the company's principal membrane products are * VaporSep® systems to remove organic vapors from air and nitrogen * NitroSep TM and fuel gas conditioning systems for natural gas treatment * Hydrogen recovery systems for refinery and other applications MTR's current R&D is extending use of membranes to carbon sequestration and biofuels separations. www.mtrinc.com New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes Challenge Membrane technology was first commercialized in the 1960s and 1970s for well-known applications such as water filtration

92

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - ODS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

93

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

94

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 26, 2009 March 26, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming Researchers Seek Patent for Isotopic Ratio to Evaluate Water in Coalbeds Washington, DC -Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, was the creation of 27 jobs over the project's 2+ years.

95

Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

96

An overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work an overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies is presented. In particular, the various gas turbine technologies are described and compared. Emphasis has been given to the various advance cycles involving heat recovery from the gas turbine exhaust, such as, the gas to gas recuperation cycle, the combined cycle, the chemical recuperation cycle, the Cheng cycle, the humid air turbine cycle, etc. The thermodynamic characteristics of the various cycles are considered in order to establish their relative importance to future power generation markets. The combined cycle technology is now well established and offers superior to any of the competing gas turbine based systems, which are likely to be available in the medium term for large-scale power generation applications. In small-scale generation, less than 50 MWe, it is more cost effective to install a less complex power plant, due to the adverse effect of the economics of scale. Combined cycle plants in this power output range normally have higher specific investment costs and lower electrical efficiencies but also offer robust and reliable performance. Mixed air steam turbines (MAST) technologies are among the possible ways to improve the performance of gas turbine based power plants at feasible costs (e.g. peak load gas turbine plants).

Andreas Poullikkas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, Michael B.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, Mark B.

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Sandia National Laboratories: oil and gas technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industriell og teknisk forskning) will now tackle energy challenges such as renewable-energy integration, grid modernization, gas technologies, and algae-based biofuels. SINTEF is...

100

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Digg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Increased olefins production via recovery of refinery gas hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of catalytically cracking heavy petroleum fractions to make gasoline and light fuel oil, by-product waste gases are also generated. The waste gases, normally used as fuel, are themselves rich sources of ethylene, propylene and other light hydrocarbons which can be recovered inexpensively via a cryogenic dephlegmator process. This gas separation technique is exploited in a system, in operation since spring of 1987, which reclaims C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a refinery gas. The reclamation process bolsters production in a nearby ethylene plant. Causing no disruption of ethylene plant operations, the cryogenic hydrocarbon recovery system functions smoothly with existing systems. The dephlegmation unit operation melds distillation and heat transfer processes in a single easily-controlled step which boosts the hydrocarbon purity and recovery above the levels profitably achievable with conventional cryogenic separation techniques. Very attractive operating economics follow from high purity, high recovery, and high energy efficiency. This paper discusses process concepts, economic benefits, plant operation, and early performance results.

Bernhard, D.P.; Rowles, H.C.; Moss, J.A.; Pickering, J.L. Jr.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014 115 Copyright © 2014 Inderscience fields in Saudi Arabia', Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp.115­131. Biographical economic recovery of oil and gas from a reservoir. The purpose of reservoir management is to control

Mohaghegh, Shahab

103

Structure and Parameters Optimization of Organic Rankine Cycle System for Natural Gas Compressor Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper, the structure and working principle of free piston based organic rankine cycle (ORC) exhaust gas energy recovery system...

Yongqiang Han; Zhongchang Liu; Yun Xu…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forum Forum Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Form (NGVTF) logo The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) supports development and deployment of commercially competitive natural gas engines, vehicles, and infrastructure. Learn about NGVTF's purpose, activities, meetings, stakeholders, steering committee, and webinars. Purpose Led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission, NGVTF unites a diverse group of stakeholders to: Share information and resources Identify natural gas engine, vehicle, and infrastructure technology targets Facilitate government-industry research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) to achieve targets Communicate high-priority needs of natural gas vehicle end users to natural gas equipment and vehicle manufacturers

105

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Unconventional gas recovery program. Semi-annual report for the period ending September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the third semi-annual report describing the technical progress of the US DOE projects directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources. Currently the program includes Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, Eastern Gas Shales Project, Western Gas Sands Project, and Geopressured Aquifers Project.

Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effect of Gas Diffusion on Mobility of Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery Lars E. Nonnekes1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Gas Diffusion on Mobility of Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery Lars E. Nonnekes1 Foam can improve the sweep efficiency of gas injected into oil reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery University William Richard Rossen Email: W.R.Rossen@tudelft.nl Abstract Transport of gas across

Cox, Simon

108

Vehicle Technologies Office: Natural Gas Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Research Natural Gas Research Natural gas offers tremendous opportunities for reducing the use of petroleum in transportation. Medium and heavy-duty fleets, which have significant potential to use natural gas, currently consume more than a third of the petroleum in transportation in the U.S. Natural gas is an excellent fit for a wide range of heavy-duty applications, especially transit buses, refuse haulers, and Class 8 long-haul or delivery trucks. In addition, natural gas can be a very good choice for light-duty vehicle fleets with central refueling. See the Alternative Fuels Data Center for a description of the uses and benefits of natural gas vehicles or its Laws and Incentives database for information on tax incentives. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports the development of natural gas engines and research into renewable natural gas production.

109

Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

110

Apparatus and method for fast recovery and charge of insulation gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An insulation gas recovery and charge apparatus is provided comprising a pump, a connect, an inflatable collection device and at least one valve.

Jordan, Kevin

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

111

Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned November 20, 2014...

112

DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for...

113

The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effect of gas production rate and rock and fluid properties on the recovery of gas from strong water drive gas reservoirs will permit gas production optimization and should result in conservation of natural and financial resources. Hence... saturations, gas production rate is not a dominant factor affecting the ultimate gas recovery. Almost all the gas is recovered whether producing the field at 0. 1 or 10 times GRR. In predicting the gas recovery in a strong water drive reser- voir...

Soemarso, Christophorus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Energy recovery from solid waste fuels using advanced gasification technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, TPS Termiska Processer AB has been working on the development of an atmospheric-pressure gasification process. A major aim at the start of this work was the generation of fuel gas from indigenous fuels to Sweden (i.e. biomass). As the economic climate changed and awareness of the damage to the environment caused by the use of fossil fuels in power generation equipment increased, the aim of the development work at TPS was changed to applying the process to heat and power generation from feedstocks such as biomass and solid wastes. Compared with modern waste incineration with heat recovery, the gasification process will permit an increase in electricity output of up to 50%. The gasification process being developed is based on an atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized bed gasifier coupled to a tar-cracking vessel. The gas produced from this process is then cooled and cleaned in conventional equipment. The energy-rich gas produced is clean enough to be fired in a gas boiler without requiring extensive flue gas cleaning, as is normally required in conventional waste incineration plants. Producing clean fuel gas in this manner, which facilitates the use of efficient gas-fired boilers, means that overall plant electrical efficiencies of close to 30% can be achieved. TPS has performed a considerable amount of pilot plant testing on waste fuels in their gasification/gas cleaning pilot plant in Sweden. Two gasifiers of TPS design have been in operation in Greve-in-Chianti, italy since 1992. This plant processes 200 tonnes of RDF (refuse-derived fuel) per day.

Morris, M.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)] [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has been proven to be difficult due to the lack of robust instrumentation that can accurately and reliably monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multilateral wells. This is the final report for the four-year program ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'', funded by the National Petroleum Technology Office of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech from October 1, 1999 to March 31, 2003. The main objective of this research program was to develop cost-effective, reliable optical fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. During the program, optical fiber sensors were demonstrated for the measurement of temperature, pressure, flow, and acoustic waves, including three successful field tests in the Chevron/Texaco oil fields in Coalinga, California, and at the world-class oil flow simulation facilities in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Research efforts included the design and fabrication of sensor probes, development of signal processing algorithms, construction of test systems, development and testing of strategies for the protection of optical fibers and sensors in the downhole environment, development of remote monitoring capabilities allowing real-time monitoring of the field test data from virtually anywhere in the world, and development of novel data processing techniques. Comprehensive testing was performed to systematically evaluate the performance of the fiber optic sensor systems in both lab and field environments.

Anbo Wang; Kristie L. Cooper; Gary R. Pickrell

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant fraction of U.S. natural gas reserves are subquality due to the presence of acid gases and nitrogen; 13% of existing reserves (19 trillion cubic feed) may be contaminated with hydrogen sulfide. For natural gas to be useful as fuel and feedstock, this hydrogen sulfide has to be removed to the pipeline specification of 4 ppm. The technology used to achieve these specifications has been amine, or similar chemical or physical solvent, absorption. Although mature and widely used in the gas industry, absorption processes are capital and energy-intensive and require constant supervision for proper operation. This makes these processes unsuitable for treating gas at low throughput, in remote locations, or with a high concentration of acid gases. The U.S. Department of Energy, recognizes that exploitation of smaller, more sub-quality resources will be necessary to meet demand as the large gas fields in the U.S. are depleted. In response to this need, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has developed membranes and a membrane process for removing hydrogen sulfide from natural gas. During this project, high-performance polymeric thin-film composite membranes were brought from the research stage to field testing. The membranes have hydrogen sulfide/methane selectivities in the range 35 to 60, depending on the feed conditions, and have been scaled up to commercial-scale production. A large number of spiral-wound modules were manufactured, tested and optimized during this project, which culminated in a field test at a Shell facility in East Texas. The short field test showed that membrane module performance on an actual natural gas stream was close to that observed in the laboratory tests with cleaner streams. An extensive technical and economic analysis was performed to determine the best applications for the membrane process. Two areas were identified: the low-flow-rate, high-hydrogen-sulfide-content region and the high-flow-rate, high-hydrogen-sulfide-content region. In both regions the MTR membrane process will be combined with another process to provide the necessary hydrogen sulfide removal from the natural gas. In the first region the membrane process will be combined with the SulfaTreat fixed-bed absorption process, and in the second region the membrane process will be combined with a conventional absorption process. Economic analyses indicate that these hybrid processes provide 20-40% cost savings over stand-alone absorption technologies.

K. Amo; R.W. Baker; V.D. Helm; T. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala; I. Pinnau; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; L. Toy; J.G. Wijmans

1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery Final Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: 1 October 1998 Reporting Period End Date: 31 March 2003 Principal Investigator: Anbo Wang Principal Report Authors: Kristie L. Cooper, Gary R. Pickrell, Anbo Wang Report Issued: June 2003 DOE Award Number: DE-FT26-98BC15167 Submitted by: Center for Photonics Technology Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Blacksburg, VA 24061-0111 ii Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

118

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

Mark B. Murphy

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas and Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop on AddThis.com...

120

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technology Forum Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum Leadership Committee Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NREL: Technology Deployment - Disaster Recovery Support at FEMA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disaster Recovery Support at FEMA Incorporates Sustainability in Rebuilding Efforts News FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Effort NREL's Federal Fueling Station Data...

122

Natural Gas Technologies Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Center Technologies Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Gas Technologies Center Name Natural Gas Technologies Center Address 1350, Nobel, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada Place Montreal, Quebec Zip J4B 5H3 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1992 Phone number 1.450.449.4774 Coordinates 45.5678623°, -73.4186892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5678623,"lon":-73.4186892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Recovery Act-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects on AddThis.com...

124

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May -October, 2009 May -October, 2009 Submitted by: Rice University, University of Texas, and Oklahoma State University George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Texas Priyank Jaiswal, Oklahoma State University November, 2009 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 John Terneus, Program Officer Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy 2 Table of Contents Disclaimer .......................................................................................................... 3

125

Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition (SI) engine, from a prototyping of a practical supervi- sion and control system for a pilot Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant Program PON-13-503 http ............................................................................................................................5 PIER NATURAL GAS RESEARCH PROGRAM

129

Lithium bromide chiller technology in gas processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption Chillers have been in use for more than half a century, mainly in the commercial air conditioning industry. The Gas Research Institute and EnMark Natural Gas Company co-funded a field test to determine the viability of this commercial air conditioning technology in the gas industry. In 1991, a 10 MMCFC natural gas conditioning plant was constructed in Sherman, Texas. The plant was designed to use a standard, off-the-shelf chiller from Trane with a modified control scheme to maintain tight operating temperature parameters. The main objective was to obtain a 40 F dewpoint natural gas stream to meet pipeline sales specifications. Various testing performed over the past three years has proven that the chiller can be operated economically and on a continuous basis in an oilfield environment with minimal operation and maintenance costs. This paper will discuss how a LiBr absorption chiller operates, how the conditioning plant performed during testing, and what potential applications are available for LiBr chiller technology.

Huey, M.A.; Leppin, D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives are listed and technical progress is summarized for contracts for field projects and supporting research on: chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, extraction technology, improved drilling technology, residual oil, and microbial enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Combined Flue Gas Heat Recovery and Pollution Control Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the field of heat recovery now make it possible to recover a portion of the wasted heat and improve the working conditions of the air purification equipment. Proper design and selection of heat recovery and pollution control equipment as a combination...

Zbikowski, T.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Bartlesville Energy Technology Center enhanced oil recovery project data base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BETC Enhanced Oil Recovery Data Base is currently being developed to provide an information resource to accelerate the advancement and applications of EOR technology. The primary initial sources of data have been the Incentive and Cost-Shared Programs. The data base presently contains information on 607 EOR projects. This includes 410 of the approximately 423 projects which operators originally applied for certification with the Incentive Program; 20 EOR projects under the Cost-Shared Program; and a data base relating to 177 projects developed by Gulf Universities Research Consortium. In addition, relevant data from all previous DOE-funded contractor EOR data bases will be integrated into the BETC data base. Data collection activities from publicly available information sources is continuing on an on-going basis to insure the accuracy and timeliness of the information within the data base. The BETC data base is being developed utilizing a commercial data base management system. The basic structure of the data base is presented as Appendix I. This data base includes information relating to reservoir characteristics, process-specific data, cost information, production data, and contact persons for each project. The preliminary list of data elements and the current density of occurrence is presented as Appendix II. A basic profile of the types of projects contained within the developmental data base is contained in Appendix III. Appendix IV presents a number of system output reports to illustrate potential data base applications. Plans to eventually place the data base in a computer system which would be publicly accessible are currently under active consideration. A list of Incentive projects processed to date by BETC is provided as Appendix V. Appendix VI gives a detailed report by EOR Process for all projects in the BETC's Enhanced Oil Recovery Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

Arnold, Marion Denson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gas Reactor Technology R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy to Invest U.S. Department of Energy to Invest up to $7.3 Million for "Deep-Burn" Gas-Reactor Technology R&D Artist's rendering of Nuclear Plant An artist's rendering of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant concept. The U.S. Department of Energy today announced a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) valued at $7.3 million for universities, commercial entities, National Laboratories with expertise in the concept of nuclear fuel "Deep-Burn" in which plutonium and higher transuranics recycled from spent nuclear fuel are destroyed. The funding opportunity seeks to establish the technological foundations that will support the role of the very-high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) in the nuclear fuel cycle -- which is one of the prototype reactors being researched/developed under

135

Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Designing a Pilot-Scale Experiment for the Production of Natural Gas Hydrates and Sequestration of CO2 in Geologic Reservoirs Authors: Mark White and Pete McGrail Venue: The 9th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Technologies will be held November 16-20, 2008 at The Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. The Conference will be organized by MIT in collaboration with the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG), with major sponsorship from the US Department of Energy. http://mit.edu/ghgt9/ . Abstract: Under high pressure and low temperature conditions small nonpolar molecules (typically gases) can combine with water to form crystalline structures known as clathrate hydrates. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) form nearly identical clathrate structures (sI), with the CO2 hydrate being thermodynamically favored. Vast accumulations of methane hydrates have been found in suboceanic deposits and beneath the arctic permafrost. Because of the large volumetric storage densities, clathrate hydrates on the deep ocean floor have been suggested as a sequestration option for CO2. Alternatively, CO2 hydrates can be formed in the geologic settings of naturally occurring accumulations of methane hydrates. Global assessments of natural gas resources have shown that gas hydrate resources exceed those of conventional resources, which is indicative of the potential for clathrate hydrate sequestration of CO2. Recovery of natural gas from hydrate-bearing geologic deposits has the potential for being economically viable, but there remain significant technical challenges in converting these natural accumulations into a useable resource. Currently, conventional methods for producing methane hydrates from geologic settings include depressurization, thermal stimulation, and inhibitor injection. Although CO2 clathrates generally are not naturally as abundant as those of CH4, their occurrence forms the foundation of an unconventional approach for producing natural gas hydrates that involves the exchange of CO2 with CH4 in the hydrate structure. This unconventional concept has several distinct benefits over the conventional methods: 1) the heat of formation of CO2 hydrate is greater than the heat of dissociation of CH4 hydrate, providing a low-grade heat source to support additional methane hydrate dissociation, 2) exchanging CO2 with CH4 will maintain the mechanical stability of the geologic formation, and 3) the process is environmentally friendly, providing a sequestration mechanism for the injected CO2. The exchange production technology would not be feasible without the favorable thermodynamics of CO2 hydrates over CH4 hydrates. This situation yields challenges for the technology to avoid secondary hydrate formation and clogging of the geologic repository. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of producing natural gas and sequestering CO2 using the direct exchange technology in geologic media. These experiments have duplicated numerically using the STOMP-HYD simulator, which solves the nonisothermal multifluid flow and transport equations for mixed hydrate systems in geologic media. This paper describes the design (via numerical simulation) of a pilot-scale demonstration test of the CO2 exchange production and sequestration technology for a geologic setting beneath the arctic permafrost, involving a gas-hydrate interval overlying a free-gas interval (i.e., Class 1 Hydrate Accumulation).

137

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report (seventh quarter), April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program -- based on advanced reservoir management methods -- can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the US oil and gas industry. Results obtained to date are summarized.

NONE

1997-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Bioenergy recovery from landfill gas: A case study in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) utilization which means a synergy...3/h and the methane concentration was above 90%. The process and optimization of the pilot-scale test were also reported in the paper. The product gas was of...

Wei Wang; Yuxiang Luo; Zhou Deng

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Bioenergy Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funds; the projects accelerate advanced biofuels RD&D, speed the deployment of commercialization of biofuels, and further the U.S....

142

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Development...

143

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites...

144

Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview and status of project to develop thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery and achieve at least 10% fuel economy improvement.

145

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program--based on advanced reservoir management methods--can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the US oil and gas industry. Results obtained to date are summarized for the following: geostatistics and reservoir mapping; reservoir engineering; reservoir characterization/reservoir simulation; miscible recovery simulations; and technology transfer.

NONE

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

147

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Meeting to someone by E-mail 1 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2011 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

148

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies [Internet]. [cited 2013/10/15]. Available from: http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Petroleum/projects/EP/Explor_Tech/P225.htm Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oil_%26_Natural_Gas_Projects_Exploration_and_Production_Technologies&oldid=688583

149

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Meeting to someone by E-mail 2 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2012 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

150

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program

151

The effect on recovery of the injection of alternating slugs of gas and water at pressures above the bubble point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Gas Slug. 13 4, Refined Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Water Slug. 14 5. The Effect of Slug Length on Recovery of Refined Oil. 15 6. Recovery of East... Texas Crude Oil vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Gas Slug. ig 7. Recovery of East Texas Crude Oil vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Water Slug. 19 8. The Effect of Slug Length on Recovery of East Texas Crude Oil. 20...

Givens, James Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery from Industrial Process Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of energy from relatively low-temperature waste streams is a goal that has not been achieved on any large scale. Heat exchangers do not operate efficiently with low-temperature streams and thus require such large heat exchanger surface areas that they are not practical. Condensing economizers offer one option for heat recovery from such streams, but they have not been widely implemented by industry. A promising alternative to these heat exchangers and economizers is a prototype ceramic membrane system using transport membrane technology for separation of water vapor and recovery of heat. This system was successfully tested by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) on a natural gas fired boiler where the flue gas is relatively clean and free of contaminants. However, since the tubes of the prototype system were constructed of aluminum oxide, the brittle nature of the tubes limited the robustness of the system and even limited the length of tubes that could be used. In order to improve the robustness of the membrane tubes and make the system more suitable for industrial applications, this project was initiated with the objective of developing a system with materials that would permit the system to function successfully on a larger scale and in contaminated and potentially corrosive industrial environments. This required identifying likely industrial environments and the hazards associated with those environments. Based on the hazardous components in these environments, candidate metallic materials were identified that are expected to have sufficient strength, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance to permit production of longer tubes that could function in the industrial environments identified. Tests were conducted to determine the corrosion resistance of these candidate alloys, and the feasibility of forming these materials into porous substrates was assessed. Once the most promising metallic materials were identified, the ability to form an alumina membrane layer on the surface of the metallic tubes was evaluated. Evaluation of this new style of membrane tube involved exposure to SO{sub 2} containing gases as well as to materials with a potential for fouling. Once the choice of substrate and membrane materials and design were confirmed, about 150 tubes were fabricated and assembled into three modules. These modules were mounted on an industrial size boiler and their performance carefully monitored during a limited testing period. The positive results of this performance test confirm the feasibility of utilizing such a system for recovery of heat and water from industrial waste streams. The improved module design along with use of long metallic substrate tubes with a ceramic membrane on the outer surface resulted in the successful, limited scale demonstration of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in the GTI test facility. This test showed this technology can successfully recover a significant amount of heat and water from gaseous waste streams. However, before industry will make the investment to install a full scale TMC, a full scale system will need to be constructed, installed and successfully operated at a few industrial sites. Companies were identified that had an interest in serving as a host site for a demonstration system.

Keiser, J.R.; Wang, D. (Gas Technology Institute); Bischoff, B.; Ciora (Media and Process Technology); Radhakrishnan, B.; Gorti, S.B.

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases. IFT measurements were carried out in a standard ternary liquid system of benzene, ethanol and water using drop shape analysis and capillary rise techniques. The experimental results indicate strong correlation among the three thermodynamic properties solubility, miscibility and IFT. The miscibility determined from IFT measurements for this ternary liquid system is in good agreement with phase diagram and solubility data, which clearly indicates the sound conceptual basis of VIT technique to determine fluid-fluid miscibility. Model fluid systems have been identified for VIT experimentation at elevated pressures and temperatures. Section III comprises of the experimental study aimed at evaluating the multiphase displacement characteristics of the various gas injection EOR process performances using Berea sandstone cores. During this reporting period, extensive literature review was completed to: (1) study the gravity drainage concepts, (2) identify the various factors influencing gravity stable gas injection processes, (3) identify various multiphase mechanisms and fluid dynamics operative during the GAGD process, and (4) identify important dimensionless groups governing the GAGD process performance. Furthermore, the dimensional analysis of the GAGD process, using Buckingham-Pi theorem to isolate the various dimensionless groups, as well as experimental design based on these dimensionless quantities have been completed in this reporting period. On the experimental front, recommendations from previous WAG and CGI have been used to modify the experimental protocol. This report also includes results from scaled preliminary GAGD displacements as well as the details of the planned GAGD corefloods for the next quarter. The technology transfer activities have mainly consisted of preparing technical papers, progress reports and discussions with industry personnel for possible GAGD field tests.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil March 3, 2006 - 11:40am Addthis WASHINGTON , D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) released today reports indicating that state-of-the-art enhanced oil recovery techniques could significantly increase recoverable oil resources of the United States in the future. According to the findings, 89 billion barrels or more could eventually be added to the current U.S. proven reserves of 21.4 billion barrels. "These promising new technologies could further help us reduce our reliance on foreign sources of oil," Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman said. "By using the proven technique of carbon sequestration, we get the double

155

The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: Simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Urban symbiosis creates compatibility of industrial development and waste management. {yields} Mechanical technology leads to more CO{sub 2} emission reduction. {yields} Energy recovery technology leads to more fossil fuel saving. {yields} Clean energy makes recycling technologies cleaner. {yields} Demand management is crucial for realizing potential environmental gains of recycling. - Abstract: With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO{sub 2}e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kgce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

Chen Xudong, E-mail: chen.xudong@nies.go.jp [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan); Xi Fengming [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Geng Yong, E-mail: gengyong@iae.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujita, Tsuyoshi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2005 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail 2005 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2005 Meeting and Presentations on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative

158

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail 10 Meeting and Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2010 Meeting and Presentations on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative

159

Recovery Act: ArcelorMittal USA Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. (ArcelorMittal) for a project to construct and operate a blast furnace gas recovery boiler and supporting infrastructure at ArcelorMittal’s Indiana Harbor Steel Mill in East Chicago, Indiana. Blast furnace gas (BFG) is a by-product of blast furnaces that is generated when iron ore is reduced with coke to create metallic iron. BFG has a very low heating value, about 1/10th the heating value of natural gas. BFG is commonly used as a boiler fuel; however, before installation of the gas recovery boiler, ArcelorMittal flared 22 percent of the blast furnace gas produced at the No. 7 Blast Furnace at Indiana Harbor. The project uses the previously flared BFG to power a new high efficiency boiler which produces 350,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam produced is used to drive existing turbines to generate electricity and for other requirements at the facility. The goals of the project included job creation and preservation, reduced energy consumption, reduced energy costs, environmental improvement, and sustainability.

Seaman, John

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modeling effects of diffusion and gravity drainage on oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs under gas injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas injection in naturally fractured reservoirs maintains the reservoir pressure, and increases oil recovery primarily by gravity drainage and to a lesser extent by mass transfer between the flowing gas in the fracture and the porous matrix...

Jamili, Ahmad

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Chemical flood predictive model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Flood Predictive Model (CFPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp for the US Department of Energy and was used in the National Petroleum Council's (NPC) 1984 survey of US enhanced oil recovery potential (NPC, 1984). The CFPM models micellar (surfactant)-polymer (MP) floods in reservoirs which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option is available in the model which allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic (alkaline) or caustic-polymer processes. This ''caustic'' option, added for the NPC survey, is not modeled as a separate process. Rather, the caustic and caustic-polymer oil recoveries are computed simply as 15% and 40%, respectively, of the MP oil recovery. In the CFPM, an oil rate versus time function for a single pattern is computed and the results are passed to the economic routines. To estimate multi-pattern project behavior, a pattern development schedule must be specified. After-tax cash flow is computed by combining revenues with capital costs for drilling, conversion and upgrading of wells, chemical handling costs, fixed and variable operating costs, injectant costs, depreciation, royalties, severance, state, federal, and windfall profit taxes, cost and price inflation rates, and the discount rate. A lumped parameter uncertainty routine is used to estimate risk, and allows for variation in computed project performance within an 80% confidence interval. The CFPM uses theory and the results of numerical simulation to predict MP oil recovery in five-spot patterns. Oil-bank and surfactant breakthrough and project life are determined from fractional flow theory. A Koval-type factor, based on the Dykstra-Parsons (1950) coefficient, is used to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on surfactant and oil bank velocities. 18 refs., 17 figs., 27 tabs.

Ray, R.M.; Munoz, J.D.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

163

An LCA model for waste incineration enhanced with new technologies for metal recovery and application to the case of Switzerland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • An enhanced process-based LCA model for MSWI is featured and applied in case study. • LCA modeling of recent technological developments for metal recovery from fly ash. • Net release from Swiss MSWI 133 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste from attributional LCA perspective. • Net savings from a consequential LCA perspective reach up to 303 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste. • Impacts according to ReCiPe and CExD show similar pattern to climate change. - Abstract: A process model of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) and new technologies for metal recovery from combustion residues was developed. The environmental impact is modeled as a function of waste composition as well as waste treatment and material recovery technologies. The model includes combustion with a grate incinerator, several flue gas treatment technologies, electricity and steam production from waste heat recovery, metal recovery from slag and fly ash, and landfilling of residues and can be tailored to specific plants and sites (software tools can be downloaded free of charge). Application of the model to Switzerland shows that the treatment of one tonne of municipal solid waste results on average in 425 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. generated in the incineration process, and 54 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. accrue in upstream processes such as waste transport and the production of operating materials. Downstream processes, i.e. residue disposal, generates 5 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Savings from energy recovery are in the range of 67 to 752 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. depending on the assumptions regarding the substituted energy production, while the recovery of metals from slag and fly ash currently results in a net saving of approximately 35 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. A similar impact pattern is observed when assessing the MSWI model for aggregated environmental impacts (ReCiPe) and for non-renewable resource consumption (cumulative exergy demand), except that direct emissions have less and no relevance, respectively, on the total score. The study illustrates that MSWI plants can be an important element of industrial ecology as they provide waste disposal services and can help to close material and energetic cycles.

Boesch, Michael E. [Aveny GmbH, Schwandenholzstr. 212, CH-8046 Zürich (Switzerland); Vadenbo, Carl, E-mail: vadenbo@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Saner, Dominik [Swiss Post, Communications, Politics and Social Responsibility, Viktoriastrasse 21, P.O. Box, CH-3030 Berne (Switzerland); Huter, Christoph [City of Zürich, ERZ Entsorgung - Recycling Zürich, Hagenholzstrasse 110, P.O. Box, CH-8050 Zürich (Switzerland); Hellweg, Stefanie [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

165

This work was supported by the USDepartment of Energy, UnconventionalGas Recovery Research Program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;This work was supported by the USDepartment of Energy, UnconventionalGas Recovery Research the world's first Hot Dry Rock geothermalenergyextractionsystemat FentonHill,New Mexico. The system-specifiedtools should be capableof operatingfor sustained periodsin hot wells; have automaticgain controland

166

Greenhouse Gas Return on Investment: A New Metric for Energy Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas INTRODUCTION Alternative energy technologies such asmotivations of alternative energy technologies: mitigatingaddresses the goal of alternative energy technology

Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

NREL: Technology Deployment - FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Effort FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Effort May 8, 2013 Natural Disasters, By the Numbers There have been 144 weather/climate disasters since 1980 in which overall damages reached or exceeded $1 billion. In 2005, the estimated economic loss due to Hurricane Katrina was about $187 billion. In 2012, the estimated total loss due to Hurricane Sandy was $71 billion in New York and New Jersey alone. By the time Hurricane Sandy pounded the East Coast on October 29, 2012, it had grown to be the largest Atlantic hurricane on record-with winds spanning 1,100 miles. The devastation left in its wake affected 24 states with the most severe damage concentrated in New Jersey and New York; total damage topped an estimated $71 billion for the two states alone. For the first time, NREL was funded by the Federal Emergency Management

168

Rapid pipeline repair technology for war damage recovery. Technical note  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development of three experimental pipeline couplers for rapid repair of fuel lines damaged in an attack. The experimental couplers are: (1) the Cold Forge coupler, (2) the Internal Coupler, and (3) the Inflatable Seal Coupler. The focus of the evaluation was to determine the feasibility of rapidly repairing bomb-damaged fuel lines with each coupler, particularly underground pipelines made of carbon steel. Evaluating the feasibility of repair with each coupler was based on such aspects as installations speed and effectiveness. The test results confirmed that each coupler could be used during base recovery, operations to rapidly and effectively repair a fuel pipeline that may be out-of-round or highly misaligned. Recommended that each experimental coupler be taken into advanced development for extensive testing and field evaluation. Base recovery, Expedient pipeline repair, Utility repair.

Anguiano, G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Eighth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1996 (fifth quarter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program--based on advanced reservoir management methods--can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques while comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program, can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the US oil and gas industry. Results so far are described on geology, engineering, 3-D seismic, reservoir characterization and simulation, and technology transfer.

NONE

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1996 (fourth quarter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals to attain the objective are: (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US oil and gas industry. Results obtained to date are summarized on the following: geology, engineering, 3-D seismic, reservoir characterization and simulation, and technology transfer.

NONE

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Vidal, J.M. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CA (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services and Technology, Houston, TX (United States)); Coover, D.M. Jr. (Pintas Creek Oil Company, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Bloxsom, W.E. (Coastal Texas Oil and Gas, Houston, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

174

Commercial Demonstration of Wood Recovery, Recycling, and Value Adding Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This commercial demonstration project demonstrated the technical feasibility of converting low-value, underutilized and waste stream solid wood fiber material into higher valued products. With a growing need to increase product/production yield and reduce waste in most sawmills, few recovery operations and practically no data existed to support the viability of recovery operations. Prior to our efforts, most all in the forest products industry believed that recovery was difficult, extremely labor intensive, not cost effective, and that recovered products had low value and were difficult to sell. This project provided an opportunity for many within the industry to see through demonstration that converting waste stream material into higher valued products does in fact offer a solution. Our work, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, throughout the project aimed to demonstrate a reasonable approach to reducing the millions of recoverable solid wood fiber tons that are annually treated as and converted into low value chips, mulch and fuel. Consequently sawmills continue to suffer from reduced availability of forest resources, higher raw material costs, growing waste disposal problems, increased global competition, and more pressure to operate in an Environmentally Friendly manner. It is our belief (based upon the experience of this project) that the successful mainstreaming of the recovery concept would assist in alleviating this burden as well as provide for a realistically achievable economic benefit to those who would seriously pursue the concept and tap into the rapidly growing ''GREEN'' building marketplace. Ultimately, with participation and aggressive pursuit of the recovery concept, the public would benefit in that: (1) Landfill/disposal waste volume could be reduced adding greater life to existing municipal landfill sites thereby minimizing the need to prematurely license and open added facilities. Also, there would be a cost avoidance benefit associated to what would have been the added municipal (community) management costs involved with maintaining closed landfills. (2) With greater quantities of recovered material being returned to and integrated into manufacturing and the marketplace, reduced demand upon virgin wood sources could help lead the way to promoting improved relations and environmental balance between producers and consumers further expanding the value of our natural resource without adding environmental burden.

Auburn Machinery, Inc.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

176

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

177

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

178

Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

179

Post-Shred Materials Recovery Technology Development and Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

180

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change: A Meta-Analysis of Estimates in the Literature and overlapping choices of assumptions. The purpose of the study is to use regression and related analyses

Watson, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO{sub 2} gas floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

Raible, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO sub 2 gas floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

Raible, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Meteorological parameters as an important factor on the energy recovery of landfill gas in landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of meteorological factors on the composition and the energy recovery of the landfill gas (LFG) were evaluated in this study. Landfill gas data consisting of methane carbon dioxide and oxygen content as well as LFG temperature were collected from April 2009 to March 2010 along with meteorological data. The data set were first used to visualize the similarity by using self-organizing maps and to calculate correlation factors. Then the data was used with ANN to further analyze the impacts of meteorological factors. In both analysis it is seen that the most important meteorological parameter effective on LFG energy content is soil temperatures. Furthermore ANN was found to be successful in explaining variations of methane content and temperature of LFG with correlation coefficients of 0.706 and 0.984 respectively. ANN was proved itself to be a useful tool for estimating energy recovery of the landfill gas.

?brahim Uyanik; Bestamin Özkaya; Selami Demir; Mehmet Çakmakci

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:27am Addthis Photo of a bulldozer on top of a large trash mound in a landfill with a cloudy sky in the backdrop. Methane and other gases produced from landfill decomposition can be leveraged for energy. This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector. Overview Landfill gases are a viable energy resource created during waste decomposition. Landfills are present in most communities. These resources can be tapped to generate heat and electricity. As organic waste decomposes, bio-gas is produced made up of roughly half methane, half carbon dioxide, and small amounts of non-methane organic

186

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology Energy Systems Research/index.html January 2012 The Issue California is the secondlargest natural gas consuming state in the United States, just behind Texas. About 85% of the natural gas consumed in California is delivered on interstate

187

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Polymer predictive model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Polymer Flood Predictive Model (PFPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp for the National Petroleum Council's (NPC) 1984 survey of US enhanced oil recovery potential (NPC, 1984). The PFPM is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option in the model allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. The architecture of the PFPM is similar to that of the other predictive models in the series: in-situ combustion, steam drive (Aydelotte and Pope, 1983), chemical flooding (Paul et al., 1982) and CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding (Paul et al., 1984). In the PFPM, an oil rate versus time function for a single pattern is computed and then is passed to the economic calculations. Data for reservoir and process development, operating costs, and a pattern schedule (if multiple patterns are desired) allow the computation of discounted cash flow and other measures of profitability. The PFPM is a three-dimensional (stratified, five-spot), two-phase (water and oil) model which computes water from breakthrough and oil recovery using fractional flow theory, and models areal and vertical sweeps using a streamtube approach. A correlation based on numerical simulation results is used to model the polymer slug size effect. The physical properties of polymer fluids, such as adsorption, permeability reduction, and non-Newtonian effects, are included in the model. Pressure drop between the injector and producer is kept constant, and the injectivity at each time step is calculated based on the mobility in each streamtube. Heterogeneity is accounted for by either entering detailed layer data or using the Dykstra-Parsons coefficient for a reservoir with a log-normal permeability distribution. 24 refs., 27 figs., 59 tabs.

Not Available

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy Requirements for Butanol Recovery Using the Flash Fermentation Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bioreactor is operated at atmospheric pressure and the broth is circulated in a closed loop to a vacuum chamber where ABE is continuously boiled off at 37 °C and condensed afterward. ... Having in mind that the accuracy of the amount of butanol recovered in the flash tank is given by a good representation of the thermodynamics characteristics of the vapor–liquid equilibrium of the n-butanol/water system, validation of the equilibrium calculations was carried out using experimental data available in the literature. ... (phase) properties of butanol and water systems, this paper presents a structured approach to det. the key characteristics of various butanol recovery methods. ...

Adriano P. Mariano; Mohammad J. Keshtkar; Daniel I. P. Atala; Francisco Maugeri Filho; Maria Regina Wolf Maciel; Rubens Maciel Filho; Paul Stuart

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

Murphy, Mark B.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Compression Stripping of Flue Gas with Energy Recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SOX and NOX and CO2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO2, SO2, and H2O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Compression stripping of flue gas with energy recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of remediating and recovering energy from combustion products from a fossil fuel power plant having at least one fossil fuel combustion chamber, at least one compressor, at least one turbine, at least one heat exchanger and a source of oxygen. Combustion products including non-condensable gases such as oxygen and nitrogen and condensable vapors such as water vapor and acid gases such as SO.sub.X and NO.sub.X and CO.sub.2 and pollutants are produced and energy is recovered during the remediation which recycles combustion products and adds oxygen to support combustion. The temperature and/or pressure of the combustion products are changed by cooling through heat exchange with thermodynamic working fluids in the power generation cycle and/or compressing and/or heating and/or expanding the combustion products to a temperature/pressure combination below the dew point of at least some of the condensable vapors to condense liquid having some acid gases dissolved and/or entrained and/or directly condense acid gas vapors from the combustion products and to entrain and/or dissolve some of the pollutants while recovering sensible and/or latent heat from the combustion products through heat exchange between the combustion products and thermodynamic working fluids and/or cooling fluids used in the power generating cycle. Then the CO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O poor and oxygen enriched remediation stream is sent to an exhaust and/or an air separation unit and/or a turbine.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf E&P Focus Newsletter Banner The oil and gas exploration and production R&D newsletter, E&P Focus, highlights the latest developments in R&D being carried out by NETL. E&P Focus promotes the widespread dissemination of research results among all types of oil and gas industry stakeholders: producers, researchers, educators, regulators, and policymakers. Each issue provides up-to-date information regarding extramural projects managed under the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and OilÂ’s traditional oil and gas program, the EPAct Section 999 Program administered by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA), and in-house oil and gas research carried out by NETLÂ’s Office of Research and Development.

193

Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Technology Remarks by The President on Recovery Act Funding For Smart Grid Technology October 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis (Arcadia, Florida) - Today, President Obama spoke at the DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center in Arcadia, Florida where he delivered the below remarks: THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, guys. Thank you very much. Please, have a seat. Thank you so much. Well, first of all, let me thank Lew Hay and his visionary leadership at Florida Power & Light. It's an example of a company that is doing well by doing good. And I think it's a model for what we could duplicate all across the country. To Greg Bove, who just gave me the tour and was a construction manager for this facility, congratulations. We've got a couple of special guests here:

194

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Bioenergy Technologies Office Investments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office rewarded about $178 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funds; the projects accelerate advanced biofuels RD&D, speed the deployment of commercialization of biofuels, and further the U.S. bioindustry through market transformation.

195

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals to attain the objective are: (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, M.B.

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf Solicitations Project Summaries Publications News Releases Software/Databases CDs/DVDs EOR Illustrations Welcome to the NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf. Recently released and in-demand reference materials are available directly from this page using the links below. Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Now Available The Knowledge Management Database (KMD) provides easy access to the results of nearly four decades of research supported by the Office of Fossil EnergyÂ’s Oil and Natural Gas Program. The database portal provides access to content from dozens of CDs and DVDs related to oil and natural gas research that FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory has published over the years. It

197

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs May 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). OsComp Systems designed and tested the novel compressor design with funding from the DOE-supported Stripper Well Consortium, an industry-driven organization whose members include natural gas and petroleum producers,

198

DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A $92 million research investment in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Energy is today being credited with technological contributions that have stimulated development of domestic natural gas from shales.

199

Oil and Natural Gas Program Commericialized Technologies and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) works to ensure that domestic natural gas and oil can remain part of the U.S. energy portfolio for decades to come. Research focused on...

200

Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

gas hydrate accumulations * Suboceanic gas hydrate accumulations * Piceance Basin oil shale * Enhanced oil recovery technologies Experimental Links * CCl 4 Migration and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem, and integration costs into the material selection criteria in order to balance various materials, module and subsystem design, and vehicle integration options. Our work on advanced TE materials development and on TEG system design, assembly, vehicle integration, and testing proceeded in parallel efforts. Results from our two preliminary prototype TEGs using only Bi-Te TE modules allowed us to solve various mechanical challenges and to finalize and fine tune aspects of the design and implementation. Our materials research effort led us to quickly abandon work on PbTe and focus on the skutterudite materials due to their superior mechanical performance and suitability at automotive exhaust gas operating temperatures. We synthesized a sufficiently large quantity of skutterudite material for module fabrication for our third and final prototype. Our TEG#3 is the first of its kind to contain state-of-the-art skutterudite-based TE modules to be installed and tested on a production vehicle. The design, which consisted of 24 skutterudite modules and 18 Bi-Te modules, attempted to optimize electrical power generation by using these two kinds of TE modules that have their peak performance temperatures matched to the actual temperature profile of the TEG during operation. The performance of TEG#3 was limited by the maximum temperature allowable for the Bi-Te TE modules located in the colder end of the TEG, resulting in the operating temperature for the skutterudite modules to be considerably below optimum. We measured the power output for (1) the complete TEG (25 Watts) and (2) an individual TE module series string (1/3 of the TEG) operated at a 60°C higher temperature (19 Watts). We estimate that under optimum operating temperature conditions, TEG#3 will generate about 235 Watts. With additional improvements in thermal and electrical interfaces, temperature homogeneity, and power conditioning, we estimate TEG#3 could deliver a power output of about 425 Watts.

Gregory Meisner

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Carbon dioxide recovery from an integrated coal gasifier, combined cycle plant using membrane separation and a CO2 gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scheme is described for electricity production based on coal gasification with recovery of carbon dioxide. In this scheme, coal is gasified into a coal gas, consisting mainly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A ...

Chris Hendriks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Offshore oil and gas: global resource knowledge and technological change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is argued that the contribution of technological change to the offshore oil and gas industry's progress is under-researched. As a prelude this theme, the changing geography of known offshore oil and gas resources is reviewed. Significant, and largely technologically dependent, developments are identified in terms of the industry's global spread, its extension into deep and ultradeep waters and its ability to enhance output from well-established oil and gas provinces. Three sections (on the evolution of exploration and production rigs, drilling techniques and the application of IT to improve resource knowledge and access) then examine the relationships between technological change and the offshore industry's progress. It is concluded that new technologies improve knowledge of, and access to, resources via four distinctive routes, but that the full impact of R & D is frequently related to the inter-dependence of technologies. Opportunities for further research are identified.

David Pinder

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nanoparticle technology for heavy oil in-situ upgrading and recovery enhancement: Opportunities and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With more than 170 billion barrels of estimated oil sands reserves in Canada, Canada has the third largest oil reserves in the world. However, more than 80% of oil sand’s reserves are located deep underground and could not be accessed by surface mining. Nonetheless, a number of in-situ recovery methods have been developed to extract heavy oil and bitumen from deep reservoirs. Once produced, bitumen is transferred to upgraders converting low quality oil to synthetic crude oil. However, in the present context, heavy oil and bitumen exploitation process is not just high-energy and water intensive, but also it has significant environmental footprints as it produces significant amount of gaseous emissions and wastewater. In addition, the level of contaminants in bitumen requires special equipment, and has also environmental repercussions. Recently, nanotechnology has emerged as an alternative technology for in-situ heavy oil upgrading and recovery enhancement. Nanoparticle catalysts (nanocatalysts) are one of the important examples on nanotechnology applications. Nanocatalysts portray unique catalytic and sorption properties due to their exceptionally high surface area-to-volume ratio and active surface sites. In-situ catalytic conversion or upgrading of heavy oil with the aid of multi-metallic nanocatalysts is a promising cost effective and environmentally friendly technology for production of high quality oils that meet pipeline and refinery specifications. Further, nanoparticles could be employed as inhibitors for preventing or delaying asphaltene precipitation and subsequently enhance oil recovery. Nevertheless, as with any new technologies, there are a number of challenges facing the employment of nanoparticles for in-situ catalytic upgrading and recovery enhancement. The main goal of this article is to provide an overview of nanoparticle technology usage for enhancing the in-situ catalytic upgrading and recovery processes of crude oil. Furthermore, the article sheds lights on the advantages of employment of nanoparticles in heavy oil industry and addresses some of the limitations and challenges facing this new technology.

Rohallah Hashemi; Nashaat N. Nassar; Pedro Pereira Almao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

Jalalzadeh, A. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Bartlesville Energy Technology Center enhanced oil recovery project data base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive EOR project data base that is validated, integrated, and continuously maintained and updated is being developed at BETC. The data base, which is not currently available to the public, provides an information resource to accelerate the advancement and applications of EOR technology. The primary sources of data have been specific EOR Projects certified in the Incentives Program, the DOE Cost-Shared Tertiary Program, and a data base of ongoing EOR projects supplied by Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC). Information from these sources has provided an extensive basis for the development of a comprehensive data base relating the key parameters for EOR projects in the United States. The sources and types of data within the data base are organized in a manner which will facilitate information transfer within the petroleum industry. 28 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

French, T.R.; Ray, R.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

IFP --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --(Script : 1er specimen) --1 --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --rev. IFP, Vol. xx (2009), No X, pp. 00-00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 1 -- Oil & Gas Science2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology - Rev. IFP, 65, 3 (2010) 435-444" DOI : 10.2516/ogst/2010007 #12;IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 2

Boyer, Edmond

209

Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

Rao, Dandina N. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

NETL: News Release - DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today Washington, DC - A $92 million research investment in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is today being credited with technological contributions that have stimulated development of domestic natural gas from shales. The result: more U.S. jobs, increased energy security, and higher revenues for states and the Federal Government. Spurred by the technological advancements resulting from this investment, U.S. shale gas production continues to grow, amounting to more than 8 billion cubic feet per day, or about 14 percent of the total volume of dry natural gas produced in the United States. DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that the shale gas share of U.S. natural gas production will reach 45 percent by 2035. The EIA also projects that 827 trillion cubic feet of natural gas is now recoverable from U.S. shales using currently available technology-an increase of nearly 500 trillion cubic feet over earlier estimates.

212

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 26, quarter ending March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives and technical progress are summarized for field projects and supporting research in chemical flooding, CO/sub 2/ injection, thermal/heavy oil recovery, resource assessment, extraction technology, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and improved drilling technology. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Efficiency of Gas-to-Liquids Technology with Different Synthesis Gas Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design and optimization of a gas-to-liquids technology (GTL) is considered, mostly from the view of an optimal choice of a synthesis gas (syngas) production method. ... If the tail gas is not enough, an additional portion of the natural gas is burned. ... The temperature of the flue gases passing from the radiation chamber of the tubular furnace to the convection chamber is taken as equal to 1150 °C, which allows proper calculation of required amount of gas supplied to the burner. ...

Ilya S. Ermolaev; Vadim S. Ermolaev; Vladimir Z. Mordkovich

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery From Slope Basin Clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced methods. A key goal is to transfer advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere, and throughout the US oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery From Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced methods. A key goal is to transfer advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere, and throughout the US oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential July 18, 2012 - 3:52pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy Corp. in Houston, Texas. Proinlosa is a company in the wind turbine manufacturing supply chain that develops tower parts and has benefitted from the Production Tax Credit (PTC). | Photo courtesy of Keri Fulton. Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman tours Proinlosa Energy Corp. in Houston, Texas. Proinlosa is a company in the wind turbine manufacturing supply chain that develops tower parts and has benefitted from the Production Tax Credit (PTC). | Photo courtesy of Keri Fulton. Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy What does this project do? Builds on President Obama's call for a new era for American energy

217

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum 2014 Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forum 2014 Meeting Forum 2014 Meeting Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Form (NGVTF) logo The Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) will hold a meeting for stakeholders on Jan. 14-15, 2014, at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Meeting Details Date: Jan. 14-15, 2014 | Icon of a calendar. Add to my calendar Location: Brookhaven National Laboratory 33 Lewis Rd. Upton, NY 11961 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is hosting this meeting in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission to support the development and deployment of commercially competitive natural gas engines, vehicles, and infrastructure. NGVTF is free and open to stakeholders, so join the conversation about natural gas engines, vehicles, infrastructure, and codes and standards.

218

Mixed refrigerants proven efficient in natural-gas-liquids recovery process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower processing temperatures for higher recoveries of natural gas liquids (NGL) leads to increasingly complex and expensive refrigeration techniques. This paper describes the mixed component refrigeration technique and that it has been proven as a viable alternative to the turboexpander plant. Mixed component refrigeration systems have been primarily used in applications such as LNG terminals and peak-shaving plants, where overall compression horse-power requirements are of primary concern due to operating cost. Recently, development of high pressure, brazed aluminum plate/fin exchangers and increasing compression costs have made economic potential of the mixed refrigerant alternative apparent. If the residue gas must be compressed to the same pressure as the plant inlet using the turbo-expander design, the mixed refrigerant system will require approximately 15% less horsepower for the same liquids production.

Mac Kenzie, D.H.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Externally fired gas turbine technology: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Externally fired heat engines were used widely since helium the industrial revolution using dirty solid fuels for example coal, due to the lack of refined fuels. However, with the availability of clean fuels, external firing mode was abandoned, except for steam power plants. Lately, with the global trend moving towards green power production, the idea of the external fired system has captured the attention again especially externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) due to its wider range of power generation and the potential of using environment friendly renewable energy sources like biomass. In this paper, a wide range of thermal power sources utilizing EFGT such as concentrated solar power (CSP), fossil, nuclear and biomass fuels are reviewed. Gas turbine as the main component of EFGT is investigated from micro scale below 1 MWe to the large scale central power generation. Moreover, the different high temperature heat exchanger (HTHE) materials and designs are reviewed. Finally, the methods of improving cycle efficiency such as the externally fired combined cycle (EFCC), humidified air turbine (HAT), EFGT with fuel cells and other cycles are reviewed thoroughly.

K.A. Al-attab; Z.A. Zainal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry Title Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kong, Lingbo, Ali Hasanbeigi, and Lynn K. Price Date Published 12/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords emerging technologies, energy efficiency, ghg, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, pulp and paper Abstract The pulp and paper industry ranks fourth in terms of energy consumption among industries worldwide. Globally, the pulp and paper industry accounted for approximately 5 percent of total world industrial final energy consumption in 2007, and contributed 2 percent of direct carbon dioxide (CO2)emissions from industry. Worldwide pulp and paper demand and production are projected to increase significantly by 2050, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and GHG mitigation technologies and their deployment in the market will be crucial for the pulp and paper industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report describes the industry's processes and compiles available information on the energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for 36 emerging technologies to reduce the industry's energy use and GHG emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies that have already been commercialized for the pulp and paper industry, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. The purpose of this report is to provide engineers, researchers, investors, paper companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured resource of information on these technologies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs De-Watering of Hunton Reservoirs Author: Mohan Kelkar, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. Venue: Tulsa Association of Petroleum Landmen meeting in Tulsa, OK, April 19, 2007 (http://www.landman.org [external site]). Abstract: The Hunton reservoir in Oklahoma represents one of the largest discoveries in Oklahoma in recent history. Since 1995, several Hunton reservoir fields have been exploited by various operators. The principle behind this exploitation remains the same: The wells produce large quantities of water, and along with it, significant quantities of natural gas and sometimes oil. Examination of various fields producing from the Hunton reservoir indicates that the economic success from these fields is not uniform. Some fields produce significant quantities of oil, whereas some fields only produce gas. In some fields, horizontal wells work best, whereas in some other fields, vertical wells do a good job. The water production from the fields ranges from as low as few hundred barrels per day to several thousand barrels per day. In this paper, we present the results from various fields to indicate the parameters needed in a Hunton field to make it economically successful. We restrict our evaluation to parameters that can be easily measured or are readily available. These include log data (gamma ray, resistivity, neutron, and density), initial potential data, production data (oil, gas, and water—if available) and well configuration (vertical or horizontal). By analyzing the recovery of oil and gas according to various reservoir parameters, we developed a methodology for predicting the future success of the field. For example, a clear relationship exists between porosity of the rock and initial hydrocarbon saturation: The higher the oil saturation, the better the recovery factor. Initial potential is critical in determining possible recovery. Horizontal wells cost 1.5 to 2 times more than vertical wells and may not provide the additional recovery to justify the costs. The Hunton formation is extensive in Oklahoma. If we want to extend the success of some of the fields to other areas, we need clear guidelines in terms of what is needed to exploit those fields. This paper provides some of those guidelines based on the examination of the currently producing fields.

222

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Gas Hydrate Research and Stratigraphic Test Results, Milne Point Unit, Alaska North Slope Authors: Robert Hunter (ASRC Energy), Scott Digert (BPXA), Tim Collett (USGS), Ray Boswell (USDOE) Venue: AAPG National Meeting Gas Hydrate session, Oral Presentation, San Antonio, TX, April 22, 2008 (http://www.AAPG.org [external site]) Abstract: This BP-DOE collaborative research project is helping determine whether or not gas hydrate can become a technically and economically recoverable gas resource. Reservoir characterization, development modeling, and associated studies indicate that 0-0.34 trillion cubic meters (TCM) gas may be technically recoverable from the estimated 0.92 TCM gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). Reservoir modeling indicates sufficient potential for technical recovery to justify proceeding into field operations to acquire basic reservoir and fluid data from the Mount Elbert gas hydrate prospect in the Milne Point Unit (MPU). Successful drilling and data acquisition in the Mount Elbert-01 stratigraphic test well was completed during February 3-19, 2007. Data was acquired from 131 meters of core (30.5 meters gas hydrate-bearing), extensive wireline logging, and wireline production testing operations using Modular Dynamics Testing (MDT). The stratigraphic test validated the 3D seismic interpretation of the MPU gas hydrate-bearing Mount Elbert prospect. Onsite core sub- sampling preserved samples for later analyses of interstitial water geochemistry, physical properties, thermal properties, organic geochemistry, petrophysics, and mechanical properties. MDT testing was accomplished within two gas hydrate-bearing intervals, and acquired during four long shut-in period tests. Four gas samples and one pre-gas hydrate dissociation formation water sample were collected. MDT analyses are helping to improve understanding of gas hydrate dissociation, gas production, formation cooling, and long-term production potential as well as help calibrate reservoir simulation models.

223

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico. Annual report, September 25, 1995--September 24, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic driver for this project is the low recovery observed in Delaware reservoirs, such as the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). This low recovery is caused by low reservoir energy, less than optimum permeabilities and porosities, and inadequate reservoir characterization and reservoir management strategies which are typical of projects operated by independent producers. Rapid oil decline rates and high gas/oil ratios are typically observed in the first year of primary production. Based on the production characteristics that have been observed in similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Pool. Three basic constraints to producing the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Reservoir are: (1) limited areal and interwell geologic knowledge, (2) lack of an engineering tool to evaluate the various producing strategies, and (3) limited surface access prohibiting development with conventional drilling. The limited surface access is caused by the proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes. The objectives of this project are: (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers, especially in the Permian Basin.

Murphy, M.B.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004 axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna Germany. Since its installation this turbine has gathered more than 16 000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

Klaus Ohlig; Stefan Bischoff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal

226

Recovery Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) presents opportunities with potential for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Signed into law by President Obama on February 17,...

227

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress Review No. 31, quarter ending June 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental, petroleum technology, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (?14–15 years) compared to the other two sites (?6–11 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7 g m?2 d?1, respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R = 0.827, P < 0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils.

Yao Su; Xuan Zhang; Fang-Fang Xia; Qi-Qi Zhang; Jiao-Yan Kong; Jing Wang; Ruo He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Mechanisms by Which Methane Gas and Methane Hydrate Coexist In Ocean Sediments Authors: Maša Prodanovic (speaker), Javad Behseresht, Yao Peng, Steven L. Bryant, Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: A spectrum of behavior is encountered in methane hydrate provinces, especially ocean sediments, ranging from essentially static accumulations where the pore space is filled with hydrate and brine, to active seeps where hydrate and methane gas phase co-exist in the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). The grain-scale models of drainage and fracturing presented demonstrate key processes involved in pressure-driven gas phase invasion of a sediment. A novel extension of invasion percolation to infinite-acting, physically representative networks is used to evaluate the connectivity of water in a gas-drained sediment. A novel implementation of the level set method (LSM) is used to determine the capillarity-controlled displacement of brine by gas from sediment and from fractures within the sediment. The discrete element method (DEM) is extended to model the coupling between the pore fluids and the solid, and thereby predict the onset of sediment fracturing by gas phase pressure under in situ loading conditions. The DEM grain mechanics model accounts for the different pressure of brine and methane gas in a “membrane” two-fluid model. The fluid-fluid configuration from LSM can be mapped directly to the pore space in DEM, thereby coupling the drainage and mechanics models. The type of behavior that can emerge from the coupled processes is illustrated with an extended LSM model. The extension computes grain displacement by the gas phase with a simple kinematic rule.

231

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economics of black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogenerationblack liquor and biomass gasifier/gas turbine technology".entrained flow booster gasifier in New Bern, North Carolina;

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 28  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of progress during the quarter ending September 30, 1981 are summarized. Field projects and supporting research in the following areas are reported: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal processes/heavy oil (steam and in-situ combustion); resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; petroleum technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and improved drilling technology. A list of BETC publications with abstracts, published during the quarter is included. (DMC)

Linville, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Decreasing Air Emission Impacts From Oil and Gas Development Authors: Charles B. McComas, PE; J. Daniel Arthur, PE; Gerry Baker; G. Lee Moody; and David B. Cornue, PG, CHMM Venue: American Chemical Society (53rd Pentasectional Meeting) – Halliburton Energy Services Technology Center, Duncan, OK, March 8, 2008 (http://www.acs.org [external site]) Abstract: Research funded by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and conducted under the direction of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission has examined concerns related to air emissions resulting from domestic onshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Current air issues such as ambient air quality standards and non-attainment areas, regulatory compliance and regional inconsistencies, as well as global climate change and carbon sequestration are a few of the subjects perceived to represent potential barriers to energy development. The topic of air quality and how it relates to onshore oil and gas exploration and production activities is examined from the position of environmental sustainability. These concerns can be addressed through reasonable and prudent practices that industry may implement in order to avoid, minimize, or mitigate air emissions. Additionally, air emissions parameters that are not currently regulated (e.g.: CH4 and CO2) may become the subject of increased concern in the future and, therefore, add to the list of issues facing oil and gas exploration and production. Suggestions for further research opportunities with the potential to benefit responsible energy resource development are also presented.

234

Catalyst optimization in gas-to-liquid technology : an operations view / Israel Olalekan Jolaolu.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gas to Liquids (GTL) technology is a general term used for a group of technologies that has the capability to create liquid hydrocarbon fuels from… (more)

Jolaolu, Israel Olalekan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sizzling Qatar boom sparked by foreign money, technology, and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International oil companies have collected advanced upstream and downstream technology and focused it on the small Persian Gulf emirate of Qatar, a roughly 110 mile long by 50 mile wide, thumb-like peninsula that juts out from Saudi Arabia. The emirate, in a burst of enlightened self interest, has opened its doors to international companies and is now riding a wave of foreign investment and new technology to major increases in oil, natural gas, and petrochemical production. The largest natural gas reserve in the world is under Qatari waters and is the driver for the activity that includes two LNG plants. Qatar has proven that you don`t need crude oil in the Persian Gulf to be important. Activities are discussed.

Aalund, L.R.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gas Foil Bearing Technology Advancements for Closed Brayton Cycle Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbine systems are under consideration for future space electric power generation. CBC turbines convert thermal energy from a nuclear reactor or other heat source to electrical power using a closed?loop cycle. The operating fluid in the closed?loop is commonly a high pressure inert gas mixture that cannot tolerate contamination. One source of potential contamination in a system such as this is the lubricant used in the turbomachine bearings. Gas Foil Bearings (GFB) represent a bearing technology that eliminates the possibility of contamination by using the working fluid as the lubricant. Thus foil bearings are well suited to application in space power CBC turbine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center is actively researching GFB technology for use in these CBC power turbines. A power loss model has been developed and the effects of very high ambient pressure start?up torque and misalignment have been observed and are reported here.

Samuel A. Howard; Robert J. Bruckner; Christopher DellaCorte; Kevin C. Radil

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies Webinar on the Potential for Natural Gas to Enhance Biomass Technologies January 22, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis...

238

Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies; Natural Gas Trasit Users Group (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

and and infrastructure research, development, and deployment through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to help the United States reduce its dependence on imported petro- leum and to pave the way to a future transportation network based on hydrogen. Natural gas vehicles can also reduce emissions of regulated pollutants compared with vehicles powered by conventional fuels such as gasoline

239

Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Bio-Gas Technologies, LLC Address 2025 George St. Place Sandusky, Ohio Zip 44870 Sector Biomass, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Agriculture;Business and legal services;Consulting; Energy provider: power production;Energy provider: wholesale;Engineering/architectural/design;Installation;Investment/finances;Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing Phone number 419-663-8000 Website http://www.biogastech.com Coordinates 41.4369°, -82.747133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4369,"lon":-82.747133,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

Options for Gas-to-Liquids Technology in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10 percent. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinquish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, Eric Partridge

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Options for gas-to-liquids technology in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to assess the effect of applying new technology to the economics of a proposed natural gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant, to evaluate the potential of a slower-paced, staged deployment of GTL technology, and to evaluate the effect of GTL placement of economics. Five scenarios were economically evaluated and compared: a no-major-gas-sales scenario, a gas-pipeline/LNG scenario, a fast-paced GTL development scenario, a slow-paced GTL development scenario, and a scenario which places the GTL plant in lower Alaska, instead of on the North Slope. Evaluations were completed using an after-tax discounted cash flow analysis. Results indicate that the slow-paced GTL scenario is the only one with a rate of return greater than 10%. The slow-paced GTL development would allow cost saving on subsequent expansions. These assumed savings, along with the lowering of the transportation tariff, combine to distinguish this option for marketing the North Slope gas from the other scenarios. Critical variables that need further consideration include the GTL plant cost, the GTL product premium, and operating and maintenance costs.

Robertson, E.P.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Davies, J. (General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)); Zammit, M. (AC Rochester, NY (United States)); Patterson, P. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The 1991 natural gas vehicle challenge: Developing dedicated natural gas vehicle technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering research and design competition to develop and demonstrate dedicated natural gas-powered light-duty trucks, the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge, was held June 6--11, 1191, in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada (EMR), the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE), and General Motors Corporation (GM), the competition consisted of rigorous vehicle testing of exhaust emissions, fuel economy, performance parameters, and vehicle design. Using Sierra 2500 pickup trucks donated by GM, 24 teams of college and university engineers from the US and Canada participated in the event. A gasoline-powered control testing as a reference vehicle. This paper discusses the results of the event, summarizes the technologies employed, and makes observations on the state of natural gas vehicle technology.

Larsen, R.; Rimkus, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Davies, J. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Zammit, M. [AC Rochester, NY (United States); Patterson, P. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Gas Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Technology Institute (Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit) Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Technology Institute Place Des Plaines, IL Website http://www.gastechnology.org/ Coordinates 42.0333623°, -87.8833991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0333623,"lon":-87.8833991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The reservoir characterization, geologic modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

Murphy, M.B.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 32, quarter ending September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental and safety, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 33, quarter ending December 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental and safety, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 36 for quarter ending September 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports for the quarter ending September 30, 1983, are presented for field projects and supported research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovery by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The programs focus on hot-gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match or nearly match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents which can reduce the sulfur in coal gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. This report summarizes the highlights and accomplishments of the October slipstream test run of the Zinc Titanate Fluid Bed Desulfurization/Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (ZTFBD/DSRP) Mobile Laboratory at the Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Although the run had to be shortened due to mechanical problems with METC`s gasifier, there was sufficient on-stream time to demonstrate highly successful operation of both the zinc titanate fluid bed desulfurization and the DSRP with actual coal gas.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Demonstration of Natural Gas Engine Driven Air Compressor Technology at Department of Defense Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are offset by differences in prevailing utility rates, efficiencies of partial load operation, reductions in peak demand, heat recovery, and avoiding the cost of back-up generators. Natural gas, a clean-burning fuel, is abundant and readily available...

Lin, M.; Aylor, S. W.; Van Ormer, H.

252

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Mohamed Toema (speaker), Sarah Nuss-Warren, and Kirby S. Chapman, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory; James McCarthy and Thomas McGrath, Innovative Environmental Solutions Inc. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: The researchers are conducting a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of field gas-fired four-stroke cycle rich burn engines equipped with non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology. Engine emissions and operating parameters are being monitored on three engines over an extended period. In addition, a mapping study was conducted on one engine. The NSCR was operated at various controlled air-to-fuel (AF) ratios while emission measurements were conducted and engine operating parameters monitored. NOx, CO, and oxygen were measured using both EPA reference method technology and the portable analyzer used in the long-term study. In the mapping study, ammonia, formaldehyde, CO, NOx, and speciated hydrocarbon emissions were recorded in real-time using an extractive FTIR system. This paper focuses on the engine mapping phase. The mapping tests demonstrated a trade-off between NOx emissions and CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbon emissions. Richer engine operation (lower AF) decreases NOx emissions at the expense of higher CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbons. Leaner operation has the opposite effect. The results to date of the semi-continuous monitoring are presented in a separate paper.

253

Request for Information on Efficiency Standards for Natural Gas Compressors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ormat Technologies is headquartered in Reno Nevada and designs and manufactures waste heat recovery units that are commonly applied on natural gas pipeline compressor stations

254

Natural Gas Technologies II Conference - Ingenuity & Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Technologies II Conference - Ingenuity & Innovation Natural Gas Technologies II Conference - Ingenuity & Innovation Session 10 - Gas Industry Forum February 8-11, 2004 Phoenix, Arizona Table of Contents Disclaimer Program [PDF-102KB] Biographies [PDF-107KB] Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

255

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database) and to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama and to identify those resources that are producible at moderate cost. These objectives will be achieved through detailed geological, engineering, and geostatistical characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on the completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data relevant to the Smackover reservoir in southwestern Alabama. Subtask 2 comprises the geological and engineering characterization of Smackover reservoir lithofacies. This has been accomplished through detailed examination and analysis of geophysical well logs, core material, well cuttings, and well-test data from wells penetrating Smackover reservoirs in southwestern Alabama. From these data, reservoir heterogeneities, such as lateral and vertical changes in lithology, porosity, permeability, and diagenetic overprint, have been recognized and used to produce maps, cross sections, graphs, and other graphic representations to aid in interpretation of the geologic parameters that affect these reservoirs. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities for Smackover reservoirs. This research has been based primarily on the evaluation of key geologic and engineering data from selected Smackover fields. 1 fig.

Mancini, E.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Government works with technology to boost gas output/usage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specially treated ethane gas from fields of the Moomba area in the Cooper basin of South Australia now flows freely through 870 mi of interstate gas pipeline to an end-user in Sydney, New South Wales. This unprecedented usage of ethane is the result of a long-term cooperative agreement. The producer sought to provide the end-user with ethane gas for usage as a petrochemical feedstock to manufacture ethylene and plastic goods. The end-user had strict specifications for a low-CO{sub 2}, very dry ethane product with a small percentage of methane. In order to meet these, the producer committed millions of dollars to construct a high-technology, state-of-the-art ethane treatment facility in the Moomba area, and lay an extensive pipeline. Santos also contracted with the amines supplier to provide a high-performance, deep CO{sub 2} removal solvent with good corrosion prevention characteristics. The paper discusses the Moomba field overflow, gas treatment, government cooperation, and project completion.

Nicoll, H. [Dow Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States). GAS/SPEC Technology Group

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

258

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low-Rank Coals Project Number: DE-FE0007759 Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX Refinery offgas PSA at Air Products' facility in Baytown, TX. Air Products, in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), is testing its Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (Sour PSA) process that separates syngas into an hydrogen-rich stream and second stream comprising of sulfur compounds(primarily hydrogen sulfide)carbon dioxide (CO2), and other impurities. The adsorbent technology testing that has been performed to date utilized syngas streams derived from higher rank coals and petcoke. Using data from experiments based on petcoke-derived syngas, replacing the

259

Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate End of Phase 2 Topical Report Reporting Period: June, 2007-June, 2008 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston June, 2008 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory

260

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Place Volumes and Liquid Recovery for Volatile Oil and Gas Condensate Reservoirs. (December 2000) Juan Manual Jaramillo Arias, B. S. , Universidad de America; B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Colombia Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Maria A. Barrufet... Reservoir Performance 2. 2 Equation of State Review. . 2. 3 Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR EOS). 2. 4 Vapor Liquid Equilibria. . 2. 5 Volume Translation. 2. 6 Pseudoization or Lumping. 2. 7 Heavy Fraction Characterization. . 2. 8 Compositional...

Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 22, quarter ending March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains statements of objectives and summaries of technical progress on all DOE contracts pertaining to enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling techniques. Subject categories include chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal recovery of heavy oil; resource assessment; improved drilling technology; residual oil; environmental; petroleum technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery. An index containing the names of the companies and institutions involved is included. Current publications resulting from the DOE contractual program are listed. (DMC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Variation in Long-Term Emissions Data from NSCR-Equipped Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Kirby S. Chapman (speaker), Mohamed Toema, and Sarah Nuss-Warren, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: This paper describes work on a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology, including a catalyst and air-to-fuel ratio controller (AFRC), applied to four-stroke cycle rich-burn engines. Emissions and engine data were collected semi-continuously with a portable emissions analyzer on three engines in the Four Corners area. In addition, periodic emissions measurements that included ammonia were conducted several times. Data collected from October 2007 through August 2008 show significant variation in emissions levels over hours, days, and longer periods of time, as well as seasonal variation. As a result of these variations, simultaneous control of NOx to below a few hundred parts per million (ppm) and CO to below 1,000 ppm volumetric concentration was not consistently achieved. Instead, the NSCR/AFRC systems were able to simultaneously control both species to these levels for only a fraction of the time the engines were monitored. Both semi-continuous emissions data and periodically collected emissions data support a NOx-CO trade-off and a NOx-ammonia tradeoff in NSCR-equipped engines.

265

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) is southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope-basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types.

Murphy, Mark B.

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

Determining the maximal capacity of a combined-cycle plant operating with afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect gained from afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler used as part of a PGU-450T combined-cycle plant is considered. The results obtained from ... electric and therma...

V. M. Borovkov; N. M. Osmanova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6: July 14, 2003 6: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276: July 14, 2003 Natural Gas Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2000 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #276:

268

Natural gas and efficient technologies: A response to global warming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become recognized by the international scientific community that global warming due to fossil fuel energy buildup of greenhouse CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is a real environmental problem. Worldwide agreement has also been reached to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. A leading approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions is to utilize hydrogen-rich fuels and improve the efficiency of conversion in the power generation, transportation and heating sectors of the economy. In this report, natural gas, having the highest hydrogen content of all the fossil fuels, can have an important impact in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper explores natural gas and improved conversion systems for supplying energy to all three sectors of the economy. The improved technologies include combined cycle for power generation, the Carnol system for methanol production for the transportation sector and fuel cells for both power generation and transportation use. The reduction in CO{sub 2} from current emissions range from 13% when natural gas is substituted for gasoline in the transportation sector to 45% when substituting methanol produced by the Carnol systems (hydrogen from thermal decomposition of methane reacting with CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants) used in the transportation sector. CO{sub 2} reductions exceeding 60% can be achieved by using natural gas in combined cycle for power generation and Carnol methanol in the transportation sector and would, thus, stabilize CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere predicted to avoid undue climate change effects. It is estimated that the total fossil fuel energy bill in the US can be reduced by over 40% from the current fuel bill. This also allows a doubling in the unit cost for natural gas if the current energy bill is maintained. Estimates of the total net incremental replacement capital cost for completing the new improved equipment is not more than that which will have to be spent to replace the existing equipment conducting business as usual.

Steinberg, M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity The mission of the Environmental Program is to promote a reliable, affordable, and secure supply of domestic oil and clean-burning natural gas, by providing cost-effective environmental regulatory compliance technologies, enhancing environmental protections during oil and gas E&P operations, and facilitating the development and use of scientific, risk-based environmental regulatory frameworks.

270

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge using multi-solid fluidized bed combustion technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was initiated to investigate the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) and domestic sewage sludge (DSS) simultaneously by using Battelle's multi-solid fluidized-bed combustion (MS-FBC) technology. The concept was to recover energy as high and low pressure steam, simultaneously. High pressure steam would be generated from flue gas using a conventional tubular boiler. Low pressure steam would be generated by direct contact drying of DSS (as 4% solids) with hot sand in a fluidized bed that is an integral part of the MS-FBC process. It was proposed that high pressure steam could be used for district heating or electricity generation. The low pressure steam could be used for close proximity building heat. Alternatively, low pressure steam could be used to heat wastewater in a sewage treatment plant to enhance sedimentation and biological activity that would provide a captive market for this part of the recovered energy. The direct contact drying or tubeless steam generation eliminates fouling problems that are common during heat exchange with DSS. The MS-FBC process was originally developed for coal and was chosen for this investigation because its combustion rate is about three times that of conventional fluidized beds and it was projected to have the flexibility needed for accomplishing tubeless steam generation. The results of the investigation show that the MS-FBC process concept for the co-utilization of MSW and DSS is technically feasible and that the thermal efficiency of the process is 76 to 82% based on experiments conducted in a 70 to 85 lb/h pilot plant and calculations on three conceptual cases.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Coupled Hydrological, Thermal and Geomechanical Analysis of Wellbore Stability in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (OTC 19672) Authors: Jonny Rutqvist (speaker), George J. Moridis, and Tarun Grover Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 ( http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] ) Abstract: This study investigated coupled multiphase flow, themal, thermodynamic and geomechanical behavior of oceanic Hydrate Bearing Sediments (HBS), during depressurization-induced gas production in general, and potential wellbore in-stability and casing deformation in particular. The project investigated the geomechanical changes and wellbore stability for two alternative cases of production using a horizontal well in a Class 3 deposit and a vertical well in a Class 2 deposit. The research compared the geomechanical responses and the potential adverse geomechanical effects for the two different cases. Analysis shows that geomechanical responses during depressurization-induced gas production from oceanic hydrate deposits is driven by the reservoir-wide pressure decline (Delta P), which in turn is controlled by the induced pressure decline near the wellbore. Because any change quickly propagates within the entire reservoir, the reservoir wide geomechanical response can occur within a few days of production induced pressure decline.

272

Determination of technology transfer requirements for enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed field study was conducted to determine the technical information needs of current and potential users of enhanced oil recovery data. Under the direction of the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), the study (1) identifies groups which have a need for EOR-related information, (2) delineate the specific information needs of each user-group, and (3) outlines methods for improved transfer of appropriate information to the end users. This study also assesses attitudes toward the EOR-related efforts of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the BETC, and the role each should play in facilitating the commercialization of EOR processes. More than 300 users and potential users of EOR information were surveyed. Included in the survey sample were representatives of major oil companies, independent oil companies, engineering consulting firms, university and private research organizations, financial institutions and federal, state, and local policy-making bodies. In-depth questionnaires were specifically designed for each group. This study analyzes each group's position pertaining to (1) current level of EOR activity or interest, (2) current and projected EOR information needs, (3) assessments of the BETC's current information services and suggestions for improvement, (4) delineation of technical and economic constraints to increased EOR activity, and (5) steps the DOE might take to enhance the attractiveness of commercial EOR operations.

Wilson, T.D.; Scott, J.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the flue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler flue gases are often rejected to the stack at temperatures more than 100 F to 150 F higher than the temperature of the generated steam. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for every 40 F reduction in flue gas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer can often reduce fuel requirements by 5% to 10% and pay for itself in less than 2 years. The table provides examples of the potential for heat recovery.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Progress review No. 24: contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress report, quarter ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection and thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: extraction technology; resource assessment technology; environmental; petroleum technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Third ammendment and extension to Annex IV enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the seven tasks of the Third Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of effort under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 25 through 31. The first, second, and third reports on Annex IV, ((Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, and IV-3 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, and DOE/BC-86/2/SP)) contain the results from the first 24 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, and March 1986. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Peterson, G.; Munoz, J.D.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Review of technologies for oil and gas produced water treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Produced water is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. It is a mixture of different organic and inorganic compounds. Due to the increasing volume of waste all over the world in the current decade, the outcome and effect of discharging produced water on the environment has lately become a significant issue of environmental concern. Produced water is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, current technologies cannot remove small-suspended oil particles and dissolved elements. Besides, many chemical treatments, whose initial and/or running cost are high and produce hazardous sludge. In onshore facilities, biological pretreatment of oily wastewater can be a cost-effective and environmental friendly method. As high salt concentration and variations of influent characteristics have direct influence on the turbidity of the effluent, it is appropriate to incorporate a physical treatment, e.g., membrane to refine the final effluent. For these reasons, major research efforts in the future could focus on the optimization of current technologies and use of combined physico-chemical and/or biological treatment of produced water in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits.

Ahmadun Fakhru’l-Razi; Alireza Pendashteh; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Dayang Radiah Awang Biak; Sayed Siavash Madaeni; Zurina Zainal Abidin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

Qu, Ming [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Yin, Hongxi [Southeast University, Nanjing, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers continuous electromagnetic data on the reservoir conditions, enabling economical and effective monitoring and analysis. April 3, 2012 One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells already producing oil and gas and drilling operations for new wells. One of several active projects, LANL and Chevron co-developed INFICOMM(tm), a wireless technology used to collect real-time temperature and pressure information from sensors in oil and gas wells, including very deep wells

280

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development DOE-Funded Primer Underscores Technology Advances, Challenges of Shale Gas Development April 14, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces the release of "Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer." The Primer provides regulators, policy makers, and the public with an objective source of information on the technology advances and challenges that accompany deep shale gas development. Natural gas production from hydrocarbon rich deep shale formations, known as "shale gas," is one of the most quickly expanding trends in onshore domestic oil and gas exploration. The lower 48 states have a wide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} at the Dragon Products, Inc. Cement Plant located in Thomaston, Maine. 1990 Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The background and process of the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} are described. The Scrubber was developed for Dragon Cement Plant in Thomaston, Maine and facilitates a number of process improvements. The exhaust gas is scrubbed of SO{sub 2} with better than 90% efficiency. The kiln dust is cleaned of alkalines and so can be returned to kiln feed instead of dumped to landfill. Potassium sulfate in commercial quantity and purity can be recovered. Distilled water is recovered which also has commercial potential. Thus, various benefits are accrued and no waste streams remain for disposal. The process is applicable to both wet and dry process cement kilns and appears to have potential in any industry which generates acidic gaseous exhausts and/or basic solid or liquid wastes.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas Detonation and its Application in Engineering and Technologies (Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most relevant aspects of advanced experimental investigations of gas detonation and its mathematical simulation are presented. Examples of the engineering use of gas detonation are given.

Yu. A. Nikolaev; A. A. Vasil'ev…

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- for a total of 30 million - that will pursue innovations in natural gas storage tanks and fueling stations, helping to harness our abundant supplies of domestic natural gas...

284

Effect of sweep gas composition on ionization chamber response in the BEATRIX-II tritium recovery experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BEATRIX-II irradiation experiment was an in situ tritium recovery experiment to evaluate the tritium release characteristics of fusion ceramic breeder materials and to characterize their stability under fast neutron irradiation to extended burnups. This is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored experiment which is being carried out in the Materials Open Test Assembly of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The participants are Japan, Canada and the US The in situ tritium recovery experiment consisted of two individual in-reactor experimental assemblies (Phase I and Phase II) that were irradiated for 300 and 200 EFPD, respectively. Each experimental phase included two specimens: a thin annular specimen capable of temperature changes and a larger temperature-gradient specimen. In Phase I both specimens were Li{sub 2}O while for Phase II the temperature-change specimen consisted of Li{sub 2}O and the temperature-gradient specimen was a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} spherebed. Real-time measurements of the tritium release from the specimens during changing conditions (neutronics, temperature and sweep gas composition) were made using ion chambers. In order to correctly interpret the response of the ionization chambers it is necessary to understand the effect of changing sweep gas composition on the operation of the chambers. The purpose of this paper is to describe activities carried out to determine the effect of hydrogen additions to a helium sweep gas on the operation of these ionization chambers.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baker, D.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Effect of sweep gas composition on ionization chamber response in the BEATRIX-II tritium recovery experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BEATRIX-II irradiation experiment was an in situ tritium recovery experiment to evaluate the tritium release characteristics of fusion ceramic breeder materials and to characterize their stability under fast neutron irradiation to extended burnups. This is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored experiment which is being carried out in the Materials Open Test Assembly of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The participants are Japan, Canada and the US The in situ tritium recovery experiment consisted of two individual in-reactor experimental assemblies (Phase I and Phase II) that were irradiated for 300 and 200 EFPD, respectively. Each experimental phase included two specimens: a thin annular specimen capable of temperature changes and a larger temperature-gradient specimen. In Phase I both specimens were Li[sub 2]O while for Phase II the temperature-change specimen consisted of Li[sub 2]O and the temperature-gradient specimen was a Li[sub 2]ZrO[sub 3] spherebed. Real-time measurements of the tritium release from the specimens during changing conditions (neutronics, temperature and sweep gas composition) were made using ion chambers. In order to correctly interpret the response of the ionization chambers it is necessary to understand the effect of changing sweep gas composition on the operation of the chambers. The purpose of this paper is to describe activities carried out to determine the effect of hydrogen additions to a helium sweep gas on the operation of these ionization chambers.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Baker, D.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation of fracture treatment type on the recovery of gas from the cotton valley formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every tight gas well needs to be stimulated with a hydraulic fracture treatment to produce natural gas at economic flow rates and recover a volume of gas that provides an acceptable return on investment. Over the past few decades, many different...

Yalavarthi, Ramakrishna

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SANANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; (7) Mobility control agents.

Unknown

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Authors: Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM; Enid J. Sullivan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM; and Lynn E. Katz and Kerry A. Kinney, University of Texas, Austin, TX. Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: About 2.3 billion cubic meters (600 billion gallons) of wastewater (produced water) is generated each year as a byproduct of oil and gas operations in the continental United States. Disposal of this water represents about 10% of the cost of hydrocarbon production. Inexpensive treatment technologies can lower the cost of disposal and generate higher-quality water for other uses. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively sorb a variety of nonpolar organic compounds from water. SMZ was tested as a medium to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from produced water generated during extraction of coalbed natural gas. BTEX removal is necessary prior to surface discharge of produced waters or as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis. We demonstrated in laboratory column experiments that BTEX-saturated SMZ is readily regenerated by air sparging. There was no loss in BTEX sorption capacity, and a minor decrease in hydraulic conductivity, after 50 sorption/regeneration cycles. Based upon the laboratory results, a pilot-scale produced-water treatment system was designed and tested at a reinjection facility in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The SMZ-based system was designed to treat up to 110 liters (30 gallons) of produced water per hour on a continuous basis by running two SMZ columns in series. The system performed as predicted, based on laboratory results, over repeated feed and regeneration cycles during the month-long operation. The BTEX-laden sparge gases were treated with a vapor-phase bioreactor system, resulting in an emissions-free process

290

Oil & Gas Science and Technology --Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles Copyright 2010 IFPEN Energies nouvelles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- Rev. IFP Energies nouvelles Copyright © 2010 IFPEN Energies to an effective thermal management system and to maintain safety, perfor- #12;2 Oil & Gas Science and Technology of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109 - USA 2 U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development

Stefanopoulou, Anna

291

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Numerical Studies of Geomechanical Stability of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Authors: George J. Moridis, Jonny Rutqvist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Venue: 2007 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 30–May 1, 2007 (http://www.otcnet.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The thermal and mechanical loading of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) can result in hydrate dissociation and a significant pressure increase, with potentially adverse consequences on the integrity and stability of the wellbore assembly, the HBS, and the bounding formations. The perception of HBS instability, coupled with insufficient knowledge of their geomechanical behavior and the absence of predictive capabilities, has resulted in a strategy of avoidance of HBS when locating offshore production platforms. These factors can also impede the development of hydrate deposits as gas resources. For the analysis of the geomechanical stability of HBS, project researchers developed and used a numerical model that integrates a commercial geomechanical code into a simulator describing the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transport, and thermodynamic behavior in geologic media. The geomechanical code includes elastoplastic models for quasi-static yield and failure analysis and viscoplastic models for time-dependent (creep) analysis. The hydrate simulator can model the non-isothermal hydration reactions (equilibrium or kinetic), phase behavior, and flow of fluids and heat in HBS, and can handle any combination of hydrate dissociation mechanisms. The simulations can account for the interdependence of changes in the hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical properties of the HBS, in addition to swelling/shrinkage, displacement (subsidence), and possible geomechanical failure. Researchers investigated in three cases the coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic, and geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS systems. The first involves hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper, conventional reservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipes intersecting the HBS. The second case involves mechanical loading caused by the weight of structures placed on HBS at the ocean floor, and the third describes system response during gas production from a hydrate deposit. The results indicate that the stability of HBS in the vicinity of warm pipes may be significantly affected, especially near the ocean floor where the sediments are unconsolidated and more compressible. Conversely, the increased pressure caused by the weight of structures on the ocean floor increases the stability of hydrates, while gas production from oceanic deposits minimally affects the geomechanical stability of HBS under the conditions that are deemed desirable for production.

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual technology review Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

42 Low Cost, High Efficiency Reversible Fuel Cell Systems Summary: Wh Annual Heat Recovery 18000 MJ Natural Gas LHV 925 BTUscf 12;May 19 , 2003 Technology Management,...

293

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies, such as large volume fracture treatments, are required before a reasonable profit can be made. Hydraulic fracturing is one of the best methods to stimulate a tight gas well. Most fracture treatments result in 3-6 fold increases in the productivity...

Wang, Yilin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Rarefied gas dynamics and its applications to vacuum technology F. Sharipov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rarefied gas dynamics and its applications to vacuum technology F. Sharipov Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, 81531-990, Brazil Abstract Basic concepts of rarefied gas dynamics are given in a concise form. Some problems of rarefied gas flows are considered, namely, calculations of velocity slip

Sharipov, Felix

295

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Current Oil Sands Technologies: Surface Mining and In Situ Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Current Oil Sands Technologies: Surface Mining and In Situ Applications ... efficiency - gas turbine ?GT ... The studied uncertainties include, (1) uncertainty in emissions factors for petroleum substitutes, (2) uncertainties resulting from poor knowledge of the amt. of remaining conventional petroleum, and (3) uncertainties about the amt. of prodn. of petroleum substitutes from natural gas and coal feedstocks. ...

Joule A. Bergerson; Oyeshola Kofoworola; Alex D. Charpentier; Sylvia Sleep; Heather L. MacLean

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

296

NETL: News Release - DOE, Penn State To Establish Gas Storage Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 11, 2003 September 11, 2003 DOE, Penn State To Establish Gas Storage Technology Consortium Goal is to Improve Performance of the Nation's Underground Gas Storage Infrastructure Map of U.S. natural gas storage sites - click for larger image FOSSIL FACT: The nation's gas industry stores natural gas in more than 400 underground storage reservoirs and salt caverns throughout the country. Click here for larger image UNIVERSITY PARK , PA - The Pennsylvania State University has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to establish and operate an underground gas storage technology consortium. The agreement between Penn State and DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas will last four-and-a-half years at a total cost of $3 million. The first phase of the agreement will last

297

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Project Number: FE0013363 Project Description In this project, Air Products will operate a two-bed mobile system at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) facility. A slipstream of authentic, high-hydrogen syngas based on low-rank coal will be evaluated as the feedstock. Testing will be conducted for approximately eight weeks, thereby providing far longer adsorbent exposure data than demonstrated to date. By utilizing real-world, high- hydrogen syngas, information necessary to understand the utility of the system for methanol production will be made available. In addition, Air Products will also operate a multi-bed PSA process development unit (PDU), located at its Trexlertown, PA headquarters, to evaluate the impact of incorporating pressure equalization steps in the process cycle. This testing will be conducted utilizing a sulfur-free, synthetic syngas, and will improve the reliability of the prediction of the system's operating performance at commercial scale.

298

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand Permeability of Laboratory-Formed Hydrate-Bearing Sand (OTC 19536) Authors: Timothy J. Kneafsey (speaker), Yongkoo Seol, Arvind Gupta, and Liviu Tomutsa Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] Abstract: Methane hydrate was formed in moist sand under confining stress in a long, x-ray transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane hydrate saturations. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes, caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas permeability was measured in each test for dry sand, moist sand, frozen sand, and hydrate-bearing sand. Results of these measurements are presented. Water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing sand, and the changes in water saturation were observed using CT scanning. Inverse modeling will be performed using these data to extend the relative permeability measurements

299

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Authors: Joshua A. Simpson and Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) from water generated during oil and natural gas production (produced water). The BTEX sorption isotherms are linear and noncompetitive, suggesting that the removal mechanism is partitioning into the surfactant’s hydrophobic bilayer formed on SMZ. Even though BTEX sorption in batch systems is rapid, chemical equilibrium models do not accurately describe BTEX transport through packed beds of SMZ. Comparison with transport of a nonreactive tracer (tritium) suggests that two-site, diffusive nonequilibrium sorption-desorption controls BTEX transport. We conducted batch experiments with SMZ to determine the nonequilibrium sorption kinetics of each BTEX constituent. The kinetic measurements were used to parameterize a nonequilibrium transport model to predict BTEX removal under varying flow conditions. The accuracy of predictions is being tested using laboratory column experiments with produced water from the San Juan Basin of New Mexico

300

Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heat waste recovery system from exhaust gas of diesel engine to a reciprocal steam engine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research project was about the combined organic Rankine cycle which extracted energy from the exhaust gas of a diesel engine. There was a study… (more)

Duong, Tai Anh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 35, quarter ending June 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 30, quarter ending March 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Progress review No. 25: contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress report, quarter ending December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improving drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Contracts and grants for cooperative research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 20, quarter ending September 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contracts and grants for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology are arranged according to: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; improved drilling technology; residual oil; environmental; and petroleum techology.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 27, for quarter ending June 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 34, quarter ending March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress achieved for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; and thermal/heavy oil. In addition, progress reports are presented for: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovered by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.) [ed.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Assisting Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Bus Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2-page fact sheet summarizing the U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Transit Users Group, which provides assistance to transit agencies implementing natural gas vehicles into their fleets.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Current Status of High Resolution Column Technology for Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......work in high-resolution gas-solid chromatography...developments in high- resolution gas chromatographic column...illary or high-resolution gas chromatography. Of these...column material is its high cost compared to glass columns...re sulting from column production, and requires deactivation......

Mary A. Kaiser; Matthew S. Klee

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

312

The efficiency of using gas turbine technologies in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper considers the technical and economic features of using stream-gas and gas-turbine power generators in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits in Irkutsk oblast under conditions of carrying o...

A. M. Karasevich; A. V. Fedyaev; G. G. Lachkov; O. N. Fedyaeva

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Proposing a novel combined cycle for optimal exergy recovery of liquefied natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective utilization of the cryogenic exergy associated with liquefied natural gas (LNG) vaporization is important. In this paper, a novel combined power cycle is proposed which utilizes LNG in different ......

M. R. Salimpour; M. A. Zahedi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Semantic technology in the oil and gas drilling domain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Data integration and knowledge representation in the oil and gas drilling domain are two challenges much work is focused upon. They are important real-world challenges… (more)

Overĺ, Lars

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Clean Cities program webinar elaborates first on successful past technology choices and then suggests future technological pathways that can be taken for the United States to expand its use of...

318

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 29, quarter ending December 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of progress accomplished during the quarter ending December, 1981, are summarized in this report. Discussion is presented under the following headings: chemical flooding - field projects; chemical flooding - supporting research; carbon dioxide injection - field projects; carbon dioxide injection - supporting research; thermal/heavy oil - field projects and supporting research; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental aspects; petroleum processing technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and improved drilling technology. (DMC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Increasing liquid hydrocarbon recovery from natural gas: Evaluation of the vortex-tube device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vortex-tube device provides a useful addition to the range of equipment available to the gas industry. It has been shown that the use of vortex-tube equipment permits improved separation in comparison with a Joule-Thomson system, without entering into the cost and complexity of a true isentropic system such as a turbo-expander unit. The comparative advantage of the vortex tube depends upon the inlet conditions of the gas and the pressure drop that is available. An optimum pressure drop of 25--35% of the inlet gas pressure has been confirmed in practice. Although not yet tested on operating plant, it is expected that a loss of performance of vortex-tube units will occur for inlet liquid-to-gas ratios of greater than 20%. Units with up to 5% liquid at the inlet have been successfully operated showing that a single phase gas at the unit inlet is not essential. It is expected that future application of vortex tube units will be concentrated where performance improvements over Joule-Thomson units, at low capital cost, are required.

Hajdik, B. [CBS Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Steinle, J. [BEB Erdoel and Erdgas GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Lorey, M. [Filtan Analgenbau GmbH, Langenselbold (Germany); Thomas, K. [Falk and Thomas Engineering GmbH, Wettenberg (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Analysis of energy recovery potential using innovative technologies of waste gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy recovery from waste by gasification was simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two processes: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of feeding waste: Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and pulper residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different configurations for the energy cycles were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with performances from conventional Waste-to-Energy process. - Abstract: In this paper, two alternative thermo-chemical processes for waste treatment were analysed: high temperature gasification and gasification associated to plasma process. The two processes were analysed from the thermodynamic point of view, trying to reconstruct two simplified models, using appropriate simulation tools and some support data from existing/planned plants, able to predict the energy recovery performances by process application. In order to carry out a comparative analysis, the same waste stream input was considered as input to the two models and the generated results were compared. The performances were compared with those that can be obtained from conventional combustion with energy recovery process by means of steam turbine cycle. Results are reported in terms of energy recovery performance indicators as overall energy efficiency, specific energy production per unit of mass of entering waste, primary energy source savings, specific carbon dioxide production.

Lombardi, Lidia, E-mail: lidia.lombardi@unifit.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Carnevale, Ennio [Dipartimento di Energetica, University of Florence, via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence (Italy); Corti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 56100 Siena (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Recovery of Wasted Mechanical Energy from the Reduction of Natural Gas Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract At the present time in Romania, the transition from the natural gas transportation system to the distribution system is done only thru the use of pressure reducing stations. Here the pressure drop is usually done by using throttle valves or pressure reducing valves, where the gas energy is spent without doing any work. In this article we propose the use of turbo-expanders in the pressure reducing stations, where the natural gas pressure from the transportation grid is high and needs to drop to lower levels to enter the distribution grids, in this way part of the energy consumed in the compression stations are recovered. The plans are made at this time for a pilot project at the pressure reducing station in the city of Onesti, Bacau County.

Iancu Andrei; Tudorache Valentin; Tarean Cristina; Toma Niculae

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments Mechanical strength and seismic property measurements of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) during hydrate formation and loading tests (OTC 19559) Authors: Seiji Nakagawa (speaker), Timothy J. Kneafsey, and George J. Moridis Venue: 2008 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, Texas, May 5-8, 2008 http://www.spe.org and http://www.smenet.org [external sites] Abstract: An on-going effort on conducting laboratory triaxial compression tests on synthetic methane hydrate-bearing sediment cores is presented. Methane hydrate is formed within a sand pack inside a test cell under controlled temperature and confining stress, and triaxial compression tests are performed while monitoring seismic properties. A unique aspect of the experiment is that the formation and dissociation of hydrate in a sediment core, and the failure of the sample during loading tests, can be monitored in real time using both seismic waves and x-ray CT imaging. For this purpose, a specially designed triaxial (geomechanical) test cell was built. This cell allows for conducting seismic wave measurements on a sediment core using compressional and shear (torsion) waves. Concurrently, CT images can be obtained through an x-ray-transparent cell wall. These are used to determine the porosity distribution within a sample owing to both original sand packing and formation of hydrate in the pore space. For interpreting the results from both seismic measurements and geomechanical tests, characterization of sample heterogeneity can be critically important. In this paper, the basic functions of the test cell are presented, with the results of preliminary experiments using non-hydrate bearing sandpack and sandstone core. These measurements confirmed that (1) clear x-ray images of gas-fluid boundaries within a sediment/rock core can be obtained through a thick aluminum test cell wall, (2) the test cell functions correctly during loading tests, and (3) both compressional and shear waves can be measured during a loading test. Further experiments using methane-hydrate-bearing samples will be presented at the conference

324

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH4 flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 ± 0.014, 0.224 ± 0.012 and 0.237 ± 0.008 l CH4/m2 hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m2 hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06–0.89 l/m2 hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42–2.46 l/m2 hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L0) values in the range of 19.8–102.6 m3/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

Mutasem El-Fadel; Layale Abi-Esber; Samer Salhab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

326

Study of integrated metal hydrides heat pump and cascade utilization of liquefied natural gas cold energy recovery system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional cold energy utilization of the liquefied natural gas system needs a higher temperature heat source to improve exergy efficiency, which barricades the application of the common low quality thermal energy. The adoption of a metal hydride heat pump system powered by low quality energy could provide the necessary high temperature heat and reduce the overall energy consumption. Thus, an LNG cold energy recovery system integrating metal hydride heat pump was proposed, and the exergy analysis method was applied to study the case. The performance of the proposed integration system was evaluated. Moreover, some key factors were also theoretically investigated about their influences on the system performance. According to the results of the analysis, some optimization directions of the integrated system were also pointed out.

Xiangyu Meng; Feifei Bai; Fusheng Yang; Zewei Bao; Zaoxiao Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines For years, gas turbine manufacturers faced a barrier that, for all practical purposes, capped power generating efficiencies for turbine-based power generating systems. The barrier was temperature. Above 2300 degrees F, available cooling technologies were insufficient to protect the turbine blades and other internal components from heat degradation. Since higher temperatures are the key to higher efficiencies, this effectively limited the generating efficiency at which a turbine power plant could convert the energy in the fuel into electricity. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy took on the challenge of turbine temperatures in 1992, and nine years later, its private sector

328

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of hydrogen production using low-cost natural gas.

329

The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fracture treatments. This study evaluates fracture stimulation technology in tight gas sands by using case histories found in the petroleum engineering literature and by using a comparison of the performance of wells stimulated with different treatment...

Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas Description Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology offers a means to utilize coal -the most abundant fuel in the United States-to produce a host of products, ranging from electricity to value-added chemicals like transportation fuels and hydrogen, in an efficient, environmentally friendly manner. However, the overall cost (capital, operating,

331

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: EOR thermal processes. Seventh Amendment and Extension to Annex 4, Enhanced oil recovery thermal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Seventh Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 50 through 55. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh reports on Annex IV, Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5 and IV-6 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/l/SP, DOE/BC-90/l/SP, and DOE/BC-92/l/SP) contain the results for the first 49 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, and October 1991, respectively. Each task report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Reid, T B [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)] [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States); Colonomos, P [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)] [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Fact sheet from Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. about its pilot-scale industrial membrane system that was funded by the SBIR program.

333

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the...

334

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pore-Scale Mechanistic Study of the Preferential Mode of Hydrate Formation in Sediments: Fluid Flow Aspects Pore-Scale Mechanistic Study of the Preferential Mode of Hydrate Formation in Sediments: Fluid Flow Aspects Pore-Scale Mechanistic Study of the Preferential Mode of Hydrate Formation in Sediments: Fluid Flow Aspects Authors: Javad Behseresht, Masa Prodanovic, and Steven Bryant, University of Texas at Austin. Venue: American Geophysical Union fall meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 10-14, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/ [external site]). Abstract: A spectrum of behavior is encountered in ocean sediments bearing methane hydrates, ranging from essentially static accumulations where hydrate and brine co-exist, to active cold seeps where hydrate and a methane gas phase co-exist in the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). In this and a companion paper (Jain and Juanes), the researchers describe methods to test the following hypothesis: The coupling between drainage and fracturing, both induced by pore pressure, determines whether methane gas entering the HSZ is converted completely to hydrate. The researchers will describe a novel implementation of the level set method to determine the capillarity-controlled displacement of brine by gas from sediment and from fractures within the sediment. Predictions of fluid configurations in infinite-acting-model sediments indicate that the brine in drained sediment (after invasion by methane gas) is better connected than previously believed. This increases the availability of water and the rate of counter-diffusion of salinity ions, thus relaxing the limit on hydrate build-up within the gas-invaded grain matrix. Simulated drainage of a fracture in sediment shows that points of contact between fracture faces are crucial. They allow residual water saturation to remain within an otherwise gas-filled fracture. Simulations of imbibition—which can occur, for example, after drainage into surrounding sediment reduces gas phase pressure in the fracture—indicate that the gas/water interfaces at contact points significantly shift the threshold pressures for withdrawal of gas. During both drainage and imbibition, the contact points greatly increase water availability for hydrate formation within the fracture. The researchers will discuss coupling this capillarity-controlled displacement model with a discrete element model for grain-scale mechanics. The coupled model provides a basis for evaluating the macroscopic conditions (thickness of gas accumulation below the hydrate stability zone, average sediment grain size, principal earth stresses) favoring co-existence of methane gas and hydrate in the HSZ. Explaining the range of behavior is useful in assessing resource volumes and evaluating pore-to-core scale flow paths in production strategies

335

Gas-lift technology applied to dewatering of coalbed methane wells in the black warrior basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) wells are usually dewatered with sucker rod or progressive cavity pumps to reduce wellbore water levels, although not without problems. This paper describes high-volume artificial-lift technology that incorporates specifically designed gas-lift methods to dewater Black Warrior CBM wells. Gas lift provides improved well maintenance and production optimization by the use of conventional wireline service methods.

Johnson, K.J.; Coats, A. (Otis Engineering Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)); Marinello, S.A. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Reactive transport modeling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and dissociation in response to climate change Authors: Matthew T. Reagan and George J. Moridis Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, July 9-12, 2008 (http://www.icgh.org [external site]) Abstract: Paleoceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating past global climate. The implication is that global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate is the main culprit for a sequence of rapid global warming affects that occurred during the late Quaternary period. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed coupled thermo-hydrological-chemical simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor, and assessed the potential for methane release into the ecosystem. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and the effects of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that while many deep hydrate deposits are indeed stable during periods of rapid ocean temperature changes, shallow deposits (such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico) can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant carbon fluxes over a period of decades. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane and the formation of carbonates) to sequester the released carbon. This model will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

338

SciTech Connect: Recovery Act: Oxy-Combustion Technology Development...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS Clean Coal Technology; Coal-Fuels; Industrial and Environmental Processes; Electricity;...

339

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Production Strategies for Marine Hydrate Reservoirs Authors: J. Phirani. & K. K. Mohanty Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008. http://www.ichg.org/showcontent.aspx?MenuID=287 [external site]. Abstract: Large quantities of natural gas hydrate are present in marine sediments. This research is aimed at assessing production of natural gas from these deposits. We had developed a multiphase, multicomponent, thermal, 3D simulator in the past, which can simulate production of hydrates both in equilibrium and kinetic modes. Four components (hydrate, methane, water and salt) and five phases (hydrate, gas, aqueous-phase, ice and salt precipitate) are considered in the simulator. The intrinsic kinetics of hydrate formation or dissociation is considered using the Kim–Bishnoi model. Water freezing and ice melting are tracked with primary variable switch method (PVSM) by assuming equilibrium phase transition. In this work, we simulate depressurization and warm water flooding for hydrate production in a hydrate reservoir underlain by a water layer. Water flooding has been studied as a function of well spacing, well orientation, and injection temperature. Results show that depressurization is limited by the supply of heat of hydrate formation. Warm water flooding can supply this heat of formation. Gas production rate is higher for the water flooding than depressurization. Optimum configuration for wells and water temperature are identified.

340

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas-hydrate concentration and uncertainty estimation from electrical resistivity logs: examples from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico Gas-hydrate concentration and uncertainty estimation from electrical resistivity logs: examples from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico Carbon isotope evidence (13C and 14C) for fossil methane-derived dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps Authors: Pohlman, J.W. (speaker), Coffin, R.B., and Osburn, C.L., U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Bauer, J.E., College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Venue: Goldschmidt 2007 Atoms to Planets conference in Cologne, Germany, August 19-24, 2007 http://www.the-conference.com/conferences/2007/gold2007/ [external site]. Abstract: No abstract available yet. Related NETL Project: The proposed research of the related NETL project DE-AI26-05NT42496, “Conducting Scientific Studies of Natural Gas Hydrates to Support the DOE Efforts to Evaluate and Understand Methane Hydrates,” is to conduct scientific studies of natural gas hydrates to support DOE efforts to evaluate and understand methane hydrates, their potential as an energy resource, and the hazard they may pose to ongoing drilling efforts. This project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Fuel experts from China, India, and the United States shared lessons learned about deploying CNG- and hydrogen-fueled vehicles in public transit fleets and the consumer sector at the Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles workshop. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) hosted the workshop on December 10-11, 2009. Here you'll find information about the workshop's focus, agenda and notes, and presentations. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Focus of the Workshop The workshop aimed to: Compare fuel properties-including blends-industries, and applications (e.g., product specifications, tanks, reliability, safety procedures, risk mitigation, and dispensing)

342

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Authors: John and Deidre Boysen Venue: International Petroleum and Biofuels Environmental Conference, November 11-13, 2008, Albuquerque, NM cese@utulsa.edu Abstract: Economic and efficient produced water management is complex. Produced waters contain mixtures of organic and inorganic compounds, including heavy metals. Many of these constituents interfere with treatment processes that are selective for other constituents. Further, the concentrations of organic and inorganic constituents vary widely with location and producing formation. In addition, regulations related to discharge and beneficial uses vary from state to state, basin-to-basin and well location to well location.

343

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005227 Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005227 Final Report Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County Submitted by: Lea County Government 100 N. Main Lovington, NM 88260 And New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM 87801 Report Authors: Cecilia E. Nelson, Principal Investigator Lea County Government and Ashok Kumar Ghosh, Ph.D., P.E. Principal Researcher, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Report Date: September 20, 2011 Reporting Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United

344

Flue-gas sulfur-recovery plant for a multifuel boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1991, a Finnish fluting mill brought on stream a flue-gas desulfurization plant with an SO{sub 2} reduction capacity of 99%. The desulfurization plant enabled the mill to discontinue the use of its sulfur burner for SO{sub 2} production. The required makeup sulfur is now obtained in the form of sulfuric acid used by the acetic acid plant, which operates in conjunction with the evaporating plant. The mill`s sulfur consumption has decreased by about 6,000 tons/year (13.2 million lb/year) because of sulfur recycling.

Miettunen, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland); Aitlahti, S. [Savon Sellu Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Physical properties of sediment from the 2006 National Gas Hydrate Program expedition offshore India Authors: Winters, W.J., (U.S. Geological Survey, speaker), Gomes, M., Giosan, L., Johnson, J., Kastner, M., Torres, M.E., Long, P.E., Schaef, H.T., Rose, K., and the NGHP-01 Shipboard Scientific Party. Venue: India’s Directorate General of Hydrocarbons’ International Conference on Gas Hydrates in Nodia (New Delhi), India, February 6–8, 2008 (http://www.dghindia.org/site/pdfattachments/upcomingevents/Updated_Programme_gAS[1].pdf [PDF-external site]). Abstract: The scientific goals of the NGHP Expedition 01 physical properties program are to a) constrain baseline index properties of host sediment; b) ground-truth well-log, seismic, and other shipboard data sets; c) relate textural characteristics to gas hydrate occurrence and small-scale porous media effects; and d) relate index properties and textural analyses to gas hydrate occurrence and regional sedimentologic interpretations. During the shipboard phase of NGHP-01, baseline bulk physical properties, such as water content, grain density, bulk density, and porosity, were determined on more than 1,800 sediment samples from 14 sites located in four study areas. Overall, physical properties change more significantly near the seafloor, then at a much more gradual rate with depth. The transition depth varies between sites but can range from about 12 to as deep as 200 meters beneath the seafloor. In addition, shear strength, electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal conductivity, and acoustic velocity measurements were conducted to further characterize the sediment. These measurements, when combined with sedimentologic and geochemical studies, delineate the role of the host sediment in hydrate formation and occurrence and are used in modeling the response of hydrate-bearing sediment to natural change or drilling operations. Strong correlation typically exists between physical properties determined from shipboard analyses and well-log studies. More than 500 shore-based grain-size analyses have been conducted that indicate that most sediment is characterized as clayey silt to silty clay with a median grain size that is near or slightly greater than the silt-clay boundary. Grain-size analyses are being conducted on samples identified by infrared imaging as having high concentrations of gas hydrate in recovered core samples. These analyses will be used to study porous-media effects and geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in situ.

346

Shale gas for the petrochemical industry: Incorporation of novel technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, a new shale gas-based polygeneration system with essentially zero CO2 emissions is proposed that co-produces methanol, dimethyl ether (DME), olefins and power. The thermal and economic analysis of the proposed process is performed to determine the optimum product portfolio regarding current market prices. The optimization results show that production of methanol/DME and power can improve the performance of the olefin production section significantly. Therefore, the proposed plant can link the shale gas industry to the petrochemical sector efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way.

Yaser Khojasteh Salkuyeh; Thomas A. Adams II

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Recent developments in gas turbine materials and technology and their implications for syngas firing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbine combined-cycle systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology that is widely used. A critical factor in their development was the rapid adaptation of aero-engine technology (single crystal airfoils, sophisticated cooling techniques, and thermal barrier coatings) in order to operate at the high rotor-inlet temperatures required for high efficiency generation. Early reliability problems have been largely overcome, so that this type of power generation system is now considered to be a mature technology capable of achieving high levels of availability. Current interest in replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas or hydrogen) in these gas turbine systems focuses attention on implications for the critical turbine components. In this paper, the development requirements for materials for critical hot gas-path parts in large gas turbines burning coal-derived syngas fuels are briefly considered in the context of the state-of-the-art in materials for engines burning natural gas. It is shown that, despite some difficult design issues, many of the materials used in current engines will be applicable to units burning syngas. However, there is the potential that the durability of some components may be prejudiced because of differences in the combustion environment (especially in terms of water vapor content, and possibly sulfur compounds and particulates). Consequently, effort to develop improved coatings to resist erosion and also attack by S-containing compounds may be necessary.

I.G. Wright; T.B. Gibbons

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Current status of MHI CO2 capture plant technology, large scale demonstration project and road map to commercialization for coal fired flue gas application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) It is becoming increasingly evident that the prolonged utilization of fossil fuels for primary energy production, especially coal which is relatively cheap and abundant, is inevitable and that Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology can significantly reduce CO2 emissions from this sector thus allowing the continued environmentally sustainable use of this important energy commodity on a global basis. (2) MHI has co-developed the Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process (KM-CDR Process™) and KS-1™ absorbent, which has been deployed in seven CO2 capture plants, now under commercial operation operating at a CO2 capture capacity of 450 metric tons per day (tpd). In addition, a further two commercial plants are now under construction all of which capture CO2 from natural gas fired flue gas boilers and steam reformers. Accordingly this technology is now available for commercial scale CO2 capture for gas boiler and gas turbine application. (3) However before offering commercial CO2 capture plants for coal fired flue gas application, it is necessary to verify the influence of, and develop countermeasures for, related impurities contained in coal fired flue gas. This includes the influence on both the absorbent and the entire system of the CO2 capture plant to achieve high operational reliability and minimize maintenance requirements. (4) Preventing the accumulation of impurities, especially the build up of dust, is very important when treating coal fired flue gas and MHI has undertaken significant work to understand the impact of impurities in order to achieve reliable and stable operating conditions and to efficiently optimize integration between the CO2 capture plant, the coal fired power plant and the flue gas clean up equipment. (5) To achieve this purpose, MHI constructed a 10 tpd CO2 capture demonstration plant at the Matsushima 1000 MW Power Station and confirmed successful, long term demonstration following ?5000 hours of operation in 2006–07 with 50% financial support by RITE, as a joint program to promote technological development with the private sector, and cooperation from J-POWER. (6) Following successful demonstration testing at Matsushima, additional testing was undertaken in 2008 to examine the impact of entrainment of higher levels of flue gas impurities (primarily \\{SOx\\} and dust by bypassing the existing FGD) and to determine which components of the CO2 recovery process are responsible for the removal of these impurities. Following an additional 1000 demonstration hours, results indicated stable operational performance in relation to the following impurities; (1) SO2: Even at higher SO2 concentrations were almost completely removed from the flue gas before entering the CO2 absorber. (2) Dust: The accumulation of dust in the absorbent was higher, leading to an advanced understanding of the behavior of dust in the CO2 capture plant and the dust removal efficiency of each component within the CO2 recovery system. The data obtained is useful for the design of large-scale units and confirms the operating robustness of the CO2 capture plant accounting for wide fluctuations in impurity concentrations. (7) This important coal fired flue gas testing showed categorically that minimizing the accumulation of large concentrations of impurities, and to suppress dust concentrations below a prescribed level, is important to achieve long-term stable operation and to minimize maintenance work for the CO2 capture plant. To comply with the above requirement, various countermeasures have been developed which include the optimization of the impurity removal technology, flue gas pre treatment and improved optimization with the flue gas desulfurization facility. (8) In case of a commercial scale CO2 capture plant applied for coal fired flue gas, its respective size will be several thousand tpd which represents a considerable scale-up from the 10 tpd demonstration plant. In order to ensure the operational reliability and to accurately confirm the influence and the behavior of the impurities in coal fired fl

Takahiko Endo; Yoshinori Kajiya; Hiromitsu Nagayasu; Masaki Iijima; Tsuyoshi Ohishi; Hiroshi Tanaka; Ronald Mitchell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The oil and gas industry is a very diverse and complex sector of the energy economy. It ranges from exploration to production, processing, transportation, and distribution. All of these segments are elements of the natural gas industry and the oil industry but are different for oil than for natural gas. An example of a technology pathway for the oil refining industry is the Petroleum Refining Vision and Roadmap, which was developed through a joint effort of government and industry. Other technology roadmaps of relevance to Climate VISION participants either are being developed or will be developed in the future. The oil refining example is provided initially. Others will be added as they become available. Petroleum refining is one of nine energy-intensive industries that is

350

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments HyFlux - Part II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate-bearing marine sediments Authors: Naehr, T.H., Asper, V., Garcia, O., Kastner, M., Leifer, I., MacDonald, I.R., Solomon, E., Yvon-Lewis, S., and Zimmer, B. Venue: AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19 2008 -- Session OS25: Methane Flux from Naturally Occurring Marine Gas Hydrates http://www.agu.org Abstract: The recently funded DOE/NETL study "HyFlux: Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere" (see MacDonald et al.: HyFlux - Part I) will combine sea surface, water column and shallow subsurface observations to improve our estimates of methane flux from submarine seeps and associated gas hydrate deposits to the water column and atmosphere along the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and other selected areas world-wide. As methane-rich fluids rise towards the sediment-water interface, they will interact with sulfate-rich pore fluids derived from overlying bottom water, which results in the formation of an important biogeochemical redox boundary, the so-called sulfate-methane interface, or SMI. Both methane and sulfate are consumed within the SMI and dissolved inorganic carbon, mostly bicarbonate (HCO3-) and hydrogen sulfide are produced, stimulating authigenic carbonate precipitation at and immediately below the SMI. Accordingly, the formation of authigenic carbonates in methane- and gas-hydrate-rich sediments will sequester a portion of the methane-derived carbon. To date, however, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these reactions. Rates of DIC production are not well constrained, but recent biogeochemical models indicate that CaCO3 precipitation rates may be as high as 120 µmol cm-2a-1. Therefore, AOM-driven carbonate precipitation must be considered when assessing the impact of gas-hydrate-derived methane on the global carbon cycle.

351

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulation of the system behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic media involves solving fully coupled mass and heat balance equations. The models need to simulate equilibrium or kinetic processes of hydrate formation and dissociation. TOUGH+HYDRATE is a widely used code for gas hydrate simulations. The code can model non-isothermal gas release, phase changes and flow of fluids and heat. It accounts for up to four mass components and four possible phases. Because hydrate simulations require intensive computational effort, many studies that involve serial processors are limited by problems of complexity and scale. With the growing availability of multi-core CPUs, Linux clusters, and super-computers, the use of parallel processing methods is a distinct advantage. This study develops a domain decomposition approach for large-scale gas hydrate simulations using parallel computation. The approach partitions the simulation domain into small sub-domains. The full simulation domain is simulated integrally by using multiple processes. Each process will be in charge of one portion of the simulation domain for updating thermophysical properties, assembling mass and energy balance equations, solving linear equation systems, and performing other local computations. The linear equation systems are solved in parallel by multiple processes with a parallel linear solver. The multiple processes are run in parallel on shared- or distributed memory multiple-CPU computers. A hybrid approach, running multiple processes in each CPU and using multiple CPUs, may achieve additional speedup. During calculations, communication between processes is needed to update sub-domain boundary parameters. An efficient inter-process communication scheme has been developed. The new approach was implemented into the TOUGH+HYDRATE code and demonstrates excellent speedup and very good scalability. For many large-scale problems, this method can obtain linear or super-linear speedup. This paper will show applications of the new approach to simulate three dimensional field-scale models for gas production from gas-hydrate

352

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy Duty Roots Expander Heat Energy Recovery (HD-REHER)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Eaton Corporation at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy duty roots expander...

353

Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 1: Success of horizontal well technology, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume I of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA. and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA. and 88 in Canada. Operators responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The geomechanical response of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (HBS) is a serious concern that needs to be addressed before the installation of facilities for hydrate deposits can proceed, and if gas production from hydrate deposits is to become reality. HBS are often unconsolidated, and are characterized by low shear strength. Heat from external sources, that cross the formation or depressurization-based production, can induce dissociation of hydrates (a strong cementing agent), and degradation of the structural stability of the HBS. Changes in pressure and temperature, phase changes, and the evolution of an expanding (and structurally weak) gas zone can significantly alter the distribution of loads in the sediments. The corresponding changes in the local stress and strain fields can result in substantial changes in the hydrologic, thermal and geomechanical properties of the system, displacement, and potentially failure.

355

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control Author: M. Sharma Venue: Industry Workshop, Austin, Texas, May 7, 2008 (http://www.cpge.utexas.edu) Abstract: The Hydraulic Fracturing and Sand Control project consists of a set of 9 projects (5 related to fracturing and 4 related to sand control) that are currently underway. The project began in 2006 and is planned to continue for at least 2 years (2008). Each member company contributes $50,000 per year as a grant to the University and in return receives all the research results from the projects underway. F1. Energized fractures in tight gas sands/ gas shales (Kyle Freihof, Mukul Sharma) F2. Refracturing and stress reorientation in sands / shales (Vasudev Singh, Nicolas Rousell, Mukul Sharma)

356

Technology Makes Solid State Multi-Gas Emission Monitoring Possible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

single crystal thallium arsenic se1enide (TAS) on a production basis has made it possible to buLld an electronically controlled acousto ,-,ptie tunable filter (AOTF) capable of operating in the infrared. Such a filter with integral .11 t rasonic... trifnsduce r can be used in place of Inechanica1 filter wheels, spinning gas cells, moving mirrors, diffraction gratings and mechanical light choppers. The TAS AOTF produces an electronically controllable narrow banel infrared filter capable of being...

Nelson, R. L.

357

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy Recovery DUring Expansion of Compressed Gas Using Power Plant Low-Quality Heat Sources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Piezoelectric Axial Flow Microvalve Piezoelectric Axial Flow Microvalve Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,159,841 entitled "Piezoelectric Axial Flow Microvalve." Disclosed in this patent are the design and functionality of NETL's piezo-electrically operated microvalves and their use in fuel cell systems, which consist of an assembly of individual fuel cells into a stack. The microvalve improves flow control over the entire fuel cell system by integrating flow distribution and controlling of individual fuel cells within the stack. By controlling fuel flow in each individual cell, the microvalve system can prevent the overheating and under-performing of a portion of the stack, thereby

359

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Framework of the 2005 Keathley Canyon Geologic Framework of the 2005 Keathley Canyon Gas Hydrate Research Well, Northern Gulf of Mexico Authors: D.R. Hutchinson, P.E. Hart, T.S. Collett, K.M. Edwards, and D.C. Twichell, U.S. Geological Survey, and F. Snyder, WesternGeco-Schlumberger. Venue: American Geophysical UnionÂ’s 2007 Joint Assembly, Acapulco, Mexico, May 22-25, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/ja07/ [external site]). Abstract: The project was located in the Casey Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico at 1,335 m water depth. A grid of 2-D high-resolution multichannel seismic lines around the drill sites, targeted for imaging depths down to at least 1,000 m subbottom, reveals multiple disconformities that bound seven mappable seismic stratigraphic units. A major disconformity in the middle of the units stands out for its angular baselapping geometry. From the seismic and drilling data, three episodes of sedimentary deposition and deformation are inferred. The oldest episode consists of fine-grained muds deposited during a period of relative stability in the basin (Units E, F, and G). A second episode (Units C and D) consists of large vertical displacements associated with infilling and ponding of sediment. This second interval corresponds with intercalated fine and coarse-grained material in the drill hole, which sampled the thin edges of much thicker units. The final episode (Units A and B) occurred during much-subdued vertical displacement. Hemipelagic drape (Unit A) characterizes the modern seafloor deposits. The basin is mostly filled. Its sill is part of a subsiding graben that is only 10-20 m shallower than the deepest point in the basin, indicating that gravity-driven transport would mostly bypass the basin. Contemporary faulting along the basin margins has selectively reactivated an older group of faults. The intercalated sand and mud deposits of Units C and D are tentatively correlated with late Pleistocene deposition derived from the western shelf-edge delta/depocenter of the Mississippi River, which was probably most active from 320 ka to 70 ka (Winker and Booth, 2000). Gas hydrate occurs within near-vertical fractures in Units E and F of the oldest episode. The presence of sand within the gas hydrate stability zone is not sufficient to concentrate gas hydrate, even though dispersed gas hydrate occurs deeper in the fractured mud/clay-rich sections of Units E and F.

360

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics A Grain-Scale Coupled Model of Multiphase Fluid Flow and Sediment Mechanics – Application to Methane Hydrates in Natural Systems Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19, 2008 – Special Session H06: Particle Tracking Simulation of Fluid Flow and Mass Transport. http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm08/ Abstract: A discrete element model is presented for the simulation, at the grain scale, of gas migration in brine-saturated deformable media. The model rigorously accounts for the presence of two fluids in the pore space by incorporating grain forces due to pore fluid pressures, and surface tension between fluids. The coupled model permits investigating an essential process that takes place at the base of the hydrate stability zone: the upward migration of methane in its own free gas phase. The ways in which gas migration may take place were elucidated: (1) by capillary invasion in a rigid-like medium; and (2) by initiation and propagation of a fracture. Results indicate that the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport in the sediment is the grain size, and that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain media. The results have important implications for understanding hydrates in natural systems. The results predict that, in fine sediments, hydrate will likely form in veins that follow a fracture-network pattern, and the hydrate concentration in this type of accumulations will likely be quite low. In coarse sediments, the buoyant methane gas is likely to invade the pore space more uniformly, in a process akin to invasion percolation, and the overall pore occupancy is likely to be much higher than for a fracture-dominated regime. These implications are consistent with field observations of methane hydrates in natural

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361

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Gas Hydrate Energy resource Studies in the United States Authors: T.Collett (USGS), R. Boswell (DOE), K. Rose (DOE), W. Agena (USGS), and R. Baker (DOE) Venue: American Chemical Society Meeting, March 22-26, 2009, Salt Lake City, Utah http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_MEETINGS&node_id=86&use_sec=false&__uuid=614acbfd-ce1c-4a0b-98de-348a14738f4e [external site] Abstract: In 1982, scientists onboard the Research Vessel Glomar Challenger retrieved a meter-long sample of massive gas hydrate off the coast of Guatemala. This sample became the impetus for the first United States national research and development program dedicated to gas hydrates. By the mid 1990s, it was widely accepted that gas hydrates represented a vast storehouse of gas. Recognizing the importance of gas hydrate research and the need for coordinated efforts, Congress and the President of the United States enacted Public Law 106-193, the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. Authorization for this program was extended to 2010 as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Many of the current gas hydrate projects in the United States are conducted within this program, which is administered by the U. S. Department of Energy in collaboration with six other U.S. federal agencies, and conducted in partnership with private industry, academic institutions, and DOEÂ’s National Laboratories. In addition, other U.S. federal agencies conduct significant self-directed gas hydrate research; most notably the gas hydrate resource assessment activities conducted by U.S. Department of Interior agencies (the U.S. Geological Survey and the Minerals Management Service).

362

Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Analysis and optimization of cascade Rankine cycle for liquefied natural gas cold energy recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study proposes a new concept called the cascade Rankine cycle, which recovers LNG (liquefied natural gas) cold energy for power generation, optimizes the cycle by investigating the effects of key parameters on its performance, and compares its thermal efficiency, exergy efficiency and economic evaluation to those of the conventional alternatives. The cascade Rankine cycle consists of multiple stages of the organic Rankine cycle in a layered structure in which the first stage encompasses the second one that, in turn, encompasses the next. Due to its layered configuration, optimization of the cycle is straightforward and involves sequentially optimizing the individual stages. Optimization of the subsequent stages, however, required process simulation considering the equipment efficiency and the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid. Process simulation indicated that the indicators such as net power output, thermal efficiency, and exergy efficiency generally increase as the number of stages increases. These indicators were, however, significantly affected by the thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The proposed cycles demonstrated significantly better performance in these indicators than the conventional cycles. The three-stage cascade Rankine cycle with propane as the working fluid exhibited the highest net power output, thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency within the set.

In-Hwan Choi; Sangick Lee; Yutaek Seo; Daejun Chang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation Following the fuel cell funding announcement, DOE funded the fuel cell market transformation projects listed below. These projects focus on fuel cell systems in emergency backup power, material handling, and combined heat and power applications, with the goal of improving the potential of fuel cells to provide power in stationary, portable, and specialty vehicles. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is collecting and analyzing data from these projects to show potential adopters the benefits and real-world performance of fuel cells. These data are aggregated across industries and sites as composite data products to provide relevant technology status results and fuel cell performance data without revealing proprietary information. These publicly available data products build the business case for fuel cells and help fuel cell developers understand the state of technologies while identifying ways to improve them.

365

Development of the Polish wasteless technology of apatite phosphogypsum utilization with recovery of rare earths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most promising source of rare earth elements in Poland is apatite phosphogypsum, a waste product obtained in the process of phosphoric acid production from Kola apatite. Depending on the technology used, as the hydration ratio of calcium sulphate is changed from hemihydrate to dihydrate, the content of rare earths varies from 0.6% to 0.3% Ln2O3 respectively. Technological flow charts for recovering the rare earths as a byproduct have been developed. The basic process used in the technology consists of three steps: apatite phosphogypsum leaching with dilute sulphuric acid solution; separation of rare earth concentrates from leaching sulphuric acid by preconcentration via evaporization, liquid-liquid extraction or precipitation method; anhydrite production from purified phosphogypsum by recrystallization in concentrated sulphuric acid solution.

A. Jarosi?ski; J. Kowalczyk; Cz. Mazanek

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity Title The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, James H., Andrew DeBenedictis, Rebecca Ghanadan, Amber Mahone, Jack Moore, William R. Morrow, Snuller Price, and Margaret S. Torn Journal Science Volume 335 Start Page 53 Issue 6064 Pagination 53-59 Date Published 01/2012 Abstract Several states and countries have adopted targets for deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, but there has been little physically realistic modeling of the energy and economic transformations required. We analyzed the infrastructure and technology path required to meet California's goal of an 80% reduction below 1990 levels, using detailed modeling of infrastructure stocks, resource constraints, and electricity system operability. We found that technically feasible levels of energy efficiency and decarbonized energy supply alone are not sufficient; widespread electrification of transportation and other sectors is required. Decarbonized electricity would become the dominant form of energy supply, posing challenges and opportunities for economic growth and climate policy. This transformation demands technologies that are not yet commercialized, as well as coordination of investment, technology development, and infrastructure deployment.

367

Chapter 10.2 - Heat-Resistant Coating Technology for Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operating temperature of gas turbines in the 1990s and later has been notably high in order to achieve high-efficiency power-generating plants by combining these gas turbines and steam turbines. Such high operating temperatures has been made possible with the development of heat-resistant superalloys forming turbine hot parts, as well as advances made in heat-resistant coating technology and cooling technology. For 1500 °C-class gas turbines, the adoption of single-crystal Ni-based superalloy blades and ceramic thermal barrier coatings is indispensable, and additionally, steam-cooled technology should be employed. In particular, thermal barrier coating (TBC) technology is recognized as important. Therefore, this paper reviews the trend of development of heat-resistant coating technology for gas turbines by paying attention to coating processes and evaluation. The paper also reviews the trend of development and standardization of heat-resistance evaluation test methods for coatings, because such evaluation test methods are indispensable for the development of heat-resistant coating technology.

Yoshiyasu Ito

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Alternative Tri-axial Testing System for CO2-Rock Interaction Experiments An Alternative Tri-axial Testing System for CO2-Rock Interaction Experiments An Alternative Tri-axial Testing System for CO2-Rock Interaction Experiments Authors: Zhengwen Zeng (speaker), Xuejun Zhou, and Hong Liu, University of North Dakota. Venue: 43rd U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium and 4th U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium, Asheville, NC, June 28-July 1, 2009. http://www.armasymposium.org/ [external site] Abstract: Carbon dioxide (CO2)-rock interaction has become an important topic in recent years due to the potential energy and environmental benefits offered by injecting CO2 into deep geological formations for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and carbon sequestration. In both cases, CO2 reacts with formation rocks under deep geological formation conditions. The reaction will change the petrophysical, geomechanical, and geochemical properties of the rock. Consequently, rock integrity and fluid flow characteristics will be changed. How to quantitatively describe this CO2-rock interaction process is critical to the success of both EOR and sequestration projects. Experimental investigation under reservoir conditions is a direct way to develop the quantitative models to describe this process. This type of experiment involves real-time measurements for petrophysical, geomechanical, and geochemical parameters. Existing tri-axial testing systems can meet part of the requirements. An alternative triaxial testing system has been developed for this purpose. This paper introduces the principles, measurements, data processing, and the calibration and verification of the system

369

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone Conditions under Which Gaseous Methane Will Fracture Ocean Sediments and Penetrate Through the Hydrate Stability Zone: Modeling Multiphase Flow and Sediment Mechanics at the Pore-Scale Authors: Antone K. Jain and Ruben Juanes Venue: American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 15-19, 2008 – Special Session H06: Particle Tracking Simulation of Fluid Flow and Mass Transport. http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm08/ Abstract: Two competing processes were simulated, capillary invasion and fracture opening, by which free methane gas penetrates the Hydrate Stability Zone (HSZ). In situ conditions were predicted in which the methane propagates fractures and flows all the way through the HSZ and into the ocean, bypassing hydrate formation. In the fully coupled model, the discrete element method was used to simulate the sediment mechanics, and pore fluid pressures and surface tension between the gas and brine were accounted for by incorporating additional sets of pressure forces and adhesion forces. Results indicate that given enough capillary pressure, the main factor controlling the mode of gas transport is the grain size, and show that coarse-grain sediments favor capillary invasion and widespread hydrate formation, whereas fracturing dominates in fine-grain sediments. The fracturing threshold was calculated as a function of grain size, capillary pressure, and seafloor depth, and place these results in the context of naturally-occurring hydrate

370

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capillarity-controlled displacements in sediments with moveable grains Capillarity-controlled displacements in sediments with moveable grains Capillarity-controlled displacements in sediments with moveable grains: Implications for growth of methane hydrates Authors: Maša Prodanovic (speaker), Steven L. Bryant Venue: SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, Denver, Colorado, 21-24 September, 2008. http://www.spe.org [external site]. Abstract: We consider immiscible displacements when fluid/fluid interfaces are controlled by capillary forces. The progressive quasistatic (PQS) algorithm based on the level set method readily determines the geometry of these interfaces at the pore level. Capillary pressure generally exerts a net force on grains supporting an interface. We extend PQS to implement a kinematic model of grain displacement in response to that force. We examine the changes in the drainage curve caused by this coupling. We compute the interfacial area associated with the bulk water phase, anticipating preferential growth of methane hydrate there. Gas invasion of sediments is one mechanism by which methane hydrates are believed to form. In unconsolidated ocean sediments the capillary pressure exerted by an accumulated gas phase below the hydrate stability zone can be large enough to move grains apart. This motion alters the pore throat sizes which control subsequent drainage of the sediment. A model for the dynamics of this process is useful for assessing the competition between drainage (controlled by capillary forces) and fracturing (controlled by pore pressure and earth stresses). This in turn provides insight into the possible growth habits within the hydrate stability zone. When grains can move in response to net force exerted by the gas phase, small variations in an otherwise uniform distribution of pore throat sizes quickly lead to self-reinforcing, focused channels of gas phase. In contrast to behavior in stationary grains, the drainage curve exhibits no clear percolation threshold. Displacements in materials with broad throat size distributions also exhibit self-reinforcing channels. Behind the leading edge of the displacement front, the net force exerted on the grains tends to push them together. This effectively seals off these regions from subsequent invasion. Thus hydrate growth tends to be localized along the channel of displaced grains. This is the first quantitative grain-scale study of the drainage behavior when grains can move in response to invasion events. The coupling leads to qualitatively different displacement patterns. The method presented for studying this behavior is applicable to any granular material and to other applications, such as sand production.

371

Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives are to develop actuators for enhancing the mixing between gas streams, increase combustion stability, and develop hgih-temperature materials for actuators and sensors in combustors. Turbulent kinetic energy maps of an excited jet with co-flow in a cavity with a partially closed exhaust end are given with and without a longitudinal or a transverse acoustic field. Dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients were determined for Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics.

Vandsburger, U. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Roe, L.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

373

NETL: News Release - DOE Seeks "Small-Footprint" Oil and Gas Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

June 16, 2004 June 16, 2004 DOE Seeks "Small-Footprint" Oil and Gas Technologies Two-Inch "Microholes" Could Lessen Environmental Impacts, Costs The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a major new research and development initiative to develop "microhole" technologies - those that use portable drilling rigs with a smaller footprint and lower environmental impact. The program is designed to bring about faster, cheaper and safer oil and gas projects. "This is a major new research and development initiative that is aimed at reducing the environmental footprint of oil and gas operations at the same time it reduces costs and increases America's oil and gas production," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "It's clear this initiative will help meet President Bush's goals for energy and the environment."

374

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand Fluid Flow through Heterogeneous Methane-Hydrate Bearing Sand: Observations Using X-Ray CT Scanning Authors: Yongkoo Seol and Timothy J. Kneafsey Venue: 6th International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2008), Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, July 6-10, 2008. http://www.icgh.org/ [external site] Abstract: The effects of porous medium heterogeneity on methane hydrate formation, water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand, and hydrate dissociation were observed in an experiment using a heterogeneous sand column with prescribed heterogeneities. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to monitor saturation changes in water, gas, and hydrate during hydrate formation, water flow, and hydrate dissociation. The sand column was packed in several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with two distinct grain-size sands. The CT images showed that as hydrate formed, the water and hydrate saturations were dynamically redistributed by variations in capillary strength of the medium (the tendency for a material to imbibe water), which changed with the presence and saturation of hydrate. Water preferentially flowed through fine sand near higher hydrate-saturation regions where the capillary strength was elevated relative to the lower hydrate saturation regions. Hydrate dissociation initiated by depressurization varied with different grain sizes and hydrate saturations.

375

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Authors: Michael D. Vanden Berg, Stephanie Carney, Michael D. Laine, Craig D. Morgan, Utah Geological Survey; and Paul B. Anderson, consulting geologist. Venue: Poster Session: Responsible Development, Sustainability, and Climate Science—Groundwater and Site Remediation, June 9, 2009, American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting, Denver, CO, June 7 to 10, 2009. http://www.aapg.org/denver/ [external site] Abstract: Saline water disposal is the single most pressing issue with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Conventional oil and gas fields in the basin provide 67% of Utah’s total crude oil production and 71% of Utah’s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 175% in the last 10 years. As petroleum production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of fresh water sources. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that petroleum and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. Researchers have begun efforts to re-map the base of the moderately saline aquifer within the Uinta Basin using more robust data and more sophisticated GIS techniques than previous efforts. Below this base, they believe that saline water can be injected without damage to the overlying freshwater reservoirs. Water chemistry data are being collected from wells of operators and governmental agencies. These ground-truth data are supplemented with water chemistry information calculated from geophysical logs. In addition to the new GIS-based map, the researchers are constructing cross sections showing the stratigraphic position of the moderately saline to very saline transition and its relationship to potential seals and disposal zones in the Uinta Basin. A potentially suitable disposal zone for large volume saline water disposal is the fresh to slightly saline Bird’s-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formation’s Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft above the kerogen-rich Mahogany zone. A significant concern is that saline water disposal into the Bird’s-Nest by conventional gas producers may hinder oil shale development by creating unforeseen economic and technical hurdles. With increased saline water disposal, the water quality in the Bird’s-Nest could degrade and create additional water disposal problems for oil shale development companies. Researchers have examined this aquifer in outcrop, core, and geophysical logs and have gained a better understanding of its areal extent, thickness, and zones of differing water chemistry

376

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007. Dual pressure recovery boiler. Patent No. : US 7243619Cycle Power or Recovery Boiler into an Existing Pulp Mill".Monacelli. 2009. "Recovery Boiler Reheat Steam Cycle". Paper

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Authors: D. Xing, NETL; R. Erick, NETL and University of Pittsburgh Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; K. Trickett, J. Eastoe, M. Hollamby, and K.Mutch, Bristol University School of Chemistry; S. Rogers and R. Heenan, ISIS STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK; and D. Steytler, University of East Anglia School of Chemical Sciences, Norwich, UK. Venue: May 20, 2009, ISASF-ENSIC 9th International Symposium on Supercritical Fluids, Bordeaux, France, May 18-20, 2009. http://www.issf2009.cnrs.fr/ [external site] Abstract: About 1.5 billion standard cubic feet of CO2 is injected into US oil fields each day, resulting in the recovery of about 200,000 barrels per day of oil, but the low viscosity of CO2 results in viscous fingering and poor volumetric sweep efficiency. If the viscosity of dense CO2 could be increased by a factor of 2-20, much less CO2 would be required to recover the oil. Further, there would be no need for the injection of alternating slugs of water into the reservoir to reduce the relative permeability of the CO2. Researchers have identified two polymeric thickeners for CO2: a fluoroacrylate-styrene copolymer and a vinyl acetate-styrene copolymer. They have also hypothesized that it is possible to increase the viscosity (thicken) dense, high-pressure CO2 via the self-assembly of CO2-soluble surfactants into rod-like micelles. Three semi-fluorinated surfactants have been synthesized in order to test this concept; one with a monovalent cation and a single twin-tail, Na+1((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1, and two with a divalent cation and two twin-tails, Ni+2(((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1)2 and Co+2(((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1)2. Phase behavior results indicate that all three surfactants are soluble to at least 5 wt% in CO2 at 295K and pressures less than 20 MPa. SANS results indicate that only the surfactants with divalent metal ions and two twin tails form cylindrical micelles in CO2. No viscosity enhancement was detected for the surfactant with the monovalent cation. Falling cylinder viscometry results will illustrate the degree of “CO2 thickening” that was achieved by the formation of rod-like micelles at relatively high shear rates. The mobility of the surfactant solution flowing through Berea sandstone was also provided to determine the effectiveness of the thickener at extremely low shear rates characteristic of enhanced oil recovery projects. The performance of the copolymeric and surfactant thickeners will be compared. The strategy for the development of CO2-soluble non-fluorous surfactants capable of forming rod-like micelles will also be presented.

378

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synergy among Surfactants in Solution Synergy among Surfactants in Solution Synergy among Surfactants in Solution and on Particles in Suspensions Authors: Shaohua Lu and Ponisseril Somasundaran, Columbia University, New York, NY. Venue: 81st ACS (American Chemical Society) Colloid & Surface Science Symposium, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, June 24–27, 2007 (http://www.engr.udel.edu/Colloids2007/) [external site]). Abstract: Surfactant mixtures are widely used in detergent, personal care, enhanced oil recovery, and flotation applications. Adsorption of nonionic/cationic/anionic (ex: n-dodecyl-â-D-maltoside(DM), and sodium dodecyl sulfonate) on solids such as alumina was studied in this work at different solution conditions of pH, mixing ratio and salt contents along with the wettability and zeta potential. Solution interactions were studied by analytical ultracentrifuge, surface tension, small-angle neutron scattering, and cryoTEM. It was found that surfactant adsorption is dramatically affected under certain pH conditions. The effects of pH, however, are reduced by synergistic interactions in the case of nonionic/anionic mixtures. Surface tension results reveal a negative interaction parameter, suggesting that there are synergistic interactions between them. Importantly, only one peak indicative of one type of micelle was identified using analytical ultracentrifugation in the case of the above anionic/nonionic mixtures, while two types of aggregates were observed in the case of nonionic/nonionic mixtures. The above information on surfactant aggregation helps to reveal the mechanisms of interactions between surfactants, as well as their efficient application in various industrial processes.

379

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regenerating spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub 2} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The process will generate only marketable by-products. Our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high-efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water-soluble phthalocyanine compounds invented by SRI as well as polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media. The final novelty of our approach is the arrangement of the absorbers in cassette (stackable) form so that the NO{sub x} absorber can be on top of the SO{sub x} absorber. This arrangement is possible only because of the high efficiency of the hollow fiber scrubbing devices, as indicated by our preliminary laboratory data. This arrangement makes it possible for the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing chambers to be separate without incurring the large ducting and gas pressure drop costs necessary if a second conventional absorber vessel were used. Because we have separate scrubbers, we will have separate liquor loops and simplify the chemical complexity of simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} scrubbing.

Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Ventura, S. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Supporting Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery-EOR Thermal Processes Report IV-12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eight, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1! 987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

Izequeido, Alexandor

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gas recovery technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

[Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm[sup 2]; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

Unknown

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Environmental trends in Asia are accelerating the introduction of clean coal technologies and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the changing energy mix for Asia to 2020, and impacts of increased coal consumption on Asia`s share of world SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} emissions. Stricter SO{sub 2} emissions laws are summarized for eight Asian economies along with implications for fuel and technology choices. The paper compares the economics of different technologies for coal and natural gas in 1997 and in 2007. Trends toward introducing clean coal technologies and the use of natural gas will accelerate in response to tighter environmental standards by 2000. The most important coal conversion technology for Asia, particularly China, in the long term is likely to be integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), but only under the assumption of multiple products.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 71, quarter ending June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Feasibility Evaluation for East Texas Oil Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) has been undergoing for four decades and is now a proven technology. CO2-EOR increases oil recovery, and in the meantime reduces the greenhouse gas emissions by capture CO2 underground. The objectives...

Lu, Ping

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Integrated Underground Gas Storage of CO2 and CH4 to Decarbonise the “Power-to-gas-to-gas-to-power” Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Excess energy produced from renewables can be stored and reused via the “power-to-gas-to-power” (PGP) technology. We present an innovative idea which represents a decarbonised extension of PGP based on a closed carbon cycle. Our show case for the cities Potsdam and Brandenburg/Havel (Germany) outlines an overall efficiency for the entire process chain of 28% with total costs of electricity of 20 eurocents/kWh. If existing locations in Europe, where natural gas storage in porous formations is performed, were to be extended by CO2 storage sites, a significant quantity of wind and solar energy could be stored economically as methane.

Michael Kühn; Martin Streibel; Natalie Nakaten; Thomas Kempka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Delivery Reliability for Natural Gas--Inspection Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique is ideal for inspecting unpiggable pipelines because all of its components can be made smaller than the diameter of the pipe to be inspected. For these reasons, RFEC was selected as a technology to be integrated with the Explorer II robotic platform for unpiggable pipeline inspections. The research work is a continuation of a prior DOE-NETL project but is now directed towards a seamless integration with the robot. The laboratory set-up has been improved and data collection is nearly autonomous. With the improved collections speeds, GTI has been able to test more variables. Tests have been run on 6-inch and 12-inch seamless and seam-welded pipes. Testing on the 6-inch pipes have included using five exciter coils, each of a different geometry. Two types of sensor coils have been tested. With a focus on preparing the technology for use on the Explorer II, improvements in power consumption have proved successful. Tests with metal components have been performed to check for interference with the electromagnetic field. The results of these tests indicate RFEC will produce quality inspections while on the robot. GTI has also been testing manufactured detection boards currently used for boiler tube inspections. These boards are appropriately compact for use on the Explorer II robot and are able to detect defects at the speed of robot travel. In addition to advanced sensor development, GTI has participated in sensor/platform definition and module design activities. Mechanical constraints, power requirements, limited control and communication protocols, and potential busses and connectors have been addressed. GTI has conducted a proper design process to produce a sound design for the RFEC components to fit into two modules. The remaining work to be performed in the design of the sensor module is packaging and strengthening.

Albert Teitsma; Julie Maupin

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Coalbed Methane  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Author: John Wheaton, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, Butte, MT. Venue: The tour will be conducted starting in Gillette, WY, and extend along the northern Powder River Basin, on June 3, 2007, under the auspices of the American Society for Mining and Reclamation (http://ces.ca.uky.edu/asmr/ [external site]). Abstract: This field tour will emphasize successful reclamation in an alternative type of coal industry in the Powder River Basin: coalbed methane. The tour will leave Gillette, WY, at 7:30 a.m., Sunday, June 3, 2007, and travel to Sheridan, WY, and back, touring coalbed methane production areas. Stops will include active drilling and producing areas to learn about the footprint and approach to development of coalbed methane. Reclamation includes drilling pads and linear trenching for water and gas pipelines. Produced-water management is a major expense and concern. Among the water management options we plan to see are stock-watering facilities, infiltration ponds, irrigation sites, and water treatment facilities. A landowner will join us and be able to answer questions from the ranching perspective for part of the tour. Lunches are included in the price of the tour.

391

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Super-Cement for Annular Seal & Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells Authors: Fred Sabins, Kevin Edgely, and Larry Watters, CSI Technologies, LLC, Houston, TX. Venue: 2007 Drilling Engineering Association Workshop, Moody Gardens Hotel, Galveston, TX, June 19-20, 2007 (http://www.dea-global.org) [external site]). Abstract: Successful laboratory and field testing of Ultra-Seal® R and Pre-Stressed Cement will be presented. The application of these materials can dramatically reduce the costs of re-establishing annular seal integrity in deep, hot wells, thereby significantly lowering life-cycle well costs. CSI Technologies chose two cement types for further field testing in the third phase of the project to develop a “supercement” for work in high-temperature/high-pressure (HT/HP) wells. HT/HP wells often encounter problems with isolation of production zones due to cement failures. This can result in expensive repair jobs and costly shut-ins of high-volume wells. CSI determined that resin and magnesium oxide cements showed very good mechanical properties and bonding characteristics and are controllable at HT/HP conditions. The resin cement has been used successfully in more than 50 field plugging jobs and in one HT/HP squeeze job. CSI developed a second supercement formulation that is Portland cement- based and functions by generating substantial expansion during the curing process. This material functions in the confined wellbore environment by developing significant cement matrix compressive stress during cure, resulting in a compressive pre-load. In practice, the compressive pre-load functions to elevate the effective tensile strength of the material because the compressive stress must be relieved before the material can experience tensile stress. Additionally, the pre-load functions to keep the material tightly bound to the wellbore tubulars, thereby reducing the tendency of repeated stress cycles to form a microannulus.

393

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Updated Results from Deep Trek High-Temperature Electronics Development Programs Author: Bruce W. Ohme, Honeywell Inc., Plymouth, MN. Venue: HITEN 2007 (High-Temperature Electronics Network conference), St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, U.K., September 17–19, 2007, (http://science24.com/event/hiten2007 [external site]). Abstract: Electronics are used in modern oil and gas exploration to collect, log, and/or process data such as heading and inclination, weight on the bit, vibration, seismic/acoustic response, temperature, pressure, radiation, and resistivity of the strata. High-temperature electronics are needed that can operate reliably in deep-well conditions (up to 250oC). Under its Deep Trek program, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded two projects led by Honeywell. The first project, launched in 2003 and being completed this year, established a production-level integrated circuit manufacturing process, components, and design tools specifically targeting high-temperature environments (up to 250oC). The second project, launched in 2006 and expected to be completed in 2008, will develop rugged packaging suitable for downhole shock and vibration levels that will be used to house and demonstrate components developed in the earlier project. This paper will describe updated results from both of these projects, including previously unreported results obtained from prototype testing of a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC); a high-temperature, single-poly, floating-gate EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory); and a 12-bit, successive-approximation ADC. Also, a multi-chip module being developed as a complete downhole processing unit will be discussed

394

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating Fracture Reorientation Due to Fluid Injection/Production Estimating Fracture Reorientation Due to Fluid Injection/Production Estimating Fracture Reorientation Due to Fluid Injection/Production Authors: Zongyu Zhai and Mukul M. Sharma, University of Texas at Austin. Venue: Society of Petroleum Engineers’ Production and Operations Symposium, Oklahoma City, OK, April 1–3, 2007 (http://www.spe.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The injection or production of large volumes of fluid into or from a reservoir can result in significant changes to the effective in-situ stress distributions. Field evidence of this has been provided in the past by mapping refracturing treatments in tight gas sands and microseismic monitoring of injection wells in waterflooded reservoirs. A poro-elastic model is presented to show how the extent of fracture reorientation can be estimated under different conditions of fluid injection and production. The extent of fracture reorientation is a function of the in-situ stresses, the mechanical properties of the rock, and the pore pressure gradients. In reservoirs where the pore pressure gradients are complicated due to multiple injection and production wells, fracture reorientation is sensitive to the net pore-pressure gradients. Fractures tend to reorient themselves towards the injection wells and away from production wells, if the pressure gradients are comparable to the in-situ stress contrast. While far-field principal stress orientations are impacted only by in-situ stresses and pore-pressure gradients, near-wellbore in-situ stress orientation is also impacted by the hoop stress and the wellbore pressure. These can have a significant effect on near-wellbore fracture reorientation. The results of our model are compared with field observations obtained from microseismic monitoring of water injection wells. The implications of the results to refracturing operations and candidate well selection are discussed.

395

Power Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) - 2,870,000 x 0.8 6 W - 3414 = 70 kw (or 900 hp). When recovering power from an expanding gas, consideration should be given to the final gas temperature. This tem;:>f'rature can be estimated by the formula: T 2 Final temperature, oR. Other... with the requirements make generation fqr more useful. Presently a recovery level of around 500 kw (or 657 hp) appears to be the minimum level which will support an in stallation. In order to achieve reasonable effi ciency, quality equipment with good control...

Murray, F.

396

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Drilling Tests of an Active Vibration Damper Authors: Mark Wassell, Martin Cobern, Carl Perry, Jason Barbely, and Daniel Burgess, APS Technology, Inc. Venue: Drilling Engineering Association’s 2007 DEA Workshop in Galveston, TX, June 19-20, 2007 Abstract: Testing of an active drilling vibration damper (AVD) system at TerraTek Laboratory, under conditions designed to induce vibration, demonstrated that the use of the AVD reduced vibration, maintained more consistent weight-on-bit, and increased rate of penetration (ROP). These tests demonstrated that the AVD is likely to provide significant time and cost savings, particularly in deep wells. The results of these tests will be outlined. Related NETL Project: The goal of the related NETL project DE-FC26-02NT41664, “Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System,” is to improve ROP and reduce the incidence of premature equipment failures in deep hard rock drilling environments by reducing harmful drillstring vibration.

397

NETL: News Release - 3-D Seismic Technology Locates Natural Gas in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 10, 2005 January 10, 2005 3-D Seismic Technology Locates Natural Gas in Fractured Reservoirs DOE-Sponsored Project Taps New Supplies of "Tight" Gas RIO ARRIBA COUNTY, N.M. - Large volumes of natural gas are being tapped from the tight rocks of the San Juan Basin in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County using a new technology developed in a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In this cost-shared project, GeoSpectrum, Inc., of Midland, Texas, uses 3-D seismic to locate fractures in the earth that provide access to millions of cubic feet of untapped natural gas in four new wells-including one well that is now producing up to 2 million cubic feet per day. "The key innovation in this project is the integration of technologies that map previously unseen fracture lineaments and perturbations in seismic data, and then target fracture "sweet spots" where multiple fractures intersect," said geophysicist Francis Toro, who manages the project for DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory.

398

Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01/2004 Development and Application of Gas Sensing Technologies to Enable Boiler Balancing to monitor total NOx (0-1000 ppm), CO (0-1000 ppm) and O2 (1-15%) within the convective pass of the boiler of such sensor systems will dramatically alter how boilers are operated, since much of the emissions creation

Dutta, Prabir K.

399

IEA-Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFP-06 IEA- Renewable Energy Technologies, Bioenergy Agreement Task 37: Energy from Biogas-Bioenergy, Task 37- Energy from Biogas and Landfill Gas", via samarbejde, informationsudveksling, fælles analyser. biogas fra anaerob udrådning (AD) som en integreret gylle og affalds behandlings teknologi. Arbejdet

400

ESTIMATING THE IMPACT OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ON GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng Department of Civil Engineering University of Transportation Engineers to be held May 12-15, 2002 in Ottawa Ontario #12;1 Estimating the Impact of Demographics and Automotive Technologies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ryan McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng

Hellinga, Bruce

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

402

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments that Contain Hydrates and High Concentrations of Methane Authors: Colwell, F. (speaker, Oregon State University), Hangsterfer, A., Brodie, E., Daly, R., Holland, M., Briggs, B., Carini, P., Torres, M., Kastner, M., Long, P., Schaef, H., Delwiche, M., Winters, W., and Riedel, M. Venue: American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting in San Francisco, CA, December 10–14, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/ [external site]). Abstract: Deep subseafloor sediments with high concentrations of organic carbon and microbially generated methane contain microbial communities that play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. However, there remains a limited understanding of the fine (centimeter)-scale sediment properties (e.g., grain size, presence/absence of hydrates) that determine key microbial attributes in deep marine sediments. This project’s objective is to determine the quantity, diversity, and distribution of microbial communities in the context of abiotic properties in gas-rich marine sediments. DNA was extracted from deep marine sediments cored from various continental shelf locations, including offshore India and the Cascadia Margin. Abiotic characterization of the same sediments included grain size analysis, chloride concentrations in sediment pore waters, and presence of hydrates in the sediments as determined by thermal anomalies. As in past studies of such systems, most of the samples yielded low levels of DNA (0.3-1.5 ng/g of sediment). Bacterial DNA appeared to be more easily amplified than archaeal DNA. Initial attempts to amplify DNA using primers specific for the methanogen functional gene, methyl-CoM-reductase, were unsuccessful. Infrequently, cores from relatively shallow sediments (e.g., 0.5 mbsf Leg 204, 1251B-1H) from central (Hydrate Ridge) and northern (offshore Vancouver Island) Cascadia and from India’s eastern margin contained macroscopically visible, pigmented biofilms. One of these biofilms was composed of high concentrations of cell clusters when viewed microscopically. The predominant cells in the Hydrate Ridge biofilm were large (ca. 10 um) cocci, and preliminary characterization of the 16S rDNA amplified and sequenced from this biofilm suggests the prevalence of a microbe with 97% similarity to mycobacteria. These discrete biofilm communities appear to be distinctive relative to the normally sparse distribution of cells in the sediments. By determining how the abiotic properties of deep marine sediments control the numbers and distribution of microbial communities that process organic matter, project researchers hope to provide better parameters for computational models that describe carbon cycling in these systems.

403

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Authors: Rick Colwell, Oregon State University, and Dimitris Ntarlagiannis, Rutgers University. Venue: American Geophysical UnionÂ’s 2007 Joint Assembly, Acapulco Mexico, May 21-25, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The new subdiscipline of biogeophysics has focused mostly on the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in contaminated subsurface environments usually undergoing remediation. However, the use of biogeophysics to examine the biogeochemistry of marine sediments has not yet been well integrated into conceptual models that describe subseafloor processes. Current examples of geophysical measurements that have been used to detect geomicrobiological processes or infer their location in the seafloor include sound surveillance system (SOSUS)-derived data that detect seafloor eruptive events, deep and shallow cross-sectional seismic surveys that determine the presence of hydraulically conductive zones or gas-bearing sediments (e.g., bottom-simulating reflectors or bubble-rich strata), and thermal profiles. One possible area for innovative biogeophysical characterization of the seafloor involves determining the depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) in locations where sulfate diffuses from the seawater and methane emanates from subsurface strata. The SMI demarcates a stratum where microbially driven anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is dependent upon methane as an electron donor and sulfate as an electron acceptor. AMO is carried out by a recently defined, unique consortium of microbes that metabolically temper the flux of methane into the overlying seawater. The depth of the SMI is, respectively, shallow or deep according to whether a high or low rate of methane flux occurs from the deep sediments. Presently, the SMI can only be determined by direct measurements of methane and sulfate concentrations in the interstitial waters or by molecular biological techniques that target the microbes responsible for creating the SMI. Both methods require collection and considerable analysis of sediment samples. Therefore, detection of the SMI by non-destructive methods would be advantageous. As a key biogeochemical threshold in marine sediments, the depth of the SMI defines methane charge in marine sediments, whether it is from dissolved methane or from methane hydrates. As such, a biogeophysical strategy for determining SMI depth would represent an important contribution to assessing methane charge with respect to climate change, sediment stability, or potential energy resources.

404

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Authors: Paul La Pointe, FracMan Technology Group, Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA; Robert D. Benson, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; and Claudia Rebne, Legacy Energy, Denver, CO. Venue: American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting in Snowbird, UT, October 7-9, 2007. Abstract: A 3D9C survey was carried out over a 6 square mile portion of the Roadrunner and Towaoc fields on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation in southwestern Colorado. This survey was jointly funded by DOE and the Southern Ute tribeÂ’s Red Willow Corporation to promote development of Ismay algal mound plays in the Paradox Basin within Ute Mountain Tribal lands and elsewhere in the Paradox Basin. Multicomponent data were utilized to better delineate the external mound geometry as well as to estimate internal mound reservoir parameters such as matrix permeability, saturation, and porosity. Simple cross-plotting of various multicomponent attributes against reservoir properties did not provide the desired predictive accuracy, in part due to sub-optimal frequency content in components derived from the shear wave data. However, a multivariate statistical analysis greatly improved the predictive accuracy. These multivariate regressions were then used to prescribe reservoir properties for a static reservoir model, which in turn formed the basis for a dynamic reservoir simulation model of the project area to assess the usefulness of the multivariate relations developed. This poster presentation will illustrate the workflow used to carry out the multivariate modeling, key maps of the reservoir properties that were derived, the static model, and results from the dynamic simulation used to assess the usefulness of the approach. Results from wells drilled based on the seismic data also will be presented.

405

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Authors: Sean P. Trisch, Wayne D. Pennington, and Roger Turpening, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI. Venue: Seismological Society of America’s annual meeting in Waikaloa, Kona, HI., April 11–13, 2007 Abstract: Imaging of the Earth’s crust is increasingly being accomplished through the use of borehole-based sensors. Experience gained in recent crosswell seismic surveys may assist endeavors to image the near-borehole environment near plate boundaries or other places of scientific interest. A high-resolution crosswell seismic data set was collected over a Silurian (Niagaran) reef in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The survey was optimized for both reflection imaging purposes and the gathering of a wide range of incidence angles. The reflection image was intended to aid in interpretation of the reef structure at a level of detail never before possible with seismic methods. The survey was also conducted to maximize data available for study of the dependence of amplitudes with angle-of-incidence. Prestack angle data were processed to half-degree intervals and utilized for enhanced interpretation of the seismic image through partial stacks and through amplitude variation with angle (AVA) analyses. Frequencies as high as 3,000 Hz (the limit of the source sweep) were recorded, with a predominant signal at about 2,000 Hz; the well separation was 600 m, and the target reef is at 1,400–1,525 m depth. Many of the interfaces present within the area have small reflection amplitudes at narrow angles that increase substantially near the critical angle. Analyses were performed on various interfaces in the seismic section to compare with Zoeppritz-equation solutions, using rock data acquired through an extensive library of seismic and well logging data available for the area. These models were then compared with the actual AVA character acquired at the interface and matched as closely as possible. Through this analysis and match process, various rock property estimates were inferred or refined.

406

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0000408 Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FE0000408 Final Report October 2009 - September 2012 Post Retort, Pre Hydro-treat Upgrading of Shale Oil Submitted by: Ceramatec Inc 2425 S. 900 W. Salt Lake City, UT 84119 Prepared by: John H. Gordon, PI Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 25, 2013 Office of Fossil Energy Final Report: October 2009 - September 2012 Ceramatec Inc, 1 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em- ployees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

407

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions related to the the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 19, 2011 CX-005047: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/19/2011 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 19, 2011 CX-005039: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/19/2011

408

IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTION ON CONTROL SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2003 1 Control of Natural Gas that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed the anode field of fuel cell stack is considered partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas. We present a model-based control analysis and design

Peng, Huei

409

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Grand Challenges and Great Opportunities in Science, Technology, and Public Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...As part of the NIH Roadmap (see below), seven...well-documented greenhouse gas accumulation and global...burning fuels, by using gas turbines and other innovative combined technologies; this is the technological...recovery of oil and gas from established fields...

Gilbert S. Omenn

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Recent Development in Oxy-Combustion Technology and Its Applications to Gas Turbine Combustors and ITM Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent Development in Oxy-Combustion Technology and Its Applications to Gas Turbine Combustors and ITM Reactors ... Also, the application of oxy-combustion technology into gas turbines is possible; however, the combustion temperature will be increased tremendously, which needs more control to make safe the turbine blades. ... technologies, a simplified model of a power plant with two forms of CO2 capture was developed. ...

Mohamed A. Habib; Medhat Nemitallah; Rached Ben-Mansour

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

Frey, H.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, R.B. [Carneigie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

STATE OF THE ART AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NATURAL GAS ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current, state of the art natural gas engines provide the lowest emission commercial technology for use in medium heavy duty vehicles. NOx emission levels are 25 to 50% lower than state of the art diesel engines and PM levels are 90% lower than non-filter equipped diesels. Yet, in common with diesel engines, natural gas engines are challenged to become even cleaner and more efficient to meet environmental and end-user demands. Cummins Westport is developing two streams of technologies to achieve these goals for medium-heavy and heavy-heavy duty applications. For medium-heavy duty applications, lowest possible emissions are sought on SI engines without significant increase in complexity and with improvements in efficiency and BMEP. The selected path builds on the capabilities of the CWI Plus technology and recent diesel engine advances in NOx controls, providing potential to reduce emissions to 2010 values in an accelerated manner and without the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction or NOx Storage and Reduction technology. For heavy-heavy duty applications where high torque and fuel economy are of prime concern, the Westport-Cycle{trademark} technology is in field trial. This technology incorporates High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI{trademark}) of natural gas with a diesel pilot ignition source. Both fuels are delivered through a single, dual common rail injector. The operating cycle is entirely unthrottled and maintains the high compression ratio of a diesel engine. As a result of burning 95% natural gas rather than diesel fuel, NOx emissions are halved and PM is reduced by around 70%. High levels of EGR can be applied while maintaining high combustion efficiency, resulting in extremely low NOx potential. Some recent studies have indicated that DPF-equipped diesels emit less nanoparticles than some natural gas vehicles [1]. It must be understood that the ultrafine particles emitted from SI natural gas engines are generally accepted to consist predominantly of VOCs [2], and that lubricating oil is a major contributor. Fitting an oxidation catalyst to the natural gas engine leads to a reduction in nanoparticles emissions in comparison to engines without aftertreatment [2,3,4]. In 2001, the Cummins Westport Plus technology was introduced with the C Gas Plus engine, a popular choice for transit bus applications. This incorporates drive by wire, fully integrated, closed loop electronic controls and a standard oxidation catalyst for all applications. The B Gas Plus and the B Propane Plus engines, with application in shuttle and school buses were launched in 2002 and 2003. The gas-specific oxidation catalyst operates in concert with an optimized ring-pack and liner combination to reduce total particulate mass below 0.01g/bhphr, combat ultrafine particles and control VOC emissions.

Dunn, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Donald Duttlinger

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z